PDA

View Full Version : How Do You Know if You Have Talent?



deborah811
07-23-2008, 05:22 AM
Hi,

I am new to all of this - not the world, mind you, but the writing world. Honestly, how do you know if you have talent? Must I move to Key West (can't afford it), get some six-toed cats (allergic) and start drinking a lot (that I can do here), in order to really be a writer?

I have extensively searched the internet for a mentor (constantly distracted by "Can I Get a Mentor" to the tune of "Can I Get a Witness" running through my head). Anyway, if anyone knows of a mentoring program, I would greatly appreciate some guidance.

I am new to this site - seems like a lot of nice and knowledgeable people here.

Thanks,

Matera the Mad
07-23-2008, 05:40 AM
You just know, dahling. And if you can write an amusing forum post that makes sense off the top of your head, you probably do. Heh, dive in and prove it.

maestrowork
07-23-2008, 05:42 AM
If you've got it you've got it. There's nothing to it.

Puma
07-23-2008, 05:46 AM
Hi Deborah811 - Look around here at the forums and then after you have a bit of an idea how things work (be sure to look at stickied items at the tops of forums), move on to the Share Your Work Forum (password protected but open to everyone) and take a look at the types of works people are putting up there to be critiqued. Read the initial posts and then look at the critiques. If you're not intimidated, post a short selection of yours in whichever of the genre specific share your work forums is most appropriate and see what kind of comments you get. That should help you have an idea pretty quickly. But again - before you post, be sure to read the advice for newcomers and other stickies in the Main Share Your Work Forum - doing so can save a lot of problems and heartaches. Good luck and welcome to AW. Puma

veinglory
07-23-2008, 05:48 AM
Here are some options:

1) Have a teflon/kevlar ego and just beleive it, failing that you need to make someone else believe it, e.g.:
2) Take a course and get an A+
3) Get published and sell many copies
4) Enter and win competition and awards

John Paton
07-23-2008, 05:50 AM
Yo Deborah

I took the liberty and read some of your blog which I found entertaining.

I think we all need some form of validation in our lives and writers are no different. Stick around and pitch in with some posts just to get a feel for this place.

It certainly makes sense to offer up something in the Share Your Work sections - however be careful not to take some of the comments to heart. They are someone's opinion and that someone may have a quite different outlook to the world than the one you have.

All the very best to you and keep writing ;)

John Paton
07-23-2008, 05:52 AM
[quote=maestrowork;2579359]If you've got it you've got it.quote]

I hear a course on antibiotics may help !! ;)

triceretops
07-23-2008, 05:55 AM
Well, you've got a good start on the humor forum. Such humility, too. Welcome to AW. Nice thing about this place is, is that you might end up having to beat the mentors (here) off with a stick. We do like our fresh ones.

Tri

WannabeWriter
07-23-2008, 06:02 AM
The only person who can tell whether you have talent is you. Simple as that. :)

deborah811
07-23-2008, 06:23 AM
Boy, I was right, this is a great site. Thanks for all your input - was feeling kind of down. All of your responses helped a lot. Triceretops, as long as I can use a stick and don't have to beat the mentors off another way, that will be fine!

roseangel
07-23-2008, 08:35 AM
Just, you know, post and read here. Everyone here is always so willing to help, this place is the best!

shannonmac
07-23-2008, 10:10 AM
I think you have to believe in yourself and just go for it!
You'll never know if you don't try, and even if you try and some don't like it, don't give up, just find your audience.

Although it doesn't hurt when other enjoy it now does it!

BrookieCookie777
07-23-2008, 10:58 AM
Love the six toed cats thing. Hilarious! =) I would say you have talent. Just belive in yourself . . . it will carry you far.

blacbird
07-23-2008, 11:14 AM
I think you have to believe in yourself and just go for it!
You'll never know if you don't try, and even if you try and some don't like it, don't give up, just find your audience.

But . . . if they're on Neptune . . .

caw

Jill
07-23-2008, 11:23 AM
The only person who can tell whether you have talent is you. Simple as that. :)

I wish it was that simple. The only way you can be sure that you have talent is when your readers tell you that you have - and by that I don't mean your family and friends!

Of course there's no point in writing unless you believe in what you're doing and above all learn to trust your own voice.

Momento Mori
07-23-2008, 01:03 PM
Hi, deborah811, and welcome to AW!


deborah811:
Honestly, how do you know if you have talent?

Define "talent".

