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View Full Version : 2 weeks, or walk out?



thethinker42
08-06-2008, 05:06 AM
I should preface this by saying that, under normal circumstances, I don't believe in leaving a job without giving at least 2 weeks' notice. That said...

I put in my notice on Sunday. I was already going to leave in mid-September due to my upcoming move overseas, but I've decided to cut it shorter. For the first time ever, I'm seriously considering just walking out. It's not because the job sucks (it actually ROCKS), or because the people there suck (they're awesome), or anything. In fact, I really like the job and was rather bummed to be leaving it.

However, some things happened on Saturday night that left me feeling extremely uneasy and unsafe. Can't go into tremendous detail on a public board, but it involved some people being in places they didn't belong, trying to steal some things, and one of them acting in such a way that had me CONVINCED -- with good reason -- that he was going to pull a gun on me. We've had some escalating problems lately, but nothing this bold or brazen, and this is the first time there's actually been a threat to employee safety. And there is a strong suspicion that these people might be involved in a gang, and their activities are part of a gang initiation. I don't want to mess with that!

I didn't realize how much it bothered me until the next day. I had a hard time walking around the lot alone, even during the day. The thought of being there at night again seriously scares the hell out of me. Being in our office didn't make me feel any safer: the guys made it into our building, and at one point (as I found out later) the only thing separating them from me (alone) was an UNlocked door.

I've had the last two days off (my normal days off). I'm dreading going back tomorrow. I'm not an easily rattled person. I can sleep alone in a house that someone has tried to break into recently. I can venture into some of the more unsavory parts of town without too much anxiety. I'm careful and cautious, but generally not an easily frightened person.

But this...it's bothering me. A lot. I am sick to my stomach just thinking about going back.

I am very seriously considering just turning in my keys tomorrow and leaving.

At what point do you just say to hell with it and leave?

Siddow
08-06-2008, 05:12 AM
Two days ago. That's the point I would have said the hell with it.

Don't go.

Siddow
08-06-2008, 05:15 AM
Another thought: do you need to come back to this job at some point? That might make a difference in how you handle it. If you don't, I'd just call and let them know you decided to split, and call them from overseas to say why. If you want to come back, I'd tell them why now.

Either way, if you care about these folks, you probably want to let them know what happened so it doesn't happen to them.

akiwiguy
08-06-2008, 05:18 AM
Given your word "escalating", I'd get out now. I'm not a great believer in laying everything on the line for employers. At the end of the day as employees we're dispensible, fact of life, and I think it's look after #1.

A bit simplistic, and I'm kinda guessing the situation, but screw giving notice if it compromises your safety. I always ask myself in those situations... does anyone seriously at the end of the day care enough about me that I owe it to them?

thethinker42
08-06-2008, 05:18 AM
Another thought: do you need to come back to this job at some point? That might make a difference in how you handle it. If you don't, I'd just call and let them know you decided to split, and call them from overseas to say why. If you want to come back, I'd tell them why now.

I don't think so. It'll be at least 3 years before I'm stateside again, and I don't know that I could convince myself to go back to that job.


Either way, if you care about these folks, you probably want to let them know what happened so it doesn't happen to them.

They already know what happened, trust me. I called two of the other managers after I got off the phone with the police, and it's traveling very quickly up the chain. I definitely wouldn't let something like this slide, believe me.

thethinker42
08-06-2008, 05:23 AM
Given your word "escalating", I'd get out now. I'm not a great believer in laying everything on the line for employers. At the end of the day as employees we're dispensible, fact of life, and I think it's look after #1.

True...my life/safety is definitely worth more than the merchandise I'm protecting.


A bit simplistic, and I'm kinda guessing the situation, but screw giving notice if it compromises your safety. I always ask myself in those situations... does anyone seriously at the end of the day care enough about me that I owe it to them?

Good point. I think my immediate chain of command (can't tell I'm from a military family, can you?) genuinely cares about my safety...and they do all seem to care about us and about each other...which is probably why I'm hesitating to do what almost seems like screwing them over.

It's like neither option -- waiting OR walking -- leaves me with a good feeling at all.

