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Dario D.
07-21-2008, 10:59 AM
Hi all.

Simple question, I think: Were you ever taught how to understand dictionary-style pronunciations at any point in your schooling? (if it was in a public school, please mention what country it was)

Just trying to figure out how many people roughly understand pronunciations like "[pʰɹɜʊ̯ˌnɐnsiˈeɪʃn̩]" (pronunciation), and other methods.

Thanks.

Albedo
07-21-2008, 11:09 AM
That's IPA. The standard dictionaries used in schools in my country use a special phonetic pronunciation guide, so it would be something like "pro-nun-see-ai-shun". I do know IPA though because I use a real dictionary now (Concise Oxford).

FinbarReilly
07-21-2008, 01:18 PM
Dictionary-style, yes. However, not that particular dictionary style...

FR

alleycat
07-21-2008, 01:51 PM
Just trying to figure out how many people roughly understand pronunciations like "[pʰɹɜʊ̯ˌnɐnsiˈeɪʃn̩]" (pronunciation), and other methods.
I certainly hope they're not teaching children that.

When I was in school (a long, long time ago), we started using the dictionary to look up various things about words starting in the third grade.

[The quote function lost the formatting of the original post. Sorry about that.]

Tsu Dho Nimh
07-21-2008, 02:46 PM
When you say "School" do you mean primary, secondary or college?

I don't remember,it's been so long ago.

IceCreamEmpress
07-21-2008, 08:28 PM
It seems like you're using the symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet, but that's not an accurate phonetic transcription of the word "pronunciation".

In US schools, pronunciation is generally indicated in books by phonetic spelling using the Roman alphabet only. Most US dictionaries use Roman-alphabet phonetics rather than IPA.

So an elementary schoolbook here might say something like, "Pronunciation (pro-nun-see-AY-shun) is very important in understanding words."

kuwisdelu
07-21-2008, 10:59 PM
It seems like you're using the symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet, but that's not an accurate phonetic transcription of the word "pronunciation".

In US schools, pronunciation is generally indicated in books by phonetic spelling using the Roman alphabet only. Most US dictionaries use Roman-alphabet phonetics rather than IPA.

So an elementary schoolbook here might say something like, "Pronunciation (pro-nun-see-AY-shun) is very important in understanding words."


That's IPA. The standard dictionaries used in schools in my country use a special phonetic pronunciation guide, so it would be something like "pro-nun-see-ai-shun". I do know IPA though because I use a real dictionary now (Concise Oxford).

Lots of dictionaries (especially American ones) use their own twisted form of IPA that isn't IPA at all. There's often a key at the beginning of the dictionary that tells you what symbols mean what, and lots of times it can be rather arbitrary from dictionary to dictionary.

I know IPA thanks to my linguistics class. Dictionaries that use IPA I can understand. But dictionaries that use anything else (including regular Roman alphabet attempts) leave me clueless.

Orientalist
07-22-2008, 02:35 AM
I learned something like that in 4th grade, when we were issued dictionaries and learned how to find words by alphabetical order and so on. This was in Massachusetts, fwiw. That system definitely wasn't as simple as the one Albedo used.

I learned IPA in a linguistics course as a freshman in college.

Dario D.
07-22-2008, 09:50 AM
Okay, thanks for the help, all.

Got the help I needed.

JoNightshade
07-22-2008, 09:58 AM
Er, I learned this in college linguistics. Never in primary or secondary school, though. :)