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Jcomp
08-19-2008, 11:28 PM
So, I've been on the boards a little while, and I hope most of you would agree that I've shown no inclination towards prejudice. I accept--nay, embrace--people from various backgrounds, races and nationalities.

But there are certain people starting to drive me crazy with their persistent refusal to communicate clearly. Yes, YOU people... you freaking IT people...

I'm a pretty bright dude--I like to think so anyway. I build websites, I know code, I'm not exactly lost when you use techno-terminology on me. But it still feels like we're speaking two different languages sometimes. I've searched the ends of the internet for some sort translation guide for terms that a regular person might think means one thing but an IT person interprets differently, but no such luck.


Example Convo:

ME: So the client just called in about Problem A that I reported to you last week. What's the latest on that?

IT DUDE: I was just about to email you. While researching Problem A I stumbled upon Problem B. Problem B's been out there for a while so I started working on that.

ME: Hm. Okay. Is Problem B somehow related to Problem A? As in Problem A can't be fixed until Problem B is fixed?

ITD: Nah. Just something I thought should be done. It's been sitting out there for a while.

ME: I understand that, but the thing is the client is specifically concerned with Problem A. I don't even think they're aware of Problem B, and near as I can tell Problem B is mostly comsetic while Problem A regards actual functionality.

ITD: Right, but once they see Problem B fixed they'll really be much happier with the product.

ME: I think they'd be even happier if Problem A was fixed, since that's what they initially reported as not working and they have no idea that Problem B even exists.

ITD: But wouldn't they happiest with both fixed? Anyway, I'm halfway through with Problem B already.

ME: So, if I let you finish that how long would it take for you to get around to Problem A?

ITD: About another week or so.

ME: (pinching bridge of nose) See... that's not... that's not gonna work. Problem A should be the priority.

ITD: But Problem B--

ME: "Has been out there for a while." I know. We'll come back to that, though? Okay? Promise.

ITD: (obviously disappointed and somewhat bemused)...All right, if you think that's what the client would want.

ME: I really do. I really do.

ITD: Fine. I suppose you don't even want to hear about Problems C through Quark then, huh?

ME: (Looking over ITD's notes) You know, "Product Lacking Hyperdrive and Flux Capacitor" isn't really a "problem"...


*****

I'm sorry, I really do not mean to offend any IT-nians that may frequent the boards. I'm just saying that when you're at work, speak basic Office-ese. Is that too much to ask?

quickWit
08-19-2008, 11:32 PM
I'm just saying that when you're at work, speak basic Office-ese. Is that too much to ask?
Yes. Yes it is.


fecking users. :)

melaniehoo
08-19-2008, 11:33 PM
I once worked at a place that had two levels of IT people: the ones who did on-site calls for our clients, and those that stayed in the office. It seems the "office bound" ones were harder to talk to.

I hope Problem A is being worked on now?

Beach Bunny
08-19-2008, 11:33 PM
Um, I think you should change ITD to IDIOT. You get those in all fields, not just IT. :)

Shadow_Ferret
08-19-2008, 11:35 PM
The reason they went into IT is because they CAN'T speak English, only computerese.

You know what's worse? IT people in India. Then you have the additional accent to contend with.

quickWit
08-19-2008, 11:35 PM
I hope Problem A is being worked on now?

As soon as IT dude is finished playing HALO over the office T3 line he'll get right on that Problem A...problem.

Jcomp
08-19-2008, 11:38 PM
I hope Problem A is being worked on now?

Not quite. I'm now getting "clarification questions" ostensibly about Problem A that really have to do with "Problem Non-Existent."

Mr Flibble
08-19-2008, 11:40 PM
Um, I think you should change ITD to IDIOT. You get those in all fields, not just IT. :)

I resemble that remark!

