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KikiteNeko
07-29-2008, 11:00 PM
I need to know anything and everything you might have to offer about bees, including but not limited to:

-Where they might build a nest in a back yard
-Time of year they're most likely to build said nest
-What the nest would look like
-If there would be honey, twigs, leaves or anything stuck to the outside of the nest
-If two children prodded at a nest, but one of the two children ran, would the bees likely sting the child who stays, or chase the one who runs off?
-what will make bees relent? Will spraying them with the hose get them temporarily away?
-If someone is not allergic to bees, but is stung in excess, is it still life-threatening? What are some home remedies to bee stings?

MelancholyMan
07-29-2008, 11:12 PM
They sting so I stay away from them.

Sounds like you need to read a good book on bees.

-MM

dirtsider
07-29-2008, 11:22 PM
1. Try your normal Google-fu and see what you can find under "apiary". (Wikipedia defines 'apiary' as the "beeyard".) I just did and there seemed to be a decent amount of websites dedicated to it.

2. Howell Living History Farm has several colonies on site, which requires a beekeeper to tend to them regularly. I know they have one Saturday event dedicated to tending the hives themselves and one for harvesting the honey. If you can't get out there, try sending an email to the email address listed on their website (www.howellfarm.com), requesting information on bees. What they can't answer, I"m sure they can probably give you suggestions on where to go to get more information.

3. Try your local department of agriculture and see if they have a beekeeper on staff. I know they have one for my county. He's the one who tends the Howell Farm hives.

4. No, it's unlikely to have honey on the outside of the hive itself. That's food, both for their eggs and the bees themselves so they're not going to waste it by putting it on the outside of their hives.

5. Watch "Ullie's Gold". It came out several years ago but it's about a beekeeper. It focuses mostly on Ullie's family problems but it's got some good visuals on the bee business, at least for starters.

Finni
07-29-2008, 11:36 PM
Isn't smoke a good way to keep them at a distance? Water would just piss 'em off.
If stung enough a person can die.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/aa159

Sarpedon
07-30-2008, 12:02 AM
If you are talking about wild honey bees, I believe they prefer to make their hives inside hollow objects. A tree stump, or a leftover flowerpot (preferably upended with a hole in the bottom)

A bee doesn't have much of a brain, so when in attack mode I doubt it can tell the difference between the rock thrower and the innocent bystander. It probably doesn't even understand the concept of rock throwing, just that the nest is disturbed and it needs to sting something.

I'm told that an adult human can outrun bees, I presume they'll stop chasing after a while. the only other way to deter them is smoke or immersion in water. Spraying them with a hose will only stop the ones you manage to hit with the hose.

Captshady
07-30-2008, 12:37 AM
-If someone is not allergic to bees, but is stung in excess, is it still life-threatening?

I ran over a bee hive with my lawn mower, and was stung over 200 times. I ran, and they chased. The initial attack was exactly like a cartoon. This big black LOUD cloud shot up into the sky, then came at me. I later found out that if you're running from bees, it's best to run toward the sun, in a zig-zag pattern, which I didn't do.

After I got the bees away, suddenly I couldn't breathe. It felt as if I could exhale for only a second or two, and only inhale for a fraction of a second. I was 100% convinced beyond a doubt, that I was going to die. (One of the symptoms of anaphylactic shock is a sense of impending doom).

When I got to the hospital, I was given a breathing treatment (albuterol) and an I.V. injection of epinephrine. The Epinephrine made my heart feel like it was going to jump out of my chest. I told the nurse, who said it was supposed to do that, and a second or two later, she tells another nurse, kind of quietly "he's going into V-TAC, get the crash cart." Well, I didn't know what V-TAC was, but I'd seen enough episodes of ER to know that "get the crash cart" ain't a positive thing.

I was told that even though I wasn't allergic to bee stings before, that I am now allergic to all flying, stinging insects. I have an epi-pen, that I carry with me at all times, in case of bee sting. Oddly enough, I got stung about 2 weeks ago by a paper wasp, and decided not to give myself the shot, but had it ready, just in case. I didn't go into shock, my breathing wasn't shortened, and my heart didn't go crazy. I have no idea what that means.


