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jenngreenleaf
08-09-2008, 07:07 PM
Good morning AW'ers!

I'm writing The WonderDads Handbook for Raising a Girl Ages 0-10: A Month-by-Month Look at What to Expect, Developmental Tips, and Ideas For Activities. This book is going to be broken down into years, and then further broken down into months (bite-sized bits easily ingested by fly-by reader dads).

Here's what I'm looking for:
1: One or two sentences about your 0-10 year old daughter. Example for a three month old, "My daughter did not transition well from bassinet to crib until we started playing a CD with ocean sounds." That sort of thing.
2: A one or two paragraph "this is what I experienced with my daughter during this [insert event, activity, or milestone]" type of description that I can pull quotes or other reference material from.

This book is a guide for dads, but it doesn't necessarily have to be quoted by dads or first-person stories [I]from dads. It's meant to serve as a go-to guide when things come up that confuse, frustrate, or perplex dads while raising their daughters alone, or with a co-parent.

Anyone game?

Stacia Kane
08-09-2008, 07:59 PM
I have two daughters, currently ages 3 and 7. I'm game. You just want sentences on anything? Are there particular topics you want?

My youngest screamed bloody murder in her carseat, from birth until about 2 months. We finally bought a CD of ocean sounds (yep, your example above reminded me) and that helped, but it took a couple of months before she really got comfortable with it. A few times she got so hysterical we had to pull over and take her out of the carseat until she calmed down.

jenngreenleaf
08-09-2008, 10:02 PM
Thanks for responding! Yes, this will work great! I'm looking for "real life" examples of what dads can expect and things like that. So, if he's expecting life to be grand when putting his daughter in a carseat, your example will shed some light on that reality. :)

How long did it take for her to get out of this phase?

Do you have special projects you enjoy doing with your daughters? A sport, craft, outing, or any other kind of activity would be great.

Thanks, again!

Perks
08-09-2008, 10:15 PM
I've got two daughters - 5 and 9. Let me talk to the man and I'll get back to you with some quotes.

kristi26
08-09-2008, 10:50 PM
I've got one daughter (and two sons, ages 8 and 5). She's 2 1/2 years old now.

When we brought our daughter home from the hospital, she wanted nothing to do with anyone except Mommy. She didn't even want to look at Daddy. It wasn't until she was closer to 4-5 months that she realized "Daddy can be fun too."

Our daughter hated the bath from the first moment she entered the water. I thought it was just something she would do the first time and then she'd love it the next. I was wrong. She screamed like we were killing her at every single for six months. And then one day, she loved it. For the next couple of months, she'd laugh and play in the tub, having a grand time. Then she switched again. She hated it so much that my husband and I took turns taking her in the shower with us. We learned an interesting lesson in this. Little girls can be wishy-washy.

If I think of anymore to add, I'll come back.

jenngreenleaf
08-09-2008, 11:00 PM
I've got two daughters - 5 and 9. Let me talk to the man and I'll get back to you with some quotes.GREAT! Thank you! :D

jenngreenleaf
08-09-2008, 11:02 PM
I've got one daughter (and two sons, ages 8 and 5). She's 2 1/2 years old now.

When we brought our daughter home from the hospital, she wanted nothing to do with anyone except Mommy. She didn't even want to look at Daddy. It wasn't until she was closer to 4-5 months that she realized "Daddy can be fun too."

Our daughter hated the bath from the first moment she entered the water. I thought it was just something she would do the first time and then she'd love it the next. I was wrong. She screamed like we were killing her at every single for six months. And then one day, she loved it. For the next couple of months, she'd laugh and play in the tub, having a grand time. Then she switched again. She hated it so much that my husband and I took turns taking her in the shower with us. We learned an interesting lesson in this. Little girls can be wishy-washy.

If I think of anymore to add, I'll come back.
Thank you for responding! Is there anything about her development now that differs from the development of your sons when they were her age? Do you notice that she's interested in different activities at this age in comparison to your sons at this age?

I really appreciate your time!

kristi26
08-09-2008, 11:08 PM
She's very interested in being "a mommy." She loves dolls and loves to share her food, which is very cute. She can count to ten but she still doesn't know all of her colors. She is slightly more dramatic than her brothers. You know, everything's a big event.

jenngreenleaf
08-09-2008, 11:21 PM
Very interesting! Thank you for sharing! Did you notice a difference in how out-going or shy she was/is compared to her brothers at that age? Or were they all pretty much the same across the board?

