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View Full Version : "Sorry, we don't accept..." (Rant)



seun
08-15-2008, 03:07 PM
This has REALLY pissed me off and although it will do no good, I still have to post this.

I'm in the middle of the soul-crushing shit hole that is submitting to agents. I find one who sounds promising, I check them out and see on their site that they're willing to read all kinds of fiction. So I submit the opening chapters of a fantasy novel.

And I get back:

"Sorry, we don't accept Fantasy."

So why the fuck say on your site that you look at all fiction? What a waste of time. Like I've got nothing better to do than submit to people who aren't only going to reject me, but they're going to reject me because I'm apparently too much of a thicko to know they don't read my subject.

OK. Rant over. For now.

nerds
08-15-2008, 03:15 PM
This process of querying/submitting can at times feel incredibly demoralizing. It's such a slog sometimes and you just wonder if it's ever, ever going to amount to anything. Don't let 'em get you down.


:Hug2:

Deccydiva
08-15-2008, 03:18 PM
That must be soooo annoying. :rant:I sympathise. It sounds a bit like my job searching, I have applied for over 200 jobs all of which I am well qualified to do, and have over 30 years experience of, but the "reasons" for not even seeing me are getting more bizzare by the week. :Shrug:I think the best one so far must be "you live in G*****. We don't employ people from G***** because they don't turn up for work in the winter if it's frosty!" :roll: You have to laugh or you'd crack up.

seun
08-15-2008, 03:29 PM
I'm having a bad week so the agent issue didn't help. Felt good to swear about it, though. :D

kct webber
08-15-2008, 03:41 PM
That sucks, dude. I've seen a couple of agent sites that are really unclear about genre, so I get what you mean. Hang in, man. :)

Maryn
08-15-2008, 04:09 PM
seun, anybody's who's submitted, all hopeful and puppy-eyed, has been there. I submitted my first novel, which opens with a rape, and received a rejection from one place because they don't do children's books. Say what? The very next rejection was because they only did fiction. Sheesh.

I rationalized that if they ran the offices that badly, they'd be hard to work with anyway.

Maryn, all about sour grapes

citymouse
08-15-2008, 05:09 PM
The thing is you read their criteria. It fits your writing and then these fools send it back as if you've make some obvious stupid mistake. What could you be thinking!
It feels very much like a sucker punch. Not a goof sensation when one is smart enough to write a novel.
BTW there are a lot of dumb novels out there but that doesn't translate into dumb writers, just dumb agents and publishers. Not every book you see on the shelves does well.
C

sheadakota
08-15-2008, 05:18 PM
Boy, can I relate to that . I submitted to an agent who accepts thrillers, which is the genre I put my novel under. I got a rejection and a suggestion that I submit to somone who deals with commercial fiction. Soooo I submitted to an agent who accepts commercial fcition and you guess it- He suggested I submit to someone who deals in Thrillers:crazy:

soleary
08-15-2008, 05:20 PM
I think I'm going to become an agent so that I can help my AW friends and rep myself :).

waylander
08-15-2008, 05:28 PM
This has REALLY pissed me off and although it will do no good, I still have to post this.

I'm in the middle of the soul-crushing shit hole that is submitting to agents. I find one who sounds promising, I check them out and see on their site that they're willing to read all kinds of fiction. So I submit the opening chapters of a fantasy novel.

And I get back:

"Sorry, we don't accept Fantasy."

So why the fuck say on your site that you look at all fiction? What a waste of time. Like I've got nothing better to do than submit to people who aren't only going to reject me, but they're going to reject me because I'm apparently too much of a thicko to know they don't read my subject.

OK. Rant over. For now.

If you're dealing with UK agents, you know you can phone most of them and ask if it is something they would be interested in seeing.
Don't do this with US agents

Charlie Horse
08-15-2008, 05:39 PM
The response that gets me is the all too overused "not a good fit." I can deal with the writing not being up to par, or it's not right for us at this time, but when you're submitting to an agent who you know has repped books in the same genre as yours, please explain to me what about my work doesn't seem to fit your narrow ass concept of what you will or won't work with.

