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katiemac
04-28-2005, 10:48 PM
On the second draft of my WIP, I'm turning one of my characters into a smoker. I've had a cigarette or two in my lifetime, nothing I've enjoyed or care to repeat, but because I don't smoke, I'm finding a bit of trouble.

She smokes for a particular reason, not enjoyment, and could "theoretically" quit at anytime. So, I guess, a couple of questions. I do realize the answers can and will vary, but I'm hoping for now just to dig up some generalities.

- We'll say for now she's been smoking approximately three years. How long would you say it would have taken to become "addicted"? How many times a day would you assume she smoked?

- Physically, how would you feel if you need a cigarette? Or, how do you know you want one? If anyone has quit, how do those feelings increase/decrease during the process?

Thanks for any help in advance. I can clarify anything if I wasn't clear. Again, I know the answers won't be the same for everyone, but I'll work through any discrepancies. Also, I do answer and respond to PMs if anyone would feel more comfortable sharing information that way.

rich
04-28-2005, 10:52 PM
I've been smoking for over 50 years. I suppose somebody can start smoking for a particular reason, but I can't see how the details of the habit would be that germaine to any story.

katiemac
04-28-2005, 11:00 PM
Good point, Rich. It's more for my own knowledge than necessarily any details I'm definitely including in the novel. Having the character as a smoker is going to add another level to the plot, and since a little over 1/2 of the book takes place in her head, I figured I should know something about being one.

rich
04-28-2005, 11:02 PM
So ask. Smoking isn't gender specific.

wurdwise
04-28-2005, 11:17 PM
I have an odd smoking habit. Most people I know who smoke, it is a part of their daily routine, they smoke all day and all night long. Not one cigarette after the other, but they light cigarettes without giving it a second thought, almost like breathing. My husband is that way.

I, on the other hand, only crave cigarettes when I am drinking coffee or alcohol, then I chain smoke. I guess you could call me a binge smoker. They taste of coffee or beer without a cigarette, well, there's no point in having a beer if I can't smoke, unless I am drinking a beer with my meal, which I might do when we go to a restaurant. And speaking of restaurants, I do not smoke outside of my house, unless I am in a bar. I don't smoke in the car, I hate the ashtray in my husband's car being full of cigarette butts, people's smoke in a car chokes me. I don't like to see a woman on the street with a cigarette hanging from her mouth. I think it looks disgusting.

Yep, I said it was odd. But I will say that when I do smoke, I enjoy it thoroughly, it has a calming affect, that must be the nicotine, that nasty, wonderful addictive drug.

ScottAJohnson
04-29-2005, 12:13 AM
To answer your questions...It seems to me, I believe I read an article that stated that nicotine is more addictive than heroin. Not sure if I agree with that, but the urge is pretty strong.
Second...How does it feel when you need a cigarette...It depends on the situation, really, but here's the majority of mine. Physical symptoms include feeling jittery, irritablitly, and getting hungry. Of course, then there's that lovely head rush you get after the first smoke of the day.

three seven
04-29-2005, 01:19 AM
Personally, I find it's a much less distinct feeling than, say, thirst or hunger. Needing a cigarette is more instinct than feeling; my brain decides that I need to smoke, so I do. The physical feelings don't start until there aren't any cigarettes to smoke - once you get it into your head that you need one, you'll stop at nothing. It begins with fidgeting and mild irritation, leads to a pounding heart and a general all-round urgency. Temper frays. Harder to smile.
"Morning Three!"
"F**k off!"

In the morning, though, if I don't light up straight away I can last to lunchtime and beyond. I'll wait til I'm in the car... ok, I'll wait til I get out of the car... ok, I'm out of the car and I don't really feel like smoking. And then eventually, inevitably, it gets lit without me really knowing how or why.

For a lot of people, it only takes one cigarette for the addiction to kick in.
Personally, I had my first one when I was about 14, and I didn't like it but a couple of days later I couldn't get it out of my head that I needed another one. Got a pack, smoked a couple, thought it was a stupid idea and threw them away. Few days later, happened again. And again. And again. No willpower, me.

What Denise said about drinking is very true. No point having a drink if I can't smoke like a chimney.

Um... what else?

katiemac
04-29-2005, 01:21 AM
Smoking isn't gender specific.

I didn't mean to imply in any of my posts this was the case. I'm sorry if I appeared unclear. I'll happily take responses from both men and women on this subject. Since my character is female, I suppose I just wrote the questions with her in mind.

To wurd, Scott and Three, thank you for the help so far. Already you have my mind running!

Celeste
04-29-2005, 03:30 AM
But I will say that when I do smoke, I enjoy it thoroughly, it has a calming affect, that must be the nicotine, that nasty, wonderful addictive drug.