What are some home remedies to bee stings?

Bennadryl. It even helps with the swelling.

Perks
07-30-2008, 12:52 AM
I know that a bee will fly up your nose if it gets sucked into the jetstream of a passing car just so. And if you inhale, you will swallow it.

I can still feel its legs scrabbling deep down between my eyes. It's only been thirty-four years. I'm hoping the memory will fade one day.

veinglory
07-30-2008, 12:56 AM
Honey bees general just use a hollow tree or some such. So all you see is a few bees going in and out of a hole.

Ken
07-30-2008, 12:57 AM
they're attracted to yellow clothes.
Pretty friendly though if not antagonized.
Bored stiff at an outdoor party I went to last summer I gave sips of my soda to several buzzing about the table who seemed very appreciative.

Sarpedon
07-30-2008, 01:17 AM
Don't confuse yellowjackets with honeybees.

Yellowjackets are the ones that will bother you at picnics. Honeybees will not.

Yellowjackets are a kind of wasp, and are actually carnivorous, but apparently like sweet stuff too.

Wasps are the nemeses of bees.

Finni
07-30-2008, 01:27 AM
I know that a bee will fly up your nose if it gets sucked into the jetstream of a passing car just so. And if you inhale, you will swallow it.

I can still feel its legs scrabbling deep down between my eyes. It's only been thirty-four years. I'm hoping the memory will fade one day.


Thanks...I was running out of things to be terrified of.

I'm gonna have nightmares tonight.

Fern
07-30-2008, 01:50 AM
We have a huge crepe myrtle tree in our front yard. In the middle of the tree, a wild rose bush has grown, climbing the tree. Bees live in there somewhere. Early mornings you can hear the loud hum coming from the tree. We steer clear. I'll have to wait until winter and all leaves are gone to see whats in there.

Course, there are different kinds of bees. The bumble bees used to provide Sunday afternoons of entertainment for us as kids. We each got a flat piece of board, flyswat, broom handle, etc. and walked around the house (outside) batting bumble bees.

Fenika
07-30-2008, 03:09 AM
Dewey M. Caron wrote a great apiology book that can help you with a lot of details.

A quick reply, as others have helped you out:
-Where they might build a nest in a back yard
We had some in a hollowed out section of a tree trunk in our back yard. As others said, trees are a favorite...
-Time of year they're most likely to build said nest
They will swarm at certain times of the year, but live in an established hive year round
-What the nest would look like
Working on getting you a pic, but google images for ideas
-If there would be honey, twigs, leaves or anything stuck to the outside of the nest
They are pretty clean critters. Not likely to have any of that hanging around as their housekeepers do a good job.
-If two children prodded at a nest, but one of the two children ran, would the bees likely sting the child who stays, or chase the one who runs off?
Both. I got stung five times by a nest of bees- most of them when I was near the tree and one after I was 1/2 a block away. (Although only 2/3rd of us who were there got stung that day)
-what will make bees relent? Will spraying them with the hose get them temporarily away?
Maybe. Prolly would make them more pissed and they'd come back with more numbers. They let off a hormone that recruits more angry bees

Hope that helped.

C.bronco
07-30-2008, 04:38 AM
Bees like my holly bush.
The cold and smoke make them slow.

I saw The Bee Movie, but I don't know if there are any actual facts in it.

chevbrock
07-30-2008, 05:10 AM
I wouldn't try "Bee Movie" as a source of facts. I don't think they have a Krelman in the hive, for example! :)

Keyan
07-30-2008, 06:09 AM
I ran over a bee hive with my lawn mower, and was stung over 200 times. I ran, and they chased. The initial attack was exactly like a cartoon. This big black LOUD cloud shot up into the sky, then came at me. I later found out that if you're running from bees, it's best to run toward the sun, in a zig-zag pattern, which I didn't do.

After I got the bees away, suddenly I couldn't breathe. It felt as if I could exhale for only a second or two, and only inhale for a fraction of a second. I was 100% convinced beyond a doubt, that I was going to die. (One of the symptoms of anaphylactic shock is a sense of impending doom).