There, now I feel better too.

citymouse
08-15-2008, 05:40 PM
A writer friend has often ranted to me about not only the rejection side of all this but also the hoops many agents put you through just to approach them. These have been discussed in AW to a fine point so I'll not enumerate them.
The excuse I've so often read about the abruptness, off handedness and sometimes dead silence is that agents and their staff, if any, are so busy, they're simply rushed off their feet. Oh, poor babies. I worked for 37 years in a research laboratory. To paraphrase a famous line, I had to get it right or people could literally die. No one asked or cared if I was busy.
C

JimmyB27
08-15-2008, 05:40 PM
Come on. Everyone knows fantasy isn't proper writing. You can hardly blame them for rejecting you.
And anyway, they said they *read* all kinds of fiction, not that they *accept* all kinds. ;)

seun
08-15-2008, 05:49 PM
If you're dealing with UK agents, you know you can phone most of them and ask if it is something they would be interested in seeing.

Hmm...I'm a little doubtful about that. I've read plenty of agent blurbs that said no phone calls, no emails etc.

Toothpaste
08-15-2008, 05:56 PM
Well I called the agencies in the UK before sending out my stuff. Many of the listings didn't have names to whom I should address my packages. So I called them and asked. Very short. Though there was one agency where the secretary put me through to the agent, and he asked what I wrote. After I said Children's, and he said he didn't represent that, I said, "Well okay, I guess never mind then!" and I laughed. He laughed too, was really sweet, and that was that.

I don't know how it is in the US, but it seemed as long as it was obvious I was being professional and to the point: "I'm calling to know to whom I should address my submission", no one seemed to mind.

waylander
08-15-2008, 06:14 PM
Hmm...I'm a little doubtful about that. I've read plenty of agent blurbs that said no phone calls, no emails etc.

Well those that say that, you don't call. The others you can

Sophia2
08-15-2008, 06:14 PM
duplicate

Sophia2
08-15-2008, 06:19 PM
This has REALLY pissed me off and although it will do no good, I still have to post this.

I'm in the middle of the soul-crushing shit hole that is submitting to agents. I find one who sounds promising, I check them out and see on their site that they're willing to read all kinds of fiction. So I submit the opening chapters of a fantasy novel.

And I get back:

"Sorry, we don't accept Fantasy."

So why the fuck say on your site that you look at all fiction? What a waste of time. Like I've got nothing better to do than submit to people who aren't only going to reject me, but they're going to reject me because I'm apparently too much of a thicko to know they don't read my subject.

OK. Rant over. For now.

What did you learn from the moral of the story?

Fantasy is very big with the film industry at the moment. My advice is to look for a film agent that also does books. The film industry are buying fantasy book outlines at the moment before the book is completed. You could also contact the film studios directly. However, make sure you copyright your idea and film plot.

Sophia

tehuti88
08-15-2008, 09:10 PM
Seems rather unprofessional for their site to not be more specific, and to assume that writers submitting their MS will know that "all fiction" doesn't really mean ALL fiction. :/

Ms Hollands
08-15-2008, 09:27 PM
seun, anybody's who's submitted, all hopeful and puppy-eyed, has been there. I submitted my first novel, which opens with a rape, and received a rejection from one place because they don't do children's books. Say what? The very next rejection was because they only did fiction. Sheesh.

I rationalized that if they ran the offices that badly, they'd be hard to work with anyway.

Maryn, all about sour grapes

:Jaw: Oh wow. Yeah, not good agents if they give you feedback like that! You're right - you're better off without them.

narnia
08-15-2008, 11:01 PM
I recently pitched to a whole bunch of agents at a pitch fest, and while it was actually kind of fun, it was also a good learning experience.

One such interesting lesson: A top agency had more than one agent hearing pitches. I was pleased to see that among them was an agent I'd set my sights on awhile ago and had researched. Said agent also represented a bunch of newbies I'd become somewhat acquainted with, so I thought this person would be a great fit. Targeting this person as my first pitch, I eagerly waited in line, and when I finally got my chance, my eagerness turned to disappointment. Condescending, borderline rude, and very dismissive. Ok, this person is an agent, I say to myself, but if you volunteer to do something like this which can only be to your benefit, leave the ego at the door. I gave my pitch, and was told that paranormal (my genre) was dead unless it had sex and vampires and werewolves, so that pretty much shot all my pitches full of holes.

I was reluctant to approach anyone else after that, mostly my fault since I'd been so looking forward to pitching to this person. Luckily for my fragile psyche, an author friend who was there to check out the fun and games shoved me at another agent and said, try again! This agent worked for the same agency so of course my answer was 'no way'!!! The author friend gave me a metaphorical swift kick in the behind and I did as directed. I had barely begun my pitch when agent #2 stopped me. My heart sunk like a stone, so it took me a few seconds to realize what the agent said: "Wow, paranormal is hot and I love your premise! How soon can you send me the first 50 pages?"