Some people have an instinctive gift for writing well crafted fiction. (It's okay to hate those people ;)).

Most people (IMHO) can learn how to produce something of a publishable quality with the right tools and enough dedication.

For me, talent is over-rated. The key is stamina - you need to keep plugging away at your craft, honing it and refining it until you make it across the finishing line.

This comment was brought to you by a variety of cliches that should never be used in fiction. :p

MM

Jill
07-23-2008, 01:30 PM
The key is stamina - you need to keep plugging away at your craft, honing it and refining it until you make it across the finishing line.MM

Stamina being the operative word! But how do you define the finishing line? Is it when you write THE END or when someone -agent, publisher (and by publisher I mean a reputable one!) - takes notice of you?

Deccydiva
07-23-2008, 01:56 PM
Having completed my first novel I agree that stamina is way up there and I was surprised just how much effort had to go in to structuring the novel so that various bits of plot and sub-plot came in at the right time and in the right way. Time will tell if I have got that right; previously published efforts have been short stories and poetry which required a lot of work in their own way too, but of a different kind.
As far as talent goes - like beauty, it's in the eye of the beholder. I have complete strangers rave about my work yet others snub it, similarly there are authors whose work does not interest me in the slightest but they are on the best seller list. Have faith!
I was told once that success is talent multiplied by effort but if you have zero of one of these - well you know what happens when you multiply anything by zero...;)

Momento Mori
07-23-2008, 03:54 PM
Jill:
Is it when you write THE END or when someone -agent, publisher (and by publisher I mean a reputable one!) - takes notice of you?

I think it's a two-stage process. You need to actually finish a novel first (which is an achievement in itself). Then you need to hone it until a publisher decides to buy it. And if a publisher doesn't want to buy that novel, then you need to write another one. So it could be a three-stage process or whatever. ;)

Obviously there are writers out there who aren't interested in publication and are writing for themselves (and I'm not criticising that in any way) and there are writers who decide to self-publish (and I'm not criticising that either), but if you're looking for an objective baseline, then money talks and you've either written something that a publisher is prepared to pay more than a dollar for or you haven't.

I think that some people get hung up on the idea that you have to be an artist or someone who creates fabulous prose that brings tears to your eyes (or whatever) in order to make it as a writer. But there's a wide market out there and for every Salman Rushdie there's a Dan Brown. Each of those authors has crossed the finishing line regardless of what someone may personally believe as to whether they have talent.

Just my opinion.

MM

Bubastes
07-23-2008, 04:31 PM
For me, talent is over-rated. The key is stamina - you need to keep plugging away at your craft, honing it and refining it until you make it across the finishing line.


I agree completely. Persistence trumps talent.

Norman D Gutter
07-23-2008, 04:56 PM
deborah:

Welcome to AW!

I fully understand what you are saying. The road to publication is so long, with so much work (improving craft, learning story-telling, researching agents/editors, understanding the industry, learning the craft of letter writing, etc.), that you don't want to go down it until and unless you know you have some chance of success that depends on you and not on chance. I've been there, and to some extent am still there.

Unfortunately, I don't see any easy answer to this question. Critique groups, in real life and on-line such as here in "Share Your Work" have limited value. You don't really know if the people critiquing you know more than you, or if they "have it". Paid critiques at writers conferences, I have found, are not worth the money, because the critiquers rush through a bunch of them quickly and critique by rote, rather than by the true pros and cons of the piece. Beta readers are good, but you still have the concern about how much they know. Beta readers who are not writers, but who are in your intended audiences, may tend to overlook faults that would kill the piece to an editor. Beta readers who are writers may tend to focus on the trees and not help you with the forest--at least that's my experience.

So it seems to me about the only ways to know if you "have it", the talent to achieve publication, are 1) pay a mentor, 2) have something accepted for publication, or 3) the accumulated evidence of critiques, which includes comments from editors.

I have yet to find mentors who work for free, but possibly you'll find one. Many successful writers who are not quite earning enough to be full time will mentor for a fee. This takes a lot of research on your part, and possibly some luck of timing.

Beta readers who are writers don't work for free either. This normally requires reciprocity: you want someone to read your work in progrees, you must reciprocate and read theirs. So the cost is your time. Beta readers who aren't writers will do it for free, but these tend to be your colleaques and family, which somewhat diminishes the value of their critique, unless they can be truly honest.

Having something published before you know if you "have it" sounds a bit like an oxymoron. But maybe, while doing the work for the book-length piece, you can also pursue publishing shorter works in regional markets. Acceptance by them, while not guaranteeing anything, is some feedback for your decision making process.