Jersey Chick
08-10-2008, 12:02 AM
When my daughter (who's now nearly 8) was about a year old and we took her off formula to put her on milk, she wanted nothing to do with milk. Wouldn't drink it at all. Then I started spiking it with vanilla extract. It worked like a charm and I could decrease the amount of vanilla until we got to the point where she didn't miss it when I stopped putting it in.

Now my son... didn't have a problem getting him to drink milk - which he prefers now over juice. But if only we could get him to eat.... ;)

kristi26
08-10-2008, 01:16 AM
Very interesting! Thank you for sharing! Did you notice a difference in how out-going or shy she was/is compared to her brothers at that age? Or were they all pretty much the same across the board?


She is a little more shy than her brothers and slower to warm up to strangers. I actually have relatives that live out of state (and visit irregularly) who she won't say more than two words to. The other day, I was on the phone with my aunt and DD was talking to me. My aunt couldn't believe it was her!

Another thing I thought of: My middle son weaned (from nursing) at thirteen months on his own with no trouble. He never really looked back. My DD just weaned, at 30 months, about 4 weeks ago. She still asks for it sometimes. The first time, she cried and cried like I'd broken her heart. I felt so bad. Now she takes the offered chocolate milk instead without much resistance. But she still misses it. Another thing that happened when my son weaned was that he didn't really want to cuddle with me as much as he did before. My daughter still loves to cuddle despite losing the nursing.

Stacia Kane
08-10-2008, 06:30 PM
Both our girls are fascinated by Daddy's facial hair. They like to play with it when he doesn't shave.

He grows a beard occasionally. When Faerie was, oh, a year and a half or so, he'd hold her in his lap and she'd scritch her fingernails over the beard and giggle like crazy. She was disappointed when he shaved it, but he re-grew it six months later or so and she didn't like it as much. When he shaved it that time she grinned and said, "Now I can see your cheeks!"

Sometimes they ask him to regrow it again; sometimes he asks them if he should and they say no. But they find the whole process really interesting, so that might be something fun for Dads to try when the girls are a little past infancy.

jenngreenleaf
08-11-2008, 12:21 AM
This is great information, guys, thank you so much for sharing this with me! :)

WendyNYC
08-11-2008, 12:28 AM
My daughters were both terrified of public toilets when they were just out of diapers, especially the ones that flush automatically. (It IS startling!) I started carrying post-its in my purse and would tape one up over the sensor before they sat down and viola, no scary flush.

jenngreenleaf
08-11-2008, 01:05 AM
What an excellent tip! And, yes, they are startling! My son is still terrified of them, so I think I'm going to try this with him - I never saw a little person scurry so quickly out of a stall in my life. :D

Mom'sWrite
08-11-2008, 01:06 AM
Our daughters are 7 and 8 years old. The single quote I could extract from my husband about raising our daughters involves cradling his head in hands and moaning, "I'm in so much trouble."

jenngreenleaf
08-11-2008, 01:18 AM
LOL Yes, that's so very true!! LOL

jenngreenleaf
08-11-2008, 07:01 PM
P.S. Sorry guys - I forgot to mention that, if you prefer, you can emal responses to me at writerjennh [at] aol [dot] com. Thank you so much for your interest and your help with this project! :D

Elladog
08-11-2008, 09:54 PM
My daughter turned two in June, and has always been a bit of a daddy's girl. This worked well for us because I was breastfeeding so already had my built-in baby time, so it was nice that she always really enjoyed time with him, too. He has always been a very hands-on, diaper changing, late-night rocking, down on the floor playing kind of dad.

We're finding this age interesting as up til now most of her toys have been the gender-neutral infant stuff, and now we're getting into more of the dolls vs trucks stuff. We don't try to guide her preferences and right now she's at a place where she will happily don a tutu and hockey helmet while driving her Barbie in a toy backhoe to the fishin' hole. She can name about a dozen different kinds of trucks and tractors, and loves ballerinas and fairies. I think there was a point when my husband had some concerns about whether he could have the kind of relationship with a little girl that he might have had with a son, but it becomes more and more obvious every day that it's not about a father and a daughter, it's about these two specific people and the indescribable depth of love they have for each other.

As we learn this parent thing, we've both discovered some new skills we had no idea we had - for him we've learned he is brilliant at making up on-the-spot words to songs that actually rhyme, unfailingly asks just the right questions to extract the information we need ("but where was the butterfly before it was in your mouth?") and makes the world's best scrambled eggs & cheese.

