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JoNightshade
07-24-2008, 05:45 AM
I need a good Russian curse - in English phonetics. All I can find when I google are curses in actual Russian letters, which mean relatively little to me. :) Of course it would also be nice to know an actual person had verified the language in question.

So the speaker in question is an older gentleman, well-read, he lives in America, and he's just discovered his son is following him around. This pisses him off. So I need a curse he can blurt out when he realizes he's being followed. I'm thinking something that is foul but marks him as a bit 'cultured.' Something that would be equivalent to, say, "You impudent little fuck!"

Ravenlocks
07-24-2008, 07:26 AM
If he's swearing about the discovery but not directly at the son, "Gospodi" might work, as in "Gospodi, what are you doing?" It's mild but would express annoyance. Literally it means "Lord," but they use it as a mild expletive.

The cultured Russians I've hung out with didn't curse much. The next level of curses I know is really vulgar.

JoNightshade
07-24-2008, 08:49 AM
Yes please, vulgar! Sorry, I didn't mean to say it shouldn't be vulgar. Vulgar is fine. :) I'm just hoping to lend a bit of a sense that he's not a bartender or something, you know what I mean?

RJK
07-24-2008, 06:31 PM
I just found this (http://www.insultmonger.com/swearing/russian.htm) by Googling your question. No guarantees.

Paichka
07-24-2008, 08:27 PM
When I was in high school, I took Russian, and we used to sing Russian folksongs as part of the lessons -- she was a big believer in getting us "beyond the vocabulary". We used to cook pilmeni and vereniki (meat & potato dumplings) in class, and watch Russian movies. It was fun.

Anyway, one of the songs we learned was "Milenki ti moi", which essentially means, "Dear One" or similar. It's a back & forth between a man and a woman, and the woman is begging the man to take her away with him. First she asks to be his wife, and he says he already has one; then she asks to be his sister, and he says he already has one; then she asks to be his "schuzoi", which is like an alien or stranger, and he tells her he doesn't NEED a schuzoi, so she ends the song telling him to go to hell.

She said (phonetically): Nu, e chort staboy! Which I think means, "The devil take you!" or something.

Anyway. Hope that helps. :)

MelancholyMan
07-24-2008, 08:42 PM
Grayrose/Greyrose/Gray Rose (can't remember which) is Russian I'm pretty sure. She posts on the forums pretty regularly. I'm sure she could help you here.

-MM

Gray Rose
07-24-2008, 10:07 PM
If he's swearing about the discovery but not directly at the son, "Gospodi" might work, as in "Gospodi, what are you doing?" It's mild but would express annoyance. Literally it means "Lord," but they use it as a mild expletive.

Not in this context, I'm afraid. You'd find gospodi more in contexts such as, Gospodi, za chto? 'Lord allmighty, what for [=why did this happen to me?]" And I think a woman is much more likely to say that than a man, imho.
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The cultured Russians I've hung out with didn't curse much. The next level of curses I know is really vulgar.

Russian men (and sometimes women) curse in "mat", which is very vulgar and involves genitalia, mothers, and combinations thereof. A cultured gentleman might, under the circumstances, let himself go if no women and children are present.

The relevant expression in this case would be either, yob tvoiu mat' 'fuck your mother' (if you use it, please don't mention me as a source), or the milder equivalent yo moye (spoken under one's breath). Another possibility is blyad' 'whore' (this is also quite vulgar and used often as an exclamation). There are much more elaborate versions, of course, but your gentleman wouldn't be using these.

What your gentleman would say, I suspect, is either one of these:

blin 'pancake' - an euphemism for bliad' 'whore'
sobaka 'dog' - but with lots of feeling, dragging the consonants, as in ssobbaka, or vot sobaka 'what a dog'
chert poberi 'the devil take [you]' - an old-fashioned curse that everybody well-read is rather fond of, in meaning it's more like, "oh, shit"
chert vozmi - same as chert poberi above. pretty mild
vot zasranec - 'what a (person who shat himself all over)'. This is, I think, what a father would use to curse his son.
Another variants that can fit into this construction 'vot ____________' are:
merzavec - SOB (woman is more likely to say this)
podonok - SOB, stronger than merzavec, still slight gender bias towards the fem., but a man can say this.
parshivec - dirty, pimply one (not sure exactly how to translate it, but it implies important problems with personal hygiene :) )

