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View Full Version : Beware of people asking for your signature.



citymouse
07-23-2008, 09:32 PM
I have no idea if I'm off base in being suspicious but I just got an email via my website.
I haven't seen anything like this posted in this forum before.
I'm posting it here but I'm removing the man's name because if this is legit I don't want him to be unfairly scrutinized. Notice the different fonts in the salutation and the body of the message. Pay close attention to what he's really asking for. It just seems off to me. Also I worked for a year with a Belgian. When he was composing a thank you letter to an American colleague he was embarrassed to write Dear in the salutation. He told me this is not customary in Europe. Since the author of this email is also Belgian I would expect a different salutation.

Has anyone had this kind of contact before?

Dear, (my name was typed here.)

I am a Belgian (the Flemish speaking part) fan of your work. Unfortunately I haven't had the opportunity to get a signed book. As far as I know you haven't been in Belgium or The Netherlands recently. If you do come to Belgium or The Netherlands in the near future I would love to hear from that... Until then I would like to ask if it's possible to send me a signed postcard/bookplate and/or an autographed photo?

If it would be possible to send a signed copy of one of your books that would be great, but I understand this may be way out of league...

Thanks in advance - also for spending time to read this e-mail!

Yours sincerely,

His Name was here
Moderator edit: private address removed.
No big deal, more a "just in case" - I wouldn't want my home address posted on an open board.

Robin Bayne
07-23-2008, 09:38 PM
I've received these type requests over the years, mostly for signed photos. I reply and thank them for their interest, and tell them I do not have a professional photo for sending out.

I think you're right to be wary-- signatures are valuable. On the other hand, it could be someone who collects these things and is harmless. Could be he just hopes for a free book.

Let us know how you respond.

Oh, one thing you could do that's worked for me--offer readers outside the US a copy of your book in e-format.

citymouse
07-23-2008, 09:48 PM
Inspiewriter, thanks for your post. I feel a bit better. Frankly I didn't quite know how to respond. I'll let you know if I get the nerve to reply to him
C



I've received these type requests over the years, mostly for signed photos. I reply and thank them for their interest, and tell them I do not have a professional photo for sending out.

I think you're right to be wary-- signatures are valuable. On the other hand, it could be someone who collects these things and is harmless. Could be he just hopes for a free book.

Let us know how you respond.

Oh, one thing you could do that's worked for me--offer readers outside the US a copy of your book in e-format.

DeleyanLee
07-23-2008, 10:05 PM
Sending out signed bookplates is a standard promotional tool for many writers, so I don't find that part of the request that odd. Using "Dear" to start letters isn't that odd in Belgium or The Netherlands to my experience, at least, not when they're dealing with known Americans--one of my former jobs dealt with those countries among others.

This situation is the very reason why I use pen names--I've discovered that I can't do an autograph significantly different from my legal signature. My pen name has as few letters as possible in common with my legal name.

Whenever you're dealing with any kind of promotion, though, you have to go with your gut. If something feels wrong, then it probably is wrong and avoid it if you can.

IceCreamEmpress
07-23-2008, 11:18 PM
I'm confused as to what you find odd about this request. As DeleyanLee says, it's very common for people to ask authors to sign a bookplate if they don't have the opportunity to have the actual book signed.

Google "signing bookplates" and you'll see how usual this is.

citymouse
07-23-2008, 11:55 PM
Forget it.
C






I'm confused as to what you find odd about this request. As DeleyanLee says, it's very common for people to ask authors to sign a bookplate if they don't have the opportunity to have the actual book signed.

Google "signing bookplates" and you'll see how usual this is.

IceCreamEmpress
07-24-2008, 12:10 AM
Seriously, citymouse? You don't have to sign bookplates for your readers if you don't feel like it.

But thinking that requests for signed bookplates are some kind of scam shows a lack of information.

citymouse
07-24-2008, 12:42 AM
ICE,
I did not used the word scam. Scam is a legal term and not to be used lightly. The word I used was "legit" and I used is as in not engaging in illegal activity or attempting to deceive. Sorry if I confused anyone.

