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Shadow_Ferret
08-22-2008, 09:29 PM
So, I'm out for my normal 2-mile lunch walk and I get ahead of these women, and I overhear, "So she axed him. She axed him, then she turned around and axed me!" and I'm horrified. I don't want to turn around for fear of seeing this poor woman with a cleft skull, and I'm thinking, here this woman has Lizzy Bordon running around her office, she might be mortally wounded, and she's talking about it like it's an every day occurance.

What's wrong with this picture?

Which reminds me of my own near death experience. I went to the supermarket to pick up a few items and I see this new product, I can't remember the name nor is it important to this story, but I get in the checkout and the cashier picks it up and she's like, "Have you tried this?" And I'm like no, and she goes, "Cuz I was gonna ax you!" WTF? What kind of grocery story slaughters their customers for trying new products?
I have never returned there again!

So I ax you, what is the world coming to?

Kitrianna
08-22-2008, 09:30 PM
A good laugh if they read your posts SF :roll:

DeleyanLee
08-22-2008, 09:33 PM
A mutated and strange form of the English language.

CaroGirl
08-22-2008, 09:51 PM
I consider myself lucky that this particular idiomatic pronunciation has not yet reached my workplace.

Ferret: If you write this in a column you could probably sell it to your local daily. It's funny stuff. Use your powers for good, not evil, young Padawan.

Shadow_Ferret
08-22-2008, 09:52 PM
Or I could just stick it in my blog.

Kitrianna
08-22-2008, 09:57 PM
I vote for Ferret making extra cash off of his humour! :)

Pagey's_Girl
08-22-2008, 10:17 PM
In Noo Yawk, youse'd get yerself axed for axing that...

Kitrianna
08-22-2008, 10:18 PM
Certain parts of New York. Not amongst those of us from the Upstate area. We're nice...

IceCreamEmpress
08-22-2008, 10:20 PM
"Ax" as a subdialectical pronunciation of "ask" has been around since the 18th century. It's generally considered to be a sign of an uneducated speaker, but I know some tenured university professors who use it as a matter of course, because it is part of the subdialect they grew up with.

Ferret, dear, I don't see how you went all these years without encountering this very frequent variant pronunciation.

Kitrianna
08-22-2008, 10:27 PM
Ferret, dear, I don't see how you went all these years without encountering this very frequent variant pronunciation.


He lives under a rock and has had a sheltered life? :D

Shadow_Ferret
08-22-2008, 10:41 PM
"Ax" as a subdialectical pronunciation of "ask" has been around since the 18th century. It's generally considered to be a sign of an uneducated speaker, but I know some tenured university professors who use it as a matter of course, because it is part of the subdialect they grew up with.

Ferret, dear, I don't see how you went all these years without encountering this very frequent variant pronunciation.
I have encountered it before. I usually ignore it, but this particular woman's monologue just piqued my interest and imagination. Must be the horror writer in me.

Pagey's_Girl
08-22-2008, 10:50 PM
Certain parts of New York. Not amongst those of us from the Upstate area. We're nice...


There's New York and then there's "Noo Yawk."

(BTW, I'm about 60 miles north of "Noo Yawk" myself. :))

JLCwrites
08-22-2008, 10:53 PM
Silly Ferret, Axe (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I9tWZB7OUSU) is for men!

Kitrianna
08-22-2008, 11:24 PM
I grew up right next to Cananda. We don't say Noo Yawk in Buffalo, We do however say sherbert instead of sherbet.

Shadow_Ferret
08-22-2008, 11:26 PM
We do however say sherbert instead of sherbet.Which, of course, is the correct pronunciation (says the midwesterner).

Kitrianna
08-22-2008, 11:28 PM
Which, of course, is the correct pronunciation (says the midwesterner).

:) I knew we had it right and that the rest of the country was wrong. Just like that whole pop/soda debate. It's pop dammit!

Shadow_Ferret
08-22-2008, 11:30 PM
It's odd, but everyone around us calls it pop, but Milwaukee is this little island that says soda.

Kitrianna
08-22-2008, 11:32 PM
It's POP dammit! That I have learned is actually an Ontario if not Canadian thing. Soda...that's the thingy with the ice cream and pop that you eat with a spoon then drink with a straw... :D

Siddow
08-22-2008, 11:35 PM
here in the south, it's 'coke'.

not that you ast me or nuthin'.

*ast is the word you come up with when you take a noo yawker and put her in Georgia*

vixey
08-22-2008, 11:40 PM
I grew up drinking coke but now I drink soda thanks to a roommate from NJ! :tongue

But - a few years ago we hired a bricklayer to build a "chimbley" on our house (his word not mine).

Robert Toy
08-22-2008, 11:52 PM
I grew up right next to Cananda. We don't say Noo Yawk in Buffalo, We do however say sherbert instead of sherbet.
Lessin yu ben to skool then it's sorbet...side from bakalav the onlist too things reely good from Turkey. Cep for Turkeys, need dem for thanksgivn.

Kitrianna
08-22-2008, 11:54 PM
No. Sherbert is different from sorbet.

Robert Toy
08-22-2008, 11:54 PM
No. Sherbert is different from sorbet.
taint

Kitrianna
08-23-2008, 12:00 AM
Tis! GOtta run. See y`all tomorrow or Tuesday.

Shadow_Ferret
08-23-2008, 12:02 AM
Actually, yes, they are different. Here sherbet has dairy in it. Sorbet does not.

sassandgroove
08-23-2008, 12:07 AM
I heard a company had placed ads for hire stating to call for Mr. Ask, and if they called and asked for Mr. Axed, they were told there was no one there by that name.

Pagey's_Girl
08-23-2008, 12:15 AM
I heard a company had placed ads for hire stating to call for Mr. Ask, and if they called and asked for Mr. Axed, they were told there was no one there by that name.

Sounds like my fourth-grade teacher, who pretended not to know what you were saying if you asked to go to the "liberry." To this day I overpronounce that "r."

And at pne of my old jobs, I had the unenviable task of handwriting "MS P911" (mail stop - internal mail address for HR) on a box of SASE envelopes we put out along with our employment apps. We ended up getting a bunch of apps back that included cover letters addressed to "Ms Pall."

Yes, my handwriting really is that bad....

Robert Toy
08-23-2008, 12:20 AM
Actually, yes, they are different. Here sherbet has dairy in it. Sorbet does not.
You are correct, based the the U.S. definitions:

http://sci-toys.com/ingredients/ice_cream.html

regdog
08-23-2008, 12:20 AM
One of my friends says "Ax him if he wants a sangwich?" :Wha:

WildScribe
08-23-2008, 12:20 AM
I heard a company had placed ads for hire stating to call for Mr. Ask, and if they called and asked for Mr. Axed, they were told there was no one there by that name.

That's kind of brilliant, actually.

Robert Toy
08-23-2008, 12:26 AM
Jeet yet?

Nah?

Lets squeet!

Kay.

sassandgroove
08-23-2008, 01:02 AM
That's kind of brilliant, actually.
It was a caller on a local radio show talking about it. The ad was for a call center, they wanted people who spoke clearly.

astonwest
08-23-2008, 03:41 AM
I've been catching a lot of people lately around here who pronounce the 's' in Illinois, and it's driving me nuts...

stormie
08-23-2008, 03:55 AM
I've heard "axed" for "asked" from people who come from Brooklyn and a few from North Jersey (maybe displaced Brooklyn-ites).

Then again, one of my sons is developmentally disabled. Saying "axed" for "asked" is common among DDs. I guess it's easy to transpose the "k" with the "s"

But I doubt SF was listening in on two developmentally disabled women.

Okay. Enough from me. I'm off for my shot of schnapps on ice.

benbradley
08-23-2008, 06:32 AM
So, I'm out for my normal 2-mile lunch walk and I get ahead of these women, and I overhear, "So she axed him. She axed him, then she turned around and axed me!" and I'm horrified. I don't want to turn around for fear of seeing this poor woman with a cleft skull, and I'm thinking, here this woman has Lizzy Bordon running around her office, she might be mortally wounded, and she's talking about it like it's an every day occurance.

What's wrong with this picture?
Okay, I was reading this "in context", and was thinking you're taking this word "axe" literally (as I kept reading the above it appears you indeed were), but the "lunch walk" think tells me this is near an office park, and one woman was relating to the other an office conversation. In office/business lingo, to "axe" someone is to fire them - to "terminate" them - to inform them they no longer work at the company. So this woman was relating a story of another woman at her office firing (reliving of job responsibilities and pay) a male, then doing the same to her (the speaker).

So, "axe" is just a euphemism for terminating an employee's employment. It doesn't mean to hit someone with an axe.

Which reminds me of my own near death experience. I went to the supermarket to pick up a few items and I see this new product, I can't remember the name nor is it important to this story, but I get in the checkout and the cashier picks it up and she's like, "Have you tried this?" And I'm like no, and she goes, "Cuz I was gonna ax you!"
Oh .... now I see ... (says the blind man) ...

WTF? What kind of grocery story slaughters their customers for trying new products?
I have never returned there again!

So I ax you, what is the world coming to?

here in the south, it's 'coke'.

not that you ast me or nuthin'.

*ast is the word you come up with when you take a noo yawker and put her in Georgia*
For most practical purposes you're still in Atlanter, Jawja. Out in the country it's pronounced cocola, and you better watch out when someone offers you a co-cola, because if you accept they might give you a Sam's Choice or a Shasta (do they still make Shasta???) or some such. Doesn't matter that the nearest Walmart is 20 miles north of here, people drive whatever distance it takes for that after-midnight shopping experience.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
08-23-2008, 07:07 AM
One of my friends says "Ax him if he wants a sangwich?" :Wha:

With or without ungyuns?

Shadow_Ferret
08-23-2008, 07:19 AM
I've been catching a lot of people lately around here who pronounce the 's' in Illinois, and it's driving me nuts...
I pronounce it "Ill in Noise."

astonwest
08-23-2008, 07:52 AM
I pronounce it "Ill in Noise."Ack!!!! Make it stop!!!!

Priene
08-23-2008, 08:39 AM
But - a few years ago we hired a bricklayer to build a "chimbley" on our house (his word not mine).

That's a common dialect word in the UK

And by climbing to the chimbley,
You could see cross to Wembley,
If it was't for the 'ouses in between.

Words by Edgar Bateman
Music by George Le Brunn
Circa 1890's (http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3328&messages=36)

Woodsie
08-23-2008, 08:41 AM
Thanks for a good laugh! :)

Bayou Bill
08-23-2008, 08:50 AM
Ax not upon whom the ax falls.

Bayou Bill :cool:

sheadakota
08-23-2008, 01:45 PM
Oh ye amateurs. I grew up in North Eastern Pa. There exist a strange mixture of Pennsylvania Dutch and coal cracker dialect.

we have towns there that you will never find on a map.

Smokin-(Shamokin)
Berk-(Berwik)
Shendoa-(Shenendohoa)
Sesquehannie (Susquehanna)

Then there is the dialect- Ye goin to rid up yer room, we got a couple two, tree hours till we go.

I'm going to town. You want to come wit?

Where's the next rest stop - I have to go to the batroom (not to be confused with the cave batman hangs out in)

Don't forget to outin the lights when you leave.

I often have to translate for relatives from out of the immidiate area.

Silver King
08-23-2008, 06:24 PM
...And so, my fellow Americans: Axe not what your country can do for you--axe what you can do for your country.

nerds
08-23-2008, 06:45 PM
from my world of plants and bugs -


muskemelons - mushmelons

artichokes - artiechokes

Black Widder spiders

flowering prune tree

copper beech - copper birch (there is no such thing)

sugar maple - syrup maple

tomato hornworm - hornbeam monster

compost - combust (which it theoretically could do if hot enough)

arugula - arugella

germination - termination

stormie
08-23-2008, 06:45 PM
...And so, my fellow Americans: Axe not what your country can do for you--axe what you can do for your country.^^:ROFL: ^^

Pup
08-23-2008, 07:13 PM
I was researching some 19th century American slang last night, came across the following from Martine's Hand-Book of Etiquette, 1866, and of course immediately thought of this thread:


Among the words or expressions to be strictly avoided, are the following...

Axe, instead of ask. An old English word, now become obsolete. "And Pilate axide him, 'Art thou King of Jewis?' And Jhesus answeride and seide to him, 'Thou seist.' " --Wicliff's Bible, cited by Bartlett.

regdog
08-23-2008, 07:24 PM
With or without ungyuns?


wit ungyuns

Hillary
08-23-2008, 09:52 PM
Without reading anything but the OP...

I was once walking in Washington Square Park in New York City, and was approached by a man who requested that I go for a ride with him in his Escalade. I declined. He then sweetened the offer with: "Honey, we could smoke some weed!" I declined again. He replied, "Ah-ight. Just wanted to axe you!"

OMFG, How great is MY intuition? I mean, really, he admitted it himself - I could have been KILLED if I'd accepted!

God bless my time in NYC...

rhymegirl
08-24-2008, 03:50 AM
It's POP dammit! That I have learned is actually an Ontario if not Canadian thing. Soda...that's the thingy with the ice cream and pop that you eat with a spoon then drink with a straw... :D

Nope.

We call the fizzy stuff in cans and bottles "soda."

The thingy with the ice cream in the soda is an "ice cream soda" or an "ice cream float."

BenPanced
08-24-2008, 05:23 AM
"Ax" as a subdialectical pronunciation of "ask" has been around since the 18th century. It's generally considered to be a sign of an uneducated speaker, but I know some tenured university professors who use it as a matter of course, because it is part of the subdialect they grew up with.

Ferret, dear, I don't see how you went all these years without encountering this very frequent variant pronunciation.
Supposubly.

mscelina
08-24-2008, 05:36 AM
I still call it Coke even if it's Pepsi (at which point I complain a lot about the taste and drink it anyway). Back home in Tennessee,it was always Coke whether it was a Coke product or not.

Save Coke Classic. We just called that 'ass.'

Up here in Ohio, however, it's all 'pop.' That word's always fascinated me. When someone asks (not axes) me for a 'can of pop' I get the uncontrollable giggles.

And hand them a Pepsi. After all, they didn't ask for one of my Cokes, right?

Unique
08-24-2008, 03:06 PM
I've been catching a lot of people lately around here who pronounce the 's' in Illinois, and it's driving me nuts...


I pronounce it "Ill in Noise."

Thankx, mr. ferret - i was always thinkin' it was Illy Noise. But maybe not.

Btw - Did the hot gitonya? It was mighty steamy yesterday.