I think your gentleman is likely to go either with chert poberi, or with vot zasranec, blin (or other word order combinations for emphasis, i.e. vot blin zasranec)



Anyway, one of the songs we learned was "Milenki ti moi", which essentially means, "Dear One" or similar. It's a back & forth between a man and a woman, and the woman is begging the man to take her away with him. First she asks to be his wife, and he says he already has one; then she asks to be his sister, and he says he already has one; then she asks to be his "schuzoi", which is like an alien or stranger, and he tells her he doesn't NEED a schuzoi, so she ends the song telling him to go to hell.

She said (phonetically): Nu, e chort staboy! Which I think means, "The devil take you!" or something.

Anyway. Hope that helps. :)
In the version I know, the woman says absolutely nothing. it ends up with ...tam v strane dalekoj chuzhaya ty mne ne nuzhna 'there, in the far away land, I don't need you as a stranger'. I suspect your teacher added this one . Nu i chort s toboy means, 'the devil with you,' and is the equivalent of "well, whatever." I don't think it fits.



Grayrose/Greyrose/Gray Rose (can't remember which) is Russian I'm pretty sure. She posts on the forums pretty regularly. I'm sure she could help you here.

-MM
I am indeed. :D

Hope this helped. But please don't ask me to supply the curses in "three-storey mat" (the really vulgar variant). I can do it, but I'd rather not. :D

JoNightshade
07-25-2008, 01:10 AM
Oooooh!!! What a bunch of wonderful profanities you've given me to choose from!!! Now I'm torn between chert poberi and vot zasranec. Actually I think I'm going to go for the vot blin zasranec. If I combine your definitions, this means 'what a whore (who shat himself all over)' right? That's a great combination because from the macho-dad's perspective, the (adult) son is somewhat effeminate and childish.

I forgot to add before that the one thing this guy WOULDN'T do is say anything bad in reference to the son's mom.

JoNightshade
07-25-2008, 01:25 AM
Oh, and Rose - while I have you - any suggestions for a completely unpronounceable dog's name? I need it to be something that, if a Russian person said it, most English speakers would go "Huh? Could you repeat that? SLOWLY?"

Ravenlocks
07-25-2008, 05:08 AM
Not in this context, I'm afraid. You'd find gospodi more in contexts such as, Gospodi, za chto? 'Lord allmighty, what for [=why did this happen to me?]" And I think a woman is much more likely to say that than a man, imho.

To clarify, in case I was unclear, I wasn't using "Gospodi" to refer to the man's son. Just as a general exclamation. But in any case I defer to the actual Russian and her amazing list of expletives.

:)

Gray Rose
07-25-2008, 08:13 AM
Oh, and Rose - while I have you - any suggestions for a completely unpronounceable dog's name? I need it to be something that, if a Russian person said it, most English speakers would go "Huh? Could you repeat that? SLOWLY?"

Jo, is your dog male of female? What color is it?

I'll try once you give me these details, but the thing is that Russians usually give their dogs English-sounding or at least foreign names. The two Russian dogs I know are named Tyson and Bridget. The default Russian dog's name is Sharik, but that's easy to pronounce. The default cat's name is Barsik, followed by Timofey (Timothy).

JoNightshade
07-25-2008, 08:30 AM
Jo, is your dog male of female? What color is it?

I'll try once you give me these details, but the thing is that Russians usually give their dogs English-sounding or at least foreign names. The two Russian dogs I know are named Tyson and Bridget. The default Russian dog's name is Sharik, but that's easy to pronounce. The default cat's name is Barsik, followed by Timofey (Timothy).

The dog is male and it's a mangy, matted mutt-- probably a uniform dirty-grey-brown. Completely unruly and misbehaving towards everyone except his owner.

