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three seven
04-19-2005, 07:36 PM
Ok, so you know all that useless information floating around out there? Well I bet at least some of it's useful to someone!

How about you offload some of those little pointless tidbits you know you're never going to need, and throw 'em all in this here thread! That way, instead of going to waste they can be recycled as shiny new useful tidbits for someone else, and you can free up some brainspace to concentrate on writing something like you're supposed to be doing! Everybody's happy!

And you never know, you might be leafing through this thread later and find just exactly what you never knew you needed!

Brilliant!

MadScientistMatt
04-19-2005, 07:54 PM
Wear rubber gloves when handling chili peppers. If you don't, even after several hours and washing your hands several times, rubbing your eye is going to really, really hurt. I've lost a few disposable contact lenses that way.

three seven
04-19-2005, 07:55 PM
Wear rubber gloves when handling chili peppers. If you don't, even after several hours and washing your hands several times, rubbing your eye is going to really, really hurt.Not to mention having a pee.

mdin
04-20-2005, 06:35 AM
It's illegal to hunt camels in Arizona!

sgtsdaughter
04-20-2005, 07:01 AM
pot became illegal in 1933. but cocaine use was a popular pastime throughout the 1920s--both for the US.

adult toys (if you know what i mean) are illegal in atlanta.

there are musical condoms.

there are condoms named after the US flag--old glory condoms they are.

hitler was missing 1/2 of his manhood--really. a birth defect.

FDR died in the bed of his mistress.

F. Scott Fitzgerald's wife set her hospital on fire--it is so believed.

yup, most of mine are dirty and weird. acadamia will do that to you.

Hermit
04-20-2005, 08:29 AM
You don't need to drink alcohol to get drunk.

Drink 60 glasses of water in one hour and you will be legally drunk and feel all the same effects.

That's what I heard on the Discovery Channel.

sgtsdaughter
04-20-2005, 08:31 AM
You don't need to drink alcohol to get drunk.

Drink 60 glasses of water in one hour and you will be legally drunk and feel all the same effects.

That's what I heard on the Discovery Channel.

humm. maybe i should try that. might save on my bar bill. but the peeing . . . how in the heck would i manage?

Ella
04-20-2005, 09:15 AM
Vanillan, artificial vanilla, is made from paper/pulp mill waste.

MadScientistMatt
04-20-2005, 04:17 PM
pot became illegal in 1933. but cocaine use was a popular pastime throughout the 1920s--both for the US.

Not to mention, cocaine was never outright banned like marijuanna. It can still be obtained legally by prescription.

Ella
04-21-2005, 12:24 AM
Pez candy was originally marketed to smokers as a stop-smoking aid, in plain little round tins.

Julie Worth
04-21-2005, 12:30 AM
Britain once went to war with Spain over an ear.

sgtsdaughter
04-21-2005, 01:24 AM
Not to mention, cocaine was never outright banned like marijuanna. It can still be obtained legally by prescription.

why yes, yes it is. and when you have a terminal disease, or even in an intense flare with lupus--or the likes, doctors will rx it to you by the bottles.

soloset
04-22-2005, 08:24 AM
The "fresh after rain" smell is caused by bacterial spores reproducing themselves. Depressing, huh?

Stuff in the freezer still goes bad eventually (I made it to twenty-six before I learned this, so no laughing).

If you add a pinch of cloves to a burned pot of stew, or just about any hearty beef dish, it helps hide the burned taste.

Add a tablespoon or two of unsweetened Dutch chocolate to chili; it gives it a really rich, full-bodied taste.

mdin
04-22-2005, 09:02 AM
Here's a good one:

If you run out of dishwasher detergent, dishwashing liquid is not a good substitite.


In fact, it's probably one of the worst things you can do. :(

smallthunder
04-22-2005, 01:34 PM
Great, a chance to address one of my pet peeves!
That is: "The Great Wall of China is the only man-made object visible from space."
NOT so!
If you think about it for a moment, perhaps you'll understand:
the wall is very llllllllllllllllllllooooooooooooooooonnnnnnnnnng
but not very high.

By the way -- "The Great Wall" is not actually one wall, per se. Several Chinese emperors built "a great wall" during different dynasties. They don't line up.

I have an academic background in traditional Chinese culture, and life experiences in both the PRC and Taiwan -- so, if you have any questions in this area, just let me know.

three seven
05-04-2005, 01:20 AM
Come on people, you can't have gone a whole week without learning anything trivial! Ok, I've got one for you:

You can't immobilise a car by pouring sugar in the tank. The sugar won't dissolve and all it'll do is clog up the filter. Eventually. Maybe.

Your turn!

smallthunder
05-04-2005, 05:11 AM
OK, here's something that may be of use -- if not for some novel, then personally:
The fastest way to clear up a bruise (black-and-blue mark) is to drink pineapple juice.
Seriously.

Unique
05-04-2005, 05:45 AM
Don't eat polar bear liver without mixing it with lean meat like rabbit - you'll give yourself Vitamin A poisoning.

thistle
05-04-2005, 05:50 AM
Sleep researchers are using fruit flies to study sleep cycles. It turns out that their sleep needs are similar to humans' sleep needs. Gross. I hate bugs. :eek:

BradyH1861
05-04-2005, 06:07 AM
Whenever you stop and ask yourself "What were they thinking?", the answer is that they weren't.


Brady H.

Sarita
05-04-2005, 06:08 AM
Okay, here's one that everyone probably already knows...

Premarin is made from Pregnant Mares Urine....mmmm, get me some o' dat!

CaitlinK18
05-04-2005, 10:55 AM
In feudal Japan, it was legal for a samurai to cut off a peasant's head to test the sharpness of a new sword.

Go, fedualism!

Maryn
05-04-2005, 08:18 PM
One one-hundredth of an inch of rain (0.01”) falling on one acre of land weighs approximately 1.1 tons.

The hard cylinder on the end of your shoelace is called an aglet.

It would take 1.2 million mosquito bites to drain an adult human of all blood.

Maryn, unable to use these in a novel

Mr Underhill
05-04-2005, 09:00 PM
Japan and Russia have technically been in a state of war for the past fity years.

You probably know that the Soviet Union declared war on Imperial Japan after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, right before the end of the War in the Pacific. But the two countries have never signed a peace treaty, due to a dispute over the ownership of the Kurile Islands.

BlueTexas
05-07-2005, 06:52 PM
Laser pointers aimed at an aquarium will cause the fish to have convulsions. Very bad for the fish.

rhymegirl
05-07-2005, 07:36 PM
I'm not sure if this qualifies or not as useless info, but...

Teenagers can't wait to learn how to drive, finally get a license, want to go somewhere in particular, but don't know how to get there 'cause they don't know the names of streets or have any sense of direction, so you end up having to give them a ride there anyway.

robeiae
05-08-2005, 03:57 AM
Chubby Checker's real name is Ernest Evans...

Is that useless enough?

Rob

PattiTheWicked
05-17-2005, 09:58 PM
In feudal Japan, it was legal for a samurai to cut off a peasant's head to test the sharpness of a new sword.



How cool is that? I can think of a few people I know who would make good blade test subjects.

Stupidity should be painful.

PattiTheWicked
05-17-2005, 10:03 PM
OK, I'll play along with the Useless Info game!

Did you know that the microwave oven was invented by accident? A couple of British scientists back in the 1940's created a device called a "magnetron", which created microwaves. They were going to use it to defeat the Nazis, because it was supposed to work similar to radar, bouncing waves off the enemy's tanks to determine their location.

After the war, a guy named Raytheon was playing around with his magentron, and discovered that the candy bar in his pocket had melted while he was hanging out at the machine (although why he didn't just assume it was pocket-heat is beyond me). To test his theory, he got a bag of popcorn and set it front of the magnetron... poppity pop pop poppity pop! He tried it with eggs, too, and they blew up. Anyway, he decided to market the first microwave oven, but it was huge, so no one bought them. Then in the 1950's, Tappan made a "home sized" model, which sold for about $1100.

And then God created Hot Pockets.

Anastacia
05-21-2005, 04:05 AM
Breastmilk comes out of several holes in the breast, not just one. This was a very big shock to me when I nursed.

Breastfed babies will adopt quicker to cups than formula fed ones.

A breastfed baby's poop does not smell until he starts eating solids.

The ideal age of weaning is no less than a year. Toddler who nurse suffer from fewer illnesses.

Newborn babies have a distinctly pleasant smell that wears off at about nine months.

(I just want to say that I am not knocking formula feeders. Nursing is often hard so I understand why women struggle with it.)

Sarita
05-27-2005, 05:18 PM
I might end up using this, but I found it very interesting and wanted to share:

Incan soldiers used a process that was very similar to modern freeze drying. They left potatoes out in the cold mountain air to freeze at night. Then they thawed them and compressed them to remove the water. How cool is that?

SeanDSchaffer
05-30-2005, 03:09 AM
Okay, I'll bite.


A few things I remember that are kind of interesting:

1. When built in the 1920's the St. John's Bridge (Classic Suspension) just north of Portland, Oregon, was the longest bridge in the world. My grandmother, as a little girl, was one of the first people to cross it the day it opened.

2. In 1911, Portland, Oregon was the largest city on the U.S. West Coast--some people nicknamed Portland 'The New York City of the West Coast.'

3. I noticed in an earlier post, that someone said cocaine can be used medically. In the State of Oregon, Marijuana can be legally used by prescription, as well. (In fact, I remember taking a walk not too long ago in Downtown Oregon City and encountering a man carrying a joint--I could smell the thing quite a distance away--not far from the Clackamas County Courthouse, acting just like he knew what he was doing.)

4. Portland, Oregon, is the only major city in the U.S. with a volcano inside the city limits. (Mt. Tabor.)


I have plenty of other useless knowledge, but I don't have it readily available right now. Besides, I have a book to write. I'd best get back to it.

This is a fun little thread. Very enjoyable.
:)

arrowqueen
06-03-2005, 03:24 AM
When you sneeze, the air comes down your nose at between 70 and 120 mph.

Botulism gets its name from the Latin for 'little sausages.' (Which presumably went off pretty fast.)

Pasta was brought back to Italy, from China, by Marco Polo.

The Normans brought rabbits to Britain. Up till the Norman Conquest all we had were hares.

The Romans brought nettles, which they used to beat themselves with to provide warmth in the chilly British climate.

Caligula made his horse a member of the Roman Senate. (And his name means 'Little Boots.')

smallthunder
06-03-2005, 09:29 AM
Pasta was brought back to Italy, from China, by Marco Polo.


It still remains to be proven beyond a reasonable doubt that Marco Polo made it all the way to The Middle Kingdom (China). So, all those claims of the wonderful things he supposedly brought back to Europe (pasta, ice cream, etc) remain questionable as well.