I used to work in IT ( hubby still does). I have to say I didn't see any weird jargon in your exchange. Like sub net masks or anything. It's worse when they speak in letters. Your PCMCIA is bust, and your PCI needs an overhaul, plus your AGP has honey it. http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v58/Honushi/smilies/grumpy.gif

You what I have to deal with. Eastern european builders who speak about three phrases of English. The accent's sexy mind.

melaniehoo
08-19-2008, 11:45 PM
Not quite. I'm now getting "clarification questions" ostensibly about Problem A that really have to do with "Problem Non-Existent."

Well of course, the elusive Problem NE. :D

Beach Bunny
08-19-2008, 11:50 PM
I resemble that remark!


Let me clarify. This particular IT guy is an idiot because he doesn't seem to understand that giving the customer what he wants should be his first priority, not fixing something that hasn't been noticed as being broke. You'll find idiots in every field of endeavor. I know nuclear physicists who are idiots. (Now, that's a scary thought.) OP's problem is not that he is dealing with an IT person who can't speak english, but that he is dealing with an idiot. :Shrug:


ROFL! I'm an IT guy, and TRUST me, we get it from the other end too.

Mgr: So when can we expect this new system?
Me: It's ready to go, but before we get it going, I need ALL the reports you're getting from the old system, so I can create them on the new system.

Mgr: Well how long after that can we use the new system?
Me: I don't know, how many reports are you getting?
Mgr: Not many

Me: I can't give you a time frame, until I have a copy of every single report that comes through this office from the old system.
Mgr: So we can't have the new system?

Me: Yes, I just need a copy of your reports.
Mgr: That's a lot of reports.
Me: Well the sooner you give them to me, the sooner we can get the ball rolling.

And it's now 4 months later, I can't go any higher up the chain of command to get reports, and I have in my possession, exactly zero.
Yet said manager is complaining about the new system not getting released to anyone that'll listen.
See? Capt. Shady has proved my point. The manager is an idiot. :)

Jcomp
08-19-2008, 11:54 PM
ROFL! I'm an IT guy, and TRUST me, we get it from the other end too.

Mgr: So when can we expect this new system?
Me: It's ready to go, but before we get it going, I need ALL the reports you're getting from the old system, so I can create them on the new system.

Mgr: Well how long after that can we use the new system?
Me: I don't know, how many reports are you getting?
Mgr: Not many

Me: I can't give you a time frame, until I have a copy of every single report that comes through this office from the old system.
Mgr: So we can't have the new system?

Me: Yes, I just need a copy of your reports.
Mgr: That's a lot of reports.
Me: Well the sooner you give them to me, the sooner we can get the ball rolling.

And it's now 4 months later, I can't go any higher up the chain of command to get reports, and I have in my possession, exactly zero.
Yet said manager is complaining about the new system not getting released to anyone that'll listen.

Ha! You seem to be dealing with one of those managers who speaks bad Managese. AKA the Language of Bottom Lines. "I want what I want and I can't be troubled with details of how to get what I want--especially if I have to be troubled to actually do something to get what I want--just give me what I want. Bottom line."

Maybe we're not so different after all...

Stew21
08-19-2008, 11:59 PM
Do you have any idea how much fun it was to work for a director of IT, helping him hire more IT guys?

IT Manager plus new recruit, plus me doing the communicating between - good times. Over 10 years of it. I got pretty good at the technical language, but throw in an inexperienced IT consultant sales guy and it gums it all up.


Now I write proposals. I understand those.

Mr Flibble
08-19-2008, 11:59 PM
Lol Capt, my Old Man gets that all teh time.

Customer: We're having a problem with our e-mail server.
OM: OK make sure it's switched on and I'll remote access it to see what's wrong

Half hour later:

Customer: Did you fix it yet?
OM: Have you switched it back on yet?
C: *sounding confused* no
OM: If you don't switch it on I can't look at it from here.
C: OK

Half hour later

C: So, what's the problem.
OM: I don't know, you haven't switched it on yet.
C: Oh but I thought you could access it from your PC.
OM: I can, but only if your server is switched on
C: Oh but...
OM: If you like, instead of using your free remote access time, why don't I visit your office and charge you 70 per hour ( it's a 3 hour round trip) to SWITCH THE BLOODY THING ON!!!
C: No need to get shirty.
OM: OK, then switch it on.
C: Where's the button?