Oh, and I'll second the vanilla extract in the milk thing, works beautifully.

heyjude
08-11-2008, 09:59 PM
I have a daughter, now age 5.

My hubby made fun of me for saying that the baby could hear him in utero. Literally made fun of me. I made him talk to her, play his guitar, etc. He thought it was a waste of time. Until. The birth went badly, we had an emergency c-section, and I was out cold for hours. The baby wouldn't stop screaming, so my husband tentatively said her name. She stopped screaming instantly. Every time he talked to her, she quieted and watched him. He was the only one that could keep her calm.

He talked to my belly lots with the second baby. :) And now he tells everyone that dads make a huge difference!

jenngreenleaf
08-11-2008, 11:19 PM
My daughter turned two in June, and has always been a bit of a daddy's girl. This worked well for us because I was breastfeeding so already had my built-in baby time, so it was nice that she always really enjoyed time with him, too. He has always been a very hands-on, diaper changing, late-night rocking, down on the floor playing kind of dad.

We're finding this age interesting as up til now most of her toys have been the gender-neutral infant stuff, and now we're getting into more of the dolls vs trucks stuff. We don't try to guide her preferences and right now she's at a place where she will happily don a tutu and hockey helmet while driving her Barbie in a toy backhoe to the fishin' hole. She can name about a dozen different kinds of trucks and tractors, and loves ballerinas and fairies. I think there was a point when my husband had some concerns about whether he could have the kind of relationship with a little girl that he might have had with a son, but it becomes more and more obvious every day that it's not about a father and a daughter, it's about these two specific people and the indescribable depth of love they have for each other.

As we learn this parent thing, we've both discovered some new skills we had no idea we had - for him we've learned he is brilliant at making up on-the-spot words to songs that actually rhyme, unfailingly asks just the right questions to extract the information we need ("but where was the butterfly before it was in your mouth?") and makes the world's best scrambled eggs & cheese.

Oh, and I'll second the vanilla extract in the milk thing, works beautifully.
This is very interesting because I've heard a lot of parents saying it would be more difficult for a father to bond if the mother breastfeeds. I love hearing that this is just a myth. I nursed my children and didn't notice a problem with them bonding with their father - nice to know we weren't the only ones!

Thank you for this information! (I wish I had known about the use of vanilla YEARS ago! LOL)

jenngreenleaf
08-11-2008, 11:20 PM
I have a daughter, now age 5.

My hubby made fun of me for saying that the baby could hear him in utero. Literally made fun of me. I made him talk to her, play his guitar, etc. He thought it was a waste of time. Until. The birth went badly, we had an emergency c-section, and I was out cold for hours. The baby wouldn't stop screaming, so my husband tentatively said her name. She stopped screaming instantly. Every time he talked to her, she quieted and watched him. He was the only one that could keep her calm.

He talked to my belly lots with the second baby. :) And now he tells everyone that dads make a huge difference!What a sweet story!!!! I'm a firm believer in baby-belly talk, music, and singing. :) Thank you for sharing!!!

jannawrites
08-13-2008, 04:33 AM
I've got two daughters - 5 and 9. Let me talk to the man and I'll get back to you with some quotes.

Ditto (except mine are 5 and 3). I'll come back with somethin'. :D

jenngreenleaf
08-13-2008, 06:56 PM
Ditto (except mine are 5 and 3). I'll come back with somethin'. :D
Excellent! Thank you! :D

jannawrites
08-15-2008, 02:06 AM
Ditto (except mine are 5 and 3). I'll come back with somethin'. :D

I had just a few minutes to speak with misterwrites last night, and they were fruitless. :( But, in lieu of his answer, I'll give you one for him. Hope it helps.

He's been working two jobs and a lot of hours, and he's concerned about the small amount of interaction he has with them. He knows how crucial a father's presence is for girls (for their esteem, for their development), and how impressionable they are when small. That being the case, he makes that much more effort when they are together.

:)

sheadakota
08-15-2008, 04:20 AM
I have one daughter who just turned 10 this June. She has an 11 year old brother. The difference between the two is amazing.

My daughter is fearless- but she is not a typical girl- At 10 she hates Hannah Montana, she loves dragons and dinosaurs, and is very responsible.

But when she was an infant and I was still nursing her, all she wanted to do was use me as a human binky. she shared a bedroom with us and at times we had to put her in a porta- crib in the living room to let her cry herself asleep. Two nights is all it took. She still sleeps with her blankey though.