I have no problem in signing bookplates. I do it on occasion, usually for book clubs who buy my books for discussion. When asked I sign books . As I said I don't use my natural hand.

So I show a lack of information, eh? Since you put this on a personal level, I will say only that you don't know me. You know nothing of my level of education, nothing about my research skills or my ability to use Google or any other web search engine. I don't reveal much about myself in these forums. The reason is I don't want to seem as if I am here to promote my books. Few here even know my name, Victoria Strauss is one. To my knowledge she has kept it confidential.


Now I would like very much to end this.
I have emailed the gentleman and if I get a reply I can share here, I will.
C



Seriously, citymouse? You don't

have to sign bookplates for your readers if you don't feel like it.

But thinking that requests for signed bookplates are some kind of scam shows a lack of information.

Marva
07-24-2008, 04:54 AM
I've made special bookplates for all my books and gladly send them out when requested. I call it 'full service' publishing. One buyer requested a bookplate for a copy for several people. My fun one was her grandfather, who proudly displayed his "signed" copy of my book to all those he met. Warms my heart.

Just don't give them your social security number.

Perle_Rare
07-24-2008, 05:10 AM
I'm not even close to the point where I get to receive requests for signed books or bookplates but if I ever do, you can be sure the signature I'll use won't resemble in any way, shape or form what I use for my day-to-day life. :D

The Otter
07-24-2008, 05:18 AM
I'd never even heard of signed bookplates until this thread. Even after reading a FAQ about them I'm not quite sure I understand the concept. I'm sure it's completely harmless and normal, and I don't think there's much a person can do with your signature anyway, but I don't think you were being overly suspicious to ask about it. That's what this board is for, after all. Always better to err on the side of caution if you're uncertain about something.

Mumut
07-24-2008, 05:50 AM
My signature in books is not the one I use to sign cheques. I write my name in a way that looks a bit oldfashioned (I write historic fantasy) but if anyone copied it onto a legal document they wouldn't get very far at all. If I used my actual signature, nobody would be able to read it, anyway.

LeslieB
07-24-2008, 03:02 PM
To be honest, I'd always thought bookplates were something really old-fashioned. I had no idea anyone still did them. And I have to admit, my first reaction to a request like that would be to suspect an attempt at identity theft.

hammerklavier
07-24-2008, 07:51 PM
Is a signature really worth that much with regards to fraud or identity theft? I don't think banks scrutinize them before cashing checks or giving out loans, do they? Now it would be really suspicious if a fan sent you a letter explaining how he collects author's social security numbers, mother's maiden names and last three addresses.

DeleyanLee
07-24-2008, 08:09 PM
To be honest, I'd always thought bookplates were something really old-fashioned. I had no idea anyone still did them. And I have to admit, my first reaction to a request like that would be to suspect an attempt at identity theft.

Bookplates are a whole pile cheaper to mail than the entire book--having done both. LOL!

veinglory
07-24-2008, 08:11 PM
The scam is not for signatures, but for books and other saleable commodities. Fan, fan with cancer, etc asks for signed book--ebays signed book, turns profit. It's a common one.

IceCreamEmpress
07-24-2008, 08:59 PM
The scam is not for signatures, but for books and other saleable commodities. Fan, fan with cancer, etc asks for signed book--ebays signed book, turns profit. It's a common one.

That's not a scam, either--sometimes people sell signed books. It's not really in an author's interest to refuse to sign books or bookplates because someone might be wanting to sell rather than keep the book.

CBumpkin
07-24-2008, 09:00 PM
This is one of the reasons many celebrities hate signing autographs anymore. People just use them to sell and turn a profit. I personally find the idea repulsive and lose respect for people who do things like that. Have some dignity, honesty and integrity and make your own money instead of making it off the sweat and name of other people.