Pagey's_Girl
08-06-2008, 05:34 AM
If it were me, I wouldn't go back. My responsibility to protect my own life far outweighs my responsibility to any employer.

ETA - Listen to that gut feeling. Seriously.

Williebee
08-06-2008, 05:41 AM
Okinawa, huh? I graduated from high school there.

One question: Will you walking out of there impact your next job? I still wouldn't go back, but it would change how I dealt with it.

You have a family. From what you've described, further involvement with work might "come home".

That, for me, is a deal breaker.

Good luck.

Siddow
08-06-2008, 05:44 AM
Good point. I think my immediate chain of command (can't tell I'm from a military family, can you?) genuinely cares about my safety...and they do all seem to care about us and about each other...which is probably why I'm hesitating to do what almost seems like screwing them over.

It's like neither option -- waiting OR walking -- leaves me with a good feeling at all.

Think about this: at your funeral, do you think they would stand over your body and say, "To think she almost screwed us over by not showing up that day!"

Huh, do ya?

nerds
08-06-2008, 05:55 AM
Once in a while life presents us with genuine, straightforward no-brainers. This is one of those moments.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
08-06-2008, 05:55 AM
Human beings are the only animals who force themselves to ignore feelings necessary for self-preservation... IOW: Don't go back.

Perks
08-06-2008, 06:01 AM
I've said this a couple of times - the human animal is the only one that willfully suppresses instinct.

Do what you need to do.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
08-06-2008, 06:05 AM
::OFG thinks, So! Perks is the one I stole that from!::

Perks
08-06-2008, 06:08 AM
We're probably are only syncopated geniuses.

maestrowork
08-06-2008, 06:12 AM
Is it your life or is it your life?

Trust your instinct and feelings.

Besides, what's the difference between staying there for a few more weeks and getting out now, if you're going to leave anyway?

The truth is, nobody is going to care if you show up for work tomorrow or not -- at least not in a few days or weeks, at most.

Siddow
08-06-2008, 06:14 AM
We're probably are only syncopated geniuses.

Or syndicated genies.

http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BODQxNTA5MDUyNl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwMTU1MTQ2._V1._ CR0,0,334,334_SS90_.jpg

Perks
08-06-2008, 06:15 AM
Or syndicated genies.

http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BODQxNTA5MDUyNl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwMTU1MTQ2._V1._ CR0,0,334,334_SS90_.jpgThat'd be good. I could use some residual income.

shakeysix
08-06-2008, 06:17 AM
walk and don't look back.--s6

MoonWriter
08-06-2008, 06:18 AM
I'll cast my vote to keep the decision unanimous: don't go back. If something happened to you, your two cats would miss you. Okay, your husband might miss you too.

benbradley
08-06-2008, 06:19 AM
True...my life/safety is definitely worth more than the merchandise I'm protecting.



Good point. I think my immediate chain of command (can't tell I'm from a military family, can you?) genuinely cares about my safety...and they do all seem to care about us and about each other...which is probably why I'm hesitating to do what almost seems like screwing them over.

It's like neither option -- waiting OR walking -- leaves me with a good feeling at all.
By not showing up, they'll either think something BAD happened to you, or you "chickened out" about going back. I doubt they'd feel screwed over by YOU quitting that way, after you've already told them what you know/saw and your concerns. If they have any sense at all (and it sounds like they do), they'll see they got "screwed over" by unsavory and illegal activity that scared an employee so bad she quit with no notice.

Can you call a manager you trust and who already knows the situation and say "Sorry, but it's all just too much for me, I'm not going back to work." That should be all the explanation they need. Is there some reason you'd feel unsafe doing that?

Do you have any reason to feel that NOT going back would be dangerous, or is it just that you feel you'd be screwing over this company that's been good to you? Worst case with walking out (not going back), you can apologize and explain sometime down the road.

Human beings are the only animals who force themselves to ignore feelings necessary for self-preservation... IOW: Don't go back.

I've said this a couple of time - the human animal is the only one that willfully suppresses instinct.

Do what you need to do.
Looks like a consensus.

