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View Full Version : What is a Rep Tie? Repp Tie?



DWSTXS
09-28-2008, 07:49 PM
I know that I once heard that striped ties are called rep, or repp ties. I was almost sure that the colors were corresponding to school colors.

In my novel, I have a scene, and description I'd like to add, but I want to be certain that the usage is correct.

qwerty
09-28-2008, 08:07 PM
according to this web site:

About ties (http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0615/p18s02-hfks.html?s=widep)


Quality ties are made from silk, wool, or linen. One of the more common silk weaves is called "rep" (sometimes "repp"). "Rep" somehow evolved from the word "ribbed." A rep tie is made from silk that's woven in such a way as to produce tight diagonal ribs that make for deep, brilliant colors. Often, striped ties for schools, clubs, and regiments are rep ties, leading many to believe that rep is short for "reputation." Not true.

DWSTXS
09-28-2008, 08:45 PM
so, the question is, Can I use the word repp in my description?

Maryn
09-28-2008, 09:12 PM
If it were me, I'd use the "rep" spelling, since that's the one I've seen in print many, many times.

Maryn, devout conformist--sometimes

DWSTXS
09-28-2008, 11:04 PM
I will do a search and post the actual sentence, and get some feedback that way...

CACTUSWENDY
09-28-2008, 11:36 PM
You talking about a rip tide?

IceCreamEmpress
09-28-2008, 11:53 PM
If you mean a striped tie, say a striped tie. A tie made of silk rep could be a solid color.

DWSTXS
09-29-2008, 12:25 AM
well, I would, but that's not the effect I was looking for. In context, I'm trying to contrast two diifferent cultures by saying, for instance, 'Dallas was grey pin-striped suits and rep ties, whereas as San Francisco was frisbees and tie-dyes'

Your example, in my opinion, is like saying, 'It was a big dog' rather than saying, 'It was a St. Bernard'

saying 'Dallas was pin-striped suits and striped ties' just doesn't work

I guess you'd have to know the context of the quote in order to know what I'm shooting for.

thanks though for your input.


If you mean a striped tie, say a striped tie. A tie made of silk rep could be a solid color.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
09-29-2008, 12:38 AM
You're wanting the connotations associated with the 'rep tie'... perhaps this would make it clearer to those who haven't heard of them:

'Dallas was grey pin-striped suits and rep ties in the 'right' school colors, whereas as San Francisco was frisbees and tie-dyes in any color at all.'

Deb Kinnard
09-29-2008, 01:19 AM
Could you say "Dallas was pin-stripes and power ties" and get the effect you're aiming for?

DWSTXS
09-29-2008, 01:24 AM
Could you say "Dallas was pin-stripes and power ties" and get the effect you're aiming for?

Thanks Deb, but I don't know if 'power ties' was a phrase that was in use in 1969.

I like your suggestion Ol Fashioned Girl, I just might use it that way.

CACTUSWENDY
09-29-2008, 02:09 AM
So, you are not talking about rip tides.....sigh.

Carry on.

IceCreamEmpress
09-29-2008, 09:06 PM
well, I would, but that's not the effect I was looking for. In context, I'm trying to contrast two diifferent cultures by saying, for instance, 'Dallas was grey pin-striped suits and rep ties, whereas as San Francisco was frisbees and tie-dyes'

I like that! I didn't know if you were describing a specific striped tie and focusing on the stripedness, but it sounds like the fabric's formality, rather than the tie's design, is the point.

Mike Martyn
09-30-2008, 02:07 AM
In 1969, lawyers, accountants and bankers almost invariably wore three piece suits. Power ties didn't arrive on thre scene until the eighties.

I believe the three piece grey flannel suit or better yet grey Harris tweed three piece would contrast nicely to the hippy tied dyed thing. If you really want to go all the way, have him sport a gold poket watch in his vest pocket and black leather Italian loafers with tassles versus the Viet Cong stye rubber tire sandals. :)

DWSTXS
09-30-2008, 03:07 AM
Thanks Mike, now I have to go all the way back through my story and add-in the Viet Cong stye rubber tire sandals (I have forgotten all about those, even though I have heard of them)

Thanks IceCream!

Cactus - I'll rip your tide! LOL You looney-tune.

Thanks Ol Fashioned

Thanks Maryn

Thanks Deb!

Thanks qwerty.

Here is the way I'm leaving the paragraph (although I still haven't decided how I'll spell 'rep')

'Dallas was grey pin-striped suits and repp ties, whereas as San Francisco was frisbees and tie-dyes'. Dallas was boring and conservative, and San Francisco was a wide-open free-for-all of sex, drugs, and rock and roll. San Francisco had the Grateful Dead and free concerts in the park. All Dallas had ever done was to kill the president. David slung his bag over his shoulder and headed for the highway where he stuck out his thumb to start hitching his way west.