It went uphill from there, the only naysayer declining because they don't represent paranormal of any kind.

Not quite the same issue as your rant, but I thought I'd share! So hang in there seun, the hunt is frustrating but the payoff will be awesome!

:)

Red-Green
08-15-2008, 11:18 PM
I'm trapped in a vortex of this. I'm submitting only to people who say they rep sci fi AND suspense. I've had rejections that said, "this is too sci fi for me" and rejections that said, "this isn't sci fi enough for me." Shite. I'm sci fi lukewarm and sci fi Jesus is going to spit me out.

Calla Lily
08-15-2008, 11:25 PM
I'm sci fi lukewarm and sci fi Jesus is going to spit me out.

:roll: I now have DMHO's "Jesus Loogie Boogie" running trough my mind.

soleary
08-15-2008, 11:53 PM
Just had this happen to me! Bonehead said she didn't rep my genre, and told me to re-query her freaking business partner! Does she not know how to forward a freaking email?

willietheshakes
08-15-2008, 11:56 PM
make sure you copyright your idea and film plot.


You can't copyright an idea.

You can copyright your outline, but not the idea itself.

Matera the Mad
08-16-2008, 07:17 AM
Mmm, nothing like a good satisfying rant :D

Woodsie
08-16-2008, 07:22 AM
This rejection crap can really wear a person down.

seun
08-16-2008, 02:41 PM
This rejection crap can really wear a person down.

As shit as rejection is, I can take it if the agent says the sample was crap or their list is full, but for the reason I got, they can blow it out their ass.

SPMiller
08-16-2008, 02:59 PM
Can't wait to join you fellows in this painful endeavor. Good reading so far.

nerds
08-16-2008, 03:47 PM
This rejection crap can really wear a person down.



It can. I've arrived at a point of auto-pilot. I presently have too many life worries to really care anymore. I send little batches once a week and just sort of snore my way through the rejections now, it's become so routine. I mark them down on my list and move on, past caring because, well, I just can't sustain the caring any longer.

jamiehall
08-17-2008, 10:05 PM
It hasn't happened to me yet... but I've heard plenty of stories about it, including agents who tell people not to trust any source except their own website, and then have a website that is years out of date and includes genres they angrily say they don't represent in rejection letters.

What a bummer!

And, even if you did complain directly, I'm sure it would do you more harm than good. Unfortunately, agents are constantly receiving complaints from nitwits about matters that are perfectly fine, so they may not listen when a well-grounded complaint comes to them.

At least you got yelled at for being good, instead of for not following the directions!

Phaeal
08-18-2008, 05:48 PM
Well, my rant is about email queries. A common agent MO, evidently, is to equate no response with a proper rejection. I find this extremely rude. How long does it take to hit the one key that would send an auto-response rejection note? Or, failing that tech wizardry, to hit Reply, type No, and hit Send? No reply leaves the writer in limbo -- at least let the poor wretch check you off on his list.

On the writer's side, months or years spent writing the book, then bulling through the submission process. On the agent's side, a few key clicks. Is that hugely unbalanced equation really too much to ask for?

Sophia2
08-18-2008, 10:35 PM
You can't copyright an idea.

You can copyright your outline, but not the idea itself.

In my reality the idea is the concept and the concept is the book outline and/or film plot.


Sophia

willietheshakes
08-18-2008, 10:55 PM
In my reality the idea is the concept and the concept is the book outline and/or film plot.
Sophia

Well, that's as may be, but your reality doesn't conform to intelllectual property law in the US or Canada.

Yes, an idea = a concept. Neither of those are subject to copyright.

An idea or concept =/= an outline or story -- these would be the expression of an idea or concept, a work in and of themselves, and therefore subject to copyright protection.

A plot =/= an expression in and of itself, and is therefore not subject to copyright protection.

For a quick crash-course, you might want to start with this site (http://law.freeadvice.com/intellectual_property/copyright_law/copyright_idea.htm).

seun
08-19-2008, 04:31 PM
On the writer's side, months or years spent writing the book, then bulling through the submission process. On the agent's side, a few key clicks. Is that hugely unbalanced equation really too much to ask for?