Cue OM chewing the woodwork

His most oft repeated motto is : The User is always stupid.

He once got called out at 3 in teh morning by a guy panicking because his company had a rush job on and the server had gone down. He drove in to discover this guy had locked himself out by typing his login wrong 3 times. The log in was his own surname. He was Mr Down.

Kitrianna
08-20-2008, 12:03 AM
:roll:

maestrowork
08-20-2008, 12:04 AM
I'm sorry, I really do not mean to offend any IT-nians that may frequent the boards. I'm just saying that when you're at work, speak basic Office-ese. Is that too much to ask?

You poor mortals.

Here's another side of the story:


PM: I have a meeting with the client in one hour. Is the system ready for a demo?

Me: Sure, all you have to do is fire up the web browser and type in this URL.

PM: What is a web browser? What URL? What are you talking about?

Me: Um, you do know you're presenting a web-based Intranet application this morning, right?

PM: (blank stare)

Me: OK, what have you got? Can I see your presentation?

PM: (shows me a stick figure hand drawing of the "system" on a piece of Xerox paper)

Me: Um, you can't show the client this. Don't you have Powerpoint?

PM: Did it come with my laptop?

Me: Um, okay, give me 15 minutes and I'll get this done for you.

Pagey's_Girl
08-20-2008, 12:14 AM
You poor mortals.

Here's another side of the story:


PM: I have a meeting with the client in one hour. Is the system ready for a demo?

Me: Sure, all you have to do is fire up the web browser and type in this URL?

PM: What is a web browser? What URL? What are you talking about?

Me: Um, you do know you're presenting a web-based Intranet application this morning, right?

PM: (blank stare)

Me: OK, what have you got? Can I see your presentation?

PM: (shows me a stick figure hand drawing of the "system" on a piece of Xerox paper)

Me: Um, you can't show the client this. Don't you have Powerpoint?

PM: Did it come with my laptop?

Me: Um, okay, give me 15 minutes and I'll get this done for you.

You just described a typical day at my old job. And I'm a secretary, not IT. "Here, let me have it. I'll fix it up for you..."

nicolen
08-20-2008, 12:21 AM
Oh, do I know this one.

I work in the claims department for an insurance company, and I've been dealing with a claim for a written off vehicle. I'm ready to pay the client out except the premiums are outstanding by 9 cents. Yes, 9 cents. So I ring sales to get that amount written off, because it's obviously not worth collecting such a small amount.

They can't do that and it needs to go through to IT. That was 2 weeks ago and they still haven't sorted this 9 cents out. I ended up asking to be transferred to the IT manager who informed me that since the amount was so low, it wasn't economic for them to do anything about it - premiums would be taken on the 4th of September again and that would resolve it.

I was not happy - pointed out that the client would have been without their car since the 5th of August and that I'd spent up to 30 minutes per day EVERY day liasing with them and trying to explain to the client that this would be resolved really soon, I promise. So I'd spent somewhere between 4 and 5 hours on this one claim, and my time is definitely worth more than 2 cents per hour to the company. Manager has grudgingly conceded my point, so hopefully this is going to be resolved overnight. If not...it's going to get interesting for them!

Jcomp
08-20-2008, 12:25 AM
You poor mortals.

Here's another side of the story:


PM: I have a meeting with the client in one hour. Is the system ready for a demo?

Me: Sure, all you have to do is fire up the web browser and type in this URL.

PM: What is a web browser? What URL? What are you talking about?

Me: Um, you do know you're presenting a web-based Intranet application this morning, right?

PM: (blank stare)

Me: OK, what have you got? Can I see your presentation?

PM: (shows me a stick figure hand drawing of the "system" on a piece of Xerox paper)

Me: Um, you can't show the client this. Don't you have Powerpoint?

PM: Did it come with my laptop?

Me: Um, okay, give me 15 minutes and I'll get this done for you.

Ha!