To me, the best evidence is accumulated comments from agents/editors. If you submit your work to them, and receive feedback, this will really tell you something. Even a form rejection letter tells you something: the work wasn't good enough for the agent/editor to take the time write something personal. But if the agent says, "Your writing is strong, but I just don't know if I can sell this book," and if you hear something similar several times, then you probably do "have it", and just need to persevere.

Good luck,
NDG

DeleyanLee
07-23-2008, 05:12 PM
Some people have an instinctive gift for writing well crafted fiction. (It's okay to hate those people ;)).

Most people (IMHO) can learn how to produce something of a publishable quality with the right tools and enough dedication.

For me, talent is over-rated. The key is stamina - you need to keep plugging away at your craft, honing it and refining it until you make it across the finishing line.

Personally, I think it takes a combination of talent and persistence to see the job done.

Talent is the ability to put a spark into the work that speaks to the viewer/reader on some universal level. Persistence is the ability to learn the craft needed to do the work, not to mention doing the work itself. Craft without spark is just fabricated boring. Spark without craft is incomprehensible.

I've known several people with massive talent. One fellow I knew could whistle a pretty good orchestral performance of his own compositions, but he couldn't be bothered to learn how to read or write music. He was also a very talented artist, but wouldn't be bothered to display any of his work outside of his apartment. Not even on a website. Likewise, in my 30-odd years in writer's groups, I've read a lot of pages where there the sentences were well-constructed, even beautiful prose, but there wasn't anything alive on the page to care about.

How do someone know if they have talent? Honestly, I think that it's in the eyes of the stranger who experiences your work. If you can connect with them on that gut-emotional level, then you've got it.

nerds
07-23-2008, 05:19 PM
Hi,

I am new to all of this - not the world, mind you, but the writing world. Honestly, how do you know if you have talent? Must I move to Key West (can't afford it), get some six-toed cats (allergic) and start drinking a lot (that I can do here), in order to really be a writer?


You can write.

Pagey's_Girl
07-23-2008, 05:38 PM
The moment I realized I might actually have talent was back when I was about fifteen. I had somehow gotten in my head that I was going to write the most amazing spy thriller of all times. (Don't ask where that idea came from; Ian Fleming I am most definately not.) Well, I let some of my friends read my masterpiece-in-progress, and they loved it - except they thought it was the most amazing parody of a spy thriller they'd ever read. I was supremely ticked off until I realized Wait a minute. They're reading it. They're laughing. They're loving it. They're begging for more.... That was when I first started thinking I might be able to write something worth reading after all - albeit not what I'd intended....

SPMiller
07-23-2008, 05:42 PM
I've always known that I have the ability to string words together into logically coherent sentences. That's easy. However, I still don't know whether I can do so in an entertaining manner. That is, after all, the point of writing.

Shadow_Ferret
07-23-2008, 05:54 PM
how do you know if you have talent? You don't know if you have talent. You can't know. It's something other people discover in you. You just do the best you can at what you love and if you're talented, if what you're doing is worthy, then you'll be discovered.

To me there are abilities, being able to do something.

Then there is talent, which is the ability to be successful at what you do.

I have the ability to write.

I have no clue if I have the talent to be successful as a writer. I certainly haven't so far.

tehuti88
07-23-2008, 06:29 PM
Talent is something so subjective--a person can believe they're talented but everyone else thinks they suck, somebody can truly have talent but nobody they come in contact with agrees YET they could have an immense potential audience waiting elsewhere just beyond their reach, someone can think they suck yet countless others will love their work, somebody might have only one person in the world who believes with all their heart that they're talented--that to wonder what makes talent is kind of futile, IMO at least. The opinion is always going to be different.

It saddens me to think of how many people out there might have true talent if only they could be "discovered" by the right people. The attention goes to those lucky ones who were actually found easily. Who knows what potential anyone has unless the right circumstances come up, and how often do the exact right circumstances strike any of us? Right now, there might be some boy living in the bush somewhere out in the middle of nowhere, collecting roots or something, and he could be the world's greatest doctor if only the right circumstances were in play. "Talent" seems to often be a matter of opinion and chance.

I think the only way one can know if they're talented is to just be happy with where they are. If it's just belief in themselves, or belief in the opinions of thousands of devoted readers, then it's talent, for them.