I submitted via email to another agent and got back what I think was an automated reply. She said if I haven't heard anything in two weeks, I can consider it a rejection. I can handle that. It's better than nothing at all.

ideagirl
08-21-2008, 06:13 AM
Advice: quit submitting to agents who don't specifically say that they accept fantasy.

Same advice for anyone who writes in a genre--romance, detective novel and so on. Agents who are interested in particular genres generally say so.

ideagirl
08-21-2008, 06:23 AM
Seems rather unprofessional for their site to not be more specific, and to assume that writers submitting their MS will know that "all fiction" doesn't really mean ALL fiction. :/

Does it actually say that, though? If it says "literary fiction," then yes, writers should know that that means "NOT genre fiction" (not fantasy, romance, etc.). If it says "commercial fiction," I would take that to mean airport-novel type stuff--spy thrillers, chick lit and what have you. I've never seen an agent's website that says "all fiction."

seun
08-21-2008, 10:21 PM
Advice: quit submitting to agents who don't specifically say that they accept fantasy.


I'm not going to apologise for submitting to an agent who said they read all fiction. If they don't read fantasy, they should say so and not waste anyone's time.

waylander
08-21-2008, 10:45 PM
Advice: quit submitting to agents who don't specifically say that they accept fantasy.

In the UK that leaves you with about 6 agents

ideagirl
08-22-2008, 02:04 AM
In the UK that leaves you with about 6 agents

Ok, but that's not the case in the US. Just google "literary agent fantasy," for starters.

waylander
08-22-2008, 02:07 AM
I prefer Agentquery.com and search on fantasy

ideagirl
08-22-2008, 02:11 AM
I'm not going to apologise for submitting to an agent who said they read all fiction. If they don't read fantasy, they should say so and not waste anyone's time.

Why the defensive tone? I never suggested that you apologize. I just suggested a way for you to quit wasting your time. Since agents don't all do what you propose, and since you can't make them do it, your only option is to keep wasting your time or to take a different approach that is more efficient. And the way to avoid time wastage is by targeting your inquiries to agents who specifically say they do fantasy. Or at least, to agents who either (1) specifically say they do fantasy, or (2) are known to represent a specific fantasy writer.

I'm not saying it's a right and good thing for agents to say they represent "fiction" in general when there are actually major genres that they won't represent. I'm just saying that, since that is apparently how things are, the task of avoiding time wastage falls entirely on your own shoulders, and there are clearly established ways of doing it--namely, target your queries better.

seun
08-22-2008, 12:45 PM
the task of avoiding time wastage falls entirely on your own shoulders, and there are clearly established ways of doing it--namely, target your queries better.

We'll have to disagree. Avoiding wasting time in submissions is a two way street. The agent needs to tell interested writers exactly what the represent (and if they say they read all fiction, then they should make sure that's true) and the writer can improve their chances by going for genre specific agents.

Darzian
09-19-2008, 02:12 PM
On agentquery.com , the agents are listed with the genres they are interested in. Agents are supposed to specialize in genres. Nathan Bransford has said that on this site. I have yet to see someone who represents every genre in fiction.

My-Immortal
09-19-2008, 03:05 PM
I'm not going to apologise for submitting to an agent who said they read all fiction. If they don't read fantasy, they should say so and not waste anyone's time.

Have you got the rejection yet from the agent(s) that do/does rep fantasy....but not your specific kind of fantasy?

Or claim to rep fantasy, but when you look at all their recent sales, they don't have any fantasy sales...(and you still submit to them anyways, because, why not, and the rejection basically lets you know they really don't want fantasy)...

Or claim to rep only specific fantasies, and they actually list a narrow example of what they like and don't like, and your book would suit them perfectly....but they're not currently accepting submissions at this time...?

Loads and loads of fun!!! :)

C A Winters
09-19-2008, 03:21 PM
Hey, Seun, and those of you ranting the loudest, I hope you are pretty much incognito. There are agents who frequent these boards, and many from all genres who read them now and then. Hummm....:D

Suck it up, guys. Such is the writer's world, one that requires patience, research, and above all tough skins. :)

Samantha's_Song
09-19-2008, 03:27 PM
I had a letter saying that a certain agency didn't do fiction anymore; it would have been nice of them to say so in the Writers and Artists yearbook, wouldn't it.