What is not in doubt:

The Chinese invented gunpowder, papermaking, printing (block and moveable type), the mariner's compass, astronomical observatories, decimal mathematics, paper money, umbrellas, wheelbarrows, multi-stage rockets, silk production and the raising of silkworms, kites, chopsticks, crossbows ...

and the list goes on.

The PRC government, mind you, is not satisfied with the usual (long, well-documented) lists of Chinese inventions -- in recent years, they've claimed China was the birthplace of a range of things, including the toilet and the fork . . .

BlueTexas
06-03-2005, 10:52 AM
In Weatherford, Texas, it takes a piece of mail seven days to be delivered to an address less than a mile from the postal drop-off point. It takes 13 minutes to walk the distance between the two addresses.

SeanDSchaffer
06-25-2005, 01:36 AM
The first electric train set was invented by a blacksmith in the 1830's. Scientists of the time told the blacksmith the idea of an electrically operated railroad engine was impractical.

Today, almost every railroad locomotive uses electric motors (called 'Traction' motors) to drive the wheels. The massive diesel engines within the locomotives in fact drive electrical generators which power the traction motors.

CACTUSWENDY
06-25-2005, 01:48 AM
:popcorn: ...wow...I feel so much richer for this knowledge. A 'thank you' seems so trivial at this point. (gosh, I love you guys) :popcorn:

ldumont999
06-26-2005, 01:06 AM
The Romans brought nettles, which they used to beat themselves with to provide warmth in the chilly British climate.

You can make a soup from wild nettles - often done during the depression in pre-WWII Germany when food was scarce.

ldumont999
06-26-2005, 01:17 AM
:Coffee:*Coffee beans are actually a form of cherry pit.
*Coffee was discovered by a shepherd who thought his old goats were demon possessed because they were "dancing and frolicking" wildly after eating the leaves and berries from the coffee plant.
*Coffee, in its purest form, is as toxic as cocaine. By roasting it, grinding it and boiling it we dilute the caffeine to a manageable level.

ldumont999
06-26-2005, 01:53 AM
Add a tablespoon or two of unsweetened Dutch chocolate to chili; it gives it a really rich, full-bodied taste.
* Originally chocolate was made into a spicy drink by the Aztecs somewhere between the 13th and 16th centuries. They mixed powdered chocolate with wine and chili powder. It was considered a luxury item reserved for warriors and nobility and was often burned as incense or given as an offering during rituals and ceremonies.

*Cacao seeds were used as money by the Aztecs.

* By the 16th century, chocolate had been discovered by the Spanish. They found it be bitter so they added sugar to it and kept it secret for nearly a century before the rest of Europe discovered it.

* The first chocolate house was opened in London in 1657.

*Throughout history, chocolate has been used both as food and medicine. Cacao contains antibacterial agents that fight tooth decay. Hot cocoa drinks were often prescribed by physicians as a weight loss remedy.

*A 1.5 ounce milk chocolate bar contains the following vitamins and minerals - 3 grams of protein, 15% of the daily value of riboflavin, 9% of the daily value of calcium and 7% of the daily value of iron.

Maryn
06-26-2005, 08:45 PM
During fermentation, the yeast in champagne converts sugars into alcohol and carbon dioxide. Let the gas escape and you have a “still wine.” Trap it in a 2nd fermentation and you have champagne—and about 49 million bubbles per bottle.

However, “real champagne” comes only from the Champagne region of northern France--85,000 acres. In Europe, only those wines may be labeled ‘champagne.’ The roughly 250 Champagne houses label their product “vintage” only if it’s an exceptionally good year. So the best champagnes are both vintage and French. In the U.S., only 11% of the champagne consumed meets those criteria.

Cheers!

ldumont999
06-26-2005, 10:54 PM
When Marilyn Monroe married Joe DiMaggio she wore a champagne colored dress. The only veil she had was white so the day before the wedding she dyed it to an off white by soaking it in double strong coffee.

three seven
07-30-2005, 12:10 AM
Bump. We want more of these!

pconsidine
07-30-2005, 12:29 AM
You can't immobilise a car by pouring sugar in the tank. The sugar won't dissolve and all it'll do is clog up the filter. Eventually. Maybe.

However, you can easily accomplish the same task with vinegar.

ldumont999
07-30-2005, 01:30 AM
The USA is the world's largest consumer of coffee and Germany (which is only the size of Montana) of is the world's second largest consumer of coffee.
Over 53 countries grow coffee worldwide, but all of them lie along the equator between the tropic of Cancer and Capricorn.

ldumont999
07-30-2005, 02:10 AM
Here are a few days you might want to celebrate in August -- BTW, these make great triggers for a press release :Thumbs:.

August Daily Observances
Girlfriend's Day: 1
Respect For Parents: 1
National Night Out: 2
National Pretty Is As Pretty Does Day: 2
Coast Guard Day: 4
Work Like A Dog Day: 5
National Fresh Breath (Halitosis) Day: 6
National Pamper Yourself Day: 6
National Mustard Day: 6
Women's Pro Football Day: 6
Friendship Day: 7
Particularly Preposterous Packaging Day: 7
National Kid's Day: 7
Sister's Day: 7
Treasure Your Customers Day: 7
Sneak Some Zucchini Onto Your Neighbor's Porch Night: 8
International Day of the World's Indigenous People: 9
International Youth Day: 12
Vinyl Record Day: 12
Kool-Aid Day: 12
International Left Hander's Day: 13
National Garage Sale Day: 13
National Underwear Day: 13
International Nagging Day: 14
National Navajo Code Talkers Day: 14
National Relaxation Day: 15
Meaning of "Is" Day: 17
Sandcastle Day: 17
Bad Poetry Day: 18
National Personal Chef's Days: 18-20
Aviation Day: 19
"Black Cow" Root Beer Float Day: 19
Bamboo Day: 20
Vinegar Day: 20
Poets Day: 21
Be An Angel Day: 22
National Punctuation Day: 22
International Day for the Remembrance of Slave Trade and its Abolition: 23
Kiss and Make-Up Day: 25
Women's Equality Day: 26
Sing Out Day: 27
Race Your Mouse Around the Icons Day: 28
Crackers Over The Keyboard Day: 28
More Herbs, Less Salt Day: 29
Love Litigating Lawyers Day: 31

Saanen
07-30-2005, 02:28 AM
Okay, here's some stuff that's taking up space in my brain alongside jingles to products no longer made, phone numbers from 25 years ago, and the names of all my elementary school teachers:

The elephant's normal body temperature is 101 F.

Rabbits are lagomorphs, not rodents. (I assume hares are too, but I'm not sure.)

Wool and mohair are naturally fire-resistant.

If you can get all four of its feet off the ground, a sheep is virtually paralyzed. But let even the tip of one hoof come in contact with something and she is liable to be able to turn over/get up.

The two major methods of sheep shearing are Australian (the version everyone's probably seen in movies) and Mexican (where the sheep has its feet hogtied). In the hands of a master shearer, both methods take about the same amount of time and effort to shear the sheep with minimal stress to the animal.

Several breeds of sheep (including Jacob and Navajo-Churro) are multi-horned breeds, where the animal can grow 2-6 horns naturally (I believe Navajo-Churro ewes are polled--hornless--but Jacob ewes grow horns although they are smaller than the rams').

Okay, I'd better stop writing about sheep because I will just keep going all night. And then I'd start on goats.

PVish
07-30-2005, 05:26 AM
Several breeds of sheep (including Jacob and Navajo-Churro) are multi-horned breeds, where the animal can grow 2-6 horns naturally (I believe Navajo-Churro ewes are polled--hornless--but Jacob ewes grow horns although they are smaller than the rams').

You forgot to tell why the Jacob sheep are called Jacob sheep! (Hint: it's a Biblical reference.) I did a story on some locally raised Jacobs a couple of years ago. Love those spotted 4-horned sheep! They have more personality than the average sheep.

Mac H.
07-30-2005, 10:46 AM
Great, a chance to address one of my pet peeves!
That is: "The Great Wall of China is the only man-made object visible from space."
NOT so!
If you think about it for a moment, perhaps you'll understand:
the wall is very llllllllllllllllllllooooooooooooooooonnnnnnnnnng
but not very high.

I've used that one. The myth was probably started in 1934 by a Ripley's "Believe It Or Not" column.

I used it years ago in a script about a TV quiz show - which has a REALLY BORING contestant who knows everything. He keeps coming back on the show as the carry-over champion, and they have to find obscure questions to try and get rid of him. He's so boring that he's killing the ratings.

I just skimmed through the script and it was pretty bad. (I did write it years ago)

Other tidbits from that script include:
Q: What was the name of Napolean's horse ?
A: Marengo. (Actually General Margengo, because he gave his horse a field commision)
Q: February 3rd 1959. The aircraft N3794N crashed. Who died?
A: Ritchi Valents, Buddy Holly and the Big Bopper
- Wrong. It was actually Ritchi Valents, Buddy Holly, the Big Bopper - and ROGER PETERSON.
Nobody remembers ROGER PETERSON !
* Silly Putty is made from Silicone oil and Boric Acid.
* Lingonberry sauce is traditionally served on Reindeer steaks.
* Ginger left the Spice Girls on the 27th May 1998. The announcement was made at 0900 GMT.

Incidentally, they will eventually find a question that he can't answer.

He's really going to regret forgetting his wife's birthday ....

Mac

PVish
07-31-2005, 01:57 AM
Deaf cats are likely to enjoy being vacuumed; cats who can hear do not enjoy being vacuumed.

(Note: I only tested this premise on the cats that were immediately available to me as I vacuumed today.)

Heavy Magic
07-31-2005, 02:24 AM
One millionth of a gram of Plutoniun 238 is carcinogenic.

One pound, evenly distributed, would cause Lung cancer in every living human on the planet.

not sure of the statistic on animals,,,, more on that later.

Saanen
07-31-2005, 06:26 AM
You forgot to tell why the Jacob sheep are called Jacob sheep! (Hint: it's a Biblical reference.) I did a story on some locally raised Jacobs a couple of years ago. Love those spotted 4-horned sheep! They have more personality than the average sheep.

Oh, that's right--the Biblical Jacob took all the spotted sheep from the flock for his own or something. I should know the story better than that, sorry! I have read that the Jacob sheep is actually originally a Spanish breed, but the Biblical name makes for a great story. I kept Jacobs for a few years and look forward to having them again soon--they do have a lot of personality, you're right! I'm going to have Jacobs and another primitive (though not multi-horned) breed, Shetlands, when I have land again.

Here're some bits of Shetland-sheep-related trivia: Shetland sheep are short-tailed breeds that don't require their tails to be docked (which is done to reduce the chance of flystrike, and don't get me started on flystrike--undocked tails DO increase the chance of it a LOT, and it's disgusting and horrible for the sheep!). Shetlands also shed their fleeces in the spring so they don't have to be shorn; instead the shepherd pulls the fleece off, a practice known as rooing. After doing a bit of shearing, I'm all for sheep that shear themselves. :)

Mac H.
07-31-2005, 05:05 PM
One millionth of a gram of Plutoniun 238 is carcinogenic.