I can see why citymouse was skeptical. Two different types of font in an e-mail? That would raise a red flag for me, too. You can't blame someone for being cautious. None of us are so wise that we don't need advice from friends and colleagues. If we were, we wouldn't be on this forum. We should take care not to condescend when giving advice.

I didn't know about signing bookplates either and I'm not embarrassed to admit it. I've never been an autograph hound or had "celebrity fever."

IceCreamEmpress
07-24-2008, 09:05 PM
I can see why citymouse was skeptical. Two different types of font in an e-mail? That would raise a red flag for me, too.

Why?

veinglory
07-24-2008, 09:14 PM
It is a scam in the hands of scammers--which I feel this probably is. That is people who send out hudreds or thousands of these requests to every writer they can google. They hope for a book, never read it, sell it immediately. This is an operational scam with a haf dozen promonant people working it. This guy is not on my list so far but his letter follows the usual format.

CBumpkin
07-24-2008, 09:20 PM
For a short, simple e-mail like that, why would anyone use two fonts? Why a different font for the greeting than the body of the e-mail? If someone didn't speak English and were using an online translator and then copied and pasted the results, I could see that. But, this person uses English very well "way out of league..." is not a result you would get from an online translator.

Plus, given the history of the reputation of e-mail, it's natural for a person to question it.

Frankly, it raises a red flag simply because it does. Erring on the side of caution isn't a bad thing. There could be nothing to it. (Edited to delete this sentence. See my post below for the reason.) Because it raises a red flag for some doesn't mean anything except that they're cautious. What's wrong with that?

CBumpkin
07-24-2008, 09:25 PM
It is a scam in the hands of scammers--which I feel this probably is. That is people who send out hudreds or thousands of these requests to every writer they can google. They hope for a book, never read it, sell it immediately. This is an operational scam with a haf dozen promonant people working it. This guy is not on my list so far but his letter follows the usual format.

Now that you mention it, THIS would make perfect sense as to why there are two different types of fonts in this e-mail. They've copied and pasted the body of the e-mail (which states nothing specifically about the author or her book). The "Dear Author" part is a different font because they're typing it out and pasting the rest of it.

I believe you're conclusion is correct. It's someone trying to make a few extra bucks by trying to obtain free, signed ANYTHING and reselling it.

DeleyanLee
07-24-2008, 09:49 PM
All this just makes me reflect on what a sad world we live in today.

IceCreamEmpress
07-24-2008, 09:56 PM
It is a scam in the hands of scammers--which I feel this probably is. That is people who send out hudreds or thousands of these requests to every writer they can google. They hope for a book, never read it, sell it immediately.

Wait, does anyone actually send these people a copy of their book instead of a bookplate or postcard?

If so, then I suppose there's a scam to be done.

citymouse, my apologies. I misunderstood your post entirely. I thought you were suggesting that you suspected the person asking for your signature of wanting it for identity theft.

Now that I know about this "book requesting form letter" scam thing, I see why you might be annoyed by receiving this kind of correspondence.

Sorry I didn't understand that that's what you were talking about.

I sign bookplates when people request them from me--if they want to try to sell that signed bookplate, they can go right ahead. But if people are hitting up authors for free BOOKS, that's another matter entirely.

inkkognito
07-24-2008, 10:04 PM
The thing that raises red flags for me (like for most of you) is the total lack of specifics. I wrote Ray Bradbury a geeky fan girl letter back in the 80s asking for his autograph (not a book!), and you can be darned sure that I included lots of specifics like my favorite book, story, etc. He sent me back an autographed letter and movie poster. If this person is so truly enamoured of a writer's work, I think he would at least mention his favorite book or something specific enough to indicate that he actually read something. This smacks of a form letter phishing for freebies.

johnrobison
07-24-2008, 10:05 PM
First of all, I don't see anything unusual about a request for a signed bookplate or photo. I asked the artist who did my cover to make a matching bookplate for just that purpose.