The owner (same guy as before) would probably give it a word or phrase as a name, not really a NAME name, if you know what I mean. Something like "stupid mongrel" or "filthy beast." Just so you know, this guy is American-born; his parents were wealthy Russian immigrants. So he's totally fluent in English, which is what he uses most of the time, but when he's pissed off he mutters to himself in Russian. His son is the POV character, and for most of the book the dog is simply "the dog." But at one point another character asks him what his dog's name is. :)

Gray Rose
07-25-2008, 09:17 AM
In this case, I think, the dog's real name would be something English and pompous-sounding, say Balthazar. What he'd call it would be an adjective+noun combination of either

parshivaya 'dirty' (see above)
poganaya 'accursed'
chertova 'the Devil's'

and

skotina 'animal, pejorative'
dvornyaga 'mongrel'
psina 'a piece of dog' (not sure how to translate this more accurately :))

so something like 'poganaya skotina'

If the owner is very 'excited'/in the heat of the moment, he can revert the word order to noun-adjective, for example psina chertova 'that damn dog-thing'.

Does this help? I'll think again in the morning and see if I can up with anything else. My brain is pretty fried these days.

cheers,
Rose

JoNightshade
07-25-2008, 09:36 AM
Yay! These are great. Can I say "chertova dvornyaga?" I like the sound/meaning. :)

Paichka
07-25-2008, 09:38 AM
In the version I know, the woman says absolutely nothing. it ends up with ...tam v strane dalekoj chuzhaya ty mne ne nuzhna 'there, in the far away land, I don't need you as a stranger'. I suspect your teacher added this one . Nu i chort s toboy means, 'the devil with you,' and is the equivalent of "well, whatever." I don't think it fits.


Hahaha. That wouldn't surprise me at all, knowing my teacher. But in this case, she didn't -- we were listening to a Russian recording artist...someone well known for singing folksongs. She also did one about the moon...the song has a guy singing to "Masha" outside her window. I always liked that one. She had a couple of CDs, and if I heard her name again I'd remember it.

The phrase she ended with was (forgive my horrendous phonetic spelling):

Milenki ti moi
Nu y chort staboy
Tam krayul dolyokom
Yest u menyah drugoi

Which I always understood to mean:

Dear one
The devil take you (or well, whatever :))
In a land far away
I'll have someone else

I love the Russian language, even if I butcher it. :) Can we talk about how impressed with myself I am that nearly 10 years after learning that song, I still remember it? Mind like a steel trap, me.

Rose is my hero, as always.

JoNightshade
07-25-2008, 09:42 AM
I love the Russian language, even if I butcher it. :) Can we talk about how impressed with myself I am that nearly 10 years after learning that song, I still remember it? Mind like a steel trap, me.

Derail: Yesterday someone replied to my newsletter (at work) in French, about three or four sentences. I read the entire thing and started to reply before I realized it was IN FRENCH. Which I took for a grand total of 4 quarters in college, and got C's in all the way through. I couldn't speak French to save my life, but apparently something stuck!

JoNightshade
08-02-2008, 04:44 AM
Okay, now I need something that's equivalent to "My memory is a f*cking whore!" (Guy is pissed off because he can't remember a critical detail.)

Rose? :)

The Grift
08-06-2008, 07:32 PM
In Polish the word for whore is something like kurwa (sounds like "curva" or "cuerva") and is apparently very very vulgar. I think, but am not sure, the word is similar across many slavic languages including Russian.

Anybody?

Gray Rose
08-18-2008, 02:10 AM
Sorry Jo, I was in transition between A and B, and sick. Please, please do not let your character use kurva for whatever reason. :D

As for memory - skleroz is what Russians say when they forget something (most don't even think about real sclerosis when they do).
So you can do nu, blin, skleroz
or
skleroz krepchal 'memory loss became stronger' (which is modeled on the expression moroz krepchal 'the frost became stronger'.
or
pamyat' kak resheto 'memory's like a sieve' - for emphasis add blin, e.g. pamyat', blin, kak resheto

I think this should work :D
Rose

Tocotin
08-18-2008, 06:32 AM
In Polish the word for whore is something like kurwa (sounds like "curva" or "cuerva") and is apparently very very vulgar. I think, but am not sure, the word is similar across many slavic languages including Russian.

Anybody?

Yes, the word is virtually the same both in Russian and in Polish, not sure about other Slavic languages though. It's mostly used like the English *f* word, during a heated and/or vulgar conversation.