Jenifer
07-23-2008, 06:56 PM
You don't, initially. :) You put in the blood, sweat and tears and send your baby off to countless other people to judge... and then your readership (if you are lucky enough to have one) decides whether you have talent.

I think that it's better to go in blind to your skills than with a lot of followers, so to speak. Groupies are good only when they're spending money on your published book or, until then, buying lunch- picking you up a bit when you've gotten down. A lot of ready praise can be detrimental to a beginning writer in my opinion (still a beginning writer as you might have guessed).

In high school, I had every English and journalism teacher I came across effectively hoodwinked... making phone calls for me... trying to get me into assorted colleges (including one supposedly elite liberal arts school). I hadn't actually written anything beyond short stories! All of the head-patting really gave me impression that I was more than I am. It stalled my writing. Had I actually done much writing around that time, I imagine it would have read as pure ego... as much as I loved it then and loved it now. I believe my writing has improved ten-fold since then because I am more familiar with the reality of it... I can see to write around the dollar signs in my eyes.

I miss those teachers sometimes. Several of them will get signed copies of every book I ever write, provided I'm lucky enough to have anything published.

Believe in yourself, but also believe in the hard work ahead. Respect it as well as you can... dive in with both hands and toes if you can type with 'em! Again, your readership will tell you whether or not you have talent.

benbradley
07-23-2008, 07:01 PM
Ask Simon Cowell. He will tell you.

Shadow_Ferret
07-23-2008, 07:28 PM
I miss those teachers sometimes. Several of them will get signed copies of every book I ever write, provided I'm lucky enough to have anything published.

That's an interesting idea. I think all my teachers are dead.

Ask Simon Cowell. He will tell you.That's actually a good point, because all those "singers" come in thinking they're God's Gift to Vocals and genuinely look shocked when they find out they can't carry a tune in a suitcase.

They "think" they have talent when in truth they have none.

Jenifer
07-23-2008, 07:33 PM
I'm only 22... most of my teachers aren't even old yet! :)

cletus
07-23-2008, 07:37 PM
That's an interesting idea. I think all my teachers are dead.


Same here.
They shouldn't have made me so angry. ANGRY!


Time to go take my meds...

maestrowork
07-23-2008, 09:17 PM
1) Have a teflon/kevlar ego and just beleive it, failing that you need to make someone else believe it, e.g.:
2) Take a course and get an A+
3) Get published and sell many copies
4) Enter and win competition and awards

1. EGO - check. Double check. Look under the cover. Make sure I'm not drunk. Yeah, I have it. Check.

2. Check. But the teacher was sleeping with me.

3. Check. Well.... Define "many."

4. Check. Then again, the award is only good as a door jam.

W00t! I got talent! W00t! I'm RICH.

DeleyanLee
07-23-2008, 09:22 PM
4. Check. Then again, the award is only good as a door jam.

You got a door jam! Not fair! I've only gotten stuff to make wall paper out of.

jennifer75
07-23-2008, 09:30 PM
I have extensively searched the internet for a mentor (constantly distracted by "Can I Get a Mentor" to the tune of "Can I Get a Witness" running through my head). Anyway, if anyone knows of a mentoring program, I would greatly appreciate some guidance.

I am new to this site - seems like a lot of nice and knowledgeable people here.

Thanks,

Isn't there a mentor type of thread in AW??? I swore I saw one a while back.

Oh, welcome!

Quossum
07-24-2008, 06:08 AM
The moment I realized I might actually have talent was back when I was about fifteen. I had somehow gotten in my head that I was going to write the most amazing spy thriller of all times. (Don't ask where that idea came from; Ian Fleming I am most definately not.) Well, I let some of my friends read my masterpiece-in-progress, and they loved it - except they thought it was the most amazing parody of a spy thriller they'd ever read. I was supremely ticked off until I realized Wait a minute. They're reading it. They're laughing. They're loving it. They're begging for more.... That was when I first started thinking I might be able to write something worth reading after all - albeit not what I'd intended....

You MUST read My Angelica, a YA novel about a girl who's determined to write the world's best romance novel and her best friend who's torn between telling her the truth about her novel and not crushing her hopes and dreams. Wonderful, wonderful book on many levels.

--Q

Straka
07-24-2008, 06:24 AM
1) Have a teflon/kevlar ego and just beleive it, failing that you need to make someone else believe it, e.g.:


I found besides that, being dense an delusional about my own craft tricked me long enough so I was sucked in before I realized my writing was crap. At that point all I could to was ramp it up and charge forward.