Monkey
08-15-2008, 04:42 AM
I'm another breast-feeding mom with a Daddy's girl.

Cerridwen's favorite game is one, two, THREE! On one and two, we lift her slightly, and on three we raise her high over our heads (like the baby-toss game, except that we don't let go). This game will pull her out of just about any sort of moody behavior, and she likes it best when Daddy does it, at least partly because he lifts her higher and he doesn't get tired as quickly. (In my defense, I'm 5'1 and he's 6'8. She's a lot bigger percentage of my body weight than his!)

She also loves it when he runs around the yard with her, or when he takes her on a twilight walk before bedtime. These things all help her to be calmer and happier. They also strengthen her relationship with her father and even, by showing me what a caring husband and father I married, strengthen the relationship between my husband and me.

jenngreenleaf
08-15-2008, 05:25 PM
Thank you, everyone, this is GREAT! I love reading through all these stories!

Does anyone have any stories to share about activities you enjoyed doing with your daughters during any of these ages?

Tasmin21
08-15-2008, 06:19 PM
My daughter is now almost six (I dropped her off at kindergarten this morning :cry:).

But one of my favorite memories of her with her father was just after we brought her home from the hospital. When she would get fussy at night (and I didn't need to get up to feed her), my husband would take her out to the living room, put in a war movie, turn the subtitles on (so he could watch the dialogue) and the bass up. The rhythmic pounding of the gunfire would put her right to sleep, and to this day I swear this child could sleep through an atomic bomb dropping. Noise doesn't bother her in the least.

Monkey
08-15-2008, 08:24 PM
Cerridwen is one-and-a-half, and she loves it when we strip her down and sit her on the floor with washable markers. We put her on a non-stainable surface or on newspaper and give her a posterboard to draw on...but mostly, she draws on herself. She has lots of fun, and afterwards she gets a bath. She likes the way the marker colors color the water.

She also likes to play with pots, pans and spoons while we cook, she LOVES story time, and she really enjoys being danced around to music.

jannawrites
08-15-2008, 08:30 PM
My youngest, now 3, loves to sit down with paper and glue and do a "craft." I keep little pieces of foam and confetti-type stuff around, and she has a ball creating patterns. (Or not-so-patterns.) For that matter, my 5-year-old loves the same.

Both girls like whatever their daddy does with them that's physical, ie. he'll hold them up off the ground and swing them back and forth, or give piggy-back rides. And he loves to teach them about nature and animals. Museums and parks and all those things are great.

jenngreenleaf
08-17-2008, 03:13 AM
You have no idea how helpful you're all being with this -- it's WONDERFUL!

If any of you have blogs, would you consider passing this link or a link to my blog around so others can have an opportunity to participate as well? I've got posts up on my blog, plurk, myspace, and facebook. So, it's "out there" to an extent . . . I'd just like it to be a bit more "out there" if you catch my drift! :D

Thanks for all of your support!!

jannawrites
08-17-2008, 03:44 AM
You have no idea how helpful you're all being with this -- it's WONDERFUL!

If any of you have blogs, would you consider passing this link or a link to my blog around so others can have an opportunity to participate as well? I've got posts up on my blog, plurk, myspace, and facebook. So, it's "out there" to an extent . . . I'd just like it to be a bit more "out there" if you catch my drift! :D

Thanks for all of your support!!

I blogged about it here (http://somethingshewrote.blogspot.com/2008/08/help-fellow-writer.html)! :D

jenngreenleaf
08-17-2008, 05:31 PM
I blogged about it here (http://somethingshewrote.blogspot.com/2008/08/help-fellow-writer.html)! :D:snoopy: Thanks, Janna! That means a lot to me!

jenngreenleaf
09-08-2008, 05:29 PM
BUMP! :P

Reminder: I'm collecting responses between now and the end of November. I'm looking forward to hearing from you!

THANKS! :D

Jlv81
09-09-2008, 03:51 PM
When my daughter (who is now 2 and a half) was about three months old my wife would have trouble trying to get her to nap during the day. When I would get home from work, I would sit on the armchair and let her lay, with her head on my chest, and she would fall asleep within moments. My wife tried this to no avail. Only happened with me and I was thus dubbed "the Daddy mattress". Although, the obvious reason here is my wife was breast feeding and if she tried to settle her Hazel (my daughter) could obviously smell the milk. So I was cheating by not breast-feeding her. lol

Hope you can take something from that.


l8r Gods
VossMan

jenngreenleaf
09-09-2008, 11:52 PM
Thank you so much for responding!! :D

KCathy
09-10-2008, 02:17 AM
I have three daughters, aged four, two, and one. With all three, my husband has always been amazed at how early they show a marked preference to him over other people besides me. Almost as soon as we get them home, they seem to recognize him and calm down faster for him than other not-mommies. One thing that surprised us both was that it's often easier for him to get them to sleep as babies. I think it's because he's so warm-blooded, deep-voiced, and still. Or maybe just that he can't nurse them, so they're not distracted by thoughts of food with him.

