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SherryTex
09-11-2008, 07:18 PM
Current track of the hurricane has it heading to my hometown of Houston/Beaumont Tx...folks and sister and brother have to evacuate again...they had to do this last week too...aaaugh! Sorry, had to vent somewhere since I can do nothing but watch from afar. :rant:

Seaclusion
09-11-2008, 07:19 PM
I have just had my brush with Ike and I agree. Ike is no friend of mine.

Richard

Pagey's_Girl
09-11-2008, 07:21 PM
((hugs))

*Sends vibes to make nasty old Ike go somewhere where there isn't anyone to hurt...*

Williebee
09-11-2008, 07:26 PM
Yeah, there's a lot of that going around. (I have family just outside of Houston.)

And Sherry, thanks for the spiffy and ironic cultural reference! :)

I don't think he'll reach his hometown (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dwight_D._Eisenhower) though.

Shadow_Ferret
09-11-2008, 07:36 PM
I was still a baby when he was President, so I don't remember anything of him.

But I'll send good vibes to make him turn south.

Good luck, Sherry, batten down the hatches, lower the boom, raise the misenmast, and all that.

SherryTex
09-11-2008, 07:44 PM
Aye Aye sir.

I keep trying to convince them to move up here...hurricanes hardly hever happen...but then they'd have to endure the endless news cycle about politics...and that just might be more irritating than having to evacuate twice in two weeks.

Mela
09-11-2008, 08:22 PM
Ike looks like it's going to be a monster - possible cat 4, I heard this morning. ((hugs)) I'm sure your family members will get out safely in plenty of time.

I worry about all the immigrants, however, who won't evacuate or who are afraid to.

TemlynWriting
09-11-2008, 08:56 PM
I don't like Ike, either. I'm in SW Houston. We're not in the evacuation zone, which is about an hour away, so they're asking us not to leave. We don't really want to leave unless necessary, anyway, because when we left during Hurricane Rita it took about 12 hours to get to Dallas (normally a 4.5 hour drive).

However, if we stay and the power goes out and all that jazz, we're left with no power for who knows how long. And I don't like bathing when it's storming, either.

Guess we'll stay unless we're warned not to, but right now we're way outside the evacuation zones. We'll still get hit hard with winds and rain, but hopefully not flooding.

Ike has completely taken over our local television with news conferences and updates.

The only hurricane I've ever actually experienced and remember was Hurricane Gloria in New York, 1985. And since then I've lived in Central Florida (west coast) and Texas. In Florida, I lived 15 minutes from the west coast, and still never really had to go through a major storm. In Texas, we left when Rita was coming, though she veered away from us after all.

This should be interesting...

Pagey's_Girl
09-11-2008, 09:38 PM
Y'know, the only Ike I could think of was Ike Turner...

Seaclusion
09-11-2008, 09:42 PM
Ike Pappas, news anchor who died recently.

Richard

AmusingMuse
09-11-2008, 10:10 PM
I don't like Ike, either. I'm in SW Houston. We're not in the evacuation zone, which is about an hour away, so they're asking us not to leave. We don't really want to leave unless necessary, anyway, because when we left during Hurricane Rita it took about 12 hours to get to Dallas (normally a 4.5 hour drive).

However, if we stay and the power goes out and all that jazz, we're left with no power for who knows how long. And I don't like bathing when it's storming, either.

Guess we'll stay unless we're warned not to, but right now we're way outside the evacuation zones. We'll still get hit hard with winds and rain, but hopefully not flooding.

Ike has completely taken over our local television with news conferences and updates.

The only hurricane I've ever actually experienced and remember was Hurricane Gloria in New York, 1985. And since then I've lived in Central Florida (west coast) and Texas. In Florida, I lived 15 minutes from the west coast, and still never really had to go through a major storm. In Texas, we left when Rita was coming, though she veered away from us after all.

This should be interesting...


:Hug2:

Yeshanu
09-11-2008, 11:24 PM
Stay safe, all. I'll be praying for you and yours.

stormie
09-11-2008, 11:27 PM
Too all in that area, stay safe, keep us posted how you or your family members or friends are doing.