Ahh...Yes, that wonderfully addictive cigarette, I enjoy smoking.

I'm 33 and have been smoking since I was 15. I can't really say, or even remember, why I started smoking. I smoke a pack a day. Sometimes, a little more.
Someone mentioned that first cigarette of the day...Yes! It's the best!

Although, I smoke all day, every day..I do smoke a lot more when I drink.

What am I like when I don't have cigarettes? Lol... I'm a raving b*tch! The first thing I do when I wake up is get an ice cold Coke and light up a cigarette. If I don't have that waiting for me when I wake, I'm a crazy woman (some think that I'm a crazy woman anyway..;) ).

And yes, trying to quit does indeed increase the craving. I haven't been able to do it -- quit. I tried once and lasted one day. I really didn't plan to quit, I had my wisdom teeth pulled and the dentist told me I couldn't smoke for 72 hours after because of something you can get from smoking after having teeth pulled called 'dry socket', which I hear is very painful. I figured if I have to go three days without smoking, I might as well quit. I only lasted 24 hours. I learned a trick. If you put cotton in the socket/hole where the tooth/teeth were pulled I was able to smoke without getting the dry socket. It was hilarious! I was smoking with a mouth full of cotton balls! Lol... I guess I am addicted, huh? :Shrug:

My husband is I guess what you call a 'casual' smoker. He doesn't smoke every day. He smokes when he's drinking, or just for the hell of it once in a while. I don't know how he does it. I wish I could do that! http://bestsmileys.com/smoking/5.gif

http://bestsmileys.com/smoking/1.gif


celeste http://bestsmileys.com/smoking/2.gif

pepperlandgirl
04-29-2005, 03:46 AM
She's probably addicted if she smoked for 3 years. I've only been smoking for about 13 months, and I only smoke 1-2 a day, if that (at my peak, I had 5 cigarattes a day...). I've recently cut down to less than that (haven't had a smoke in two days...I usually only smoke on the weekends now) and I am addicted.

Nicotine is addictive. It actually took about six months before I got to the point of "Ok, I can't quit anytime" and that was only smoking a cigarette a day.

At any rate, when I have a craving, I don't have a real physical response, just, "Shit, I need a cigarette." The more I think about it, the more I need it, and the crankier I get. And then, when I finally get my cigarette..."AHHHHHH! BLISS!!!"

jdkiggins
04-29-2005, 04:28 AM
Of course, I'm going to show up in a thread about smoking. :) I came to sniff the answers. I've been smoke free for 28 days.


She smokes for a particular reason, not enjoyment, and could "theoretically" quit at anytime.
Yeah, that's what I thought too. But theoretically, once you start and have smoked even three years, it's not easy to quit.


- We'll say for now she's been smoking approximately three years. How long would you say it would have taken to become "addicted"? How many times a day would you assume she smoked?
This answer is going to vary from all smokers. Regardless of the reason for smoking, some may smoke as little as a few cigarettes a day to a few packs. If she's smoking to act "cool" in front of friends, it would depend on how often and how long she hangs out with the friends. If she's addicted, well then, I'd have her puffing away at least a half pack to a pack a day or more.


- Physically, how would you feel if you need a cigarette? Or, how do you know you want one? If anyone has quit, how do those feelings increase/decrease during the process?
Typing the answers to these questions makes me want a cigarette. That may tell you I've been addicted to the nasty habit for quite some time. As I stated above, I quit 28 days ago.

How do I feel? Do you really want to know? I finished writing six stories in the past five days and killed off a bunch of characters. No joke! The killing had nothing to do with the quitting but the amount of writing does. You see, I have to keep my hands busy, or I'll get "the urge" for a cigarette. As long as I type, I can't smoke.

Physically, quitting has been a roller coaster of good and bad. The down side of nicotine withdrawel is the psychological need to have something in my hand or mouth. (No nasty comments from the peanut gallery here, we're trying to be serious.) It has created headaches, nervous and upset stomach, and the I have to get up and walk, clean, do dishes, make the bed, sweep the floor, and dust type feeling comes over me.

How do I know I want one? See the sentence above, and it's sort of like being hungry but not for food. That's the other down side--people who quit smoking try to supplement the urge for a cigarette with eating. Probably why most gain weight after quitting. Lucky for me I need to gain weight and I've chosen to keep my fingers busy at the keyboard.

How do these feelings increase/decrease during the process? Wow, katiemac, the urges haven't decreased yet. I still have an increasing need to keep my hands busy and took someone's wonderful suggestion of sucking on a bic pen with the ink cartridge taken out. It's sucking air. Only it's good air. This has been a great help. I type and suck at the same time. (Oh my, this sounds awful. But it does help.)