Oh, and how's this for a pointless quote? My babies are the only ones besides my husband who get excited when I lift my shirt. :-)

Hmm, another thing that might be helpful to know is that milestones aren't everything. Obviously you shouldn't ignore it if your child misses a lot of them, but sometimes they just don't mean a thing. For whatever reason, my firstborn was on the very latest end of every age range for practically everything. She crawled at eleven months and was slow to hit speech markers, too. Now, at four and a half, she's running and talking as well as the other preschoolers. Go figure. There's nothing wrong with her. It's just that averages are derived from a lot of kids doing things earlier and a lot of kids doing things later, and our definition of normal doesn't have to be exactly the perfect median of what all kids do as a group.

Good luck!

Stacia Kane
09-10-2008, 03:45 PM
My three-year-old insists that she's going to marry Daddy when she grows up. Daddy just smiles and says he loves her or that's wonderful; we know in a few years he'll have to explain to her that he can't marry her, but for now he just enjoys it.

Also, he reads the bedtime story--they like it better when he does it and it's a special Daddy-only moment he has with them. When he's finished with the story and kissed them goodnight, he turns off the light, stands in the doorway, and says:

Okay, now. Hunker down, close your eyes, no talking, go to sleep, sweet dreams! (*sometimes he adds, "And everybody stay in their own beds"; but usually they ask to sleep together and we let them.) I love you and I'll see you in the morning.

They LOVE it. They follow his directions exactly, giggling the whole time. A few times he's been away for whatever reason and I've put them to bed and they don't like that I don't give them the speech, but if I do they say I'm not saying it right, lol.

jenngreenleaf
09-10-2008, 05:59 PM
You guys are GREAT! Thank you so much for responding! This is going to be a book broken up in 120 sections (chapters?), so the more quotes the merrier! (I'm heading each chapter/section) with a quote.)

Again, thank you for participating! :D

jenngreenleaf
09-10-2008, 06:58 PM
Check out this GREAT idea!!!


Jenn - have you thought about quotes on the flipside? Daughters who want to talk about Daddy do's and don'ts? If so, I could offer a few. :)

So, if you're a daughter and would like to offer some quotes about your dad, I'd love to hear from you!

jenngreenleaf
09-13-2008, 10:35 PM
As per the information outlined in this blog post (http://jennhollowell.blogspot.com/2008/09/announcement-my-book.html), the date of completion for this book is being moved up!

So, if you would like to add a quote or two this book please do so NOW!

I'm looking forward to hearing from you! Rememnber, responses can be emailed directly to me at writerjennh [at] aol [dot] com.

Thanks for reading!

Skyraven
09-14-2008, 03:57 AM
I wish my father would have spent more time playing games with me. He often got home and threw himself on the couch to watch tv. I would end up going to my room to play with my younger brother.
Be there when you say you will dads. As an 8th grader, there was a dinner that my school hosted where the 7th graders were the waitstaff and the entertainment. My mom and sister went, but my father showed up at the very end. If your little girl asks you to be somewhere, be there.
Another thing, dads, don't use your little girls as a remote for the tv.
Jenn is this enough?

jenngreenleaf
09-14-2008, 07:41 PM
This is an excellent twist - Dads really need to know how much their daughters need them. Thank you so much - this is excellent, Heiddi!!!! :D If you'd like to add more, feel free!

Skyraven
09-15-2008, 01:36 AM
no problem Jenn. :) Here's a bit more, dads - don't think that you can make up right away for lost time. My father (now that my mother's been in heaven for six years) feels that because I'm the only girl, I NEED him more. I haven't told him yet, but I learned to live without him a very long time ago. Be there in the moment with your girls and remember that you are the first man in her life. Every boy/man she will ever date will be compared to you. What kind of a guy do you want for your daughter?

jenngreenleaf
09-15-2008, 03:32 PM
This is great! I've found that more fathters aren't aware of the impact they make on their daughters than who do, particularly when it comes to the man she's looking to spend her life with. This is an important point to ponder and one that will certainly be included as a quote in my book - THANK YOU!

jenngreenleaf
09-30-2008, 05:12 PM
It's not too late!