SherryTex
09-12-2008, 12:17 AM
Temlyn, my folks are coming to stay with my uncle --who lives near Rice University...they were caught in Rita too --drove for 24 hours, got 100 miles from Beaumont. It was UGLY.

I just know they don't want to be doing this...they are dragging their feet.

Fraulein
09-12-2008, 10:24 AM
I don't like Ike, either. I'm in SW Houston. We're not in the evacuation zone, which is about an hour away, so they're asking us not to leave. We don't really want to leave unless necessary, anyway, because when we left during Hurricane Rita it took about 12 hours to get to Dallas (normally a 4.5 hour drive).

However, if we stay and the power goes out and all that jazz, we're left with no power for who knows how long. And I don't like bathing when it's storming, either.

Guess we'll stay unless we're warned not to, but right now we're way outside the evacuation zones. We'll still get hit hard with winds and rain, but hopefully not flooding.

Ike has completely taken over our local television with news conferences and updates.

The only hurricane I've ever actually experienced and remember was Hurricane Gloria in New York, 1985. And since then I've lived in Central Florida (west coast) and Texas. In Florida, I lived 15 minutes from the west coast, and still never really had to go through a major storm. In Texas, we left when Rita was coming, though she veered away from us after all.

This should be interesting...I'm sure you'll do fine! Leave if the power goes out, but if it doesn't, you'll be able to get back to normal much faster if you don't evacuate.


Fraulein's guide to having fun during a whirlwind! ;)

Buy eggs, bread, and milk ahead of time if you can. There's no need to buy an excess of eggs and milk because they may spoil if your power goes out, but the stores probably won't have any of that kind of stuff until they're able to reopen again with a full stock of groceries 4+ days post-storm. They can't really get those types of products after the workers have evacuated and the deliveries stop coming.
I would get gas, too. The lines were horrible post-storm until more of the stations were able to open back up.
Don't forget pet food if you need that sort of thing.

Bring any plants indoors- move them to a porch or an open sunroom first if that's possible so that the resident bugs will get upset and "evacuate". The stronger wind gusts can have an effect on plants. That's what happened to ours whenever we moved to New Orleans; they didn't like being moved in the back of an open truck traveling at 55MPH. It stunted some of the plants' growth for a year.

Find a few books to read ahead of time. You'll get tired of hurricane updates by about the third day of being stuck indoors.

Buy drinks that you like and won't mind drinking for a few days. Purified water just adds to the monotony by the second or third day.

Have a battery operated radio handy. There may be tornado warnings that, when announced, could be very powerful information. It would be better to know about that kind of an event ahead of time! There were a few tornadoes during Gustav.


If I can think of anything else, I'll post it.

Good luck and keep yourself and loved ones safe!

ETA: The wait at your local pharmacy will probably be 6-8 hours. Call in your refills ASAP! Especially if you use a pharmacy that isn't nationwide!!!

Oh. One last thing. Personally, I think generators are useless. If the power goes out, unload the fridge and cook what you can. Shoot... you can even cook perishable foods right now and eat them before the whole event actually starts. Unless you can power a small a/c unit to keep a small room cold, a generator won't be able to offer you much (IMO).

Robin
09-12-2008, 05:56 PM
Let me add to Fraulein's wonderful tips:
Use multiple ice chests if you can, to keep cold drinks separate from sandwich fixings, for example. The mayo jar floated around in the melted ice and made all of my Diet Coke cans and water bottles greasy. Blech.

Even when we couldn't make or receive calls on our cell phones after Katrina, most of us were still able to text message.

I bought a bunch of aluminum foil baking pans (esp the 9x9 inch size) for heating canned foods up on the grill. (That way I didn't have to waste drinking water on washing dishes.)



Good luck and God/Goddess bless everyone in Ike's path. The winds are gusting up to 40 mph here in Gulfport this morning and the storm is already south of LA.


And everyone please consider helping the Red Cross. If you can't give money, they need blood too. :)

Shadow_Ferret
09-12-2008, 06:09 PM
Wow. they're predicting this to be the biggest storm to hit that part of Texas since 1983's Alicia. 250 miles wide. 20 foot storm surge?