One pound, evenly distributed, would cause Lung cancer in every living human on the planet.Sorry but that is total crap.

Over a hundred people in the USA have pacemakers powered by Plutonium 238.
See: http://www.orau.org/ptp/collection/Miscellaneous/pacemaker.htm

One micro-gram will increase your risk of GETTING cancer (not even dying from it) by about 1%. And that's assuming that somebody divided the one micro-gram up into particles less than 3 microns in diameter, so that they had the chance to end up in the depths of the lungs. And that somebody collected all the 3 micron particles you breathed out again, and forced you to rebreath them until they all ended up buried in the lungs.

That doesn't even compare to the effects of natural carcinogens in organic food (such as aflatoxin) - let alone fumes from cars and cigarette smoke.

A discussion of some of the possibilities for using Plutonium 238 in a terrorist attack can be found here: http://www.llnl.gov/csts/publications/sutcliffe/

Mac

Heavy Magic
07-31-2005, 09:47 PM
[QUOTE=Mac H.]Sorry but that is total crap.

Research a little deeper Mac before you call my statements CRAP.
guess all these people are CRAP too.........

Plutonium 239, one of the most dangerous elements known to humans, is so toxic that one-millionth of a gram is carcinogenic.
http://www.truthout.org/cgi-bin/artman/exec/view.cgi/34/10373

There is no question that Plutonium-238 is an extremely lethal substance. As toxic dust inhaled by humans, less than one millionth of a gram is a carcinogenic dose. Seventy-two pounds will be carried for the Cassini mission, the most ever put into space. (Helen Caldicott, M.D., addresses the health risks of a Cassini accident in the fact sheet at .
http://archive.cpsr.net/issues/cassini.html

it is estimated that one millionth of a gram accumulating in a persons body would be fatal.
http://www.amin.org/eng/uncat/2005/jan/jan17.html


and plutonium, named after the god of hell, which is so carcinogenic that one-millionth of a gram causes cancer.
http://www.nuclearpolicy.org/NewsArticle.cfm?NewsID=2411

Plutonium 239, one of the most dangerous elements known to humans, is so toxic that one-millionth of a gram is carcinogenic. More than 440 pounds is made annually in each 1,000-megawatt nuclear power plant.
http://www.nuclearpolicy.org/NewsArticle.cfm?NewsID=2336

Plutonium 238 is hundreds of times more radioactive than the kind of plutonium used in nuclear arms, plutonium 239. "Plutonium is a man-made element. Pu-239 is weapons-grade and was produced for use in nuclear weapons. It has a “half-life” of 24,500 years. Pu-238 has a “half-life” of 80 years, which means it`s decaying at a much faster rate and thus giving off more radiation. Plutonium is extremely toxic. One particle of plutonium lodged in a lung can cause cancer."
http://tinyurl.com/e3xgy

"Plutonium 239 is so toxic that one-millionth of a gram is carcinogenic. More than 200kg is made annually in each 1000-megawatt nuclear power plant. Plutonium is handled like iron in the body, and is therefore stored in the liver, where it causes liver cancer, and in the bone, where it can induce bone cancer and blood malignancies. On inhalation it causes lung cancer. It also crosses the placenta, where, like the drug thalidomide, it can cause severe congenital deformities. Plutonium has a predisposition for the testicle, where it can cause testicular cancer and induce genetic diseases in future generations."
http://tinyurl.com/bfgny
http://www.sunvalleyonline.com/forum/discussions.asp?FID=60&ID_Discussion=1663&ID_Message=1666

It is accepted that one millionth of 1 gram of plutonium is sufficient to produce lung cancer 151050 years after initial inhalation of the element.
http://www.sustainable-city.org/articles/nuclear.htm

PLUTONIUM 239, one of the most dangerous elements known to humans, is so toxic that one-millionth of a gram is carcinogenic.
http://64.233.179.104/search?q=cache:ziXoqizHtb0J:www.reachingcriticalwi ll.org/legal/npt/RevCon05/NGOpres/medical11.pdf+one+millionth+of+a+gram+carcinogenic&hl=en


http://www.globalresponse.org/gra.php?i=3/97&j=printable

and on and on.

I too research, and personally don't put much faith in what our "government" says is good, and not good for usthese days.
but thats just me,to each his own.




Have a nice day mac and thanks for the Board welcome.

HM

Mac H.
08-01-2005, 08:42 AM
Research a little deeper Mac before you call my statements CRAP.
guess all these people are CRAP too.........
Yeah - that was a little harsh. But I do get frustrated about the web. It is a wealth of information - available to all. But people aren't checking the information before putting it on the web, and people aren't checking the info from the web.

Part of the reason 'crap' is a good word, though, is that sometimes the information isn't technically false. It's just misleading. For example, if I say that xxx th of a gram of something is carcinogenic - what does that mean. ?

Let's say that 1 gram causes cancer in 100% of people, at what point to we say it is no longer carcinogenic? Increases the rate of cancer by 1%? 0.1%? 0.001% ? If you say that it's always carcinogenic (a valid argument) then all those figures which quote '1 microgram' are saying is that 1 gram causes cancer. Or 1 thousand grams cause cancer. It's meaningless.

Another problem is that it might look like we are getting the information from plenty of independent sources, but they are all getting it from one or two sources. If so, quoting more examples isn't going to help.

OK, let's look at each of these sources of information rationally:



Plutonium 239, one of the most dangerous elements known to humans, is so toxic that one-millionth of a gram is carcinogenic.
http://www.truthout.org/cgi-bin/artman/exec/view.cgi/34/10373
OK - For a start she's talking about Plutonium 239. And she doesn't know the difference between an element and an isotope. (Plutonium 239 is not an element. Plutonium is an element. Plutonium 239 is an isotope.)



There is no question that Plutonium-238 is an extremely lethal substance. As toxic dust inhaled by humans, less than one millionth of a gram is a carcinogenic dose. Seventy-two pounds will be carried for the Cassini mission, the most ever put into space. (Helen Caldicott, M.D., addresses the health risks of a Cassini accident in the fact sheet at .
http://archive.cpsr.net/issues/cassini.html
Ok, this is the same person. So, for a start, we aren't supporting the argument by providing a DIFFERENT source of information. It is just the same source. This woman gets around.

And yes. It is extremely lethal. But unless she defines what 'carcinogenic dose' means, then they are simply heated words for getting publicity - not facts. And yes, Plutonium 238 was put into space for the Cassini missions - it makes a great long term battery. Which is exactly why people have the stuff implanted in their chests for pacemakers! (Older pacemakers, I will admit.)


it is estimated that one millionth of a gram accumulating in a persons body would be fatal.
http://www.amin.org/eng/uncat/2005/jan/jan17.html
This one is definitely irrelevant. You've gotto admit it. The document isn't talking about plutonium. Read it again. It's talking about depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is a totally different beast. They aren't interchangeable. This, by the way, is one of the reasons why we need to check sources. People often get excited by a subject, and swap two things that are similar (at least similar in their mind). It's like if I wrote an article on motorbikes, and kept confusing "Harley Davidson" with "Yamaha". I might not notice, but everyone who knows the topic would realise I'm ignorant.


and plutonium, named after the god of hell, which is so carcinogenic that one-millionth of a gram causes cancer.
http://www.nuclearpolicy.org/NewsArticle.cfm?NewsID=2411
OK - you can check out how accurate these guys are VERY easily. Research what plutonium was named after. OK - I'll save you the trouble. It wasn't named after 'the god of hell'. Uranium was named after the planet Uranus. The next element that was found was called Neptunium - after the planet Neptune. And Plutonium was named after - the planet Pluto.

Seriously. Don't believe me. Don't believe the government. Don't believe 'www.NuclearPolicy.org'. Just check the facts.

You've got to admit - these guys do NOT check their facts when they write an article.

Plutonium 239, one of the most dangerous elements known to humans, is so toxic that one-millionth of a gram is carcinogenic. More than 440 pounds is made annually in each 1,000-megawatt nuclear power plant.
http://www.nuclearpolicy.org/NewsArticle.cfm?NewsID=2336
Sigh. The whole 'element' .v. 'isotope' problem. It's like reading an article on engines and finding they have 'manifold' and 'exhaust pipe' mixed up. Would you get your engine facts from a source like that?


Plutonium 238 is hundreds of times more radioactive than the kind of plutonium used in nuclear arms, plutonium 239. "Plutonium is a man-made element. Pu-239 is weapons-grade and was produced for use in nuclear weapons. It has a “half-life” of 24,500 years. Pu-238 has a “half-life” of 80 years, which means it`s decaying at a much faster rate and thus giving off more radiation. Plutonium is extremely toxic. One particle of plutonium lodged in a lung can cause cancer." http://tinyurl.com/e3xgy
This one isn't actually false. And they do try and give some details. The problem is in what they imply. Yes, one particle of plutonium lodged in a lung COULD cause cancer. However, a truer statement would be that a single particle of Plutonium (< 3 micrograms) would increase your odds of getting cancer by XX% (Where XX is much less than 1%) And yes, at least they understand that Plutonium 238 is NOT Plutonium 239 - and is more radioactive. (Which kinda contradicts those other source which claimed that Plutonium 239 was more dangerous)


It is accepted that one millionth of 1 gram of plutonium is sufficient to produce lung cancer 151050 years after initial inhalation of the element.
http://www.sustainable-city.org/articles/nuclear.htm
This is bizarre. If I inhale the element, I could get lung cancer in 151,050 years !!! I suspect that my lungs won't be around any more, so they'll be safe from cancer. And remember - we are talking about Plutonium 238 - which has a half life of about 80 years.

and on and on.

But I do agree with your overall argument. I don't put much faith in what your "government" says is good for us, either.

However, all information must come from somewhere. Someone must have done a calculation which shows how they get their information. If the website doesn't details on how they calculated the toxicity, etc, then they should reference their information - so you can verify the information for yourself.

You are right. We should not trust the government. Nor should we blindly accept what people put on the web or in books. Verify the information.

Think how many websites happily quote urban myths without bother to verify them. Why should science facts be any different ?

Mac
(PS: And yes, we are all agreed that Plutonium 238 is nasty stuff.

And interesting book the conflicting information in the environmental industry is 'The Skeptical Environmentalist'. Sorry, but I guess you can guess which way it leans!

For how facts SHOULD be referenced, have a look at: http://www.accesstoenergy.com/view/atearchive/s76a5488.htm

When he talks about toxicity, he tells us where he got the information from.)

(PPS: And I suggest that if we continue this discussion (which I'm more than happy to) we start a thread in the 'take it outside' board. We are definitely getting off topic!!!!)