CBumpkin
08-06-2008, 07:21 AM
If you still have anything personal at work, go back to pick it up and send your boss an e-mail about the incident and then leave. They deserve to know why you're not showing up for work anymore.

If you don't have anything there to pack-up and bring home, then just call your boss or e-mail him/her from home as to why you won't be finishing out your notice. But leave. As many have said, it's YOUR life and YOU make the decisions.

Judg
08-06-2008, 07:32 AM
I agree that you should at least notify them. But I think the moral obligation to preserve your life ranks higher than the obligation to give two weeks' notice. And if they are at all reasonable, they will understand that.

willfulone
08-06-2008, 07:34 AM
You have a right to a work environment that is not hostile. It is even part of the discrimination laws and you can win suits for it. Just saying, if you feel unsafe (sounds like you do and if a gun is involved by another party - you have justified fear), then you have a right to not go until there is safety. Is the employer going to get rid of the others involved? By now, if you reported it, someone knows it was you that told and that may make you a target for some not so nice things.

Example from my history:

I worked for an employer that had a nasty truck driver. The driver reported to me and did not like dispatch by a female. He spit in my face one day when he was upset with a run. My boss witnessed the whole deal and gave the dude a "time out" (afternoon off without pay). I did not want to go back, but I did. I have a nice little scar on my arm where his metal clipboard hit and cut me the next time he came into work and did not like his run. Enough of that, I left that day and did not look back.

Your safety, well being and health come before your loyalty to anyone (other than those you love and choose to protect).

Fraulein
08-06-2008, 07:41 AM
Call in sick until your time's up. ;)


Errr.... I just found out that I have the flu.... Errr.... I'm sick as a dog. Errr.... I don't know when I'll be able to come back. I'll let you know when I start to feel better. Errr....

nighttimer
08-06-2008, 09:34 AM
I am very seriously considering just turning in my keys tomorrow and leaving.

At what point do you just say to hell with it and leave?

Your handle is "The Thinker?" Then think about this.

I've had a few jobs I thought I'd be willing to kill for, but I've never had a job I was willing to die for.

If you don't feel safe you probably aren't safe. Fear is can be your best friend. Don't ignore it.

I used to work in a state unemployment office and I can tell you from experience, unless there is a company policy that requires you to give two weeks notice you don't. They sure don't have to give you two weeks notice before they decide to fire your ass.

Don't go back. Let a friend pick up whatever you left behind. Move on.

Keyan
08-06-2008, 10:21 AM
If you don't feel safe, don't go back. You've made sure they know what's happening. That's enough. You don't *have* to go back. Tell them you can be reached on the phone if there's something really important (like a password you forgot to tell them...)

Organizations are built to survive peoples' departure. You can tell you boss you're sorry, you can call or e-mail your co-workers.

Joe270
08-06-2008, 10:41 AM
You must, at least, call in advance to let them know you are okay. It would be cruel to your co-workers to think that, perhaps, those same people had done something to you.

I would think a heart-to-heart phone conversation with your boss/supervisor would be in order, too. If the atmosphere is that unsafe, you owe that to your co-workers as well.

If they can ensure you the workplace will be safe with added security, return to support your co-workers.

If they can't, contact all the co-workers and stage a walk-out so management understands how seriously you ALL consider the situation in the workplace.

Anything less leaves your friends and coworkers vulnerable. You are in a unique position to push the issue. Please do so. It will ease your mind after you leave.

How would you feel if someone was harmed after your departure and you knew this was an unsafe workplace?

As I said, do it for your own peace of mind.

Phoebe H
08-06-2008, 10:54 AM
Any supervisor worth working for would understand immediately that you couldn't go back to work there after that experience.

Which is to say, if they give you any flak, they're not worth it.

If you need to go back to get your stuff, make sure you do it just a bit before lunch time, so you can have one last lunch with your friends.

Cassiopeia
08-06-2008, 11:08 AM
Work is hard enough without feeling threatened. I know just how you feel and wished I'd walked out on a job when I was blatantly threatened by an employee I was forced to let go. I stayed on with the support of my bosses until two weeks later when they let me go without warning the day after I got home from my mother's funeral.

