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cray
07-25-2008, 05:06 AM
i made ribs for the first time a few weeks ago.
not great.

i smoked them in a charcoal water smoker for about 6 hours or so. they had good flavor but the meat was not tender at all. yes. i removed the membrane.

i’d really like to give it another go ‘cause they are so good for you and all. there's a secret, right? what is it? anyone out there have any good rib recipes and cooking techniques????

Captshady
07-25-2008, 05:09 AM
They need to stay on the grill for at least a half hour per pound ... if it wasn't tender, I would guess the temp's too high.

One trick you might want to try is to put them in your oven for half the cooking time.

C.bronco
07-25-2008, 05:09 AM
My husband makes the best ribs.

Rub w/ kosher salt and pepper.
Cook at 250 for 6 hours.
Drain pans and put back in oven for an hour.
Cover with Jack Dainel's BBQ sauce.
Cook at 250 another hour.
Crisp on grill.

2 racks will last 5 minutes.

cray
07-25-2008, 04:17 PM
i wanna bump this up so maybe the day-timers will take notice

oh, and i forgot to mention that i did finish them up on a direct heat grill for about 10mins or so.

thanks for the replies.
cbronco,...i'm prolly close enough where i can just come and eat ribs at your house.
maybe i should just abandon this whole project. :D

Siddow
07-25-2008, 05:12 PM
I do mine like they do in the Bronco house. Just noting something she missed--cover the pans with tin foil.

auntybug
07-25-2008, 05:20 PM
I haven't tried this recipe but the best friggen ribs in the world came from Azeka's Market on Maui. (Also called Kalbi ribs)

5 lbs Beef Short Ribs

3/4 Cup Shoyu (Soy Sauce)

1/3 Cup Dark Sesame Oil

1/4 Cup White Sugar

3 Green Onions (Maui Sweets)

1 Tablespoon Fresh Garlic

1 Tablespoon Thinly Sliced Fresh Ginger Root

lostgirl
07-25-2008, 05:53 PM
I find that marinating the ribs for a couple hours at least before doing the baking process (the same that Siddow and C's hubby uses) helps to keep the meet juicy, tenderizes it, and gives it good flavor. otherwise I bake them but since I don't have a grill *sighs at my sadness* I broil them at the end to get some crisp to them.

lostgirl's marinade:

1/2 cup cooking wine (If I don't have wine, I use apple juice)
3 tbs olive oil
2 cloves chopped garlic
1/4 soy sauce
A couple shakes of Worcestershire Sauce (yeah an exact science.. LOL)

Captshady
07-25-2008, 06:30 PM
I haven't tried this recipe but the best friggen ribs in the world came from Azeka's Market on Maui. (Also called Kalbi ribs)

5 lbs Beef Short Ribs

3/4 Cup Shoyu (Soy Sauce)

1/3 Cup Dark Sesame Oil

1/4 Cup White Sugar

3 Green Onions (Maui Sweets)

1 Tablespoon Fresh Garlic

1 Tablespoon Thinly Sliced Fresh Ginger Root

That's how Koreans make kalbi, it's gooooood stuff!

Gravity
07-25-2008, 10:57 PM
Ohhh, lawzy. Now ya'll have got me jonesing for some ribs in a SERIOUS way. Guess me and Mrs. Gravity will be heading over to the Mongomery Inn tonight.

joyce
07-25-2008, 11:01 PM
I do the same as everyone else. I first bake them in the oven covered with foil and then finish them off on the grill with BBQ sauce.

Kitrianna
07-25-2008, 11:19 PM
I always marinate mine overnight when I do make ribs (which isn't very often). My father in-law cooks his in the smoker or the crock pot (depends on the time of year). Either way, his turn out great, but he cooks them for hours!

cray
07-25-2008, 11:31 PM
crock pot,..interesting idea.
huh.

anway, thanks for the replies everyone! keep 'em coming!



eta: i just spoke to someone who boils his for about an hour. then marinates overnight and then into the smoker for 5 or 6 hours.

tjwriter
07-27-2008, 09:31 PM
I'll have to ask my dad what method he uses. He's really become the master of the smoker. Everything he does is delicious. I know he uses a low temperature, but I'm not sure about the duration or his whole process.

My mom used to make ribs that were really good, too. She'd cut them up, boil them to cut down on the fat, covering them in sauce and putting them in covered pans in the oven.

*Has a pregnancy craving for ribs in addition to the eggrolls.*

kristie911
07-27-2008, 09:45 PM
I cut mine into smaller chunks (rather than an entire rack together), put then in a pan, cover them in spices like southwestern spice (for a little kick) and garlic powder. Cover with foil and bake at 300 degrees for 2-3 hours (I usually put just a bit of water in the pan too, to keep them moist and tender).