Heavy Magic
08-01-2005, 09:36 AM
Heh heh "can I put you on a retainer?"

you are correct, there are alot of reprints, and reprints of the same source.
this can be said for mass media in general, and would make for a very good "INTERVIEW" that America as a whole needs to hear on PRIME TIME!
THE TV is full of "facts" thrown out a million times, just like feed, and the public eats it up "as fact."

you have made it clear, and I have learned something that all of us have always known deep inside,which you have forced to the front to be paraded by once more, proving a great point very nicely
"Question Athority"

it's "They said" so it must be true!

it's those "they" people that in fact I talk about "IN MY OWN SCRIPT"

hahahhh how funny is that.

so the Moral here is that "THEY" SHOULD ALWAYS BE QUESTIONED TO THE INTH DEGREE.

on both sides, especially right now in time, as "it" has never been worse in my life than what I see in un-answered questions ,which are not at this point even questions anymore to most people because they have decided that what they see is already fact, bought the goods,and went on with there "Walmart lives."

ok Mac on that level "you are a FANATIC"
in a good way, and I hope people like yourself are using this insight to better mankind, it is important.

I stand corrected to that extent, but the crap was pointed, not needed, and falls into the catagory below:

to Quote the first line from "Creed Of Peace"

I am guilty of war when I proudly exercise my intelligence to the disadvantage of my fellow man.



Wow and I have only been here 1 day..........
that is twice on this board I have been attacked.
and once,Ive already learned something
is this some kind of initiation.....

"can't we all just get a loan"....

heh heh

see ya on the field MAC

HM

Mac H.
08-01-2005, 02:16 PM
that is twice on this board I have been attackedOops - sorry.

I think it is a bit of a language barrier rather than anything else. I'm used to using that description to talk about pieces of information. It's not a comment on the messenger.

I don't know if it's the fact that we live on opposite sides of the world that words mean different things, or a minor cultural gap. More likely, though, I just used the wrong word !

(I never did get used to the fact that Americans tend to call the small room containing a to!let a 'bathroom' - even if it didn't contain a bath. I suspect the word cr~p translates harsher into 'American' then it does in my native variation of Strine.)

See you around,

Mac.

Rabe
08-02-2005, 04:01 AM
OK - you can check out how accurate these guys are VERY easily. Research what plutonium was named after. OK - I'll save you the trouble. It wasn't named after 'the god of hell'. Uranium was named after the planet Uranus. The next element that was found was called Neptunium - after the planet Neptune. And Plutonium was named after - the planet Pluto.[/QUOTE]

In the interest of being completely fair and accurate here:

Uranus was named for a Roman god
Neptune was named for a Roman god of the sea
Pluto was named for a Roman god of the underwold (co-opted from the Greeks as was Neptune) - which, in certain senses, had very hellish punishments. Therefore it is fair to say that Plutonium, named for Pluto (the planet) would also be named for the Roman god of the underworld.


Otherwise, nice rebuttal.

Rabe....

MadScientistMatt
08-02-2005, 06:42 AM
I wonder if this link may shed some light on the source of the "one microgram is carinogenic" claim about plutonium:

http://yarchive.net/physics/plutonium_toxicity.html

It's the second post from the top. Seems that some agency (OSHA?) had decided not to allow workers to be exposed to more than 0.65 micrograms of plutonium. Those recommendations tend to be rather cautious, so if they were aware that one microgram meant instant death, I'd expect it to be a lot lower. Still some pretty nasty stuff, although it's not like it's botulinus toxin. (http://www.vanderbilt.edu/radsafe/9406/msg00037.html)

This is somewhat unattributed, as it's newsgroup postings and I haven't been able to find much of the supporting data online. It would probably take some digging through paper archives.

Mac H.
08-02-2005, 07:14 AM
It's the second post from the top. Seems that some agency (OSHA?) had decided not to allow workers to be exposed to more than 0.65 micrograms of plutonium. Those recommendations tend to be rather cautious, so if they were aware that one microgram meant instant death, I'd expect it to be a lot lower.A **LOT** Lower!

It's interesting to read the 'Material Safety Datasheet' for common substances.

For example, what does this sound like:
"... MAY RESULT IN RESPIRATORY DISEASE, INCLUDING SILICOSIS, PNEUMOCONIOSIS AND PULMONARY FIBROSIS"
Symptoms to watch out for: "SHORTNESS OF BREATH AND REDUCED PULMONARY FUNCTION"

And ...

Emergency/First Aid Procedures

EYES: FLUSH WITH RUNNING WATER FOR AT LEAST 15 MINUTES.
INHAL: REMOVE TO FRESH AIR. GIVE OXYGEN WITH ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION AS NEEDED. SEEK MEDICAL ATTENTION FOR TREATMENT, OBSERVATION AND SUPPORT AS NEEDED.
INGEST: CALL MD IMMEDIATELY (FP N).
SKIN: FLUSH WITH COPIOUS AMOUNTS OF WATER. CALL MD (FP N)

Pretty nasty substance - right?

This is the material safety sheet for CRYSTALLINE SILICA
ie: Beach sand !!

Mac

pconsidine
08-02-2005, 05:41 PM
Speaking of which -

A standard film developing machine requires no fewer than 145 material safety data sheets to be kept on or near the machine at all times.

Last I knew, anyway. Technology changes quickly.

Mac H.
08-02-2005, 06:05 PM
Another little-known fact:

The fax machine was invented before the telephone.
* Fax machine: 1842.
* Telephone: 1876

Mac

DJP
08-02-2005, 06:22 PM
Here's a neat email my cousin sent me. I'm not checking the facts; I just thought it was interesting...

>> > : > > Subject: Interesting facts



>> > > > Many years ago in Scotland, a new game was invented. It was
ruled
>> > "Gentlemen Only...Ladies Forbidden"...and thus the word GOLF
entered
>> into the English language.
>> > > In the 1400's a law was set forth that a man was not allowed
to beat
>> > his wife with a stick no thicker than his thumb. Hence we have
"the rule
>> > of thumb"
>> > > The first couple to be shown in bed together on prime time TV
were
>> > Fred and Wilma Flintstone.
>> > > Every day more money is printed for Monopoly than the US
Treasury.
>> > > Men can read smaller print than women can; women can hear
better.
>> > > Coca-Cola was originally green.
>> > > It is impossible to lick your elbow.
>> > > The State with the highest percentage of people who walk to
work:
>> > Alaska
>> > > The percentage of Africa that is wilderness: 28% (now get
this...)
>> > > The percentage of North America that is wilderness: 38%
>> > > The cost of raising a medium-size dog to the age of eleven:
$6,400
>> > > The average number of people airborne over the US any given
hour:
>> > 61,000
>> > > Intelligent people have more zinc and copper in their hair.
>> > > The first novel ever written on a typewriter: Tom Sawyer.
>> > > The San Francisco Cable cars are the only mobile National
Monuments.
>> > > Each king in a deck of playing cards represents a great king
from
>> > history:
>> > > Spades - King David
>> > > Hearts - Charlemagne
>> > > Clubs -Alexander, the Great
>> > > Diamonds - Julius Caesar
>> > > 111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321 (try it,
it's
>> > true!!)
>> > > If a statue in the park of a person on a horse has both front
legs in
>> > the air, the person died in battle. If the horse has one front
leg in the
>> > air the person died as a result of wounds received in battle. If
the
>> horse
>> > has all four legs on the ground, the person died of natural
causes.
>> > > Only two people signed the Declaration ofIndependenceon July
4th,
>> > John Hancock and CharlesThomson. Most of the rest signed on
August
>> 2, but the last signature wasn't added until 5 years later.
>> > Q. Half of all Americans live within 50 miles of what?
>> > A. Their birthplace
>> > Q. Most boat owners name their boats. What is the most popular
boat
>> name requested?
>> > A. Obsession
>> > Q. If you were to spell out numbers, how far would you have to go
until
>> > you would find the letter "A"?
>> > A. One thousand
>> > > Q. What do bulletproof vests, fire escapes, windshield wipers,
and
>> laser
>> > > printers all have in common?
>> > A. All invented by women.
>> > Q. What is the only food that doesn't spoil?
>> > A. Honey
>> > Q. Which day are there more collect calls than any other day of
the
>> > year?
>>A. Father's Day
>> > > In Shakespeare's time, mattresses were secured on bed frames
by ropes.
>> > When you pulled on the ropes the mattress tightened, making the
bed
>> firmer to sleep on. Hence the phrase......... "goodnight, sleep
tight."
>> > It was the accepted practice in Babylon 4,000 years ago that for
a month
>> > after the wedding, the bride's father would supply his son-in-law
with
>> > all the mead he could drink. Mead is a honey beer and because
their
>> > calendar
>> > was lunar based, this period was called the honey month . which
we know
>> > today as the honeymoon.
>> > In English pubs, ale is ordered by pints and quarts... So in old
>> > England, when customers got unruly, the bartender would yell at
them
>> "Mind your pints and quarts, and settle down."
>> > It's where we get the phrase "mind your P's and Q's"
>> Many years ago in England, pub frequenters had a whistle baked
into
>> > the rim, or handle, of their ceramic cups. When they needed a
refill,
>> they used the whistle to get some service. "Wet your whistle" is the
>> phrase inspired by this practice.
>> > ~~~~~~~~~~~AND FINALLY~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> > > At least 75% of people who read this will try to lick their
elbow
>> > > ...........................................
>> > > Don't delete this just because it looks weird. Believe it or
not, you
>> > can > read it.
>> > > I cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty
>> > uesdnatnrd waht I was rdgnieg.The
>> > phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid Aoccdrnig to
>> > rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht
oredr
>> > the > ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht
the
>> frist and
>> > lsat > ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl
mses
>> and you can
>> > sitll > raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn
mnid
>> deos not
>> > raed > ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Amzanig
huh

pconsidine
08-02-2005, 06:42 PM
In the Middle Ages in Germany, a legal matter between a husband and a wife was settled by burying the man up to his waist in the ground and giving him a sword. His wife was given a club and allowed to remain completely mobile. Whoever quit first (whether voluntarily or by losing consciousness) was declared the loser.

Valkyrie1
08-04-2005, 08:15 AM
Table salt will kill (desiccate, really) slimy critters like slugs. (I tried it when the manly man bug-killer was out, and it worked).

Algebra is named after its creator--a Muslim, Arab scientist and mathematician named Al-Jibr.

That cute, little childhood song, "Ring Around the Rosy" is about the Bubonic Plague. The title describes the deadly bubo, a bulbous sore symptomatic of the Plague; people carried posies in their pockets ("a pocket full of posies") as protection against the Plague; and, of course, we can guess the "ashes, ashes" part.
(:scared: (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/misc.php?do=getsmilies&wysiwyg=1&forumid=0#)Creepy, huh?)

The Bronx is named after a 17th century Dutch family who once owned much of the region in the modern day borough of New York. The family's name? The Broncks, of course!

I love the useless knowledge in here. Thanks.