See, my gig is basically as a middle-man between IT and the client, so I have to know more than the average bear. But I've dealt with clients who are on that level of technologically impaired. I really shouldn't complain about the "language barrier" because if more IT guys were masters of communication I'd either have to really buckle down and learn .NET & SQL and all of the other stuff I've been ducking, or look for work elsewhere.

And every story eventually ends with us on the same page. It's just sometimes my IT dudes take detours through chapters of other books that aren't even on the curriculum before finally getting to page 1.

maestrowork
08-20-2008, 12:34 AM
I'm in a rare position in which I can speak both ITese and Officese. I know exactly what a SQL statement looks like and what it does, and how an EJB work; at the same time I can decipher a risk analysis and P&L report and do one hell of a Powerpoint presentation. Still, most recruiters would only look at the acronyms on my resume and determine that I'm an out-of-this-planet tech guy who doesn't speak much English. Wait until they hear that I actually have written novels (and not SF/F!). Shocking.

Jcomp
08-20-2008, 12:55 AM
I'm in a rare position in which I can speak both ITese and Officese. I know exactly what a SQL statement looks like and what it does, and how an EJB work; at the same time I can decipher a risk analysis and P&L report and do one hell of a Powerpoint presentation. Still, most recruiters would only look at the acronyms on my resume and determine that I'm an out-of-this-planet tech guy who doesn't speak much English. Wait until they hear that I actually have written novels (and not SF/F!). Shocking.

Impressive... but can you breakdance though? Can you do the robot? These are the kinds of things that get people hired...

benbradley
08-20-2008, 01:27 AM
So, I've been on the boards a little while, and I hope most of you would agree that I've shown no inclination towards prejudice. I accept--nay, embrace--people from various backgrounds, races and nationalities.


I was thinking of a company I worked for ten years ago, it was a big French company, and one of the managers/principals at our location was from France, and had such a strong accent that I could hardly understand what he was saying. Fortunately my only interaction with him was listening to his monthly speeches in a conference room to everyone working at that location. This was the sort of "language barrier" I envisioned from the subject line.

But it was an interesting place to work for many reasons, one is that many of the people there came from other countries, and I learned a lot of things we wouldn't ordinarlily know. There was a certain product with a name that was an acronym from the words used to describe it, and it was a pronouncable (but nonsense in English) word, so that's what it was called. But someone heard it and said "Do you know what <product name> means in <non-English language>? It means <really obscene word>!"

But I read the rest of your rant, and it appears to be about something else:



But there are certain people starting to drive me crazy with their persistent refusal to communicate clearly. Yes, YOU people... you freaking IT people...

I'm a pretty bright dude--I like to think so anyway. I build websites, I know code, I'm not exactly lost when you use techno-terminology on me. But it still feels like we're speaking two different languages sometimes. I've searched the ends of the internet for some sort translation guide for terms that a regular person might think means one thing but an IT person interprets differently, but no such luck.


Example Convo:

ME: So the client just called in about Problem A that I reported to you last week. What's the latest on that?

IT DUDE: I was just about to email you. While researching Problem A I stumbled upon Problem B. Problem B's been out there for a while so I started working on that.

ME: Hm. Okay. Is Problem B somehow related to Problem A? As in Problem A can't be fixed until Problem B is fixed?

ITD: Nah. Just something I thought should be done. It's been sitting out there for a while.

ME: I understand that, but the thing is the client is specifically concerned with Problem A. I don't even think they're aware of Problem B, and near as I can tell Problem B is mostly comsetic while Problem A regards actual functionality.

ITD: Right, but once they see Problem B fixed they'll really be much happier with the product.

ME: I think they'd be even happier if Problem A was fixed, since that's what they initially reported as not working and they have no idea that Problem B even exists.

ITD: But wouldn't they happiest with both fixed? Anyway, I'm halfway through with Problem B already.

ME: So, if I let you finish that how long would it take for you to get around to Problem A?

ITD: About another week or so.

ME: (pinching bridge of nose) See... that's not... that's not gonna work. Problem A should be the priority.

ITD: But Problem B--

ME: "Has been out there for a while." I know. We'll come back to that, though? Okay? Promise.

ITD: (obviously disappointed and somewhat bemused)...All right, if you think that's what the client would want.

ME: I really do. I really do.

ITD: Fine. I suppose you don't even want to hear about Problems C through Quark then, huh?

ME: (Looking over ITD's notes) You know, "Product Lacking Hyperdrive and Flux Capacitor" isn't really a "problem"...


*****

I'm sorry, I really do not mean to offend any IT-nians that may frequent the boards. I'm just saying that when you're at work, speak basic Office-ese. Is that too much to ask?
I think language is only part of the problem here. I've spend several years as an embeded programmer and I can relate to what IT Dude was doing.

ITD sees Problem B as A Real Problem and that fixing it would be Really Helpful to Users.

However, you, on the frontline with actual customers, have never heard of Problem B, and the only customer complaint you have is with Problem A. ITD appears to have some confusion between "theoretical problem" that some customer may or may not know about, but hasn't complained about, and a "real problem" that a customer has indeed complained about. To ITD, these are both defects that simply must be fixed.

It's possible to say that ITD is "customer oriented," but only to some theoretical customer that knows all the problems with the system. But most businesses (and "customer interface" people such as you) know that success involves timely fixing of the problems that ACTUAL customers have, and that doing anything else becomes an exercise in frustration.

Oh, do I know this one.

I work in the claims department for an insurance company, and I've been dealing with a claim for a written off vehicle. I'm ready to pay the client out except the premiums are outstanding by 9 cents. Yes, 9 cents. So I ring sales to get that amount written off, because it's obviously not worth collecting such a small amount.

They can't do that and it needs to go through to IT. That was 2 weeks ago and they still haven't sorted this 9 cents out. I ended up asking to be transferred to the IT manager who informed me that since the amount was so low, it wasn't economic for them to do anything about it - premiums would be taken on the 4th of September again and that would resolve it.

I was not happy - pointed out that the client would have been without their car since the 5th of August and that I'd spent up to 30 minutes per day EVERY day liasing with them and trying to explain to the client that this would be resolved really soon, I promise. So I'd spent somewhere between 4 and 5 hours on this one claim, and my time is definitely worth more than 2 cents per hour to the company. Manager has grudgingly conceded my point, so hopefully this is going to be resolved overnight. If not...it's going to get interesting for them!
The almost-first thing that comes to mind is to pull out your personal checkbook, write a check to the company for nine cents, and in the memo area put the customer's account number. Give it to Accounts Receivable and have them process it. Sure it may cost the company $20 to process the 9-cent payment, but (at least in hindsight) it would have saved the company money overall as well as saving you lots of time and frustration.

You could then add the 9 cents onto an expense report, but you best not as it would take another five hours to justify and explain it...

Jcomp
08-20-2008, 01:32 AM
Know any entry level or low level experienced programmers looking for a low paying state job? I could use the help.

Some folks I know from my old gig got hit with the layoff hatchet, so I actually might.

sassandgroove
08-20-2008, 01:34 AM
better yet, ben, carry the nickel and four pennies over to the payment processing area.

benbradley
08-20-2008, 01:35 AM
Impressive... but can you breakdance though? Can you do the robot? These are the kinds of things that get people hired...

Executive Dude (ED also stands for something I've heard about in commericals, but I'm trying not to go there): "Yes, ROBOTS! That's exactly what we [The Bureaurocracy within Large Corporation] need, more automatons who will do exactly what they're told, and not think for themselves!"

This is why you have to be so creative, to feed the bureaurocracy the input it expects (such as that 9-cent payment) to get the output you desire (getting the claim paid off).

You should always list your accomplishments on your resume, but you shouldn't neccesarily tell just how you accomplished those things...

benbradley
08-20-2008, 01:37 AM
better yet, ben, carry the nickel and four pennies over to the payment processing area.
I suspect an insurance company wouldn't know what to do with a cash payment ("these pennies are too small to write the account number on!"), and that's why I'd write the check...

sassandgroove
08-20-2008, 01:38 AM
:ROFL:

Ol' Fashioned Girl
08-20-2008, 01:40 AM
Dispatch: Client can't get on the network. Drive to Client location (200 miles NE) and fix it.