I had gone to work for two weeks dreading each day not knowing if that creep would come get me and I lost my job anyway and then felt like a loser.

Do what you feel is best.

JoNightshade
08-06-2008, 11:14 AM
I think you'll find most (reasonable) people are understanding. I left a job once without notice (okay it was a part time cleaning job) simply because the parking lot I had to walk to and from had no lighting and I was working at 10 PM. Be nice, but explain why you're not coming back.

dpaterso
08-06-2008, 11:49 AM
Gotta admit, I'm puzzled you're even considering setting foot in the place again.

Your company must have been getting ready to give your job to someone else anyway. If not, pffft to their poor planning.

Is it a money issue, do you need your wages right up till the day you leave the job? (Don't answer -- that's personal info -- I'm just voicing the thought.) How much is your safety worth?

-Derek

thethinker42
08-06-2008, 04:26 PM
Once in a while life presents us with genuine, straightforward no-brainers. This is one of those moments.

LOL Point taken...

thethinker42
08-06-2008, 04:30 PM
Can you call a manager you trust and who already knows the situation and say "Sorry, but it's all just too much for me, I'm not going back to work." That should be all the explanation they need. Is there some reason you'd feel unsafe doing that?

I talked to two of them last night, and they know I'm rattled. I think if I turn my keys in today, they'll understand. Guess I just needed confirmation of what I already knew.


Do you have any reason to feel that NOT going back would be dangerous, or is it just that you feel you'd be screwing over this company that's been good to you? Worst case with walking out (not going back), you can apologize and explain sometime down the road.

I don't have any reason to feel unsafe about NOT going back...just that nagging conscience.

I guess I just needed to hear it from an outside source. I'm not usually one to ignore or second guess my gut feelings, intuition, etc., but this one made me stop and think for some reason.

Yikes...I must totally sound like someone who hesitates to leave an abusive spouse because I might hurt his feelings...

thethinker42
08-06-2008, 04:34 PM
Is the employer going to get rid of the others involved? By now, if you reported it, someone knows it was you that told and that may make you a target for some not so nice things.

Hadn't actually thought about that part. There is *some* suspicion that it's an inside job, and I'm probably one of the LEAST popular managers among some of the less savory employees I have ('cause I do things like...you know...make them do their job, make them get off their cell phones, write them up for things they've been warned about 3,000 times, etc).

The four guys that showed up that night do not work for us...I had never seen them before...but now that you mention it, I really do have to wonder if they KNOW some of our guys.

Good point. Methinks I'll be turning in my keys...

ChaosTitan
08-06-2008, 05:13 PM
The truth is, nobody is going to care if you show up for work tomorrow or not -- at least not in a few days or weeks, at most.

I don't know what sort of company thethinker works for, but if one of my employees suddenly decided to stop showing up for work (as they've done in the past), I'd certainly care. I'd be scrambling to find someone to fill in for them, and at the same time wondering why they stopped showing up. Their safety is the first thing I consider when someone's late or misses a shift. People do care, even upper management.

And even if an employer knows an employee is leaving, it does take time to fill a position. I gave my notice a month ago (I'm moving out of state next week), but my position still isn't filled. Why? It's not as easy as inserting Replacement Human Being into the job I did.

I do want thethinker to do what she thinks is right for her, and if turning in her keys is it, fine. But I hate seeing negative generalizations about employers/management.

thethinker42
08-06-2008, 06:20 PM
Eet eez done.

They took it really well, and my general manager and I had a long discussion about everything that happened the other night. They said I could even use them as a reference if I needed to, because they totally understood why I was leaving the way I did. My immediate supervisor even had one of our drivers take me home (I had turned in my company car and didn't have a ride home).

Color me relieved...

nerds
08-06-2008, 07:04 PM
Eet eez done.


Color me relieved...


EXCELLENT. Thanks for letting us know. Well done.

Judg
08-07-2008, 03:23 AM
Glad it worked out so well.

emeraldcite
08-07-2008, 03:54 AM
Glad that worked out. I was just about to add that you should get out. If they're aware of the situation, they'd understand. And they did. Good news.