Mac H.
08-04-2005, 03:03 PM
That cute, little childhood song, "Ring Around the Rosy" is about the Bubonic Plague. The title describes the deadly bubo, a bulbous sore symptomatic of the Plague; people carried posies in their pockets ("a pocket full of posies") as protection against the Plague; and, of course, we can guess the "ashes, ashes" part. Sorry - that one's definately a myth. Nothing to do with the Bubonic plague. Check out http://www.snopes.com/language/literary/rosie.htm for the reasoning.


Algebra is named after its creator--a Muslim, Arab scientist and mathematician named Al-Jibr.Almost. It wasn't his name - it was the title of his book.

His name was something like 'Mohammed ibn-Musa al-Khwarizmi' and his book was something along the lines of 'Al-jabr wa'l muqabalah'. Check out www.ms.uky.edu/~carl/ma330/project2/al-khwa21.html (http://www.ms.uky.edu/~carl/ma330/project2/al-khwa21.html) to see some of the algebra problems in the book.

I'm going to keep well away from refuting most of the other facts - except to mention that not only was Reverend Casimir Zeglen not female, but that the bizarre 'Rule of Thumb' myth has been debunked many times. Check out http://www.debunker.com/texts/ruleofthumb.html for example.

Mac
(PS: And yes, I did try and lick my elbow. I failed.)
(PPS: And bit about being able to read words with letters swapped around - as long as the first and last letters stay the same doesn't quite work either.

If you dno't bveilee me, tehn waht deos the fniwollog scnetnee say: Rranicesheg is aaulltcy qtiue ejablyone.

Mac
(If you give up, just use the anagram generator)

Mac H.
08-04-2005, 05:32 PM
Another (hopefully) useless fact:

Searching for Teletubby porn in Google gives you 865 webpages.

Free Speech - the other edge of the sword...

Mac

pconsidine
08-04-2005, 05:37 PM
"Researching is actually quite enjoyable."

That's the biggest myth in the whole thread. ;)

Richard
10-14-2005, 03:00 AM
(PS: And yes, I did try and lick my elbow. I failed.)

Not everyone can, but it's not impossible for the species as a whole.

Here's a related one - one of the few places you can reliably tickle yourself with a finger is the roof of your mouth.

three seven
10-14-2005, 03:08 AM
Searching for Teletubby porn in Google gives you 865 webpages.938. 364 Exact ones. And of those, guess which site appears twice on the second results page? http://www.geocities.com/thingumybobwotsit/uhoh2.gif

Gehanna
10-14-2005, 03:14 AM
Hey Richard,

I tried to lick my elbow to. Darn near dislocated my shoulder.

Richard
10-14-2005, 03:25 AM
I think Braniac repeated that particular urban myth last season, and promptly got inundated with pictures of just about everyone under the sun showing how to.

I can't do it myself, but I can't do the Vulcan sign either.

Eveningsdawn
10-14-2005, 03:35 AM
A Jacobs sheep can catch your arm with one of his horns, knock/pull you down, and step on you.

You can tell if a horse is dehydrated by pulling up on the skin and seeing if it snaps back into place quickly. If it doesn't, he is.

This is fun.

aadams73
10-14-2005, 03:57 AM
You can tell if a horse is dehydrated by pulling up on the skin and seeing if it snaps back into place quickly. If it doesn't, he is.


Works for humans and most other animals too!

smallthunder
11-14-2005, 06:51 AM
Great, a chance to address one of my pet peeves!
That is: "The Great Wall of China is the only man-made object visible from space."
NOT so!
If you think about it for a moment, perhaps you'll understand:
the wall is very llllllllllllllllllllooooooooooooooooonnnnnnnnnng
but not very high.

By the way -- "The Great Wall" is not actually one wall, per se. Several Chinese emperors built "a great wall" during different dynasties. They don't line up.

I have an academic background in traditional Chinese culture, and life experiences in both the PRC and Taiwan -- so, if you have any questions in this area, just let me know.

I am currently in Beijing, and I recently visited the Great Wall again.

For the first time in my life, I took a tour -- I wanted to see a different area of the Great Wall than I had seen before, and perhaps get away from the masses of other tourists. Guess what the tour guide announced on the way to the Wall?

Yep: "The Great Wall is the only man-made object that can be seen from the moon."

When I objected to promulgation of this myth, the tour guide then changed his story to: " ..the only man-made object that can be seen from space."

When I raised another objection, he just shrugged and replied "I didn't say how far out in space, did I?"

I gave up.
Grrr ....

Nonetheless, the Great Wall was just as AWESOME a sight to me that day as it had been that first time, 20 years ago.

spike
12-28-2005, 12:03 AM
The sound a rabbit makes is a series of high pitched squeals when hurt or scared (particularly if my cat is carrying it back to me as a prize).

Don't worry, the bunny escaped, quite unharmed. The cat likes to bring me "undamaged food"

spike
12-28-2005, 12:06 AM
There is a beagle brigade at many international airports. Beagles are used to check incoming luggage for food.

If you own a beagle, you'll know how good they are at finding food!

EyesClosed
12-29-2005, 08:10 AM
Here's some random stuff, but most of y'all probably already know it. I just thought I'd throw it out there for anyone who doesn't.

> CPR stands for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

> If you suck on an ice cube while drinking cold water, it will make you sound drunk and slur your words (it numbs your tounge or something)

> Dolplins are the only other mamals besides humans that have sex for fun

> Red is the most commonly colored vehical involved in accidents each year

> The microwave was invented after a researcher walked by a radar tube and a chocolate bar melted in his pocket

> There are 336 dimples on a regulation golf ball

> Shakespeare invented the words "assassination" and "bump"

> American Airlines saved $40,000 in 1987 by eliminating one olive from each salad served in first-class

> The electric chair was invented by a dentist

flyaway
01-12-2006, 09:05 AM
-The first child born in Madison, WI, was a baby girl. She was given the apt name of Wisconsiana.

-On the TV show M*A*S*H, it's very rare that you'll see Radar O'Reilly's left hand because Gary Burghoff made sure to hide it--it's somewhat deformed.

-Vodka makes a remarkably good mouthwash.

5KidsMom
01-23-2006, 06:41 AM
If you own a beagle, you'll know how good they are at finding food!

That's the understatement of all time! :snoopy:

Nutmeg in large quantities is hallucinogenic, and some people use it to get high.

Border collies have the problem solving ability of a 12 year old child.

Muscovey ducks are the only domestic duck not descended from mallards.

L M Ashton
01-23-2006, 07:38 AM
Wear rubber gloves when handling chili peppers. If you don't, even after several hours and washing your hands several times, rubbing your eye is going to really, really hurt. I've lost a few disposable contact lenses that way.Not for everyone, however.

I've never used gloves, nor do I bother washing my hands carefully after handling hot peppers, and I handle a LOT of hot peppers - I cook with them every day. :) I've never had a problem with pain, stinging, or anything like that, despite touching eyes, nose, or mouth.

But then, I'm also THAT FREAK who can handle eating insanely spicy food that would kill most other humans without being able to tell that it's supposed to be spicy. :)

Just saying, you know, that there are wide variations within the human spectrum.

But still, don't try that at home, kiddies. :p

three seven
01-23-2006, 11:46 AM
Border collies have the problem solving ability of a 12 year old child.Since I have the problem solving ability of a 9 year old, you can guess who fixes the electrics in my house.


Nutmeg in large quantities is hallucinogenic
Ginseng in large quantities can cause fatal toxic shock. Did I already say that?

Squidgygirl
02-22-2006, 08:14 AM
Strange Local Laws (well, local to me when I'm in England, anway!):

In Liverpool it is legal for a woman to be topless in while working in a tropical fish store (?!?), and apparently it is still legal to shoot a Welshman with a bow and arrow within the walls of Chester after dark.

Apparently, these laws haven't been repealed (I say apparently - I haven't researched it thoroughly. I just remember seeing them a few times).

smallthunder
03-13-2006, 04:06 PM
Here's some random stuff, but most of y'all probably already know it. I just thought I'd throw it out there for anyone who doesn't.

> Dolplins are the only other mamals besides humans that have sex for fun



Hmm, are you sure about that? Bonobos, a chimp-like primate, have sex to keep their society running smoothly (versus resorting to aggression). One could argue that for them, sex is for fun -- as opposed to being just for reproduction.

Bonobos -- the original "I'm a lover, not a fighter" mammals.

DamaNegra
03-28-2006, 02:00 AM
Ginseng in large quantities can cause fatal toxic shock. Did I already say that?

I heard somewhere that it can also make you sterile.

Chickens' bodies can keep on living some minutes after its heads have been severed off.

princessalex
04-06-2006, 02:55 AM
Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left.

Tish Davidson
04-06-2006, 08:33 AM
Chickens' bodies can keep on living some minutes after its heads have been severed off.

In 1912, Alexis Carrel, a Nobel Prize winning French scientist working in the United States, removed a tiny piece of heart muscle from a chicken embryo and placed it in nutrient fluid. The cells continued to beat and grow, even though they had been removed from the animal. In fact, kept beating for 34 years, far beyond the normal lifespan of a chicken, until the experiment was intentionally ended after Carrel’s death because no one wanted to tend the beating heart.


Now that was one weird guy.

Stressed
04-06-2006, 05:22 PM
I read somewhere that if you rolled out your placenta to a depth of half an inch you could park a Jeep Cherokee on it. Maybe not a Grand Cherokee though, just a classic… ;)

Tornadoboy
04-18-2006, 07:33 AM
You don't need to drink alcohol to get drunk.

Drink 60 glasses of water in one hour and you will be legally drunk and feel all the same effects.

That's what I heard on the Discovery Channel.

Yeah its because it causes brain swelling, and you'll wind up dead. There's such a thing as over-hydration and there was a news story not that long ago where a college pledge was made to drink way too much water and it actually killed him.

Tornadoboy
04-18-2006, 08:02 AM
Here's a few perfectly useless factoids, and further proof I have too much time on my hands:

- Cigarettes were invented during the 1918 flu pandemic because people were under the mistaken belief that smoking help protect them from the disease, and cigarettes were invented for women because they seemed more 'lady like' than normal cigars.

- Chocolate and grapes are extremely toxic to dogs

- You can die from lightning without even being hit, strikes create powerful electro-magnetic waves that if you are close enough and your heart catches them at a vulnerable fraction of a second between beats, it will be stopped.

- New Orleans used to be above sea level, but has sunken over 30 feet since its founding because the shifting of the Mississippi river has caused the sedimentary soils beneath it to settle.

- Pandas are actually related to raccoons and not bears

- All pet hamsters directly decend from one mother hamster and her litter which was brought from the middle east to London, then raised as lab animals until a worker decided they made good pets and brought some home for his children.

- During the filming of the shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho", unbeknownst to the actress the director arranged to have the water turn ice cold during the attack to get the desired reaction.