My-Immortal
09-19-2008, 03:34 PM
Hey, Seun, and those of you ranting the loudest, I hope you are pretty much incognito. There are agents who frequent these boards, and many from all genres who read them now and then. Hummm....:D

Suck it up, guys. Such is the writer's world, one that requires patience, research, and above all tough skins. :)

And a little harmless ranting about some of the common practices of (some) agents are going to somehow hurt their feelings? If so, then maybe writers aren't the only ones who need the tough skin. Besides, how is this any different than the rants agents do about writers not following their guidelines? If agents want to rant about writers (in general) not following their guidelines, why shouldn't writers rant about agents (in general) who don't live up to their own guidelines...?

Even though we're the ones jumping through the hoops to get their attention, aren't they ultimately the ones working for us?

<shrugs>

Seems like there are rants aplenty from both sides...

C A Winters
09-19-2008, 03:37 PM
And a little harmless ranting about some of the common practices of (some) agents are going to somehow hurt their feelings? If so, then maybe writers aren't the only ones who need the tough skin. Besides, how is this any different than the rants agents do about writers not following their guidelines? If agents want to rant about writers (in general) not following their guidelines, why shouldn't writers rant about agents (in general) who don't live up to their own guidelines...?

Even though we're the ones jumping through the hoops to get their attention, aren't they ultimately the ones working for us?

<shrugs>

Seems like there are rants aplenty from both sides...

Okay....whatever.

waylander
09-19-2008, 03:41 PM
I had a letter saying that a certain agency didn't do fiction anymore; it would have been nice of them to say so in the Writers and Artists yearbook, wouldn't it.

It would, but the information in W+A is probably 18 months old given the lead times in the publication pathway.

Samantha's_Song
09-19-2008, 03:52 PM
Hmm, methinks I won't be buying that book again then, I'll be hunting agencies on the net instead and can then spend the money I'd have (whispers) wasted on the W&A on another book. ;)


It would, but the information in W+A is probably 18 months old given the lead times in the publication pathway.

Mod35tBabe
09-19-2008, 03:53 PM
That must be soooo annoying. :rant:I sympathise. It sounds a bit like my job searching, I have applied for over 200 jobs all of which I am well qualified to do, and have over 30 years experience of, but the "reasons" for not even seeing me are getting more bizzare by the week. :Shrug:I think the best one so far must be "you live in G*****. We don't employ people from G***** because they don't turn up for work in the winter if it's frosty!" :roll: You have to laugh or you'd crack up.

Heh I'm not really experienced but I've gone for clear over 100 jobs I could do, and rarely even get told I've been rejected and if I do it's usually a form letter, however I was told during an interview "we don't usually risk putting on people from *your* town (my town's just over 100kms from the city) because they can't be bothered to travel and chances of you moving are slim aren't they?"

However, I'd just moved back from a place where I worked 60kms away, but it took 2 hours to get there, the above 100kms took just under an hour and half and was mostly freeway. Ironically, the job I just got, is in the same place as above and my new boss doesn't mind my travelling because she comes from Sydney, where its perfectly normal to travel at least 2 hours from hour to work each day lol.

Alpha Echo
09-19-2008, 04:10 PM
I submitted to someone who claimed on their website to be accepting queries. I got a letter saying they weren't currently accepting unsolicited queries.

Liars.

I feel you're pain.

waylander
09-19-2008, 04:24 PM
Hmm, methinks I won't be buying that book again then, I'll be hunting agencies on the net instead and can then spend the money I'd have (whispers) wasted on the W&A on another book. ;)


If you are looking for UK agents then this is pretty useful
http://writersservices.com/agent/uk/index1.htm

Uk agents in general seem to be some way behind US agents in having a net presence and taking e-mail subs.
However, one big difference with UK agents is they don't mind - some even encourage - you phoning them to ask about submissions.

seun
09-19-2008, 04:28 PM
Uk agents in general seem to be some way behind US agents in having a net presence and taking e-mail subs.


I've noticed that, too. It's a pain in the arse.

seun
09-19-2008, 04:40 PM
Hey, Seun, and those of you ranting the loudest, I hope you are pretty much incognito. There are agents who frequent these boards, and many from all genres who read them now and then. Hummm....:D

Suck it up, guys. Such is the writer's world, one that requires patience, research, and above all tough skins. :)

Like I said, I don't have a problem with rejection if they think my stuff is crap but rejection for an issue that was down to the agent and not me is a different matter. I don't think I should have to be incognito about it.

C A Winters
09-19-2008, 05:47 PM
Hey all you guys are great, and entitled to your opinions and rants, of course. Just injecting a little opine of mine. Carry on . . .

Have a great day, or night, which ever pertains to your location. :)

Samantha's_Song
09-19-2008, 08:26 PM
Thank you very much for the link, Waylander, I shall be putting that onto my faves link. I do belong to Litmatch here, and they seem pretty up to date, at least when I last looked.

I don't think I'll be phoning any agents though, they might think my writing's as bad as my verbal; I'm crap on the phone :D


If you are looking for UK agents then this is pretty useful
http://writersservices.com/agent/uk/index1.htm

Uk agents in general seem to be some way behind US agents in having a net presence and taking e-mail subs.
However, one big difference with UK agents is they don't mind - some even encourage - you phoning them to ask about submissions.

Susan Lanigan
09-19-2008, 09:47 PM
That must be soooo annoying. :rant:I sympathise. It sounds a bit like my job searching, I have applied for over 200 jobs all of which I am well qualified to do, and have over 30 years experience of, but the "reasons" for not even seeing me are getting more bizzare by the week. :Shrug:I think the best one so far must be "you live in G*****. We don't employ people from G***** because they don't turn up for work in the winter if it's frosty!" :roll: You have to laugh or you'd crack up.

If you're in Ireland then surely there's no question of there being frost in G***** because it's always f**king raining there the whole time?

Deccydiva
09-19-2008, 09:56 PM
If you are looking for UK agents then this is pretty useful
http://writersservices.com/agent/uk/index1.htm

Uk agents in general seem to be some way behind US agents in having a net presence and taking e-mail subs.
However, one big difference with UK agents is they don't mind - some even encourage - you phoning them to ask about submissions.

Thanks that's really useful. The funny thing is, I found some Irish Agents that I didn't find from searching over here! Do they think that Irish writers Can't imagine why. :Shrug:
I learned from my writers' group that I should expect to wait three months for a response to a query so I have a few weeks left before I hear about the one currently out there, in the meantime I will perfect my synopsis and query letter then go get 'em over the water! :)

auntybug
09-19-2008, 10:03 PM
Same frustration here. I sent a query & "This is my first novel"

"Interested. Send me 10 pages."

I send 10 pages.

"Sorry, we won't touch you if this is your 1st novel".

:e2smack:

Deccydiva
09-19-2008, 11:19 PM
If you're in Ireland then surely there's no question of there being frost in G***** because it's always f**king raining there the whole time?

Good point well made - BUT in Ireland, nothing is as it seems!;)

Seriously, we do get icy mornings sometimes which is why young drivers in particular won't drive on it - they simply don't have the experience. How they manage to rectify that, I'll never know... my post driving test days were in Kent and we had six feet of snow at Biggin Hill quite often! And I rode a motorbike through the winter!

Deccydiva
09-19-2008, 11:21 PM
Same frustration here. I sent a query & "This is my first novel"

"Interested. Send me 10 pages."

I send 10 pages.

"Sorry, we won't touch you if this is your 1st novel".

:e2smack:

Smacks of catch 22. Over thirty years ago I worked with a small film crew and had a yen to get into "the business" as a scripwriter. You couldn't get work without union membership... but you needed three screen credits to get union membership... ho hum.

Susan Lanigan
09-20-2008, 02:42 AM
Good point well made - BUT in Ireland, nothing is as it seems!;)

Seriously, we do get icy mornings sometimes which is why young drivers in particular won't drive on it - they simply don't have the experience. How they manage to rectify that, I'll never know... my post driving test days were in Kent and we had six feet of snow at Biggin Hill quite often! And I rode a motorbike through the winter!

Yeah, snow is not a big thing here.

I lived in G----- for three years and I am racking my brains trying to think was there ever snow...fairly sure there wasn't.

Cybernaught
09-20-2008, 03:05 AM
I submitted my first novel, which opens with a rape, and received a rejection from one place because they don't do children's books.

And we're left to wonder if they even read our manuscripts.

seun
09-20-2008, 07:08 PM
Same frustration here. I sent a query & "This is my first novel"

"Interested. Send me 10 pages."

I send 10 pages.

"Sorry, we won't touch you if this is your 1st novel".

:e2smack:

Oh, man. That's just. . .:Shrug: