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bylinebree
08-16-2008, 03:13 PM
Here's another one for you Experts - may as well go crazy while I'm here!

A teeny bit of Background: One of my main protags is a 3yr law student, either International Law or Criminal Law, at Cambridge. He comes from an 'old monied' family, grandfather in Parliament (I haven't decided if Lords or Commons yet...leaning towards Commons but the family has a peerage title)

He plays a major sport, but which one would a wealthy law student-type play? (he's not geeky tho' he's smart) Would he, or could he, be likely to play rugby? I looked up the teams and didn't see one Law major there. I've considered soccer, rowing, fencing...

Help or ideas, plz?? Also, any good places to get a feel for what everyday life as student would be like, such as if he'd have a dorm room or what?

waylander
08-16-2008, 04:18 PM
It would depend on where he went to school age 13-18.
If he went to a fee-paying school he would be more likely to play Rugby though soccer remains a possible (I went to a fee-paying school and played soccer and cricket thoughout my time at Cambridge). Many people take up Rowing when they get to Cambridge - but it does involve getting up very early for training before morning lectures.
All the lawyers at my college played Hockey (field hockey to you)

PM me for more details

maya
08-20-2008, 12:02 PM
Hello!

It's been a while since I was at Uni so things could have changed, but: In your first year most students generally live in dorms (called "halls of residence" here, referred to as "halls" for short), and after that, most people move out and live in shared accomodation (houses or flats) with other students, usually their mates. You arrange the rental yourself at the end of the 1st year or during the summer - so it's privately rented accomodation rather than being done through the university. I think some universities may have some flats availbe for rent by second and thrid year students , but generally there is a shortage of accomodation which is why students need to arrange their own after year 1.

What specifically did you want to know about "everday life"?

Ta
Maya

Maryn
08-20-2008, 04:52 PM
I only have knowledge for the US law student, but here, none of them play on university sports teams. In fact, very few play on any sort of intramural team, either. There simply isn't time. Law school can easily consume 80 - 100 hours a week, barely leaving you time to do your laundry or buy and prepare food.

Their athleticism's outlets tend to be pick-up games at the university's public areas, just throwing or kicking a ball on the grounds someplace, or a group gathering on a Saturday morning to play.

Maryn, doubting this is much help

ajkjd01
08-20-2008, 07:11 PM
Yeah...I second the above comment...

A law student...having a life? A third year law student is probably starting the job search, interning at least part time, and trying to keep up with school at the same time. And add in any moot court or mock trial work or law review as well. And law isn't a separate major...it's a graduate degree, by which time, most college students have used up their eligibility for sports.

On the other hand, I did play softball sporadically in law school, but it was generally with a pick up team or with a friend's team that suddenly needed an extra player. I played college fast-pitch softball, but there was no way I had time to even work out regularly as a third year law student, so I had to just find a game when I had time, which felt like never.

My house imploded on a regular basis during exams, leaving spring and fall cleaning for breaks between semesters after exams were over. Laundry sometimes became the big excursion for the week, loading it all up in the car to run to a laundromat and take up five or six machines at once while I sat and studied. Money was tight even though I was working, so there wasn't a lot of extracurricular activities (my cleats for softball were held together at one point with athletic tape). The stress level was incredible.

I had my own apartment all the way through law school because I didn't want to be distracted by the drama of all the law students under the same roof. I've never been happier about that decision. The dorms can be filled with stressed out people, and that can ratchet up the stress level for everyone else. I was able to get away from it by not living on campus.

This, of course, wasn't at Cambridge, but in the US. If you have more questions, feel free to PM me.

ideagirl
08-21-2008, 05:30 AM
A teeny bit of Background: One of my main protags is a 3yr law student, either International Law or Criminal Law, at Cambridge.

I don't know if a specialization (Int'l Law, Criminal, whatever) is possible at Cambridge's school of law. It doesn't sound like it from this link (see "Course Outline" at the bottom):
http://www.cam.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/courses/law/index.html
And that would be consistent with American law schools--you do not generally have any official specialization when you're in law school. You can choose a few more courses in one area than in another, but generally you learn your specialization after graduation, in your first job.


He plays a major sport, but which one would a wealthy law student-type play? (he's not geeky tho' he's smart) Would he, or could he, be likely to play rugby?

Does he need to play a competitive sport? Why? Somehow it seems more compatible with this sort of character, if he's athletic, to do something as a hobby like fellwalking, rambling, and so on. (Google those terms to see what I mean.) Those hobbies are popular with university students in the UK. And keep in mind, there's no UK equivalent of American college sports. It's just not a big part of UK university life.

ideagirl
08-21-2008, 05:34 AM
law isn't a separate major...it's a graduate degree, by which time, most college students have used up their eligibility for sports.

It's an undergraduate degree in most, if not all, countries other than the US. But that's a moot point as far as sports go, because in most other countries, there's basically no such thing as college sports. There might be clubs of people enthusiastic about X sport, who play it on their own time, but little to nothing in the way of official, competitive sports teams. The only exception I can think of is the Oxford-Cambridge rivalry in rowing, and I don't know if that even counts as a real exception--it's still nothing like a college sports team in the US.

pdr
08-21-2008, 06:47 AM
What happened to the honour of becoming a blue?

I think you'd better ask Waylander who actually is a Cambridge graduate.

waylander
08-21-2008, 01:05 PM
Both Oxford v Cambridge Rugby Union and cricket are high status fixtures with many players approaching (or going on) to professional standard.
In cricket, Cambridge play fixtures against some of the professional county sides, and in Rugby against some of the professional club sides (though the pro sides tend to field slightly less than their strongest sides).
In other sports there are still Oxford/Cambridge fixtures and the rivalry is intense.
What is not being mentioned here are the inter-college sports fixtures which are highly competitive and dominate the Cambridge undergrad sports scene, particularly if the MC is at a college with a strong sporting reputation (as I was).

bylinebree
08-22-2008, 06:38 PM
Hi all, and thanks for all your giving of info. For some reason, I was getting only the pm's on this thread & not seeing other replies! So my apologies. Thanks for all the pm's I have recv'd, though (you know who you are)

I've been fascinated to see the differences between "simple" (ha) college life in the States vs. England. Amazing. I admire you former law students for being able to get your laundry done!! LOL

After all this, and reading some more about Cambridge, with regrets I'll probably move the novel's setting to the Northeastern U.S., an Ivy League school I might even fabricate (or not).

My MC will be half-English, with one American parent (both deceased) and be attending school in the U.S. I do regret leaving Cambridge out, but think I can convey an American setting, at least contemporary, with more believability.

So you all helped a lot! It showed me that the setting was likely inappropo for what I'm setting(ha) out to do - which is to write a romantic story with some adventure to it, with the male protag being a Brit; it doesn't have to be in England! This seems to be a case, simply due to time restraints of research etc, where "write what you know" (or even HALF know) seems to apply.

Sigh....Cambridge, I would so love to visit you one day!! For now, I plan to see a rugby game for the first time.

WriteKnight
08-22-2008, 07:22 PM
Okay,

I coached a law school fencing club. Yeah, law students don't have much time. Attendance was sporatic - but they seemed to enjoy the mental aspects of the sport a great deal. Fencing is often referred to as 'physical chess'.

bylinebree
08-22-2008, 07:33 PM
Love fencing!

That is one of the sports I considered, other than rugby and rowing, for my male law-student character (male protag). It would serve as a nice foil (oh, lordy) to the femal protag. She's trained in Filipino stick-fighting.

More sports to research, but I'm narrowing it down at least!

WriteKnight
08-22-2008, 07:39 PM
Well for what its worth, the two strongest students in that class were both female. Strong, aggressive, determined and fearless. As I recall they went on to become excellent attorneys as well.

And of course, the American women's sabre team just swept the olympics.

bylinebree
08-22-2008, 08:18 PM
ll.

And of course, the American women's sabre team just swept the olympics.

Did they? We're having an awesome Olympics, aren't we!