- Sean Connery has a serious phobia of spiders, and once passed out after shooting a scene involving a tarantula in one of his James Bond films

- Rats giggle when playing, but it is at a higher frequency than humans can hear

- Chocolate has been proven to have a mild tranquilizing effect on women (no joke)

- Horseshoe crabs are actually considered arachnids, in other words huge spiders

- Before the book "Peter Pan" there are no known cases of the name Wendy being used

- George Wendt, aka "Norm" from the TV show "Cheers" actually hates beer

- Robert Englund (aka Freddy Kruger) got into acting with the original intent of doing comedies, and is an accomplished painter

lauram
04-28-2006, 07:22 PM
The more dehydrated you are the darker the color of your pee. If you are hydrated well your pee is clear.

B vitamins will make your pee an orangish color, despite the level of hydration.

Worn women's panties can be bought in vending machines in Japan.

PattiTheWicked
04-28-2006, 07:36 PM
Running a lawnmower for one hour creates as much air pollution as driving your car for 350 miles.

I'll have to stop cutting the grass now.

Bmwhtly
07-04-2006, 05:48 PM
Britain was still technically at war with Germany until 1989 (when the wall came down and Germany was re-united)

Mud cracks at an angle of 45degrees.

Tigers don't roar before attacking, they go ffff-ffffff. they only roar to tell other tigers where they are.

Tornadoboy
07-15-2006, 11:41 PM
Here's some more completely useless stuff, I had most of these posted already but that thread got erased with the others:

- Joseph Merrick (aka the Elephant Man) actually did not suffer from Elephantitis but another extremely rare disease called Proteus Syndrome, this has been determined because only the later could have caused the massive deformations in his bone structure.

- Aside from the hydrogen, one of the main reasons the Hindenberg burned so quickly was because its skin was waterproofed with a combination of extremely combustible chemicals, including iron oxide and powdered aluminum, which when combined and ignited burn at over 5000 degrees

- When stepping upon the moon Neil Armstrong was suppose to say "That's one small step for ONE man, and one giant leap for mankind" and not "That's one small step for man..."

- Benjamin Franklin was known by his associates for his sense of humor, his seemingly constant pranks and his talent for charming women.

- One of the reasons the Titanic suffered such catastrophic damage upon striking the iceberg was that it's hull was constructed from steel which contained too much sulfer. This made the metal become excessively brittle in the cold waters, causing it to crack and shatter instead of merely crumpling as modern steel would have. This problem was not understood by science and the metal industry of that time.

- Your average store bought recordable CDROM has a lifespan of only two years of reliable useage, beyond that the dyes in which the data is recorded can start to blur and become unreadable.

- Debris from the top of the WTC towers was traveling at over 200mph when it struck the ground and pieces were embedded over 20 feet deep.

- The classic arcade video game called "Tempest" was inspired by a nightmare the author had, in which he was battling monsters trying to climb out of a pit.

- When Anthony Hopkins sucked his teeth during his famous "I ate his liver..." scene it was an adlib.

- Catherine the Great died from a stroke, and not from being crushed under a horse she was trying to have sex with as the legend goes (Credit goes to "The Straight Dope" for that factoid)

jvc
07-16-2006, 01:25 AM
In the UK, it is illegal to eat christmas pudding on christmas day (a law brought in by Oliver Cromwell apparently, which has yet to be repealed).

Another one, in the UK it is illegal to park a horse and cart withing 100 feet of a church on a sunday.

NicoleJLeBoeuf
07-16-2006, 01:43 AM
In addition to the high-pitched squeal they make when distressed, rabbits also grunt when annoyed. (Mine did, anyway.) For more on rabbit behavior than you could ever possibly want to know, you might follow Richard Adams's lead (Watership Down) and find a copy of The Secret Life of Rabbits by ... Robert Locksley? I'm going off memory here, but it's in the WD acknowledgement pages.

Oregon legalized medical marijuana, if I remember correctly, in the same election that legalized a highly regulated procedure for physician-assisted suicide. The assisted suicide measure was on the ballot for the 2nd time. The first time, it also passed, but as I understand it, the state legislature tossed it right back to the people. "You didn't really mean to vote Yes on that, did you? Here, try again." I seem to recall it passed with an even wider margin the second time, because that sort of thing makes people annoyed.

(All the "I seem to recall" hedging reflects my attempt to rely on my own memory of having voted in that election. 1998, wasn't it?)

And according to Snopes, many of the "facts" listed in the reproduced email DJP posts upthread (no disrespect meant to DJP), no matter how "interesting," are in fact false (http://www.snopes.com/language/acronyms/golf.asp) (just for example). But this is experientially true: if you want your friends and relations to stop sending you all those "did you know?" email forwards, in most cases you'll get your wish if you begin responding to each with a link to the Snopes page debunking the myth in question.

(However, I have one chronic email-legend-sending acquaintance that reacted to this tactic simply by forwarding the Snopes link to his original list of contacts. But this, at least, resulted in the spread of information, so that's OK.)

Nuoddo
07-19-2006, 12:39 AM
M & Ms were originally developed for the military. They needed to get chocolate to soldiers (to lift their spirits), but it would melt too easily.

Hence, the chocolate that melts in your mouth, not in your hand.

puddlejumper
08-29-2006, 09:38 AM
Okay, I knew this information would, at some point, come in handy.

Penguins are flammable, and as they have no natural aversion to humans, you can just pick one up and chuck it on the fire. Apparently they burn well. :D

Tornadoboy
09-03-2006, 08:07 AM
Penguins are flammable, and as they have no natural aversion to humans, you can just pick one up and chuck it on the fire. Apparently they burn well. :D

Chilly Willy disagrees. :tongue

smallthunder
09-03-2006, 08:33 AM
Penguins are flammable, and as they have no natural aversion to humans, you can just pick one up and chuck it on the fire. Apparently they burn well. :D

I imagine the same can be said for babies ... being human, they have no natural aversion, etc.

mkcbunny
10-09-2006, 01:01 AM
It's illegal to hunt camels in Arizona!
In prehistoric times, there were camels, lions, and giant sloths in what is now Los Angeles.

You can see fossils of their skeletons at the La Brea Tar Pits/Page Museum.

Unique
10-09-2006, 02:27 AM
A potato really can explode in the oven if you forget to poke holes in it before baking.

Kentuk
10-09-2006, 03:09 AM
It's illegal to hunt camels in Arizona!

Have a couple of books on the subject of camels in the Southwest.
My great grandfather William H Echols was a topographical engineer who made maps of the Big Bend Texas region using camels to support the expedition.

Kentuk

mkcbunny
10-09-2006, 11:45 AM
One of the mysteries of prehistoric nature is why camels ever became extinct in the [American] Southwest, as modern camels enjoy various local plants therein. Camels were reintroduced in the area, but why aren't they indigenous???

poetinahat
10-09-2006, 12:08 PM
In Australia, water spins anticlockwise down the drain. I just checked.(You know you've always wondered.)

Tsu Dho Nimh
10-09-2006, 04:58 PM
Those citing "odd laws" need to check current state statutes.

It is NOT illegal to hunt camels in Arizona ... that relic of the 1800s was removed from the books a looooooooooooong time ago.

smallthunder
11-09-2006, 05:39 AM
Those citing "odd laws" need to check current state statutes.

It is NOT illegal to hunt camels in Arizona ... that relic of the 1800s was removed from the books a looooooooooooong time ago.

True, but it IS still illegal to hunt penguins in Arizona and chuck them on a fire (no matter how well penguins burn).

Flammable babies, on the other hand ... oh, no, never mind.

Tornadoboy
11-09-2006, 06:45 AM
More proof that I'm a regular Cliff Claven of useless stuff:

- The character and symbol for the game "Pacman" was thought up when it's inventory looked down at a pizza he had just taken the first slice out of.
- Hamsters have poor eyesight with almost no depth perception, which accounts for their tendency to do rash things like run off the ends of tables.
- Tobe Hooper, the writer and director of the original “Texas Chainsaw Massacre” originally came up with the basic premise when he was standing in the long line of a deli, pondering the idea of what would be the quickest way for him to get through everyone.
- When Stephen King was struck by the van that almost killed him, his glasses wound up in the front seat. While the frames were ruined the lenses remained undamaged, he had them repaired and he still wears them today.
- As a joke the animators for the Bugs Bunny cartoon once drew genitals on him during a scene when he was getting out of a hot tub, but it was for only one frame so it wasn't visible to the naked eye and was never discovered.
- The term "mad as a hatter" originates from the fact that the glue once used in making top-hats contained high levels of mercury. The 'hatters' used to close the seal around the brims with their teeth, eventually getting severe mercury poisoning and going insane.

SpiderGal
01-02-2007, 06:51 PM
India has the largest English speaking population in the world.

C.bronco
01-02-2007, 07:11 PM
New Jersey has the largest population per square mile in the U.S.
If you sink the nineball on the break in a game of nine ball, you win. If you sink the eightball on the break in a game of eightball, you lose.

Chumplet
01-02-2007, 10:56 PM
More proof that I'm a regular Cliff Claven of useless stuff:
I slogged through this whole thread before I finally found a reference to Cliff Claven. I call his little tidbits "Clavenisms".



- As a joke the animators for the Bugs Bunny cartoon once drew genitals on him during a scene when he was getting out of a hot tub, but it was for only one frame so it wasn't visible to the naked eye and was never discovered.

Did you see the one with Bugs Bunny in a huge bra?

WildScribe
01-02-2007, 11:17 PM
A duck's quack doesn't echo.

Tornadoboy
01-11-2007, 08:34 PM
A duck's quack doesn't echo.

Actually they tested that myth on the show "Myth Busters" and proved it wrong. Apparently it's very hard to detect because both the outgoing and incoming sound waves are virtually identical, or at least that's how I remember their explanation, but they concluded that there is in fact an echo.
They also proved just how tough it is to get a duck to quack on que!
"Quack damn you!" :rant:

More:

- It has been speculated that ancient Egyptians probably did not use the copper wire to pull out the brain through the nose during mummification, as previously thought. Instead they most likely used the wire along with alcohol to mash the brain into a liquid before turning the body on its stomach and allowing it to drain out through the nostrils.
Oh by the way, how's your dinner? :D

- As a prank on the director and crew of the 70's kids show "The New Zoo Revue", while shooting the last episode of the series Freddy the Frog and Charlie the Owl started pretending to fight, hurling insults and obscenities at each other before making sexual advances.

*Addendum* I've now seen this video and it's hysterical!

Charlie: "You know Freddy, it's been a long 16 weeks but... I just want you know even though I've been a little tough on you, I really do like you"

Freddy:[Throwing a handful of paper in Charlie's face] "Oh go f--k yourself Charlie!"

smallthunder
03-02-2007, 05:55 PM
It has been speculated that ancient Egyptians probably did not use the copper wire to pull out the brain through the nose during mummification, as previously thought. Instead they most likely used the wire along with alcohol to mash the brain into a liquid before turning the body on its stomach and allowing it to drain out through the nostrils.
Oh by the way, how's your dinner? :D


URk.