Shadow_Ferret
07-24-2008, 05:30 PM
Have a teflon/kevlar ego and just beleive it, failing that you need to make someone else believe it...
I have a glass ego. Always have, always will. It's just who I am.

soleary
07-24-2008, 05:53 PM
If at night you count the $1 bills in your g-string and you lose track after the first $200, you're very talented :).

Phaeal
07-24-2008, 06:18 PM
But . . . if they're on Neptune . . .

caw

Stop whining, blacbird. Neptune, big deal. MY audience appears to be extrasystematic.

;)

As for the talent thing, for only $100.00, I will put a sample of your work through my patented GENIUS DETECTOR and provide you with a detailed analysis of your potential, or lack thereof. Accept no substitutes.

~*Kate*~
09-22-2009, 09:38 PM
Agent Rachelle Gardner has a blog post today (http://cba-ramblings.blogspot.com/2009/09/chasing-your-dreams.html) that reminded me of this thread.

TrixieLox
09-23-2009, 02:52 PM
What's talent? What is beauty? What is truth? Ha ha.

Okay, in terms of a generally accepted definition of talent, YOU can't tell for sure if you have talent. No way! Think of American Idol / X Factor. There's a load of people out there who think they have talent but oh my, they soooo don't.

So in my view, if you really wanna know? You have to put yourself out there. In writing terms, this might mean getting a job in the business (generally, if you can get a paid job writing with a reputable establishment, you must be alright). Many exceptions to this though ;-) and / or send your stuff to agents. If agents do more then send you form rejections (eg. scribbled personal notes on side of a form rejection praising writing, ask to read more or, even better, offer to rep you) this suggests a certain degree of talent, as in the generally accepted form of talent. Even if your hook stinks, I find people who can write really well tend to get some nice comments from agents, even if it's a no. So there you get some indication.

Then there's writing that re-defines what talent means and that's when it gets complicated.

And heck, it's all subjective. I think it's easier to tell if someone isn't talented. When I worked as an editor for mags, that was far easier to tell. The writers who didn't have talent.

maestrowork
09-23-2009, 03:10 PM
So in my view, if you really wanna know? You have to put yourself out there.

And heck, it's all subjective. I think it's easier to tell if someone isn't talented. When I worked as an editor for mags, that was far easier to tell. The writers who didn't have talent.

Talent is determined by other people, by their standards. :)

We can call ourselves whatever we want, talented, gifted, god's image, best father on Earth, half-elf. It matters to us, but not a whole lot to other people. You can sing in your own shower and believe you're better than Pavarotti. But "talent" is determined by the outside world, and writing -- especially if you seek publication -- has to deal with people other than yourself, and thus, they (agents, publishers, the readers) get to determine if you have talent or not.

JJ Cooper
09-23-2009, 03:17 PM
If you want honest feedback when it comes to the question of 'am I talented', don't believe your agent or the team from your publisher. Don't beleive your friends or work buddies who've bought your books either.

Believe the stranger who's dropped you an email (through your website) and says that you're talented.

JJ

swvaughn
09-23-2009, 03:28 PM
W00t! I got talent! W00t! I'm RICH.

Talent = rich?

*checks bank account* Darn it all . . .

I'm going out to rob a bank. Then I'll have talent! :D

For some reason this discussion reminds me of one of the best payoff lines in a film I've ever seen, Syndrome (the villain) in The Incredibles:

"...and when everyone's super ... no one will be."

Heh. In context, it's amazing. Honest.

Phaeal
09-23-2009, 04:42 PM
For some reason this discussion reminds me of one of the best payoff lines in a film I've ever seen, Syndrome (the villain) in The Incredibles:

"...and when everyone's super ... no one will be."

Heh. In context, it's amazing. Honest.


Helen (Mrs. Incredible) also says to her son: "Dash, everyone's special."

Dash isn't buying it: "That's just another way of saying NOBODY is."

Wow, I'm geeking out over the intricate through-weaving of theme in this magnificent film. Really. PIXAR, where's our SEQUEL? You gave the damn TOYS two movies. Move it out.

Amarie
09-23-2009, 04:52 PM
I see this thread was started last year, but it's a good question, so I'm glad it has been revived.

I don't like to see writers spend their time worrying about how much talent they have or don't have, if it is going to stop them from writing. If you have the ability to make up stories, you have imagination. Many people do not have that ability. The real question is do you have the persistence and desire to learn how to get those stories on paper so other people will want to read them.