Each day does get a bit easier. I'm finding I have the urge for a cigarette less and less; normally with coffee in the morning, after meals, and if I allow myself to sit idol to watch tv for a bit. It does decrease, but not quickly enough for me. :)

Oh yes, I said there was a good side to quitting. Ummm...I'm getting a lot of writing done. My house is clean. Seriously, though, I never had a smoker's cough, but I do feel the difference in my breathing. I walk every day and find I'm not as out of breath. Food tastes better. My house smells better. My teeth are cleaner.

Hope this helps you and your story, because it just did a number on my head. I need a cigarette. I'm so glad I gave them away. :)

Good luck.
Joanne

three seven
04-29-2005, 04:40 AM
Oh, I forgot to say - I've known people who quit smoking 25 years ago and are still gasping for a fag. The craving never really goes. Sorry Joanne.

jdkiggins
04-29-2005, 05:05 AM
Gee thanks, Three. That makes me feel much better. :)

firehorse
04-29-2005, 05:10 AM
I had my first cigarette when I was 13, but I wouldn't say I became addicted for a couple of years.

I've quit twice for approximately nine months each time, and both times when I started again, it was clear to me that I had a choice. I'd reached a point at which I didn't even think about cigarettes any more, but for various reasons, I decided to have one... and then the next day another... and maybe a few days later, a few puffs... this last time, I'd say it took me a full year to get back to where I was before (and now I don't smoke inside, which cuts down a lot, too). When I'm outside, though, it's automatic. I light up without even thinking about it. Now that all restaurants and bars in Toronto are non-smoking, there's almost a binge effect: I chain-smoke while I can, because there are so many places where I can't.

The first time I quit and started again, wow... the morning cigarette never tasted so good. The other ones, though, tasted rather foul.

Speaking of foul, American cigarettes are loaded with more chemicals than British and Canadian cigarettes (to keep the shelf life longer). So if you find a pack of Marlboro Lights under the couch, and it's been there a month or so, you can still smoke 'em. Try that with Player's Lights, and you'll burn your throat off. (I learned that one the hard way). Some Brits and Canadians can't stand the smell of American cigarette smoke, but they don't mind their own.

Habit vs. addiction: I'm with Three on this. If I don't have one right away, I can go a pretty long time without physically wanting one. Unless I don't have access to any. Then I'm grumpy. When it really hits, it's a squirreliness (sp?), not quite anxiety, but more like irritation.

Now... I don't like the way it makes me (and my clothes) smell; I don't like what it does to my breath and skin; I don't think it's an attractive habit; I only like the taste if I'm really stressed out (or drunk, or having coffee, as mentioned above). Really, the only thing I like about smoking is the temporary sedation.

When I lived in New York, I smoked Marlboro Lights, but if I was really, really depressed, I'd splurge on Dunhill Reds - just a much higher quality (British) cigarette that somehow seemed more soothing. A weird detail, but just in case your smoker-girl gets depressed...

This may not be relevant, but I'm one of many (I assume) women who continues to smoke in part because every time I've quit, I've gained weight. It's not that I'm eating more - last time, I was cycling 300km/week (training for a long-distance ride) and I gained 20lbs (not all muscle) in two months.

Okay, gotta go have a smoke now... ;) (Players Extra Lights, regular, not king size. I'm also one of those who can't stand the smell of US cigarettes any more)

kmm8n
04-29-2005, 05:49 AM
I have to agree with Three. I have quit three times in the past twenty five years, each time for longer. The last time I quit was for one year. But, if someone had a cigarette, or I had a particularly stressful time period (more than a day), then I would buy a pack and that would be the end of it. And, I can't just smoke one or two a day. Within a week of starting to smoke again, I'm back at my original half a pack a day.

The weight gain is killer. My sister won't quit until she gets her weight down (and she is not heavy).

Speaking of smoking, time to light up. Unfortunately, I've learned to type and smoke at the same time!!

:)

firehorse
04-29-2005, 06:05 AM
Physically, how would you feel if you need a cigarette? Or, how do you know you want one? If anyone has quit, how do those feelings increase/decrease during the process?Physical manifestations of wanting/needing a cigarette ("nic fit" in North America) could include biting fingernails, drumming fingers on the table or on one's leg, tapping toes - general fidgeting. If a straw is available, perhaps she could be chewing on a straw? She wouldn't be able to concentrate on work or conversation.

The second time I quit, I used the patch, and it was fantastic... for a while. I had almost no trouble with the physical cravings; the habits (esp. smoking while writing) were harder to break, but it almost seemed easy. I promised myself that as long as I didn't smoke, I'd stay on the patch indefinitely (getting the nicotine without the poisonous stuff). Ha! There's a reason you're only supposed to use the patch for six weeks. Around that time, I began having allergic reactions. Not only did my skin swell up generally (bloating/edema, esp in my hands), but also when I removed each patch, the site was raised and bright red in the shape of the patch. I tried several different patches (and shapes) until my upper body looked as though a toddler had been throwing block toys against me - with the strength of a bodybuilder. It took about a month for the red marks to go away, and weaning off the patch was more difficult than quitting the cigarettes.