I'm trying to visualize it blowing south, away from Texas, but I think I need more help.

Good luck everyone.

qwerty
09-12-2008, 06:24 PM
As of an hour ago (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/7612106.stm)

I'm not a religious person, but even I concede that some praying is needed here.

Yeshanu
09-12-2008, 06:39 PM
To add a bit to what Fraulein and Robin said: You can freeze an extra bag of milk and extra bread--it'll last a bit longer that way, and act as ice in the ice chests that Robin suggests you get.

Prayers coming your way, guys.

(Does anyone have a storm-tracking link?)

benbradley
09-12-2008, 06:42 PM
I think some getting the hell out of Dodge is in order here.

qwerty
09-12-2008, 06:48 PM
strorm tracking link (http://www.wunderground.com/wundermap/?lat=23.1&lon=-83.8&zoom=6&type=hyb&rad=0&wxsn=0&svr=0&cams=0&sat=0&riv=0&mm=0&hur=1&hur.wr=0&hur.cod=1&hur.fx=1&hur.obs=1&fire=0&ft=0&sl=0)

You need to scroll around for the full picture of what is going to hit Galveston followed by . . .

No, don't wanna go there.

SherryTex
09-12-2008, 08:59 PM
Parents are 100 miles north of Houston but we may not have a hometown to go home to...I've been on those streets in Galveston. I've been on the Bolivar Penninsula which may not exist after all of this...I spent entire summers there...seeing the water rushing over and the storm hasn't hit yet, I wonder if any of Galveston or the Bolivar Penninsula will be left.

We've had our share of hurricanes but never with this level of storm surge that's predicted. I also worry because many people resisted evacuating as they only just got back from Gustav.

Seaclusion
09-12-2008, 09:03 PM
Best advice: get the eff outta there. Been through too many big ones to even contemplate sticking around.


Richard

shakeysix
09-12-2008, 09:09 PM
my brother in law is in spring, tx. he has been advised to hunker down. lots of huge trees in the woodlands and the winds are supposed to be 100+ mph. he said the traffic is so snarled he couldn't make kansas if he tried. they put a new roof on the house this summer--s6

Mela
09-12-2008, 09:32 PM
my brother in law is in spring, tx. he has been advised to hunker down. lots of huge trees in the woodlands and the winds are supposed to be 100+ mph. he said the traffic is so snarled he couldn't make kansas if he tried. they put a new roof on the house this summer--s6

Where is Spring, Texas? Is he along the coast or more inland?
My thoughts are with him and with everyone in Texas and La. this weekend.

shakeysix
09-12-2008, 09:54 PM
spring is a suburb--in a section called the woodlands. my sister is here in kansas. the plan was for him to stay behind and sell the house before moving to kansas. they've lived in houston for 15 years but the traffic and weather are getting to them. they lost almost everything in a flood back in the nineties--s6

Mela
09-12-2008, 10:00 PM
I've just read reports on the msn homepage about a guy who told his family to leave while he stays behind - his home's already started to flood -
Galveston's downtown looks like a lake and the hurricane's not even there yet and others who opted to wait and see decided to leave. Thankfully, they're reporting the highways are clear.
Oh, man. Wish everyone the best of luck with this one!

qwerty
09-12-2008, 10:14 PM
Hurricane Ike technical blog (http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=1082&tstamp=200809)

The one road leading North out of Galveston may be clear of traffic, but parts are already under water.

Fraulein
09-12-2008, 10:35 PM
As of an hour ago (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/7612106.stm)
Cuba turned the offer down, asking instead that the US sells it supplies on credit.What a strange sentence!


Carry on...

qwerty
09-12-2008, 10:48 PM
I agree that the second quote in the above post is a strange sentence. May I just point out that it wasn't me who said that.

Fraulein
09-12-2008, 10:50 PM
Those people need to get out of Galveston Island however they can!

If you have the nerve, here's a video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HLiOY3hnFY) that you can watch of Chalmette, La when it flooded.

This video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQkksAVBezc) is even more gut-wrenching and dramatic.