When I got to the hospital, I was given a breathing treatment (albuterol) and an I.V. injection of epinephrine. The Epinephrine made my heart feel like it was going to jump out of my chest. I told the nurse, who said it was supposed to do that, and a second or two later, she tells another nurse, kind of quietly "he's going into V-TAC, get the crash cart." Well, I didn't know what V-TAC was, but I'd seen enough episodes of ER to know that "get the crash cart" ain't a positive thing.

I was told that even though I wasn't allergic to bee stings before, that I am now allergic to all flying, stinging insects. I have an epi-pen, that I carry with me at all times, in case of bee sting. Oddly enough, I got stung about 2 weeks ago by a paper wasp, and decided not to give myself the shot, but had it ready, just in case. I didn't go into shock, my breathing wasn't shortened, and my heart didn't go crazy. I have no idea what that means.



Bennadryl. It even helps with the swelling.

Wow. Glad it came out OK.

Did they say that it would innoculate you against arthritis? I've heard that.

Captshady
07-30-2008, 07:00 AM
Wow. Glad it came out OK.

Did they say that it would innoculate you against arthritis? I've heard that.

Thanks. The whole experience was so horrifying, that this is the only thing I'll still grasp at for sympathy. If I'm now innoculated, you're the first to mention it.

hammerklavier
07-30-2008, 08:15 AM
They typically build in hollow trees or logs or other similar objects.

They will occasionally throw small sections of used, empty honeycomb out of the hive.

Despite their good reputation they will sometimes sting someone just for walking by (but aren't as bad about that as other bees). Once they start swarming they would probably sting both kids.

The cliche is to jump in the lake, so maybe water would get them off.

Chameleon
07-30-2008, 09:17 AM
I need to know anything and everything you might have to offer about bees, including but not limited to:


I've never been stung by a bee. I think of that as an accomplishment.

Another bizarre fact about bees: they are disappearing. They are leaving their hives behind in masses. The scientists have all sorts of theories about that i.e. pesticides, colony collapse disorder, etc..http://www.startribune.com/business/11222981.html

Priene
07-30-2008, 12:32 PM
You can be stung by a dead bee. My foot learned that on a boating holiday.

Bmwhtly
07-30-2008, 02:06 PM
I need to know anything and everything you might have to offer about beesTheir buzzing isn't made by their wings, nor their legs.
It's mostly made by what are called ventricles. Which are breathing tubes along their furry bit.

JimmyB27
07-30-2008, 03:59 PM
My sister, when she was about six or seven, learned that if you try to eat a bee, it will sting you. (One landed on her ice lolly and she didn't notice until it was too late).

Bmwhtly
07-30-2008, 05:10 PM
I saw The Bee Movie, but I don't know if there are any actual facts in it.
Speaking of which, if "my name is earl" is accurate (*snort*) Bee's can be used by Karma as punishment.

smoothseas
07-30-2008, 07:28 PM
Lawdy, Miss Scarlett, don't know nuthin' 'bout no bees; 'ceptin,' that without 'em the whole damn planet would starve....

Kathie Freeman
07-30-2008, 08:19 PM
You can be stung by a dead bee. My foot learned that on a boating holiday.

What, you never saw "To Have And Have Not"? There is a whole schtick in there between Lauren Bacall and Walter Brennan about being stung by a dead bee.

A few years ago I came across an old beehive in the wall while renovating the garage of the house we had just moved into. Not sure how they got in there, but someone had punched a hole in the inside drywall just above the nest. Maybe they heard the buzzing and got curious.

Mike Martyn
07-30-2008, 09:56 PM
[quote=Captshady;2601137]I ran over a bee hive with my lawn mower, and was stung over 200 times. end quote

Are you sure it wasn't a wasps nest? Honey bees don't typically build nests underground.

Bees have a barbed stinger and when they sting they die because they can't get their stinger out. Usually the person stung sweeps away the bee ripping it away from the stinger which remains behind together with the poision gland which keeps on pumping. Wasps on the other hand have a smooth stinger and so they can sting mutiple times.

I know a little bit about honey bees since I worked in an apiary when I was a boy.

Bees are not aggresssive since they've been breed over the millenia that way.