FWIW, I tried Nicorette, but it made my gums bleed.

And now you all know waaaaaay too much about my smoking (and quitting), but if you're going to have your character quit, these are some quirky details.

Sarita
04-29-2005, 06:25 AM
Oh, I forgot to say - I've known people who quit smoking 25 years ago and are still gasping for a fag. The craving never really goes.

It's true. I smoked for 5 years(1/2 pack a day) and haven't had one in 9 years. The cravings still hit me. When I want a cigarette, I figdet something fierce. I pick at my cuticles, I crack my knuckles. I had a great friend who cut up carrot sticks for me every day, just to help get through the quiting process. It did help a little, but then again, I like carrots.

Ugh, all this cigarrette talk... must. stay. strong. :)

maestrowork
04-29-2005, 06:33 AM
once you get it into your head that you need one, you'll stop at nothing. It begins with fidgeting and mild irritation, leads to a pounding heart and a general all-round urgency. Temper frays. Harder to smile.
"Morning Three!"
"F**k off!"

It's exactly like sex to me. Once my brain tells me I need sex...

:D

jdkiggins
04-29-2005, 06:43 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by three seven
once you get it into your head that you need one, you'll stop at nothing. It begins with fidgeting and mild irritation, leads to a pounding heart and a general all-round urgency. Temper frays. Harder to smile.
"Morning Three!"
"F**k off!"


by maestrowork
It's exactly like sex to me. Once my brain tells me I need sex...:D

Phooey! Between the two of you, I'm hankerin' to go have sex and a cig. Geesh.
Think I'll go have some ice cream instead. :D

katiemac
04-29-2005, 07:20 AM
Wow! The response to this is phenomenal. Everyone has offered up such good advice, thank you so much. Just reading this thread has given me a multitude of ideas. I've got a lot to think about now.

pepperlandgirl
04-29-2005, 07:37 AM
How do I know I want one? See the sentence above, and it's sort of like being hungry but not for food. That's the other down side--people who quit smoking try to supplement the urge for a cigarette with eating. Probably why most gain weight after quitting. Lucky for me I need to gain weight and I've chosen to keep my fingers busy at the keyboard.

Wow, that's it exactly! I never could quite describe it, but yeah, that's perfect.

Unique
04-30-2005, 08:18 PM
Yep, yep, and yep. Everything that has been said applies - but I haven't heard anyone say this:

I use cigarettes as a procrastination device.

Yep. I've caught myself doing it; I don't want to do something so I'll tell myself, 'I'll have a cig first - then do it.'

I confess!! Don't beat me!! It's a habit, and addiction and more.....

Liam Jackson
04-30-2005, 10:16 PM
Smoking almost disqualified me from Sniper school years ago. When I signed up, I was smoking a pack a day, and on somedays, a few more than that. I had no idea the cigarette issue would affect me like it did. The second week I was on the course, I had to sit motionless for a couple hours, then take a 200 meter shot. I had been without a cigarette for about eight hours by then. The result was ugly. I managed to get through the school, and quit smoking the day after graduation. Stayed tobacco-free for about 6 years. Then I lost my mind and lit up at my brother's birthday party. Been huffing and puffing ever since.

Jamesaritchie
05-01-2005, 12:27 AM
Smoking almost disqualified me from Sniper school years ago. When I signed up, I was smoking a pack a day, and on somedays, a few more than that. I had no idea the cigarette issue would affect me like it did. The second week I was on the course, I had to sit motionless for a couple hours, then take a 200 meter shot. I had been without a cigarette for about eight hours by then. The result was ugly. I managed to get through the school, and quit smoking the day after graduation. Stayed tobacco-free for about 6 years. Then I lost my mind and lit up at my brother's birthday party. Been huffing and puffing ever since.

I can't say being a smoker ever hurt my ability to hit what I was aiming at with a sniper rifle, but it did, on occasion, make my mind wander enough to make me lose awareness with my surroundings. A very dangeorus thing.

I did much the same as you. I quit cold turkey for a time, then lit up one day for no reason that made any sense at all, and I've been smoking ever since.

As for how long it takes to get hooked, a doctor told me twenty-one days will hook almost anyone.

How it feels to quit? For me, it felt like being extremely nervous, and ravenously hungry, at the same time.

Celeste
05-01-2005, 01:11 AM
How it feels to quit? For me, it felt like being extremely nervous, and ravenously hungry, at the same time.

Wow, James! Your post took me by surprise. I never figured you as a smoker.