Unique
09-30-2008, 03:09 AM
Just one 'p' in rep whenever I've seen it used.

DWSTXS
09-30-2008, 03:11 AM
Just one 'p' in rep whenever I've seen it used.


LOL. every other person I ask about this is saying two p's. Maybe I should call a tie mfg co.

Unique
09-30-2008, 03:36 AM
Well if you're talking about those college ties that mean you belonged to a certain fraternity - other books I've read had one 'p'.

But that was a while ago. I'm old and things change.

Kthxbai.

Yanno?

er... the reason I inferred (is that right? :eek: ) was that it was short for reputation. Which has one 'p'.

IceCreamEmpress
09-30-2008, 06:47 AM
er... the reason I inferred (is that right? :eek: ) was that it was short for reputation. Which has one 'p'.

Did you read any of the rest of the thread? "Rep ties" are called that because they are made out of a fabric called silk rep (also spelled "silk repp").

It has nothing to do with the word "reputation". Not all rep ties are striped.


As for the "rep or repp" dilemma, Brooks Brothers says "repp" (http://www.brooksbrothers.com/IWCatProductPage.process?Merchant_Id=1&Section_Id=211&Product_Id=829329&Parent_Id=210). As does Ralph Lauren. So I think you're safe with "repp" if you like that.

In any case, the copyeditor will change it if he or she doesn't like it. ;)

heretohelp
07-02-2009, 11:54 PM
hey, i know i'm late on this, but if it's any help, believe me, it's repp tie - two t's. it has a clear connotation (amongst fashion people anyway) of someone really preppy/traditional/east coast.

and if you don't believe me on the spelling, here:

http://www.brooksbrothers.com/IWCatProductPage.process?Merchant_Id=1&Section_Id=211&Product_Id=1398505&Parent_Id=210&default_color=Green

i hardly think brooks brothers would get this one wrong.

hope that helps.

vixey
07-03-2009, 04:11 AM
To me rep/p tie refers to the ties associated with prep schools - striped ties having the colors of the school. Very east coast/New England.

*shrugs*

I have to data to support this. I grew up in VA (went to UVA, which is probably where I learned about it).

KTC
07-03-2009, 04:16 AM
Late, yes. Almost a year late.

alleycat
07-03-2009, 04:17 AM
hey, i know i'm late on this, but if it's any help, believe me, it's repp tie - two t's. it has a clear connotation (amongst fashion people anyway) of someone really preppy/traditional/east coast.

and if you don't believe me on the spelling, here:

http://www.brooksbrothers.com/IWCatProductPage.process?Merchant_Id=1&Section_Id=211&Product_Id=1398505&Parent_Id=210&default_color=Green

i hardly think brooks brothers would get this one wrong.

hope that helps.
I hate to disagree with you (or Brooks Bros.), but since I've bought an awful lot of ties in my life I'm going to have to. I've almost always seen it spelled as "rep". I just picked up my old, dusty copy of Dress for Success; it's spelled rep in that book as well.

alleycat
07-03-2009, 04:18 AM
Late, yes. Almost a year late.
But who's counting . . .


Heck, I think they're still arguing about what size handgun would suit a woman. (I've sworn off replying to any more gun related threads myself.)

KTC
07-03-2009, 04:20 AM
hey, i know i'm late on this, but if it's any help, believe me, it's repp tie - two t's. it has a clear connotation (amongst fashion people anyway) of someone really preppy/traditional/east coast.

and if you don't believe me on the spelling, here:

http://www.brooksbrothers.com/IWCatProductPage.process?Merchant_Id=1&Section_Id=211&Product_Id=1398505&Parent_Id=210&default_color=Green

i hardly think brooks brothers would get this one wrong.

hope that helps.

Odd to make your very first post here in a thread almost a year old...and supply a link to a store. There's a link at the top of the site page.

Here's a direct link: http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=66315

It's for newbies.

IceCreamEmpress
07-03-2009, 04:22 AM
The other weird thing about that is that I linked to Brooks Brothers in the post immediately above that, to demonstrate that both "rep" and "repp" are currently used by people who sell the stuff.

::scratches head::

alleycat
07-03-2009, 04:30 AM
Well, we've opened a long-dead thread (hey, that rhymes) . . . we have to put something here.


Did you hear that Michael Jackson died?

vixey
07-03-2009, 04:34 AM
Dammit....I should have looked at the dates. I wouldn't have responded to someone else resurrecting an old post.

(That's what I get for looking to see what happened earlier today.)

*decides to resurrect drunk thread where no one cares*

alleycat
07-03-2009, 04:39 AM
Don't feel too bad. The other day people were welcoming someone in the newbie forum whose post had a 2003 date. I think that predates the modern AW era.

Cath
07-03-2009, 04:13 PM
Guys, this happens occasionally, 'k? The thread will sink of it's own accord.