I had the talent ten years ago to make up stories, but I didn't have the skill to make them readable. Maybe a few people have the inate ability to do that, but in my case it was just a lot of hard work and study. I don't mean 'study' in the sense of taking classes, though that's one option. I mean studying good writers to figure out how they did it.

It would be nice to get feedback along the way, but you can't always depend on that. Trixielox is right. If you want to know if your work is readable, you have to put it out there and see what happens.

Exir
09-23-2009, 05:23 PM
I measure my talent in writing in relation to my other interests. I used to be a science freak, a chess freak, and a music composition freak. How did those turn out?

I was rabidly mad about science (biochemistry especially), but all I could do was to recite knowledge and information from all the textbooks I read. Sure I knew a lot, but it depressed me that I have never questioned what I read other than coming up with unsubstantiated wild guessing.

In chess, I was a perpetual newbie. You know, the kind who would prize himself at being a superb strategist and knowing lots of opening variations -- but who would drop his queen in one move in every game. Soon it turned out that I was going nowhere -- patterns don't leap out at me. I don't get the thrill of finding a fantastic combination. It was just winning and losing for me, nothing more.

Composing music -- well, my piano skills were never up to scratch, so no matter what music I hear in my head I will always be unable to translate it to reality. I decided "that's it, I have no talent" when I heard a tricky, cleverly written song and couldn't for the life of me determine the bass line, never mind the chord progression. Despite spending three days trying to figure it out without "cheating" and checking out sheet music.

And then I turned to writing. It had a totally different feeling to me. Having been interested in things that never amounted to anything, I immediately felt the difference. I've only been writing seriously for two years, and I could already feel my improvement in leaps and bounds. For example, when I want to experiment in a new genre, I find that I only have to read 4 or 5 books in that genre before all the patterns and possibilities leap out at me, making me sufficiently confident to write in that genre also. (Well, I'll be mediocre, but at least confident enough to craft a story that can qualify for that genre!) And I can instantly spot improvements, not just in terms of sentences and paragraphs, but also in terms of story and plot, even in published works!

sommemi
09-23-2009, 05:30 PM
Stamina. Yeah - that'a a good one right there.

Honestly, if you are looking for mentors... I would have to say nearly everyone on this board is MY mentor (in my head at least!). Everyone here has awsome advice to share and you can pull from an immense source of experience just hanging out here for a while.

A good idea... a very very very good idea, is to look for the genre you write in, if you have just one... otherwise look in all of them... and just start reading some stuff and chime in. Eventually you'll start recognizing names that comment more and you will get more familiar with a couple of them who are more experienced than you, but have similar writing styles/likes as you. I think THEN... you have a peer that is also a mentor... then just suck it up and say "I CAN DO IT!" and then.... do it. :)

At least... that's what I'm doing.

swvaughn
09-23-2009, 11:20 PM
Helen (Mrs. Incredible) also says to her son: "Dash, everyone's special."

Dash isn't buying it: "That's just another way of saying NOBODY is."

Wow, I'm geeking out over the intricate through-weaving of theme in this magnificent film. Really. PIXAR, where's our SEQUEL? You gave the damn TOYS two movies. Move it out.

Ya know? :D They totally set it up for a sequel, but one has failed to materialize. What's the deal?

Pixar has quite a few films with great themes, a lot deeper than the typical kids' movies. The Incredibles, Wall-E, and Up have been my faves so far.

On topic... er, what was the topic again? Oh, right, talent. Lots of folks in this thread have said you can't know personally if you have talent ... maybe you can, but I think people who know they have talent (and actually do have talent) are something of a silent voice. They don't tend to brag about it. It's the people who go spouting off about how amazing they are that usually don't have the walk to back up the talk.

It's a fine line to walk. Definitely.

Cyia
09-23-2009, 11:32 PM
The TOYS got 3 movies. The next one's due out soon :D

blacbird
09-24-2009, 12:07 AM
Talent is determined by other people, by their standards.

. . . "talent" is determined by the outside world, and writing -- especially if you seek publication -- has to deal with people other than yourself, and thus, they (agents, publishers, the readers) get to determine if you have talent or not.

Echo this.

(But I usually get into big trouble here for saying such things.)

caw

popmuze
09-24-2009, 12:43 AM
As long as I can use a stick and don't have to beat the mentors off another way, that will be fine!


Just want you to know, I use the same joke in my new novel. I guess that means you must have talent.