I was having trouble in my post describing what it's like to go without, but I think you summed it up pretty accurately. I get very irritable also. Raving b!tch I am when I'm jonesin' for a smoke.

William Haskins
05-01-2005, 01:52 AM
every time i click this thread, i light up.

MacAllister
05-01-2005, 01:55 AM
heh--there's a weird psychological component: you see someone smoking, you want to smoke. When people talk about smoking, you want to smoke.

Also, if you HAVE smokes, it's okay not to smoke right now. But if you run out, you must drop everything and go and obtain more, before you can concentrate again.

BradyH1861
05-01-2005, 03:15 AM
I've had to make the late night store run many times!

I keep a pack inside the rubber strap on my helmet. I keep a pack in my turnout pants. I keep a couple of packs in my locker at the station. I keep a pack in the glove compartment of my car. And I keep another pack on the dashboard of the engine when I am working.

They are never far from me. I live in fear of running out and not being able to go out and get more.

Brady H.

reph
05-01-2005, 06:56 AM
Yes, friends, I have a BAD HABIT.

Okay, now that the embarrassing part's over with . . .

For me, there are two ways to want a cigarette. One is physiological. I experience it as a feeling in the back of my mouth. The sensation it most resembles is thirst, but I never confuse being thirsty with wanting to smoke.

The other has nothing to do with nicotine deprivation, as far as I can tell. Smoking marks time. It's punctuation between the clauses of activity that make up a day. There's the good morning cigarette, used after getting up. There's the good night cigarette, used before going to bed. In between, there are cigarettes to mark transitions between activities. (Actually, for me, each of these is a fraction of a cigarette. I don't smoke a whole one at once.)

There's also the "I need to think" cigarette or half- or third-cigarette. Sometimes I have one of those between reading a post and replying to it.

There's the boredom cigarette: I'm tired of a tedious task, but I haven't finished. I'll take a break and come back.

Not everyone has the back-of-mouth sensation. One man who I think had quit smoking said he'd felt withdrawal in his chest.

Withdrawal symptoms (craving and, paradoxically, coughing) can start as early as two or three hours after the previous smoke. I've read that withdrawal is more severe for women than for men.

A beginning smoker is likely to be nicotine-dependent before she realizes it. She may think she's smoking by choice but have a hard time if she tries to stop. However, not everyone gets addicted. I had a college roommate who smoked only when studying for finals.

Behavior around smoking is pretty complex and varied. Smoking becomes associated with certain activities and places. If you usually smoke during phone calls, a phone call will make you want to smoke. Stop-smoking programs have literature about that because they help people identify such habits in order to break them.

I haven't yet found anything that feels like smoking but doesn't have the bad health effects.

Liam Jackson
05-01-2005, 07:47 AM
James, if someone told me I would begin to suffer physical withdrawal after eight hours, I never would have believed it. It wasn't readily apparent. The tremor was so slight I couldnt feel it or see it until I started referencing the scope recticles on target. The longer we went, (days) the more pronounced the effect.

Most SOGs won't even consider an ex-smoker until he's been tobacco-free for at least a year. Man, I need to quit. Again.

BlueTexas
05-01-2005, 07:55 AM
I have this awful habit, too.

If I go more than four or five hours without a cigarette, my temper becomes increasingly short. Impaitence and stress trigger the urge for me--badly. If I'm angry or frustrated, a cigarette clears my brain so I can speak calmly and not yell when I really want to yell. Not that I'm angry or want to yell often, but that's what comes to mind. I am impaitent and easily frustrated, though, and the lack of a cigarette only exacerbates those emotions.

The thought of doing my taxes without a cig in hand frightens me.

So basically, I am addicted to the calming effect nicotine has on me.

wurdwise
05-01-2005, 08:05 AM
http://bestsmileys.com/smoking/8.gif

Celeste
05-01-2005, 09:10 AM
Also, if you HAVE smokes, it's okay not to smoke right now. But if you run out, you must drop everything and go and obtain more, before you can concentrate again.


OMG! That is so true!

As long as I know I have cigarettes, I can go a couple of hours without one. But if I don't have any, I go mad. Lol... It's absolutely insane!

three seven
05-01-2005, 10:29 PM
I also find that if I know I'm going into a situation where I might not be able to smoke for, you know, ten or fifteen minutes, like the kids are in the car or I've got an appointment somewhere, I have to have one whether I want one or not, despite the time I'm unable to smoke being shorter than the usual interval between cigarettes.

Something I find interesting is that despite all the warnings they plaster across the packs and the ads, the greatest smoking-related threat is largely ignored - that being the very real danger of another smoker killing you for your fags.

jdkiggins
05-01-2005, 11:03 PM
Will you guys quit already! Geesh, I keep seeing this thread pop to the top and it makes me want to screw up my 30 days of not smoking.

