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Fraulein
07-30-2008, 10:12 PM
What kind of mood are you in whenever you write?

I'm usually in a dark mood, which usually results in dark writing. This kind of puts a wrench into the prospect of being a writer, because I don't consider myself a dark person, and I don't feel like I would fit into the horror genre. I'm shy and fairly distant socially, but I don't think that's equivalent to "dark".

So... I'm having an identity crisis, if you will.

Also, whenever I have an intense moment of introspection or reflection, it's usually about something tragic or painful. This doesn't bother me though, and I would never try to hide myself from this kind of experience.

I don't care whether or not my writing is sunny-side up, but I would like to know if it's possible to be dark and productive without being gory and gruesome? Perhaps someone knows of another author who fits this description.
Thanks. :e2writer:

Provrb1810meggy
07-30-2008, 10:15 PM
I just finished reading The Scarlet Letter, which is obviously not a horror, but it deals with the darker parts of life, human nature, etc.

Soccer Mom
07-30-2008, 10:19 PM
Don't sweat it. Some writers are dark and moody. Some are sweet and silly. Don't try to wedge yourself into a mold. Write the way you want. Seriously. Dark isn't just for horror.

Danger Jane
07-30-2008, 10:25 PM
Don't sweat it, like Soccer Mom said. It takes all types.

Fraulein
07-30-2008, 10:30 PM
I've gotta leave for work really soon, but I would like to get back to everyone. I really appreciate your input. :D

Mr. Anonymous
07-30-2008, 11:33 PM
I think some darkness is always necessary in anything you write. After all, the life we try so hard to emulate and capture in words as writers is oft not very sunny side up.

BlueTexas
07-31-2008, 05:43 AM
After all, the life we try so hard to emulate and capture in words as writers is oft not very sunny side up.

If it was all sunny side up, there'd be nothing to write about - no conflict.

Write what you want, classify it later.

Fraulein
07-31-2008, 06:25 AM
I just finished reading The Scarlet Letter, which is obviously not a horror, but it deals with the darker parts of life, human nature, etc.I remember reading that book in high school. You're right. It's dark, but not horrific.

It's a classic, and it's dark sort of like Romeo and Juliet or Oedipus.


Don't sweat it. Some writers are dark and moody. Some are sweet and silly. Don't try to wedge yourself into a mold. Write the way you want. Seriously. Dark isn't just for horror.That makes me feel a heck of a lot better. It seems like all of the editors and agents are looking for self-help or fantasy stuff, or maybe that's just the type of mold that I've come across. I think if I were to write a book like that, I would only write one of each in my entire life. I guess I feel like the happy, silly stuff is something that I would rather experience in life than read, report, or write about. :e2hammer:


Don't sweat it, like Soccer Mom said. It takes all types.Thanks for the support. :)

There's nothing worse than feeling like the odd one out...


I think some darkness is always necessary in anything you write. After all, the life we try so hard to emulate and capture in words as writers is oft not very sunny side up.I hadn't thought of it that way. I just figured that most people want to read about aspects of life that are not inherently theirs, i.e. wealth, fame, or success.


If it was all sunny side up, there'd be nothing to write about - no conflict.

Write what you want, classify it later.That's great advice. A novel is a novel, right?


Thanks everyone. I'm happy to have read all of your posts. Rep points are on the way...

Alpha Echo
07-31-2008, 06:27 AM
I don't think a dark mood is problematic. I've written in a good mood...and lately if I want to write I HAVE to do it in a dark mood.

I think it would always be problematic if you end up in a good mood, but then...

No, it would still be okay. If you publish three novels in a dark mood, but then are suddenly in a good mood and write light-hearted stuff, just write under a different pen name and keep writing!

The point is, you're writing.

Mandy-Jane
07-31-2008, 06:48 AM
I'm sure a dark mood can result in some brilliant writing. Myself, I can't do it at all if I'm not in a good place emotionally.

Fraulein
07-31-2008, 06:56 AM
I don't think a dark mood is problematic. I've written in a good mood...and lately if I want to write I HAVE to do it in a dark mood.

I think it would always be problematic if you end up in a good mood, but then...

No, it would still be okay. If you publish three novels in a dark mood, but then are suddenly in a good mood and write light-hearted stuff, just write under a different pen name and keep writing!

The point is, you're writing.I'm going to keep that in mind whenever the times comes. It's especially important for growth and vitality. :e2BIC:

SPMiller
07-31-2008, 08:07 AM
I usually write in fantasy, and my stories are always dark. Mind you, I've not sold anything significant yet, but I will. If there were ever a genre that could be accused of lightheartedness... well, I guess that would be romance, but fantasy would be a close second! If I can get away with it, you will too.

tehuti88
07-31-2008, 09:09 PM
I'm in all kinds of moods when I write; it just depends on that day's circumstances or my current mental state. I don't tend to project my current emotional state into my writing, though. Otherwise it'd all be very angry and depressing and not worth reading. Somehow I keep the two separate, though I'm afraid I couldn't tell you how. It's just a part of how I've always kept "myself" out of my work, even if I do work in personal emotions, reactions, beliefs, and experiences. I just pass them on to my characters and keep "myself" out of it.

I think there's a place for dark writing that isn't gruesome. In fact, I wouldn't equate "dark" with "gruesome" unless the two are specifically linked (e. g., "dark horror" or something). I'm not a "dark writer," or even much of a dark person (despite my near-constant depression and anger and mulling over dark things), but there are dark elements in my work sometimes. When somebody called a sequel story of mine "considerably darker than the original," I took it as quite a compliment, because yes, it was a darker story. Not dark, just darker.

There seems to be lots of fluidity with the concept of "dark" and how it can be used, so I wouldn't worry too much.