If you're interested in sharing a quote or a story, feel free to do so! I'm collecting these materials for the next week.

Thank you, again, to all of those who have contributed!

Entropy Perk
09-30-2008, 06:01 PM
I'm breastfeeding mother (baby led feeding, to boot. no time tables in this house) and both of my girls (3 and 10mo), are total daddy's girls. He bathes, changes, cuddles, tosses them around, flips them around and has a football hold he does with them, with back pat, that knocks them right out, when they having a hard time getting to sleep for a nap.

How we did that, was- When they were wee babies, and had nice full tummies and were all sleepy, he took them and cuddled them down to sleep, several times a day. He did that, whenever he was home with them. I got to go eat/shower/do chores/nap, while he had some daddy time. He also did a lot of babywearing. Both girls often fell asleep on him, after they had been fed. Doing that, helps give mom a break, gives dad bonding time and teaches the children that both parents are a source of comfort, right from the start.

One thing he says, that always gets me, "I'm the first man they will ever love. So, I have to be the type of guy I want them to love." He also thinks its important to teach them how to stand up to boys, so they don't get pushed around. He never wants boys talking his girls into things they don't want to do.

jenngreenleaf
10-01-2008, 03:15 PM
Thank you so much for contributing! Isn't it amazing how daddys have that "magic touch" when it comes to putting babies to sleep?

Amarie
10-01-2008, 03:57 PM
My daughter is adopted from China. We were lucky to have her join our family when she was 9 months old. She is now 8.

During the adoption preparation, social workers warned us there might be issues when she realized she did not look like us, and they were right. It nearly broke my heart when she came home one day and told me she didn't like the way she looked, and she wished I was Chinese too. I have always told her how pretty she is, but the comment that had the most effect on her was from her dad. She came to me one night after he had helped her brush the tangles from her hair and said, "Daddy says I have beautiful hair!" Somehow it meant so much more coming from him. Here's a poem she wrote for school (it's supposed to be in cinquain form):

Dad
Nice, Carrying me,
Helps me much
I love you much
Daddy

jenngreenleaf
10-01-2008, 04:53 PM
What a wonderful story and poem! Thank you so much for sharing this - yours is the first account from a parent of an adoptive child. :D

eliza1903
10-12-2008, 01:50 AM
I've noticed with my daughter (just getting out of her terrible twos), that the less time she watches television, the fewer disciplinary problems we have with her. I'm not saying TV is bad, and she's allowed to watch it, but I limit it more now. She recovers from most of her angry moments more quickly, save for the occasional, huge tantrum.

jenngreenleaf
10-13-2008, 10:41 PM
That's a VERY interesting point! I just wrote about media limitations, including TV watching. Thank you for bringing this up! :D

Yeshanu
10-22-2008, 09:10 PM
My daughter's twenty now, but I remember a couple of stories that demonstrate how different she was from her brothers in wanting to grow up faster than they:

At age 2, she was upstairs and I down. I looked up the stairs and to my horror, saw that she had stuffed a whole package of light bulbs up her shirt, where her uh, "equipment" would later grow.

At six, as a pastor in a small church, I did children's time, and I asked the children if any of them were in a hurry to grow up so they could do something important. My daughter put up her hand, and I asked her what it was she wanted to do.

"Have babies!" was the reply that brought the house down.

I didn't see that need to grow up quickly in her older brother, or maybe it just illustrated less obviously.

quickWit
10-22-2008, 11:42 PM
I'll never forget the first time my daughter, who is about to turn 13, made me really laugh at a joke she'd made. We were watching TV and she made a remark about a commercial that had aired which caused me to chuckle a bit, at which point she looked at me and matter-of-factly said "I'm here 'til Thursday." She was 8.

That moment, the look of pure joy on her face at making me roar with laughter is one that I'll always treasure.

:)

mdin
10-23-2008, 01:08 AM
I have three daughters.

My nine-year-old is obsessed with Hannah Montana. I got her to eat something once because I told her I saw on the news a video of Miley Cyrus eating it.

My five-year-old is more scared of the dentist's chair moving than of the dentist.

My three-year-old tells everyone her boyfriend is Diego (from Go Diego Go!), but she carries around a baby doll and tells people I'm the father. She's also obsessed with kangaroos.

Danger Jane
10-23-2008, 04:25 AM
Not sure if this is too late...?