Breathe, Joanne. Suck on the pen tube. Drink a glass of orange juice. Eat an ice cream cone. Type. Write. Type. Write. Type. Write.

mommie4a
05-01-2005, 11:05 PM
I quit cold turkey fifteen years ago. KEEP GOING JOANNE!

BUT, as others have said, if I drink beyond a certain amount and am in the presence of certain other triggers, I'll bum, buy or steal cigarettes for as long as the craving lasts - which is usually until my partying turns into unconsciousness and then a hangover. I've got the Febreeze on my shelf from the last escapade.

Another thing: Soon after I quit (I did it with a roommate but she reverted at some point), I had dreams that I was smoking. And I swear, I'd wake up with the taste of cigarettes in my mouth. It was so bizarre. And I'd want one like I do when I'm out drinking. The mind-body connection is so strong with this habit.

If you need it, you might be interested in exploring the variety of cigarettes we've all tried - I lived in the Middle East for a while and what's available there is very different than here or Canada. Can't say about England. Also, filter v. no filter, the mock cigarettes I remember grad school students using (clove) and so on.

Just another dimension.

Good luck!

brokenfingers
05-01-2005, 11:25 PM
I can tell you one thing. If your character quits smoking, realize that it might make them very irritable and easily excited.

The biggest thing for me when I quit smoking was dealing with stress or tension.

I had three gauges I went by to see how well I was doing when I quit. If I was able to eat and not want to smoke afterwards. If I was able to drink coffee and not want a cigarette with it. And if I was able to drink alcohol and not want a cigarette with it. Once I was able to do all three without a craving to fight against I knew Id had it beat.

But there was a fourth hurdle. Handling stress.

The biggest side effect of quitting for me was how I dealt with stress and tension. Id quit once for twenty days and lived in an apartment full of guys. We knew everybody else in the place and one day I was upstairs and one of my friends did something I dont even remember what and ran downstairs to our apartment and locked the door behind him.

It was all in good fun but whatever he did was designed to piss me off as guy friends will often do to each other so I chased him downstairs to the apartment and upon confronting a locked door, didnt even hesitate to kick it down and pursue him. The look on their faces, wide-eyed and goggling like Id just burst through from hell, bought me back to Earth and let me realize that Id over-reacted. Need less to say they all begged me to start smoking again.

Another side effect was that if I got really excited I would sometimes stutter and stammer. I remember right after I quit, I was at a big meeting over a big to-do about something and there were some people there who didnt like me much, rivals I guess you could say.

Well in my excitement I stuttered a few times and stammered and this made me even more angry. Im also the type of guy who talks with his hands a lot and without a cigarette to keep them occupied - my hands were very animated indeed that night.

I was fully expecting them to make some comment about it, a joke at my expense and the thought was making me increasingly agitated. I think someone warned them that Id just quit though, because not a one of them ever mentioned a word and they acted as if nothing was wrong.

I still laugh about it because I was also trying to impress my future fiancees father at the time and I was sure at the end of it all that Id come across as a stuttering fool and would never win her.

wurdwise
05-01-2005, 11:39 PM
Will you guys quit already! Geesh, I keep seeing this thread pop to the top and it makes me want to screw up my 30 days of not smoking.

Breathe, Joanne. Suck on the pen tube. Drink a glass of orange juice. Eat an ice cream cone. Type. Write. Type. Write. Type. Write.


Joanne, stay away from this thread!:Lecture:

jdkiggins
05-02-2005, 12:40 AM
Yes Ma'am! Oops. I'm outta here. :D

brokenfingers
05-02-2005, 01:35 AM
Don't let it get to ya Joanne. You can do it. (I know you're peeking in here again!)

To show you what kind of friends I have - when I quit, they were always shoving cigarettes in my face and asking me if I want one. What I wound up doing was: I'd say "Yeah", and deliberately and slowly crush it right in front of them.

Ha!! If there's one thing a smoker can't stand, it's to see a cigarette wasted - especially if it's out of their precious pack!!

Their whole "I can't believe you can quit when I can't quit" attitude just spurred me on and made me more determined not to light a cigarette.

It's the first one that gets ya. I kept telling myself that I only had to resist lighting ONE cigarette and I'd be OK.

It's worked for two years now and I don't get the urge anymore.

Sarita
05-02-2005, 01:40 AM
It's the first one that gets ya. I kept telling myself that I only had to resist lighting ONE cigarette and I'd be OK.

This is what I've been telling myself for years. It's worked so far. I would love to think I could be a casual smoker, having one or two when I'm out with friends, but that would never happen. I'd be back into the habit so fast...

brokenfingers
05-02-2005, 01:43 AM
This is what I've been telling myself for years. It's worked so far. I would love to think I could be a casual smoker, having one or two when I'm out with friends, but that would never happen. I'd be back into the habit so fast...