Now, as regards the people who think it's terrible that people are selling the signatures . . . try making every book you sign out TO someone specific. That tends to deter people who just want to sell signed books.

But really, who cares? If book traders can make a market for my books, or my brother's books, at $100 a copy signed . . . . that has to drive people to buy our books overall. I don't see any way it hurts us.

I've heard that "sick and want a book" line before, but the wonderful thing about publishing is that society provides a means of bringing our writing to those who are sick, or disabled, or have no money . . . . and that is libraries. I refer them there.

IceCreamEmpress
07-24-2008, 10:10 PM
First of all, I don't see anything unusual about a request for a signed bookplate or photo. I asked the artist who did my cover to make a matching bookplate for just that purpose.

Now, as regards the people who think it's terrible that people are selling the signatures . . . try making every book you sign out TO someone specific. That tends to deter people who just want to sell signed books.

But really, who cares? If book traders can make a market for my books, or my brother's books, at $100 a copy signed . . . . that has to drive people to buy our books overall. I don't see any way it hurts us.

Yep, I'm with you on this one. I'd rather take the risk of sending a signed bookplate to speculators than take the risk of disappointing readers.

Not that there's a huge market in my signature. :( Yet. :)

veinglory
07-24-2008, 10:10 PM
My general response it to reply and see if they can say anything specific about my writing. The scammers don't reply, the fans do. I don't get all that many fans and so far none of the genuine articles ahve asked for a free book as far as I can tell. The reason to take the small risk of annoying a real fan is not that my books are all that precious, but that scammers should not be encouraged and supported any more than spammers. The freeloaders pollute and degrade the real avenues of communication with readers.

Kitty Pryde
07-24-2008, 10:15 PM
The scam is not for signatures, but for books and other saleable commodities. Fan, fan with cancer, etc asks for signed book--ebays signed book, turns profit. It's a common one.

Rar! That practice drives me nuts for two reasons. One, if you love an author and are dying for a signed copy of their book, why would you buy it from Joe Blow on ebay or alibris? You have exactly zero guarantee that the author and not Joe Blow himself actually wrote in it! If you can't get to an author signing, send someone else OR buy it from a bookshop you trust (Mysterious Galaxy, Borderlands, Powells, (and formerly Cody's, RIP) my fave west coast bookstores, will ship books signed at their store to anywhere in the world. You can even buy ahead of time and request the author sign it "To so-and-so"!)
Two, when authors go to signings they want to interact with and please their fans (and sell books). Published authors, are you ever pleased to see a bunch of people who never read your book and don't care about it who are hoping to shill it on ebay at a huge markup after you sign it? How is this beneficial to anyone but them? This year after seeing Kevin J Anderson and Joe Hill talk at a panel at LA Times Festival of Books, I sprinted (literally) down the road to get my KJA book signed. I was ahead of the rest of the audience. When I got there, I was shocked to see a HUGE line of people already there who didn't care enough about the authors to hear them talk, they just had big old stacks of books for them to sign. And then my head exploded.

Back to your flemish scammer, if he were really a fan, wouldn't he write something more personal, like you're so funny, or i love this character, or your book got me through a hard time in my life, or something? I know I would, and I have.

victoriastrauss
07-24-2008, 11:24 PM
The scam is not for signatures, but for books and other saleable commodities. Fan, fan with cancer, etc asks for signed book--ebays signed book, turns profit. It's a common one.

Or possibly they are used book dealers and a bookplate will allow them to ratchet up the price. Several times at mass book signings at conferences, I've had used book dealers bring me stacks of books to sign--WITH REMAINDER MARKS!!! It pisses me off because now they can sell the book for more, and I get no benefit either from that sale or from their purchase of the books, which were bought as remainders.

I get bookplate and/or photo requests every now and then. On my website, there's a link to contact me if someone wants a bookplate, so I can always tell if it's a real personal approach or not. If it's not, I just delete the email--I don't bother to respond.