Ol' Boy: On my way!

: Drive,drive,drive,drive,drive :

"Hello, Client! I am here to save the day! What seems to be the problem?"

"It won't let me log on to the network."

::Client's co-worker, passing by, overhears conversation.:: "You can't log on the network. The network is down."

Ol' Boy: "Okay, then! Good to see y'all. Call anytime!"

: Drive,drive,drive,drive,drive :

Ol' Fashioned Girl
08-20-2008, 01:55 AM
I suspect an insurance company wouldn't know what to do with a cash payment ("these pennies are too small to write the account number on!"), and that's why I'd write the check...

Au contraire, mon ami. If cash is all you have, I'll take it! :)

Elaine Margarett
08-20-2008, 04:38 PM
What I resent is being told (when I'd have a problem with the system) that it's "a mouse click error." To which I responded..."Bull s**t, it's a programming problem!"

To be fair, this was a military operation and the Command desiginated the one person on our team who knew the least about what we did to be the advisor to the programmers setting up the new system.

Ahhh...progress...

Pagey's_Girl
08-20-2008, 05:04 PM
Back at my old job, I was "upgraded" to a computer apparently possessed by an evil entity that liked to devour hard drives for breakfast. Well, after the second hard drive in a week bit the dust, I was on the phone with a dude from hardware support who kept insisting I needed to take the cover off the computer, go to a certain web site and rearrance the jumpers on the motherboard according to a certain diagram. Now I knew what he meant by rearranging the jumpers, but a) if the computer wouldn't even POST without erroring out, it sure as heck wasn't going to get to Windows, much less to IE and even less so to the internet and b) it ain't a real great idea to be mucking with the motherboard while the critter's on. :) Anyway, at one point he said, a tad condescendingly, "Don't worry, Miss. It isn't rocket science."

To which I retorted, "Yeah, maybe, but apparently it is rocket surgery!"

I really think he was sitting around taking bets with the other techs on whether or not he could get the stupid secretary to take the computer apart.

BTW, they never did figure out what was wrong with that computer. After it destroyed its fourth hard drive - as the tech was trying to configure it, nontheless - they finally gave me a new computer. Had I not insisted on holding on to my old computer until I was sure the new one actually worked, I would have been screwed.

dpaterso
08-20-2008, 05:54 PM
Me: Um, okay, give me 15 minutes and I'll get this done for you.
Did I ever tell the tale of the staff manager who kept interrupting me to draw stuff for his presentations... this day I was pretty busy but my priority suddenly became drawing a PC on a desk linked to a new piece of hardware (B.P. Era - Before PowerPoint... I drew this on a CAD system and plotted it on a transparency foil). And so it was done, off he went an hour later, ready to impress. Back he came an hour after that with a very red face. I'd drawn a rival company's logo on the PC, which only became readable when he put the foil on the overhead projector in front of 2nd and 3rd level guys. He never asked me for material for presentations again.

-Derek

Yeshanu
08-20-2008, 07:33 PM
Derek is evil, I tell you. Just plain evil. I like that in a man. :D

My favourite happened a few weeks ago at work. I came in to find that the printer on the main computer wasn't working. All three of the other (male) managers had tried to fix it (one by changing the toner cartridge, which, to be fair, needed changing anyhow), to no avail. So they settled with using the slow computer that was hooked up to the fax.

I came in that morning, and ten minutes later had it running. How you might ask?

Simple: I plugged the USB cable that runs from the printer to the computer back into the computer. :tongue

Sheesh!

My sort-of-ex-husband ('nuther story, not for here) gets that all the time. He's a school teacher who is sort-of in charge of the computers in his school.

"Bill, it's not working!"

"Is it turned on? Is it plugged in to the wall? Is it plugged in to the computer?"

I think those three questions solve about 80% of his tech support questions.

And these are teachers!