Pagey's_Girl
09-12-2008, 11:25 PM
What NOAA has to say (http://forecast.weather.gov/showsigwx.php?warnzone=TXZ238&warncounty=TXC167&firewxzone=TXZ238&local_place1=Galveston+TX&product1=Hurricane+Warning)

That storm is freaking huge. It looks like it's taking up the entire Gulf of Mexico!

Mela
09-12-2008, 11:30 PM
Just got this in on my email here at work. Pretty freakin' spooky but might be good for future hurricanes:

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2008/12sep_scream.htm?list1022244

Komnena
09-13-2008, 07:27 AM
It looks like the eye wall is coming ashore.

SherryTex
09-13-2008, 03:25 PM
What people need to understand and the media just does NOT get, is that many of the people who refused to evacuate just got back from mandatory evacuations for Gustav and live day to day --these are people who live by what they sell or what they catch --in the Port Bolivar (Bol eh Var) area, and days without catches or if the boat gets crushed, they are days without money.

That's why I suspect many of the 105 on the penninsula didn't leave, that and people who live on the coast (I grew up there, I know this area), they don't spend the day plugged into the internet or tv or even the radio, they spend it out on the boat fishing or working outside. They had livestock and grounds to keep.

I grew up with Hurricane parties. You took out the ice cream, the most expensive meats in the freezer and you grilled them and everyone brought everything to the biggest house and ate and drank and sang and laughed and there were flash lights and it was no biggie. People also fished all day because the water would turn pure clear (until the last 24 hours) and you could see the fish race to your bait.

The same holds true for Galveston and the 23,000 estimated that didn't evacuate. It's expensive and hard to leave Galveston to get somewhere else and these people remember Rita, where they drove for 24 hours and got almost no where.

I can't get radio from my home town of Beaumont, TX and even the newspaper website has only old information on it. The water surge would have traveled up the Neches River (Nait Chez) and the town is prone to flooding. Because people have whethered many a flood, I know, people were thinking, No biggie). You just go next door to the neighbor with a two story house and wait for the water to drain. It took a lot of talking to convince my own folks to leave because they had only just returned from a mandatory evacuation of Gustav.

qwerty
09-13-2008, 03:35 PM
Sherry, this should help you to keep track of what's going on in your home town.

Ike coverage from Houston (http://www.maroonspoon.com/wx/ike.html)

Beach Bunny
09-13-2008, 05:39 PM
I've been watching the videos on weather.com this morning. :( It doesn't look good. I hope everyone and their families are safe.

shakeysix
09-14-2008, 08:40 PM
two big trees crashed through the house. the roof is broken in three places and the yard is a mess of fallen trees and water but scott was sleeping in the hallway so he is okay. the best decorated room in the entire extended family is now trash and the house might be condemned but he and the neighbors are cutting trees w/ chain saws to free up the roads in the neighborhood. he lost his cell phone, laptop and lighter. bless his heart he did have the foresight to sleep with two cartons of cigarettes under his pillow. --s6

tjwriter
09-14-2008, 09:29 PM
The worst from tropical depression Ike is now past us I believe. We were only on the fringes, but the wind was(is) ferocious here, so I can't even begin to imagine how bad it was south of here.

There are trees and big limbs down everywhere. My parents lost a tree in their yard, and said the town they live in is a mess. One of the banks had windows blown out and there are shingles everywhere in addition to all the tree mess.

I really don't know how bad it is once you get past our block. Now that the husband is finally awake, I imagine he'll go check it out in a little while.

I hope everyone continues to stay safe.

Fraulein
09-14-2008, 09:29 PM
I'm sorry to hear about that shakeysix. I hope things will get better as fast as possible! I wish y'all well.

SherryTex
09-14-2008, 11:21 PM
The Bolivar Peninsula is no more. A family friend flew over the land and saw that virtually none of what was, even remains in piles. Most people never heard of it, so they won’t miss it. But for me, Caplen, Gillcrist, Crystal Beach and Galveston, they represent not just whole summers but three to four generations of memories that have just now literally been washed out to sea.

People who lived at the beach year round were easy to spot. They wore clothing that had been line dried to the point of fading and most of them smoked. Most of them had tattoos that were politically incorrect, and had them long before they were trendy. The women wore nail polish but no makeup. They had leathery tan skin that if you touched felt unspeakably soft. Men wore shorts and t-shirts 99.9% of the time and baseball caps. They were lean but not thin, strong but not muscular and frequently unshaven. These were people who lived by their hands, painting, sewing, baking, fishing and selling all they made. They cleaned whatever they caught and ate it. They invoked Jesus’ name and cursed with equal ease and didn’t think much of people who came to the beach but didn’t want to get sandy or know how to handle tar (baby oil works great), or who wanted to know where the nearest “Wi-fi” connection might be found. (Try Houston).

Their homes were often pink and grey and they would own at least one boat, one dog, one trailer and a pickup truck. They could fix air conditioners but most didn’t bother to own one, as fans worked best year round. Phones came to the peninsula grudgingly, (1984) and few bothered with TV or cable, much less computers. All that salt air and moisture made electronics beyond a good stereo a real waste of time.

That none of the businesses or homes still exist, even as piles of debris require that I remember them as they were. There was the obligatory shell shop for souvenirs, Milt’s Fish Market for bait and fresh caught goodness, and Claud’s, a store which sold everything one could possibly need at the beach except food. These stores had been here since my Grandmother was young and there were even hand written notes mentioning them as places to go for goods posted in the beach house that served as a summer place to survive with 9 kids before air conditioning for my family’s family since the 1920’s.

Then, there were the “newcomers” like Mama Theresa’s Flying Pizza (1985), which quickly became mine and my brothers and eventually our children’s favorite spot on Fridays, the Gulf Mart, (1995), a grocery store so that going to the beach no longer meant packing food for a week before going, and the waterslide (1982). A second waterslide tried to muscle in on the territory (2004), but beach goers of the Bolivar Peninsula were terribly loyal and annoyed whenever anyone tried to one up anyone else, so the second place struggled along until the first place announced that it was okay and that they were actually friends. Danny’s Donut Shoppe kept fighting to survive, selling Kolaches which the few in the know people swooped in on Sunday after mass at Our Mother of Mercy to purchase. It went out of business at least three times a summer. Maybe the guy was out fishing, but at least three trips out of five, the shop was closed during hours it was supposed to be open. The beach was like that.

Maybe we should have known that the peninsula’s days were numbered, that everything at the beach gets worn down and eventually destroyed but there was a permanent feeling to that thin stretch of Texas Coast. Whenever someone sold their beach house to someone not family, there was a feeling of shock and concern…that the next people would not be beach people. Most people who came to the beach, became beach people or sold. They didn’t like the fact that there were only three radio stations one could get in clearly, that cell phones were essentially useless and that people didn’t have answering machines. As far as I knew, there were only three atms along the entire strip and they were inside stores with a sizable service fee.

When people opened new businesses, everyone would look on with amazement to see if they could stick. Some did, like the Sand Piper (on the bay side, great fish), and some didn’t, like the Pier, which when Hurricane Rita wiped out the Pier, left the large stumps of the pier itself, standing in the surf. What I will miss though, are those experiences that were uniquely East Texas Coast Beach. I know I could go riding in the back of a pickup truck along the shore to gather driftwood for a bonfire almost anywhere, but there was something to it here.

I’ll miss hearing the old church lady imitating Kate Smith at the end of mass on 4th of July, singing God Bless America and beach combing while remembering which house was the one where we saw an alligator that had swum down into the gulf, sunning itself. I’ll miss the neighbors that would walk up to introduce themselves because your bonfire looked fun and the beer was cold. I'll even miss the crazy beach lady on her tractor mower who would get grouchy if your flipflop touched her property line when walking back to the house.

But mostly, I’ll miss the memories of bringing new people to the beach house and watching them discover that despite the seaweed and jellyfish in the brown warm surf, the tar on the beach, the stickaburrs in the grass and the fire ants and mosquitoes, that standing out on the wooden deck, staring at the ocean, sipping a freshly made drink of something, they would breathe in the salt air and marvel at how much they loved this place.

Now I know places can be rebuilt but here, we just don’t know if there is anything to build on yet, or even how to begin. It’s too soon to know if any of what we knew could be restored. By all accounts, there's just nothing there of those 85 years of memories but memories. For now, I just miss that place that described my childhood summers and almost every birthday until I was 24 and hope that in Heaven, I get to drive down highway 87 and turn onto Martha's Vineyard and find a strong southeast wind and a grey house up on 18 foot piers with family inside it sitting at my grandfather's butcher table, chopping up the ingredients for Gumbo.

shakeysix
09-14-2008, 11:24 PM
my brother in law is fine and my aunt has checked in, so we are happy here. looking at the devastation and thanking god--s6

SherryTex
09-14-2008, 11:31 PM
And you are right Shakey, all my family is safe so I have nothing to complain about in truth...It's just a sadness that it's all gone. Fortunately, they're not.

joyce
09-14-2008, 11:47 PM
I'm glad everyone is ok but I'm so sorry to hear about the loss. The pictures I'm seeing on T.V. are unbelievable!

shakeysix
09-15-2008, 12:30 AM
give me a simple little f-5 tornado anyday--s6

Susie
09-15-2008, 01:51 AM
Prayers sent to all who are in the path of Ike. Not a nice fellow...

SPMiller
09-15-2008, 02:52 AM
All my relatives who used to live in the Houston area have long since moved to Corpus.

And I only lost a tree. I didn't know Ike was going to stay so vicious on its inland journey.

Komnena
09-16-2008, 12:48 AM
I haven't seen any of the pictures of Galveston. I understand it could be two weeks before we get power back. Luckily the library has electricity. At least I'll sleep in my own bed tonight.

Shadow_Ferret
09-16-2008, 12:58 AM
I really hate Ike now. Gas prices have jumped over 40 cents per gallon over the weekend.

Strikes me as price gouging. It seems only in the last few years that prices have started spiking by 20, 30, 40 cents whenever a hurricane comes round.

Komnena
09-16-2008, 04:54 PM
Power has been restored to 86,000customers. Unfortunately I'm not one of them. Sigh.

TemlynWriting
09-16-2008, 05:52 PM
We've got no power, either. At least my hubby's company doesn't mind me coming in with him to work. I've got a manuscript to finish editing within the next day or so. Granted, I could work at home, but my laptop would only have enough power for four hours or so, and I often need to search for information online as I'm editing.

I can't come to work with him forever, though, so if we don't get power in the next few days then I'll have to spend the next few weeks visiting the local coffeehouse and library for Internet access.

Right now it's looking like it could be 2 to 4 weeks before power is restored completely in our area. What's annoying is that other neighborhoods that are close by have power. The people one street over, across from our backyard neighbors, have power. It's like there's the small grouping of streets that doesn't have power in my area.

I understand huge areas having no power, but it is a bit frustrating when everyone around our general area has power except for about three streets.

I'm just counting our blessings, though. We're okay. We have water, and minimal house damage. We'll probably need to get a new roof eventually, as we lost a bunch of shingles. We'll have to have a few trees chopped down, hopefully only one, though. A large branch from one of our trees hit our neighors' roof, but doesn't appear to have caused much damage; in fact, it's still hanging from the tree, not touching the fence between our yards.

We cook dinner on our gas stove before it gets too dark. Last night was rice and vegetables in a pot together. We go for walks in the evening. Once dusk comes we do what we can: go outside and talk to neighbors, listen to the battery-operated radio, go to sleep. I'd like to read, but don't want to strain our eyes by candlelight, and I want to save battery power on our flashlights.

Our street looks like a disaster area simply because of the trees and branches everywhere!

~Julia

Kitrianna
09-16-2008, 06:26 PM
We don't like what's left of Ike very much either...if it's any consolation. Left me looking like a pretzel for 2 days and blew all the garbage around, not to mention the rain. Like we needed anymore of that!

Yeshanu
09-16-2008, 07:18 PM
We don't like what's left of Ike very much either...if it's any consolation. Left me looking like a pretzel for 2 days and blew all the garbage around, not to mention the rain. Like we needed anymore of that!

The wonderful pressure changes meant I spent a day in bed with a pounding migraine, but the whole time I was conscious of the fact that I was much, much luckier than those who lived further south in Ike's path.

My prayers are with you as you recover, and I'm glad to hear you're physically all right.

Komnena
09-16-2008, 07:37 PM
I am definitely going to look into getting a battery powered TV when this is over. I am thinking seriously of buying a battery CD player. Audiobooks would be great to have now.

shakeysix
09-16-2008, 09:37 PM
the insurance company told my brother in law he had to get the trees off the house before they do more damage. he has no electricity, no water and the tree services are too busy to answer their phones. he just wants to come to kansas and take a bath but has to wait for the adjustor to show up. he's on a real short fuse--s6

Komnena
09-16-2008, 09:44 PM
I'd be on a short fuse too.

Mela
09-16-2008, 10:41 PM
the insurance company told my brother in law he had to get the trees off the house before they do more damage. he has no electricity, no water and the tree services are too busy to answer their phones. he just wants to come to kansas and take a bath but has to wait for the adjustor to show up. he's on a real short fuse--s6


Well how does the insurance company propose your brother get the trees off the house? Are they very tall trees? I don't mean to sound flip, but what would he do? Just roll them off like logs?

shakeysix
09-17-2008, 12:51 AM
they are damn big trees. they have broken into the roof and need to be lifted out with a crane. the whole thing is ridiculous. this summer when i drove through illinois on my way to nashville i saw all these billboards in farmer's fields saying things like 'screw ______ insurance agency" or 'don't buy insurance with so-and so company". there had been a flood in the area and people were sounding off. i see why---s6

joyce
09-17-2008, 01:07 AM
I am definitely going to look into getting a battery powered TV when this is over. I am thinking seriously of buying a battery CD player. Audiobooks would be great to have now.

When the hurricanes in 04 tore up our area, we were so happy to have the battery powered TV. I'm not sure they'll work once the cable companies go to that digital thing though. It was so darn hot! We didn't have power for 3 weeks. I just pretended I was camping at a horrible time of year. Best of luck to everyone.

The pictures I'm seeing of the affected areas are almost unbelievable. I saw some today showing fish stuck in a chain link fence. My heart goes out to all that are suffering from Ike.

Komnena
09-18-2008, 03:45 AM
How are things going,Shakey?

shakeysix
09-18-2008, 09:11 PM
i'm leaving for houston tonight after school. my sister and i are driving to houston to deliver a generator and some food to her husband. he does have water now but might not have electricity for weeks. we might bring him back with us, maybe not. depends on how things are going with the insurance company. i took friday off but not monday--my sister and i will be back in school on monday. i am not thrilled with the idea but nothing else to do. my brother can't go because he has a project at work that has to go out tomorrow. i am not terrified of snakes or anything close--still, i dreamed about them hiding in the debris last night---s6

Komnena
09-18-2008, 09:20 PM
Let me know how things are, okay?

Williebee
09-18-2008, 09:20 PM
Travel safe, Shakey.

Take lots of patience with you. It'll be hard after the drive, but you'll all need it.

Good luck.

shakeysix
09-18-2008, 09:40 PM
it's my high school students on monday morning who will test my patience--not the snakes and fire ants--s6

SherryTex
09-19-2008, 05:04 AM
Shakey, my family has power so if your family needs help, pm me and I'll see if any of them are in your neck of the woods. My uncle had to evacuate from Conroe because things were so bad.

shakeysix
09-19-2008, 05:36 AM
the water is off there, in Spring again. but some gas stations are selling gas now. i'd like to offer to bring stuff in for anyone who needs things but i'm not sure we'd get it to the right place. we're leaving tomorrow about 5 a.m. with a gas generator that still has some gas in it. my sister drives like a moron. she is calling this our last road trip and stocking up on allman brothers and lynnard skynnard ---yikes--s6

Yeshanu
09-19-2008, 06:28 AM
Ouch! Take along some ear plugs, shakey. :)

Wish I was close enough to help, but I'll send some vibes and virtual :Hug2:

SherryTex
09-19-2008, 06:35 AM
Better cure...be sure to load up on...you have to mean it now...Air Supply and Barry Manilow...it will result in a unanimous decision to void all music whatsoever....