It was breakfast, thank you very much.

:e2thud:

Tornadoboy
03-02-2007, 07:06 PM
URk.

It was breakfast, thank you very much.

:e2thud:

Glad I could be of service! :thankyou:

katrinka
03-09-2007, 08:19 PM
It is illegal to sing in the bathtub in Pennsylvania. It is also illegal to sleep on top of a refrigerator outdoors.

smallthunder
03-10-2007, 01:49 AM
It is illegal to sing in the bathtub in Pennsylvania. It is also illegal to sleep on top of a refrigerator outdoors.

But indoors in OK, right?

:e2dance:

Tornadoboy
04-12-2007, 06:32 AM
But indoors in OK, right?

:e2dance:

How about singing to a sleeping bathtub outdoors?

I'm sure it's legal here in Massachusetts, but there is probably a tax on it.

smallthunder
04-22-2007, 04:51 AM
I have it on good authority that the last living carrier pigeon was female, and named "Martha."

[How much more useless can information get?]

Stressed
04-22-2007, 05:12 AM
I read somewhere that if you rolled a human placenta out to a depth of 1-2 inches you could park a Jeep Cherokee on it. :D

smallthunder
04-22-2007, 05:21 AM
I read somewhere that if you rolled a human placenta out to a depth of 1-2 inches you could park a Jeep Cherokee on it. :D

Now, that's actually very useful information to have -- my mind is racing with all sorts of thoughts of how I could work that information into my next piece of writing --:Jump:

Tornadoboy
04-26-2007, 05:43 AM
I read somewhere that if you rolled a human placenta out to a depth of 1-2 inches you could park a Jeep Cherokee on it. :D

Yeah, I hear it's good for the tires!

Inky
05-10-2007, 11:07 AM
We're writers. We do tons of research. And along the way, read/discover tidbits we'll NEVER use, yet can't Etch-a-Sketch it out of our memories.

And it pops up at the most ridiculous times.

What's yours? A tibdit you have absolutely NO use for.

Me? Sitting at red light. Crane flies overhead. Thought Popper: our local fire department feeds the cranes; hence, they don't migrate since they know they'll have food provided.

Now...WHY would I need to know this??

Go on..you know you've got one...you know you wanna share it, and have it now locked in someone elses head...

Backward Masking
05-10-2007, 11:10 AM
We're writers. We do tons of research. And along the way, read/discover tidbits we'll NEVER use, yet can't Etch-a-Sketch it out of our memories.

And it pops up at the most ridiculous times.

What's yours? A tibdit you have absolutely NO use for.

Me? Sitting at red light. Crane flies overhead. Thought Popper: our local fire department feeds the cranes; hence, they don't migrate since they know they'll have food provided.

Now...WHY would I need to know this??

Go on..you know you've got one...you know you wanna share it, and have it now locked in someone elses head...

Knowing where the cranes get their food might just pop up on the final exam. And knowing is half the battle.

~Cheers

Inky
05-10-2007, 11:12 AM
Masking,
You ALWAYS make me laugh. It's your bedtime, there across the pond. Sweet dreams, bud.

Backward Masking
05-10-2007, 11:15 AM
Masking,
You ALWAYS make me laugh. It's your bedtime, there across the pond. Sweet dreams, bud.

Typically, they're a mix of sweet and sour. Varied dreams make for better dreaming ,or so they say.

jenfreedom
05-10-2007, 11:23 AM
What it's like to build a passive solar house on a mountain top in New Mexico. Less of a tidbit and more of a 'fills up my brain' kind of idea. We did build a house. Which is so not me -- scampering around on a roof, nailing stuff, and getting all messy. The experience took over a year longer than my partner said it would and the whole thing was a traumatic waste of time. We don't even live inn New Mexico any more. We're trying to sell said house right now so we've got a potential profit of over $200,000 worth of trouble just sitting there.

I always want to write about the experience because there's a multitude of stories there but the whole thing makes me mad and uneasy so I can't write about it. What a waste.

~ Jennifer (who will never build another house - if she can help it)

Inky
05-10-2007, 11:44 AM
What it's like to build a passive solar house on a mountain top in New Mexico. Less of a tidbit and more of a 'fills up my brain' kind of idea. We did build a house. Which is so not me -- scampering around on a roof, nailing stuff, and getting all messy. The experience took over a year longer than my partner said it would and the whole thing was a traumatic waste of time. We don't even live inn New Mexico any more. We're trying to sell said house right now so we've got a potential profit of over $200,000 worth of trouble just sitting there.

I always want to write about the experience because there's a multitude of stories there but the whole thing makes me mad and uneasy so I can't write about it. What a waste.

~ Jennifer (who will never build another house - if she can help it)

Have you seen the movie with Tom Hanks: The Money Pit? Old movie. If not, you must watch it. Extremely funny. Might give you ideas for your own writing...I think you've a topic here, if written cynically, could be laugh until sides ache for any that have shared your experience. I would definitely start jotting down scene ideas. Never know. The Money Pit made a bloody fortune.

k

Inky
05-10-2007, 11:50 AM
Thought Popper: Was doing dishes. This ejected:

There is more money being spent on breast implants
and Viagra today than on Alzheimer's research. This means that by 2040,
there should be a large elderly population with perky boobs and huge
erections and absolutely no recollection of what to do with them.

And I need this stuck in my head..why? Maybe there's more to this Dawn soap then we first thought...

Pagey's_Girl
05-10-2007, 04:31 PM
Spanish is not the language spoken in Brazil. Portuguese is. It's amazing how worldly you can look when you point that out so someone who really should have had a clue about it to begin with.

FYI, in Portuguese, the "e" on the end of a word is always pronounced, it's never silent. (Translated to English, for example, "cute" would be pronounced "cutie.")

Cattlyea orchids were first cultivated in the 1800s by a man named William Cattley, who rescued and potted up several plants that had been used as packing material in a shipment of plants from Brazil. He had no idea what sort of plants they were, but, several months later, was rewarded for his efforts with huge fragrant lavender flowers.

A nice story - a pink ladyslipper orchid that is widely cultivated today was discovered in 1913 in Vietnam by a French orchid hunter. The plants he brought back were purchased by a noted French botanist, who successfully cultivated several in his greenhouse, eventually growing some plants from seed (not an easy task with orchids.) He was so pleased with these pretty little plants that he asked the next expedition to please bring some more back - and they couldn't find any. The few in his greenhouse turned out to be the only ones left. The happiest part is that about fifteen years ago, descendants of those few orchids were again reintroduced to their old habitat, where they thrived, and today it once again grown wild in Vietnamese jungles.

One of the few times we ended up singlehandedly saving something instead of wiping it out. :)

Devil Ledbetter
05-10-2007, 04:41 PM
There is a forest-industries service organization called Hoo Hoo International. One of their affiliates is called The Hoo Hoo of Detroit. I love the name, but it's too large of a digression to work it into my novel.

Inky
05-10-2007, 04:49 PM
Spanish is not the language spoken in Brazil. Portuguese is. It's amazing how worldly you can look when you point that out so someone who really should have had a clue about it to begin with.

FYI, in Portuguese, the "e" on the end of a word is always pronounced, it's never silent. (Translated to English, for example, "cute" would be pronounced "cutie.")

Cattlyea orchids were first cultivated in the 1800s by a man named William Cattley, who rescued and potted up several plants that had been used as packing material in a shipment of plants from Brazil. He had no idea what sort of plants they were, but, several months later, was rewarded for his efforts with huge fragrant lavender flowers.

A nice story - a pink ladyslipper orchid that is widely cultivated today was discovered in 1913 in Vietnam by a French orchid hunter. The plants he brought back were purchased by a noted French botanist, who successfully cultivated several in his greenhouse, eventually growing some plants from seed (not an easy task with orchids.) He was so pleased with these pretty little plants that he asked the next expedition to please bring some more back - and they couldn't find any. The few in his greenhouse turned out to be the only ones left. The happiest part is that about fifteen years ago, descendants of those few orchids were again reintroduced to their old habitat, where they thrived, and today it once again grown wild in Vietnamese jungles.

One of the few times we ended up singlehandedly saving something instead of wiping it out. :)

Oh my God, what have I done? I've opened the gates. Thank you. I now can't get out of my head: Portuguezee Portuguezee...ahhhhhh!!!!

Inky
05-10-2007, 04:53 PM
There is a forest-industries service organization called Hoo Hoo International. One of their affiliates is called The Hoo Hoo of Detroit. I love the name, but it's too large of a digression to work it into my novel.
Ledbetter--dudette extrodinairzee..sorry..it's that whole Portuguese thing and the proper way to say it..I've been infected with someone elses info...where was I? Oh. Hoo Hoo. Do you realize my mental state--equivelent of a broken zipper--and how much fun I could have with the phrase? Wonder if The Happy Hooker had offspring, and this is what she named her? Ooh. Think I just aged myself.

Cath
05-10-2007, 06:29 PM
We have a very similar thread (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11012)in the Story Research Forum. Just so you know! :)

One day, I might even get around to indexing it...

Stew21
05-10-2007, 06:41 PM
if you can't get Heinz ketchup out of their glass bottle you turn it to a 45 degree angle and hit it with your palm right on the 57. Works every time.
I didn't realize I knew this until I was at lunch with some vendors one of them joked that the other had getting ketchup out of a bottle down to a science, so I responded, "45 degree angle, hit it on the 57."
"How did you know that?"
Um. I'm not sure.

Inky
05-10-2007, 06:42 PM
We have a very similar thread (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11012)in the Story Research Forum. Just so you know! :)

One day, I might even get around to indexing it...
Oh. Sigh. I thought I was brilliant. Should have known. Will I be forced to shut this down? If I cry, will tears soften yer' heart? How 'bout blackmail? I'm in Germany--chocolates interest you? Ooooh. I'm a hop skip and a jump from Italy. They've delicious soccer players...that Fabio character..yum..er...I think I hijacked my own thread...crimeny!

Parkinsonsd
05-10-2007, 06:48 PM
In an emergency, spider webs make an effective coagulent. Just, er get the spider off first.


Urine is filtered through the body and generally does not contain any bacteria. It took me a long time to convince my Dad that despite this, he should not try and drink it.

Obsidian (volcanic glass) when flaked to make arrowheads or other cutting implements, flakes almost down to the molecular level, creating an edge that is sharper that a surgical scalpel.

Inky
05-10-2007, 06:50 PM
if you can't get Heinz ketchup out of their glass bottle you turn it to a 45 degree angle and hit it with your palm right on the 57. Works every time.
I didn't realize I knew this until I was at lunch with some vendors one of them joked that the other had getting ketchup out of a bottle down to a science, so I responded, "45 degree angle, hit it on the 57."
"How did you know that?"
Um. I'm not sure.
Warning: do NOT snack on rice cakes and read this post...still...choking...