Then I throw them on a hot grill for a half hour, 45 minutes, basting with bbq sauce. (get the grill hot but turn it down when you put them on to prevent burning and flareups) I coat one side and let them cook for 15 or 20 minutes before flipping them over and basting the other side...that way the sauce really bakes on

To. Die. For. :D

cray
07-29-2008, 10:41 PM
update: i suck.

so, i went with my neighbors suggestion of boiling the ribs the night before and then into the smoker and then onto the grill.

well, i think they would have been good if i was paying attention,....
smoker was waaaaayyy too hot for waaayyyyy too long and as a result they were dry.
like leather.

gah!

i'll need to follow some of the instructions / suggestions above next time.
thanks everyone.

III
07-29-2008, 10:44 PM
Try basting them in Coke for 24 hours before cooking. It makes them tender and sweet. You can also baste them with Maple Syrup while cooking to make them extra-sweet (works great with chicken breast too). BBQ sauce can become boring if used too often.

cray
07-29-2008, 10:46 PM
coke? really?

never heard of that.


*wanders way mumbling,...*
rassin' frassin' texas fools....




eta: oh yea, thanks. i really just think i screwed up the cooking of them. way too hot.

ChaosTitan
08-03-2008, 03:36 AM
I always cook mine in the oven, and a bit differently from other folks (it's also a bit healthier).

I cut them up into individual ribs first, then boil them until about half-cooked. Line baking sheets with tin foil, then put on a foil-covered metal cooling rack. Put the ribs on the rack, so the grease drips down and add some water to the sheet (so nothing scorches down there).

Sprinkle with salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, and celery salt. Bake until that side starts to slightly brown. Turn them over, add more seasoning, and continue to bake until nice and crispy brown.

kikazaru
08-03-2008, 06:17 AM
I do mine like Kristie. I season the heck out of them with lots of garlic, salt and pepper, then I place them on a rack in my roasting pan that has about an inch of water in it (the rack keeps the ribs out of the water) and put the lid on. Place in oven at about 325 for 2 hours (this steams them which keeps them moist, and removes fat which can flare up on the bbq), remove, slather with your choice of bbq sauce, and place directly on the grill. I've read that allowing them to cool first makes them tougher. BBQ til brown and the sauce has caramelized.

Stacia Kane
08-03-2008, 06:02 PM
A friend of mine who was a chef used to Crock-Pot his in beer for six hours or so before grilling. It smelled awful but the ribs were fantastic.

cray
08-25-2008, 06:20 PM
update:

3rd time is a charm,...



A friend of mine who was a chef used to Crock-Pot his in beer for six hours or so before grilling. It smelled awful but the ribs were fantastic.

marinated them overnight in a double secret concoction.
crock pot for about 5 hours for the real cooking.
water smoker for about 1.5 hours to get some nice smokey flavor going.
then on to the direct heat grill for just a few minutes to finish them up.


i finally made some decent ribs!


i’ll update you on my cholesterol level in another thread :D

Shadow_Ferret
08-25-2008, 06:21 PM
I love the McRibb. I wish they'd make it a regular on their menu.

cray
08-25-2008, 06:22 PM
i never had the guts to try that,...that,....thing. :D

Shadow_Ferret
08-25-2008, 07:10 PM
More for me then. Because they're delicious.

aka eraser
09-08-2008, 08:28 PM
With all due humility, I must confess that I am (locally) famous for my ribs.

Here's the trick for superb bbq-d ribs, either pork or beef...

<looks left - then right - coast is clear - nobody's reading>

Cut ribs up (singles for beef, "twosies" for pork) and place them in a large, lidded pot of cold water. (I say "large" because I always cook at least two racks at a time and usually four or five.) Bring to boil.

IMMEDIATELY upon coming to a boil, turn the heat down and skim off the surface scum that's accumulated. When the water has settled into a slow simmer, put the lid back on, but ajar, lest it come to a boil again. You should just see occasional, faint little bubbles. (If the ribs boil for any longer than 5-8 minutes, you might as well eat your shoes.)

Simmer the ribs for at least 45 minutes. An hour is about perfect. (Simmer too long though, and they start falling off the bone. You don't want that to happen 'til they're on a plate.)