Yes, believe me, it's so true. You can't do it.

I quit a bunch of times for a few days and even nine months one time. I always made the mistake of thinking:

"Ha! I know I can quit now. No problem if I light one up. Just one...."

It's that first one that does it.

Celeste
05-02-2005, 03:05 AM
Have any of ya' tried using any of those 'quit smoking aids', such as the gum, patches, lozenges, etc..?

A couple of years ago, my doctor gave me a box of Nicorette Commit Lozenges. These little nasty things you're supposed to suck on. It was horrible! I walked out of the doc's office, jumped in the car, of course I wanted to light up, so I figured what the hell, I'll pop one of these babies in my mouth. Within a minute, I was so sick! It was like sucking on..I dunno...really strong tobacco, or something. It was just plain nasty. It upset my stomach, I was so nauseated from this thing, I threw up! Lol... Those lozenges are the nastiest things ever! Ugh! Barf!

I spit that thing out so fast, went to buy a pop and lit up a cigarette! Lol...
It was just disgusting! *sick from just thinking about it*

I tried the gum, that was a waste of money. I tried the patches, I wanted to smoke wearing the patch. I give up. I'm a friggin' smoker. :Shrug:

BradyH1861
05-03-2005, 01:43 AM
I tried the patches once upon a time. They gave me tremendous headaches. Seeing as how I kinda have to be on top of my game at work, I ripped the dang thing off and lit up a real smoke.

Funny thing is I didn't start until I was 21. From 16-20 I dipped snuff. I quit that cold turkey with no problems whatsoever. Then I took up smoking a year later and got hooked. I actually wished I dipped again. I tried making the switch back to Skoal right after we got married, but my wife wouldn't allow it.

But hey, I only smoke because it makes me cool, ya know.

Brady H.

pepperlandgirl
05-03-2005, 09:57 PM
I had three gauges I went by to see how well I was doing when I quit. If I was able to eat and not want to smoke afterwards. If I was able to drink coffee and not want a cigarette with it. And if I was able to drink alcohol and not want a cigarette with it. Once I was able to do all three without a craving to fight against I knew Id had it beat.

I can forget the cigarette after dinner. I can even enjoy a beer without a cigarette. But I still can't go across the street to the little coffee place and sit on the patio and watch the world go by without a cigarette....

Which is unfortunate, because that's my favorite passtime.

I'm doing good though. I haven't had a ciggie since Saturday (whenI had two total!)

Celeste
05-09-2005, 05:09 PM
Ugh! To make smoking even worse, so that it's even harder to quit, they make them in yummy, delicious flavors! Camel makes these flavored cigarettes that come in a squared tin. I've always bought the orange cream flavored. But last night, I bought their newest flavor called "Warm Winter Toffee". OMG! They taste like candy! I'm hooked. They are awesome. They taste so good! Lol...I'll never be able to quit now!!!

(For anyone interested in trying them, you'll have to go to a cigarette shop. It's rare to find them at a party store, etc.. There's about ten different flavors! ;) )

celeste http://bestsmileys.com/smoking/9.gif

pepperlandgirl
05-10-2005, 11:12 PM
I buy the flavored camels too! My favorite is the orange mint flavored.

CURSE YOU CAMEL!!!

Jamesaritchie
05-11-2005, 07:56 PM
James, if someone told me I would begin to suffer physical withdrawal after eight hours, I never would have believed it. It wasn't readily apparent. The tremor was so slight I couldnt feel it or see it until I started referencing the scope recticles on target. The longer we went, (days) the more pronounced the effect.

Most SOGs won't even consider an ex-smoker until he's been tobacco-free for at least a year. Man, I need to quit. Again.

Ah, how times have changed! Smoking didn't seem to concern many people thirty years ago. And all the smokers cheated, anyway. You can't smoke when you're trying to look like a clump of grass for eight hours, but you can slip a bit of snuff (Smokeless tobacco.) between lip and gum when the craving gets too strong, usually every three or four hours. It was, in fact, the suggested method of dealing with the "nicotine knocks." It works pretty well.

Celeste
05-11-2005, 08:59 PM
I buy the flavored camels too! My favorite is the orange mint flavored.

CURSE YOU CAMEL!!!


Oh, aren't they the best! I'm totally hooked on the toffee flavored. The orange creme was my fav until I tried the toffee the other night. Man! I love 'em!

Another flavor that's pretty tasty is the izmar stinger.

Read this short article about them attracting teens calling them 'candy cigarettes: http://www.wsoctv.com/family/3967974/detail.html
They say Camel is targeting teens with these so-called 'candy cigarettes' and
think they should be banned. That's so ridiculous! The teens that choose to smoke are going to smoke whether they're flavored or not. Why the fuss? Let us "adults" enjoy our flavored cigarettes, damn it!!!!