My sister is 9, and practically since she was old enough to speak she's called our dad "Best Pal". He's like a partner in crime for her, sort of a confidante, the "only person who knows" she still likes to watch Thomas the Tank Engine when nobody's home but him. She loves our mom, too, but it seems like they butt heads more, probably because Mom is the one who has to sit next to her while she (agonizingly) does her math homework, etc. Dad is who she pesters to go bog riding on a Saturday afternoon, and he almost always goes, even though he might have just spent the whole morning cleaning the basement or the garage. He's also the one who provides her with $2 plastic animals and crappy knick-knacks from garage sales. Basically the same relationship I had with my dad when I was her age.

Oh, just remembered--when she was in preschool they had this song for learning the numbers 1-10:

One one one you're so much fun fun fun
Two two two I sure like you

etc

And the line for eight was

Eight eight eight you're really great great great

but she changed it to

Eight eight eight I'm on a date--with Dad!!

That song sure got a lot of mileage...

jenngreenleaf
10-23-2008, 05:15 PM
Thank you SO much, guys, your timing couldn't be better! I was just going to update this thread requesting a few more answers! :D You've all read my mind!!!! :D

jannawrites
10-23-2008, 06:19 PM
Be sure to keep us posted with your progress, Jenn! :)

jenngreenleaf
10-24-2008, 09:00 PM
You betcha! I'm submitting the finished manuscript on Halloween! :D

MissKris
10-24-2008, 09:48 PM
If I could add my $.02 . . .

I have two daughters, ages 6 and 1 1/2. One thing I have noticed with both of them is that in the first 18 months or so they will always go to mommy for cuddles and boo-boo healing. As they have gotten older, they have gone to daddy, as well. I'm just now noticing my youngest being more willing to snuggle up with daddy as much as with me.

Here's something my husband says that I love: "I love having daughters. The great thing about daughters is that they can do everything that girls do and everything that boys do."

Case in point: my 6 year old loves ballet and barbies (and loves it when dad plays barbie with her - he has the funniest voice for the Ken doll) but also plays soccer and baseball with dad. She even likes cars and woodworking. So, let your dads know that they should try to involve their daughters their own interests - even things that don't seem "girl."

jenngreenleaf
10-25-2008, 07:15 PM
Thank you! :D It's never too late to add in your $.02!! I'm glad you did!

emandem
10-25-2008, 07:48 PM
Jenn: Don't forget: even at age 10 girls are beginning to act/react to boys the way we did when we were 12 or 13. At age 10 or 11 my daughters were already commenting about how one boy or other was "in love" with a girl from their class and wanted "to go out" with said girl. Makes for the beginning of a very confusing time.

I find the worst thing that dads can do is pretend that this is silly or that "they shouldn't be thinking about that because they're too young." It's best just to turn the serious, listening ear. That's all they want is someone to listen so they can figure things out in the open on their own.

jannawrites
10-25-2008, 09:59 PM
Jenn: Don't forget: even at age 10 girls are beginning to act/react to boys the way we did when we were 12 or 13. At age 10 or 11 my daughters were already commenting about how one boy or other was "in love" with a girl from their class and wanted "to go out" with said girl. Makes for the beginning of a very confusing time.

I find the worst thing that dads can do is pretend that this is silly or that "they shouldn't be thinking about that because they're too young." It's best just to turn the serious, listening ear. That's all they want is someone to listen so they can figure things out in the open on their own.

This has begun in my daughter's KINDERGARTEN class! Granted, they don't understand the workings of such things the same as a 10 or 11 y.o. would, but there has been talk of boys and girls being "in love" with each other, and mention of supposed kisses between said boys and girls. They're, at the very least, aware of - even if they don't get - such things younger and younger. Crushes abound!

Dads need to be alert to the potential these days, and be honest and straightforward with their daughters. Misterwrites had his "first awkward father/daughter talk" with bigwrites a few weeks ago, telling her it was okay to have boys who are friends, but that she was too young to hold hands and the like.

And dads need to remember how crucial their role is in the development of daughters' self-esteem and -worth. Especially in these impressionable years.

jannawrites
10-26-2008, 05:48 AM
Jenn - I wonder if this is worth sharing? When my oldest was a baby I played around with familiar tunes and new lyrics. One is sung to the tune of Jesus Loves Me, but I altered the words to apply to Mommy or Daddy (or whomever). In case your targeted dads would be interested in this sort of thing, here's my phrasing...