Drain and lay ribs out on a foil-lined baking sheet. (At this point, the ribs are actually cooked. Now our job is to add flavour.) I like to season them with garlic pepper and Montreal steak spice. If the latter isn't available where you are, use your favourite mixed herb spice (as long as it has lots of garlic). ;)

I like to spray the ribs with a light coating of Pam-type cooking oil spray before slathering on copious amounts of bbq sauce. (During this process, the bbq is pre-heating.)

With the bbq heated and then turned to low, put the sauce-slathered, meaty sides of the ribs on the (Pam-sprayed) grill. While they're (re)heating, brush sauce on the undersides of the ribs. Close lid (unless your bbq burns pretty hot).

After 3-6 minutes of cooking (don't let them scorch too much) turn ribs over and re-apply more sauce. Close lid again. After a couple of minutes, I turn the propane off and just let them stand in the bbq for another couple-few minutes.

Serve, and try to appear modest when the accolades roll in.

Sauces: For beef ribs, I like the Bulls-Eye sauces, made by Kraft, especially the Bold Original. These are strong-ish, pungent sauces that compliment beef nicely.

For pork, I usually go with a sweeter sauce. Many of the store brands of chicken n' rib or honey & garlic are acceptable (as long as they're thick - don't like a runny sauce.)

There's one particular sauce available in Canada that I like with either beef or pork. It's the President's Choice Smokin' Stampede Beer & Chipotle sauce available at the Loblaws' group of stores.

Shadow_Ferret
09-08-2008, 08:31 PM
McRib is back! McRib is back!

All's right with the world!

McRib is back!

cray
09-08-2008, 09:25 PM
With all due humility, I must confess that I am (locally) famous for my ribs.

Here's the trick for superb bbq-d ribs, either pork or beef...

<looks left - then right - coast is clear - nobody's reading>

Cut ribs up (singles for beef, "twosies" for pork) and place them in a large, lidded pot of cold water. (I say "large" because I always cook at least two racks at a time and usually four or five.) Bring to boil.

IMMEDIATELY upon coming to a boil, turn the heat down and skim off the surface scum that's accumulated. When the water has settled into a slow simmer, put the lid back on, but ajar, lest it come to a boil again. You should just see occasional, faint little bubbles. (If the ribs boil for any longer than 5-8 minutes, you might as well eat your shoes.)

Simmer the ribs for at least 45 minutes. An hour is about perfect. (Simmer too long though, and they start falling off the bone. You don't want that to happen 'til they're on a plate.)

Drain and lay ribs out on a foil-lined baking sheet. (At this point, the ribs are actually cooked. Now our job is to add flavour.) I like to season them with garlic pepper and Montreal steak spice. If the latter isn't available where you are, use your favourite mixed herb spice (as long as it has lots of garlic). ;)

I like to spray the ribs with a light coating of Pam-type cooking oil spray before slathering on copious amounts of bbq sauce. (During this process, the bbq is pre-heating.)

With the bbq heated and then turned to low, put the sauce-slathered, meaty sides of the ribs on the (Pam-sprayed) grill. While they're (re)heating, brush sauce on the undersides of the ribs. Close lid (unless your bbq burns pretty hot).

After 3-6 minutes of cooking (don't let them scorch too much) turn ribs over and re-apply more sauce. Close lid again. After a couple of minutes, I turn the propane off and just let them stand in the bbq for another couple-few minutes.

Serve, and try to appear modest when the accolades roll in.

Sauces: For beef ribs, I like the Bulls-Eye sauces, made by Kraft, especially the Bold Original. These are strong-ish, pungent sauces that compliment beef nicely.

For pork, I usually go with a sweeter sauce. Many of the store brands of chicken n' rib or honey & garlic are acceptable (as long as they're thick - don't like a runny sauce.)

There's one particular sauce available in Canada that I like with either beef or pork. It's the President's Choice Smokin' Stampede Beer & Chipotle sauce available at the Loblaws' group of stores.



*looks right,....looks left,..coast is clear*

*print*


awesome. thanks aka eraser!



McRib is back! McRib is back!

All's right with the world!

McRib is back!


you poor soul. :)

Chumplet
09-08-2008, 09:48 PM
aka, that is a lovely story you wrote. I used to simmer them, but now I do the foil bit in the oven, then spice it up. I make my own rub from No Salt or Mrs. Dash and some smoked paprika, along with garlic powder and anything else I can get my hands on, trying to keep the salt content down. I keep it in a little tin on the counter. It's never the same twice. I use it on everything - wings, steak, chicken breasts, whatever.

I don't get out to the barbecue nearly enough because my yard is so fugly.

Shadow_Ferret
09-08-2008, 09:52 PM
you lucky soul. :)
You had a typo in your post, but I corrected it.