JimmyB27
08-20-2008, 08:16 PM
I'm just saying that when you're at work, speak basic Office-ese. Is that too much to ask?

Yes. Yes it is.


fecking users. :)
I agree. Especially since Office-ese is its own brand of idiocy.
Action is a noun, dammit!
Is there any way we could be going other than forward?
Let's touch base? Are we working or playing baseball?

shawkins
08-20-2008, 08:32 PM
I've searched the ends of the internet for some sort translation guide for terms that a regular person might think means one thing but an IT person interprets differently, but no such luck.

Here's a partial dictionary they gave me when I was in school:

bug (1): a misunderstanding by the user
bug (2): a slanderous lie by customer support
bug (3): an actual problem caused by another programmer

design document (1): a suggestion for a coding riff, not unlike the base melody in jazz
design document (2): proof that optimism lives in the hearts of men

deadline (1): the day to begin coding

feature: what i want to code

testing: <i've never been quite clear on this one>

CaroGirl
08-20-2008, 08:53 PM
I just scheduled a meeting of subject matter experts to rewrite the Product Installation Guide for the next release. IT guy comes over to my desk.

IT guy: How important is this meeting?
Me: Well...
IT guy: Well, I know it's important to YOU but I have other things that are more important than this.
Me: Um.
IT guy: Is it really gonna take an hour?
Me: Probably not. I just booked the room for an hour. Just in case.
IT guy: Okay. [He proceeds to give me all sorts of important information that I need him to bring up at the meeting.]
Me: Well, I really think it's important that you be there.
IT guy: Okay. I guess I'll try to be there. [IT guy wanders away, muttering to himself.]

Pagey's_Girl
08-20-2008, 10:31 PM
Did I ever tell the tale of the staff manager who kept interrupting me to draw stuff for his presentations... this day I was pretty busy but my priority suddenly became drawing a PC on a desk linked to a new piece of hardware (B.P. Era - Before PowerPoint... I drew this on a CAD system and plotted it on a transparency foil). And so it was done, off he went an hour later, ready to impress. Back he came an hour after that with a very red face. I'd drawn a rival company's logo on the PC, which only became readable when he put the foil on the overhead projector in front of 2nd and 3rd level guys. He never asked me for material for presentations again.

-Derek

He should get together with the pointy-haired then-manager who came storming into the copy room wondering why I was taking so long running off about 200 transparencies - then grabbed one and started yelling at me (in front of his manager, who I also supported) because "IT'S BACKWARDS! BACKWARDS! THEY'RE ALL WRONG! CAN"T YOU GET ANYTHING RIGHT???!!!" I took it out of his hands, flipped it over and said, "They're face down. Now stop messing with them. You'll get them out of order." He started to say something, but instead just stalked out, muttering. By then, his manager was almost on the floor laughing.

He actually didn't go off at me very often, although he was notorious for yelling at his staff. He knew it wasn't a good idea to tick off his boss' secretary.

tjwriter
08-20-2008, 10:38 PM
:roll:

These stories are brilliant. Brilliant, I tell ya!

It seems I do my fair bit of translating between the quasi-IT area that is the buffer between office and IT and the area I am in.

BenPanced
08-20-2008, 11:01 PM
What I really enjoy are the IT people one floor above me who deem it necessary to speak dialects of Sanskrit that are 150 years out of use. You know. In case they give away some secret information on how to get a computer to actually perform the way it's suppposed to. And then they get pissy because not only did you have the nerve to call them, you have the unmitigated gall to not understand what they're talking about.

maestrowork
08-21-2008, 12:53 AM
200 transparencies ...."IT'S BACKWARDS! BACKWARDS! THEY'RE ALL WRONG! CAN"T YOU GET ANYTHING RIGHT???!!!"

This is classic. Is the moron still employed?

Pagey's_Girl
08-21-2008, 05:10 AM
This is classic. Is the moron still employed?

Last I knew, he was no longer in management, but working as a toady Technical Assistant for a manager almost as nasty as he was.

The sad part was, he was actually a semi-normal person until he became a manager and it went straight to his head.