- Victoria

Stormhawk
07-25-2008, 01:26 AM
Several times at mass book signings at conferences, I've had used book dealers bring me stacks of books to sign--WITH REMAINDER MARKS!!! It pisses me off because now they can sell the book for more, and I get no benefit either from that sale or from their purchase of the books, which were bought as remainders.

Isn't that why a lot of companies prefer the stripping covers method?

IceCreamEmpress
07-25-2008, 03:23 AM
Isn't that why a lot of companies prefer the stripping covers method?

Remainders aren't stripped. Remainders are offered for sale by the publisher, with an identifying mark (often a felt-marker stripe across the bottom page stack) to prevent their being returned to the publisher.

Stripped books are not supposed to be sold by anyone.

The same publishers do stripping and remaindering. Heck, sometimes the same title is both stripped and remaindered.

I've signed individual remainders, but I certainly wouldn't sign a stack of them, because as Victoria says, I'm not getting any royalties on those.

victoriastrauss
07-25-2008, 05:29 AM
Only mass market paperbacks are stripped. Trade paperbacks and hardcovers are whole-copy returnable.

- Victoria

L.C. Blackwell
07-25-2008, 06:06 AM
I don't think there's much a person can do with your signature anyway, but I don't think you were being overly suspicious to ask about it. That's what this board is for, after all. Always better to err on the side of caution if you're uncertain about something.

Not that I'm suggesting this is the case here, ;) but:

Back in the heyday of the KGB, somebody noticed that if you sent an American diplomat a Christmas card, he would send one back with his signature on it. Hence, the KGB was able to provide its forgers with authentic copies of diplomatic signatures for operational use....

citymouse
07-25-2008, 06:07 AM
ICE, Not a problem. I probably seemed way too sensitive anyway.

I did email the fellow in Belgium and he replied with sufficient detail to make me realize that he was truly asking as a fan, if I dare use the word.
He freely offered details on what he liked about my books and the MCs.
He didn't press me further on the signature and wished me future success. Actually he was quite sweet.
C



citymouse, my apologies. I misunderstood your post entirely. I thought you were suggesting that you suspected the person asking for your signature of wanting it for identity theft.

citymouse
07-25-2008, 04:12 PM
Well like many a politician, I was right before I was wrong and now it seems I was right, or at least partially right.

I emailed Ruth Sims, author of The Phoenix, the day before yesterday. I sent her the email I got from Belgium. I didn't edit out the person's name or address. Ruth in turn contacted some authors she knows. Here is her response.
" I've heard from 17 other people who got the same letter, some a couple of years ago--word for word. I figure they send out dozens, maybe hundreds, of these things. If somebody sends a bookplate they probably get tossed. But they probably figure most authors are so eager for somebody to read their books (and aren't we!?) that they'll send the books instead, autographed. So they get books for free--books which somebody else, author or publisher, has paid for and even paid for shipping--and they make a profit for doing nothing but sending scam emails. Hey, if this works I'm going to write to GM and ask for a Cadillac."

So as Thomas Jefferson wrote "for nothing is ours which another may deprive us of." Our signatures seem to be valuable to some people. Remember, this man asked for a photo, a bookplate and or a book, all with a signature. Here is where I depart from my friend Ruth. It is my signature he wanted. As I said, I sign lots of things but rarely with my natural hand. Sister Mary Frivolous would be appalled!

I don't know for a fact that something illegal is intended. I'll leave that to someone else to discover.
C

Kitty Pryde
07-25-2008, 07:57 PM
Geez! Trust your gut instincts is the moral of this story, I guess. Doesn't sound illegal but it does sound immoral. Good sleuthing!

IceCreamEmpress
07-25-2008, 08:30 PM
Well like many a politician, I was right before I was wrong and now it seems I was right, or at least partially right.

I emailed Ruth Sims, author of The Phoenix, the day before yesterday. I sent her the email I got from Belgium. I didn't edit out the person's name or address. Ruth in turn contacted some authors she knows. Here is her response.
" I've heard from 17 other people who got the same letter, some a couple of years ago--word for word. I figure they send out dozens, maybe hundreds, of these things. If somebody sends a bookplate they probably get tossed. But they probably figure most authors are so eager for somebody to read their books (and aren't we!?) that they'll send the books instead, autographed. So they get books for free--books which somebody else, author or publisher, has paid for and even paid for shipping--and they make a profit for doing nothing but sending scam emails. Hey, if this works I'm going to write to GM and ask for a Cadillac."

Thanks for sharing this feedback--it sounds like you, Ruth, and Veinglory have run across the same scheme.

I suppose this is one of the benefits of writing under a pseudonym--these folks don't know how to find me on the Internet. The people who take the trouble to send me snail-mail via the publisher have seemed legit so far, but that's harder work than fan-spam.

Sorry, again, to have misunderstood your original post and been so very cranky at you. I had a housemate many years ago who was paranoid about not letting anyone have his signature, to the point where he wouldn't sign for FedExes from the publishers I was then working for. It was fine if he didn't want to sign his own name, but he also refused to sign my name with my permission--that was the thing that really annoyed me most (that and having to go down to the FedEx center to get the stuff that should have been at my house.) I think this left me with some kind of raw nerve about signatures in general.

BlueLucario
07-25-2008, 08:33 PM
I think you should stay away from stuff like this. It really could be a scam.

What if this person uses that signature to sign you up for credit cards or buy a house under your name?

Lyra Jean
07-25-2008, 08:38 PM
You need more than someone's signature to buy a house or get a credit card.

GordonK
07-26-2008, 12:16 AM
You need more than someone's signature to buy a house or get a credit card.

House is tough, credit cards are easy. I remember reading about dogs with credit cards... they got pre-approved applications (can't understand how the names got into marketeer's database), owners filled out form (nil on income and no signature, ie, no forgery) and dogs got the plastics.

In fact, signature is much less crucial than many have thought. I rarely have clerks/cashiers check my signature on the sales slips against my cards. I have seen unsigned checks I wrote being processed without any queries.

That doesn't mean I'm causal though. I have three signatures, one for legal/financial documents and like a poster above, it is unrecognizable scribbles. One for general usage such as love notes I send all over the globe; and a very simple one sort of like "XO" for UPS guys and the like.

Mumut
07-27-2008, 10:50 AM
Is a signature really worth that much with regards to fraud or identity theft? I don't think banks scrutinize them before cashing checks or giving out loans, do they? Now it would be really suspicious if a fan sent you a letter explaining how he collects author's social security numbers, mother's maiden names and last three addresses.

In Australia banks your signature is vital as far as banks are concerned. They require a lot of identity to establish an account and check the signature for any bank use but if someone knew the way you write your signature, and practise it, they could (at least try to) withdraw your money.

Quossum
07-28-2008, 06:21 AM
...I wrote Ray Bradbury a geeky fan girl letter back in the 80s asking for his autograph (not a book!), and you can be darned sure that I included lots of specifics like my favorite book, story, etc. He sent me back an autographed letter and movie poster....

Had to mention that I wrote a geeky fan girl letter to Anne McCaffrey and got a personal letter from her son, which tickled me pink. Then years later I wrote a geeky fan girl letter to Stephen Jay Gould, asking for nothing, just gushing, and he sent me a copy of one of his books, signed, with a message to me. Still one of my most prized possessions!

--Q

Robin Bayne
07-28-2008, 08:04 PM
All this just makes me reflect on what a sad world we live in today.



I agree. And it's sad that we have to be skeptical to a point --but without being paranoid.


Years ago I received an email from a woman who loved one of my books. She also had the same last name as my maiden name (not a common name,) said her dh's name was the same as my uncle's, said her father owned the marina where my dad managed for 30 years (the marina was in my story) and said she lived a few doors up from my cousin. I think there were other things, too, and I got very paranoid that she was some kind of crazy stalker. After all, I'd been reading online how writers must protect their identity and how reader fans could go nutso.

Well, much later I learned it was all true and she wasn't crazy. In the meantime, I lost a potentially good repeat-reader.

You just never know.:Shrug:

ideagirl
08-01-2008, 12:05 AM
For a short, simple e-mail like that, why would anyone use two fonts?

Having spent nearly 5 minutes yesterday trying to make an email have only one font--I'd copy-pasted part of it from Word into the email, and that part refused to let me change it from Times NR (the Word font) to Arial (the email font)--I can vouch for the fact that an email in two fonts does not necessarily mean the author wanted it to be in two fonts. There are weird technical glitches sometimes that make that happen whether you intend for it or not.

ideagirl
08-01-2008, 12:09 AM
the wonderful thing about publishing is that society provides a means of bringing our writing to those who are sick, or disabled, or have no money . . . . and that is libraries. I refer them there.

FYI, the tradition of free (or virtually free) public libraries is widespread in the English-speaking world, but the tradition comes from England and is not necessarily available elsewhere. When I lived in France, I found that (at least outside of Paris) there was no such thing--rather, there were little specialized libraries (e.g. the American library in Toulouse, which had maybe 1200 square feet of floor space and lots of books and magazines from North America, but nothing else), and you had to pay $30-$40 per year to join each individual library.

frimble3
08-01-2008, 08:17 AM
I know how the dog (probably) got into the database. Dog's owner sees a raffle, free if you fill in the form, doesn't want his name in the marketer's database, so signs the dog's name. (Or replies to a survey or signs a petition.) On the off chance that he does win, he'll explain that 'Spot' is a nickname. The marketing people just copy the names off the tickets onto a mailing list,they don't check IDs.

Andreya
08-10-2008, 09:30 PM
Interesting thread, with lots of great info & things to ponder about... :)

yeah, it's good to be cautious...

As for libraries abroad, it probably depends... Here in Slovenia, there's a fee to join a (specific) library, it's cheaper for kids & students, & free for the unemployed. Students can join all 'students' libraries' with one card if they have a student ID.
If someone does not have the funds to join a library, they could also ask someone else to get the book from the library, no?
However, another problem (& a more 'real' one..) might be availability of good (& recent) foreign titles :) Or ability to request (& get) a foreign title.. :) /libraries are on budget too../

Darzian
09-15-2008, 08:30 PM
This is just sad. This makes writers cautious of actual fans, at the risk of hurting the fans' feelings.

I wish this planet wasn't filled with such evil people (yes EVIL).

Everyone should be subjected to the Moment of Truth show. (Okay, maybe not).

longoverdue
09-15-2008, 09:42 PM
The thing that raises red flags for me (like for most of you) is the total lack of specifics. I wrote Ray Bradbury a geeky fan girl letter back in the 80s asking for his autograph (not a book!), and you can be darned sure that I included lots of specifics like my favorite book, story, etc. He sent me back an autographed letter and movie poster. If this person is so truly enamoured of a writer's work, I think he would at least mention his favorite book or something specific enough to indicate that he actually read something. This smacks of a form letter phishing for freebies.

Yep, yep, yep....totally agree!

sissybaby
09-15-2008, 10:38 PM
Wow, Citymouse, thanks so much for posting your concerns here. Not that I'll probably ever have to worry about something like this. But this is definitely going to stick with me if I should ever be so fortunate.

It's unfortunate that this happened to you, but your intuitiveness and your forethought in posting it here will probably save someone else from falling prey to these misguided souls.

Thanks again.

citymouse
09-15-2008, 11:09 PM
Thanks Sissy. I was disappointed. At first I was very flattered. I checked the address he gave me. It does exist but it is a business not a private address. I don't suppose that makes any difference but if I were expecting something personal I wouldn't have it sent to a business address, even if I worked there.
If this fellow had simply asked for a bookplate for a book he owned that would have been a different story. But his clear intent was to get my signature. As I said before I never sign my real signature on my books or bookplates.
C