Wasps, hornets etc. are very aggressive. One of my child hood dares was to throw a rock at a wasps nest then run. You always got stung usually mutiple times. The boy with the most stings was usually considered the winner.

I'd have your charcter throw it at a wasps nest. Those are teh grey papery things which hang fro tree branches or inattics and sometimes under grpound.

Bees swarm when the hive gets too crowded. The workers hatch out another queen and half the hive swarms off with her. They will land on a bush or a branch with the queen at the center and scouts will zoom off in all directions looking for a suitable hollow tree. A good bee keeper can carefuly reach into a swarm, sweep the queen into a big sack then hold it up. All the bees will swarm in after her.

The bee keeeper I worked for had a smoker. It was a can about ten inches square with a bellows attached. You build a smoky fire in the can then pumped the bellows and smoke would come out of the spout. he seldom used it though forhe was very skilful.

Fenika
07-30-2008, 10:34 PM
[quote=Captshady;2601137]I ran over a bee hive with my lawn mower, and was stung over 200 times. end quote

Are you sure it wasn't a wasps nest? Honey bees don't typically build nests underground.



I learned about these in Okie: Ground bees (http://pestcontrolinfo.blogspot.com/2008/06/ground-bees-and-their-control.html)

Captshady
07-30-2008, 10:47 PM
Everyone thought they were ground bees, because it looked to me like this tremendous black cloud that came out of from underneath my mower. We found under an old empty trailer on our property, close to where I was mowing, a huge nest? hive? of bees, just after the attack:

http://a686.ac-images.myspacecdn.com/images01/90/l_ad2d2f78de792758d955c55015f6a315.jpg

Mike Martyn
07-31-2008, 01:37 AM
[quote=Mike Martyn;2604283]

I learned about these in Okie: Ground bees (http://pestcontrolinfo.blogspot.com/2008/06/ground-bees-and-their-control.html)

None of those referenced are honey bees. Honey bees are usually not aggressive but the one thng that really pisses them of is people calling wasps and hornets "Bees"

That's the buzz so bee-ware!

Captshady
07-31-2008, 06:55 AM
Bees have a sac of venom in their stingers, and their stingers are somewhat curved, and barbed, so they'll stay in when stung. The venom sacks are squeezed, and pump the venom in. They're ripped out of the bee (which is why they die) and pheromone is released, tripping an alarm for the others. Supposedly they'll release the pheromone on their own, if swatted at. All this came from my E.R. doc, btw.

Keyan
07-31-2008, 07:21 AM
Thanks. The whole experience was so horrifying, that this is the only thing I'll still grasp at for sympathy. If I'm now innoculated, you're the first to mention it.

Well, I hope you are... it mightn't be enough compensation, but it's better than nothing.

http://arthritis.about.com/b/2004/11/08/bee-venom-may-soothe-rheumatoid-arthritis.htm

GeorgeK
08-02-2008, 09:07 AM
Everyone thought they were ground bees, because it looked to me like this tremendous black cloud that came out of from underneath my mower. We found under an old empty trailer on our property, close to where I was mowing, a huge nest? hive? of bees, just after the attack:

http://a686.ac-images.myspacecdn.com/images01/90/l_ad2d2f78de792758d955c55015f6a315.jpg

The picture is very dark, but having a mower NEAR a swarm is very different than mowing OVER one. If there are insects actually coming out of a hole in the ground, they are likely ground hornets (aka yellow jackets) and the thing there is to leave the mower and run. If they are honeybees, hanging from something like it sort of looks like in the pictures, you have a swarm, not a hive. A swarm will eventually build a hive or move away to find a place better suited. If they are honeybees, please call your Ag extension rather than an exterminator. Honeybees are getting decimated and if there are resistant strains to whatever is killing them, they need to be preserved. (Or better than an Ag extension, see if there is a local Bee Farmer (Apiary) They'll probably come take the swarm for free.

Menyanthana
08-02-2008, 01:25 PM
-what will make bees relent? Will spraying them with the hose get them temporarily away?

Use smoke. It keeps them busy (They think their house is burning and try to take all the honey with them before they flee)