Daddy loves you, yes he does,
Daddy loves you very much,
Little one whom he adores,
You are his and he is yours.
Yes, Daddy loves you,
Yes, Daddy loves you,
Yes, Daddy loves you,
He could not love you more.

The mental picture of a daddy singing this to his little girl melts my heart. :)

jenngreenleaf
10-28-2008, 01:55 AM
The mental picture of a daddy singing this to his little girl melts my heart. :)That sounds SO sweet!! I do have a section in there that talks about bonding with daughters through use of music and
lullabies -- I think this would make an excellent additon!! :)

I find the worst thing that dads can do is pretend that this is silly or that "they shouldn't be thinking about that because they're too young." It's best just to turn the serious, listening ear. That's all they want is someone to listen so they can figure things out in the open on their own. This is SO true!!!!! My step-daughter is only eight and she's already been showing interest in boys and wondering about the whole "relationship" thing. Her dad isn't giving it much attention aside from saying to me, "I guess it's time to invest in a shotgun." Uh.oh.

jst5150
10-28-2008, 02:01 AM
-- Don't believe the published milestones. There were any number of books and magazine articles that said my daughter should be potty trained by 18 months, that she should talk at this time and walk at this time. Not true and I have dozens of examples to prove it. She was way earier on some and later on others. Your chid is your child. Your doctor will identify any real issue and work with you on them.

-- My 3-year-old has what we call "Fear of Organized Seating." For instance, you can take her into a crowd and she's fine, but put her in a movie theater (or a Shamu show at Sea World) and she's no good. Even at "It's a Small World" at Disneyworld, she had big issues. But once out and among the throngs of people, fine.

LaurieD
10-28-2008, 02:17 AM
When my now 9 yro girl was born...
After kicking my ribs for the previous 4 months, giving me morning sickness any ol' time of day from day one until about 2 months before she was born and heartburn that would have brought a grown man to tears nearly every day of the entire pregnancy, my girl was born 6 days late and was handed to me red faced and screaming. No amount of cooing and kisses from Mommy did anything to quiet my little angel girl. BUT - the nurse handed her to her daddy and instantly the howling princess stopped screaming, looked up at her daddy's face, and I kid you not, coo'd at him. She's been Daddy's girl ever since. As a matter of fact, he's taken her to her ballet class at the moment and they have a go cart in the garage they're building

jenngreenleaf
10-30-2008, 09:03 PM
Your chid is your child. Your doctor will identify any real issue and work with you on them. This is SO true! There have been a number of milestones and "what to expect" type things that didn't happen with my step-daughter, too. We took it to mean that she's human and, with that comes change.

jenngreenleaf
10-30-2008, 09:05 PM
She's been Daddy's girl ever since.For nearly the same reason, my step daughter has always been Daddy's girl as well. It's the coolest thing to see them do girly things together (she'll paint his nails, put his hair in pretty styles, and then do his make-up . . . which is difficult with a beard) and then they'll go play in the mud and look for frogs. It's so cool. :D

madderblue
11-17-2008, 04:01 PM
I have three daughters.

My nine-year-old is obsessed with Hannah Montana. I got her to eat something once because I told her I saw on the news a video of Miley Cyrus eating it.

My five-year-old is more scared of the dentist's chair moving than of the dentist.

My three-year-old tells everyone her boyfriend is Diego (from Go Diego Go!), but she carries around a baby doll and tells people I'm the father. She's also obsessed with kangaroos.

Matt, I love your family.

jenngreenleaf
07-27-2010, 11:36 PM
:hi: After all this time...the book is FINALLY out! WonderDads Publishing released the rights back to me because there were many unforseen delays.

So, here it is: :hooray:

Paperback: Raising Your Daughter From Ages 0-10: A Complete Handbook for Dads (A Month-by-Month Look at What to Expect, Developmental Tips & Ideas for Activities) (http://www.amazon.com/Raising-Your-Daughter-Month-Month/dp/1453706712/ref=pd_rhf_p_t_2)
Kindle: Raising Your Daughter From Ages 0-10: A Complete Handbook for Dads (A Month-by-Month Look at What to Expect, Developmental Tips & Ideas for Activities) (http://www.amazon.com/Raising-Your-Daughter-Ages-ebook/dp/B003WQBFJE/ref=pd_rhf_p_t_3)
Thank you, again, for all your on-going support and encouragement throughout this very lengthy process! I've put all participant's names (and references to all websites/blogs/books I could find) in the acknowledgement section in the back of the book. :snoopy: