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Elaine Margarett
08-22-2008, 06:56 PM
Could someone translate the following sentences for me? The speaker is Salvadoran if that makes a difference.

Thanks!

in Spanish... "One of them shit themselves. It stinks. Next time you go in the hole."

:-)
EM

Tsu Dho Nimh
08-22-2008, 07:59 PM
Details:
What do you mean by "hole"?
Dungeon, prison, or excavated cavity in the earth?

Are "them" male or female?

What is the relationship between the speaker and the one he is speaking to? Boss to employee, equals, long-time buddies?

Elaine Margarett
08-22-2008, 09:18 PM
Details:
What do you mean by "hole"?
Dungeon, prison, or excavated cavity in the earth?

Are "them" male or female?

What is the relationship between the speaker and the one he is speaking to? Boss to employee, equals, long-time buddies?

Sorry, I forgot all the nuances when it comes to translations! The hole is an excavated cavity in the ground. "Them" would be people of both sexes and he is speaking to a partner/equal.
Thanks!

Elaine Margarett
09-09-2008, 05:09 PM
<Bump>

Any one?

DamaNegra
09-09-2008, 05:15 PM
Could someone translate the following sentences for me? The speaker is Salvadoran if that makes a difference.

Thanks!

in Spanish... "One of them shit themselves. It stinks. Next time you go in the hole."

:-)
EM

(note that I'm Mexican, not Salvadoran, differences in dialect may exist).

"Uno de ellos ya se cagó encima. Huele horrible. La próxima vez tú te metes al hoyo."

I'm not really sure about the 'se cagó encima' part, because I get the feeling that's too Mexican. Don't know.

Carmy
09-09-2008, 08:34 PM
A word of warning, Elaine. It depends how authentic you want you Spanish to be. Spanish can be quite different in Spanish-speaking countries. (Think of UK and US English and their differences.)

I have a Mexican friend who was asked to proofread a Spanish document written by a Canadian. She laughed her way through it. It's the connotation that gets translators every time.

oneblindmouse
09-09-2008, 09:06 PM
"One of them shit themselves. It stinks. Next time you go in the hole."

"Uno de ellos se ha cagado encima. ¡Apesta! La próxima vez bajas tú al hoyo."

This would be a Spanish/Castillian version, probably not at all appropriate for a Salvadorean, I'm afraid.

Elaine Margarett
09-09-2008, 10:44 PM
A word of warning, Elaine. It depends how authentic you want you Spanish to be. Spanish can be quite different in Spanish-speaking countries. (Think of UK and US English and their differences.)

I have a Mexican friend who was asked to proofread a Spanish document written by a Canadian. She laughed her way through it. It's the connotation that gets translators every time.

Yes. LOL. I used to work with two Puerto Rican Army Reserve Units at the JPED. They'd tell me how funny it was growing up in PR and watching the Simpsons. It was a Mexican translation and whatever phrase got translated (and it was one you hear all the time in the show) had a much different, very vulgar Puerto Rican meaning. The kids love it! LOL

EM,
Who's going to Puerto Rico in two months!

Elaine Margarett
09-09-2008, 10:46 PM
"One of them shit themselves. It stinks. Next time you go in the hole."

"Uno de ellos se ha cagado encima. ¡Apesta! La próxima vez bajas tú al hoyo."

This would be a Spanish/Castillian version, probably not at all appropriate for a Salvadorean, I'm afraid.


How do you get the upside down exclamation point? And for that matter, an upside down question mark?

Thanks for the help!
EM

DamaNegra
09-10-2008, 02:02 AM
¡ ¿ you can copy paste them from here? That or you can configure your keyboard to a Latin American layout, the ¡ and ¿ are on the same key, which would be the same key you use for + and = (if you're an American, anyway).

Also, don't mind people. In Latin America, anything has the potential for a double entendre. But yeah, foreigners often make it way too easy for us :D