Yeshanu
09-19-2008, 06:38 AM
Sherry, I was trying to drink from my water bottle when I read your post. I know I should know better, but I think I'm drowning right now...

SherryTex
09-19-2008, 06:43 AM
My work here is done. Goodnight everybody! Going to take my percoset now...

Komnena
09-21-2008, 12:39 AM
We had power today for 30 seconds and then the transformer blew. I hope nobody was hurt but I probably won't find out until I get home and turn on the battery powered radio. I have been really glad I bought the little Coby Monday morning. Who could have known radio would be much better than TV this week?

mario_c
09-21-2008, 07:50 AM
Better cure...be sure to load up on...you have to mean it now...Air Supply and Barry Manilow...it will result in a unanimous decision to void all music whatsoever....
Oy the humanity!!!:ROFL:

Keep those spirits up, you Texans!

Komnena
09-22-2008, 05:52 AM
Has anyone heard from Shakey?

shakeysix
09-22-2008, 09:40 PM
quite a trip--we made good time, except for about a 30 minute wait for gas in huntsville. most lines were orderly and short. the generator worked. my sister found it in kansas for only 300$. none to be found in houston. saturday my bro-in-law worked with guys in the neighborhood to clear trees with chainsaws and small tractors. since all but one house in the subdivision is marginally habitable they are down the list for water and electricity.

my sister and i ran errands--basically we stood in line for stuff like ice and water and emergency food boxes. but there were neighboring towns that had electricity and open stores, so we did eventually piece together our list--mosquito repellent in one place, gloves and gas cans ten miles down the road. saturday night we had one lamp working, one small fan and the tv. we'd managed to scrounge up reuben sandwiches and beer. so we watched "free range" and laughed a lot. sunday we drove back. listened to the radio and talked--kind of relaxing really. oh--and i had a narrow escape from some fire ants but no copperheads in sight---s6

Komnena
09-25-2008, 06:32 AM
I spent a few minutes browsing Galveston websites. So much destruction.

shakeysix
09-25-2008, 05:13 PM
makes you wonder if palm thatched houses are so primitive after all---s6

Yeshanu
09-25-2008, 05:59 PM
makes you wonder if palm thatched houses are so primitive after all---s6

Won't get into a long discussion about how we of European ancestry have ignored the technologies of other cultures and forced them to embrace our "superior" technologies, but I think you're on to something, shakey. At least the palm thatch wouldn't cost so much to rebuild, and it would have been just as strong in the storm as most of the "advanced" houses we've built...

Speaking of which, how is the rebuilding going down there?

shakeysix
09-25-2008, 06:32 PM
they had just re-roofed and redecorated in june, planning to sell and move to kansas. they wanted to build a retirement house on our family land--homesteaded in the 1880s. now, with this second hurricane and tsunami --the financial one this weekend-- nobody knows what is going to happen. comes retirement we sibs might all be crowded into a sod house again. you know--there is a lot to be said for sod, environmentally speaking. lots of nice cow pies to burn for heat too--s6

Yeshanu
09-25-2008, 08:29 PM
Cheap, and easy to reconstruct if the weather gets it down.

Or you could try a straw bale house (http://www.planetfriendly.net/strawbale.html).

shakeysix
09-25-2008, 09:16 PM
i've seen them in print. my great grandmother, who was born in 1884, said that some settlers used tumbleweeds stomped down between chicken wire walls. wish i had listened more carefully to her stories---s6

Komnena
09-26-2008, 12:02 AM
Maybe the historical societies would have similar stories written down.

SherryTex
09-27-2008, 01:04 AM
they're just letting people onto the peninsula now. They have to get tetnus shots to go, and beware of snakes.

Komnena
09-27-2008, 05:25 AM
This storm was definitely one for the record books.