Yes! CURSE YOU CAMEL!!! Lol...

Here's those evil but oh so good 'candy cigarettes'...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/avptazzy/camelcigs.jpg

Liam Jackson
05-11-2005, 10:03 PM
James, when the rules changed on us, we went through Skoal and Copenhagen like crazed addicts. After the new wore off that trend, we started carrying single Lucky Strikes tucked away in strategic spots. Guys would break off about a quarter inch of the cigarette and chew on it. The results were damn near immediate. Yeah, a dedicated tobacco user will always find a way.

Now excuse me while I light up. The coffee is getting cold. <wink>

Jamesaritchie
05-11-2005, 10:37 PM
James, when the rules changed on us, we went through Skoal and Copenhagen like crazed addicts. After the new wore off that trend, we started carrying single Lucky Strikes tucked away in strategic spots. Guys would break off about a quarter inch of the cigarette and chew on it. The results were damn near immediate. Yeah, a dedicated tobacco user will always find a way.

Now excuse me while I light up. The coffee is getting cold. <wink>

Yeah, I even tried chewing Mail Pouch chewing tobacco. It worked, but damn! That didn't last long.

And then there were those times when there's nothing to smoke or chew or dip, and you see this old cigarette butt on the ground. Don't know who dropped it there. Don't care, either. Looks like it still has enough tobacco to get two or three good puffs, doesn't it?

I've been half-heartedly trying to quit for a couple of years. I no longer smoke inside the house or in the car. That's a pain when it's pouring rain, or when it's twenty below zero and there's a howling wind, but I've stuck to it for two years. I have cut my intake by half, but that's as low as I can get it, even with the rain and snow.

Oh, hell, I gotta go light up, too.

Celeste
05-12-2005, 12:06 AM
When I found that article (link above in my previous post), I didn't read the whole thing. I just read it and couldn't believe this statement..

"I can't imagine adults in any way would want flavored cigarettes," Weibel said.


Weibel is the spokeswoman for the American Lung Association. She looked at Camel ads on the computer and said she believes they are marketed for teens.''

That's a bunch of bull! This woman doesn't know what the hell she's talking about!

I'm 33 and I'm smoking my 'flavored' cigarette right now as I type! I know many adults who smoke these cigarettes. And having a teenage son and brother, I honestly believe that teens smoking has decreased. I've been around many teens (My son's and brother's friends) and 99% of them think smoking is disgusting.

Ella
05-23-2005, 09:48 AM
Wow. Fascinating responses.

It's been scientifically proven that coffee and alcohol can magnify the need for nicotine. (Alcohol also can cause people to want to eat.) Hence the binge smoking.

I strongly feel that once the physical withdrawal period is over, which can be up to three weeks or more, it is so seriously mental after that. I've been smoking on and off (mostly on) for 15 years. I quit while I was pregnant & breastfeeding (twice), quit for a solid three month stretch not too long ago, and now I'm back again. I've talked about it with a lot of people, and these are some of the tidbits:

-Smoking can be a crutch. This is what is done to escape the moment at hand, or as a reminder of using cigarettes as a coping mechanism during a tough time.
-The positive reinforcement thing is VERY strong, both physically and mentally. ("I deserve a break now, I'm going to have a cigarette.")
-Payback. Some people don't quit smoking just because of the pressure TO stop smoking. If those around are making a big deal out of it, it's constantly brought to mind.

I know that I personally need a LONG stretch ahead of me if I plan to quit (again, and for good.) I get verrrrry bitchy and it's really hard on my kids. (Well, and the neighbours, and the guy driving in front of me, and the store clerk... ) This is another great excuse to put it off.

I did try Nicorette gum. I made myself sick with the first piece, because I hadn't read the directions. (You don't chew it like gum. Wank on it a few times, then leave it for a while, otherwise you're overdosed with nicotine.)
Then once, I had a piece in my mouth, and I was dying for a cigarette. I bummed one from a friend, and it was disgusting! Like I had smoked a pack in one sitting. I wasn't having the physical cravings, but too wrapped up in my mental cravings to decipher the two.

I can empathize with that 'thirsty' or 'hungry' feeling when the cravings are kicking in. I also do better during the day the longer I wait in the morning to have a cigarette. I've also noticed that if I wake up in the morning and crave one right away, I'm smoking way too much. I don't usually want one in the morning until after coffee and breakfast.

I go through periods where I enjoy it, and more often, periods where I hate it. I hate the fact that my life revolves around this dependency. I hate the cost. (Way higher here in Canada) I hate the fact it bothers the kids that I smoke. (I don't smoke in the house - that's just rude.)

This thread has made me want to smoke less, not more. I'm glad I read it.