Kate Thornton
05-10-2007, 06:54 PM
PI to 16 places. 3.141592653589793
The capital of Burkina Faso. Ouagadougou

I have used them both to get free drinks.

Inky
05-10-2007, 06:54 PM
Warning: do NOT snack on rice cakes and read this post...still...choking...


In an emergency, spider webs make an effective coagulent. Just, er get the spider off first.


Urine is filtered through the body and generally does not contain any bacteria. It took me a long time to convince my Dad that despite this, he should not try and drink it.

Obsidian (volcanic glass) when flaked to make arrowheads or other cutting implements, flakes almost down to the molecular level, creating an edge that is sharper that a surgical scalpel.

I don't know which I laughed harder over: the reminder to remove said spider...or the titles of your work at the bottom...omg....that's it..rice cakes now spewed EVERYWHERE..I'm such a friggen lady...

The Lady
05-10-2007, 06:55 PM
Infrasound at 19 hertz can convince the body it's seeing ghosts.

Inky
05-10-2007, 06:56 PM
PI to 16 places. 3.141592653589793
The capital of Burkina Faso. Ouagadougou

I have used them both to get free drinks.
:roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:

Inky
05-10-2007, 06:58 PM
Infrasound at 19 hertz can convince the body it's seeing ghosts.
:eek: :Jaw: :Jaw:

Stew21
05-10-2007, 07:01 PM
I can say the States in alphabetical order. Oh yea, and I can say them ridiculously fast even after several drinks. One of my friends would see me out of a Friday night and say, "Trish! Do that state thing. You guys gotta hear this!" heh...

When will I ever need it? Never.

oswann
05-10-2007, 07:03 PM
PI to 16 places. 3.141592653589793
The capital of Burkina Faso. Ouagadougou

I have used them both to get free drinks.


Change bars. Now.

Os.

Devil Ledbetter
05-10-2007, 07:05 PM
The tendency of epoxy to stretch and deform under steady loads is called creep rupture.

oswann
05-10-2007, 07:07 PM
If you give me fifty bucks I can give you the power of invisibility.

Os.

Inky
05-10-2007, 07:24 PM
I can say the States in alphabetical order. Oh yea, and I can say them ridiculously fast even after several drinks. One of my friends would see me out of a Friday night and say, "Trish! Do that state thing. You guys gotta hear this!" heh...

When will I ever need it? Never.
Hark! Use it as blackmail for free drinks..:ROFL:

Inky
05-10-2007, 07:29 PM
The tendency of epoxy to stretch and deform under steady loads is called creep rupture.
Take into account my broken zipper mind; WHERE would such an occurance like this happen???:e2brows:

Devil Ledbetter
05-10-2007, 07:30 PM
Take into account my broken zipper mind; WHERE would such an occurance like this happen???:e2brows:In boatbuilding.

Sorry, I know that's not the answer you were looking for.

Inky
05-10-2007, 07:38 PM
In boatbuilding.

Sorry, I know that's not the answer you were looking for.

Dunno what's more scary..that you understand the shaninigans of mi' mind, or that this is related to boatbuilding. :e2teeth:

Devil Ledbetter
05-10-2007, 07:43 PM
Dunno what's more scary..that you understand the shaninigans of mi' mind, or that this is related to boatbuilding. :e2teeth:
If it happens to your boat while you're around the horn, that's scarier.

Sassee
05-10-2007, 07:52 PM
I used to know all 151 original Pokemon by heart. Names and types. <glares> Don't say it!

From an extremely gross conversation I had in WoW one time, I now know several things about sex amongst other species of animals (most of it I never wanted to know... ever). The only one I can repeat here on the forums is that dolphins are the only other creatures that have sex for pleasure. Kind of odd, but it's not particularly useful information. I don't think I'll be including dolphin nookie in a story any time soon.

TsukiRyoko
05-10-2007, 08:41 PM
Black holes do evaporate through Hawking radiation, and thanks to the preserved chemical compounds, it would be possible to tell what the black holes "ate".

Porcupine needles are barbed and, if left alone, will burrow deep under the skin and cause a terrible infection. That's why the're so dangerous, despite their lack of poison.

When a pharaoh died, his heart was replaced with a jeweled scarab. The heart was then fed to the higher-ups in search for enlightenment, or preserved.

Aztec peasants were cannibals- not by preferrence, but by neccessity.

All cigarette filters contain fiberglass.

When making AstroPops, the cellophane acts as a mold instead of an actual mold.

Peeps turn into sumo wrestlers in the microwave.

Glassblowers usually die of cancer.

That's all I can think of so far.

TsukiRyoko
05-10-2007, 08:44 PM
Oh, another one! Velociraptors portayed in the movie Jurassic Park were terribly incorrect. The real velociraptor was the size of a turkey, probably covered in feathers (much like an ostrich, it was still flightless) and they show no sign of pack behaviour. While they were smart by dinosaur standards, they were still pretty dumb. They lived in the Gobi desert, and they didn't actually exist during the Jurassic period, but rather, the Cretaceous period (I think.) Now I'm done.

Kate Thornton
05-10-2007, 09:13 PM
The tendency of epoxy to stretch and deform under steady loads is called creep rupture.

Creep Rupture sounds like a good name for a new short story - thanks!

thethinker42
05-10-2007, 09:17 PM
Go on..you know you've got one...you know you wanna share it, and have it now locked in someone elses head...

Well, most of it involves scarletpeaches, so I'm gonna just keep it to myself.

thethinker42
05-10-2007, 09:20 PM
There is a pressure point on a horse's butt that will cause it to fart.

No, I'm not making that up.

tjwriter
05-10-2007, 09:30 PM
I know all kinds of wacky stuff, but it never fails that you ask me to spout off something random and I draw a blank.

I usually bore my husband to death with the mindless facts associated with various topics of discussion.

Inky
05-10-2007, 11:50 PM
I used to know all 151 original Pokemon by heart. Names and types. <glares> Don't say it!

From an extremely gross conversation I had in WoW one time, I now know several things about sex amongst other species of animals (most of it I never wanted to know... ever). The only one I can repeat here on the forums is that dolphins are the only other creatures that have sex for pleasure. Kind of odd, but it's not particularly useful information. I don't think I'll be including dolphin nookie in a story any time soon.

Dolphin nookie? DOLPHIN NOOKIE???? THAT'S gonna stick in my head FOREVERRRRR!!!!! Aaaahhhhhhhhh:e2faint: :ROFL: :ROFL:

underthecity
05-11-2007, 01:00 AM
During Prohibition, complete instructions on how to brew your own beer were available at your public library.


Solar flares from the sun can make ghosts appear.


allen

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-11-2007, 01:28 AM
There is a pressure point on a horse's butt that will cause it to fart.

No, I'm not making that up.

Jeeez, tt42! Warn a body when you're gonna do that! You owe me a new keyboard! :D

thethinker42
05-11-2007, 01:35 AM
Jeeez, tt42! Warn a body when you're gonna do that! You owe me a new keyboard! :D

That's so ironic...that's EXACTLY what my friend said when I showed her how the "fart button" worked while she was standing behind the horse. :D

Gehanna
05-11-2007, 03:25 AM
Great! now I've got even more useless info stored in my head. :)

Chumplet
05-11-2007, 04:00 AM
Oh, another one! Velociraptors portayed in the movie Jurassic Park were terribly incorrect. The real velociraptor was the size of a turkey, probably covered in feathers (much like an ostrich, it was still flightless) and they show no sign of pack behaviour. While they were smart by dinosaur standards, they were still pretty dumb. They lived in the Gobi desert, and they didn't actually exist during the Jurassic period, but rather, the Cretaceous period (I think.) Now I'm done.

Well, that totally dashed all my Crichton fan-girl tendencies. Oh, and now that I see Tsuki's new avatar, I know what all the fuss is about. It's almost as bad as "Spooky's".

Actually, it looks exactly like my niece, except with stitches.

Inky
05-11-2007, 11:35 AM
Black holes do evaporate through Hawking radiation, and thanks to the preserved chemical compounds, it would be possible to tell what the black holes "ate".

Porcupine needles are barbed and, if left alone, will burrow deep under the skin and cause a terrible infection. That's why the're so dangerous, despite their lack of poison.

When a pharaoh died, his heart was replaced with a jeweled scarab. The heart was then fed to the higher-ups in search for enlightenment, or preserved.

Aztec peasants were cannibals- not by preferrence, but by neccessity.

All cigarette filters contain fiberglass.

When making AstroPops, the cellophane acts as a mold instead of an actual mold.

Peeps turn into sumo wrestlers in the microwave.

Glassblowers usually die of cancer.

That's all I can think of so far.

OMG...I thought I was the only one that discovered Peeps pop when ye' cook 'em..in the microwave...me thinks I've found a twisted kindred soul....

Inky
05-11-2007, 09:28 PM
There is a pressure point on a horse's butt that will cause it to fart.

No, I'm not making that up.
I'm sending you an invoice, as I now need 1) dry chair, 1) dry pair of pants 3) motrin to alleviate laugh headache 15) therapists to send me into past life regression so I can step back 10 minutes from this moment, thus eliminating this information I'll NEVER be able to eject!!:ROFL: :roll: :ROFL:

Inky
05-11-2007, 09:32 PM
During Prohibition, complete instructions on how to brew your own beer were available at your public library.


Solar flares from the sun can make ghosts appear.


allen

Really? Ghosts...REAL ones? As opposed to the plastic ones you can pick up at your local Walmart, right?

BenPanced
05-11-2007, 10:13 PM
During Prohibition, complete instructions on how to brew your own beer were available at your public library.
They also used to sell bricks of dehydrated grape pulp so you could make wine at home.

The current rates for US Savings Bonds are:
Series EE - 3.40% (fixed)
Series I - 3.74%

Hostess Twinkies used to have banana flavored filling.

The "10-2-4" on an older Dr. Pepper bottle indicates the best times to drink Dr. Pepper: 10:00, 2:00, and 4:00.

"LS/MFT" on an older pack of Lucky Strike cigarettes stands for "Lucky Strike Means Fine Tobacco".

When George Burns and Gracie Allen were doing their television show, a vase of carnations was present in many scenes as a subliminal reminder of their sponsor, Carnation Evaporated Milk.

The first woman to show her navel on TV was Terry Garr.

Michelle Phillips keeps the screaming, shrivelled souls of her former bandmates John Phillips, Denny Doherty, and Cass Elliott in an onyx box on her nightstand, next to the Botox. Okay, a LiveJournal friend made that one up.

Devil Ledbetter
05-11-2007, 10:19 PM
Sourdough starter dries so tough that in the olden days, it was sometimes used to chink cabins.

writerterri
05-11-2007, 10:31 PM
I write comercials in my head. They just pop in.


Post 911 not funny. But.


Kids making a sandwich behind a blank screen. The mustard bottle is low so it farts. The kids laugh and the screen says 'Frenches' 'Mustard Gas'.

underthecity
05-12-2007, 12:34 AM
Really? Ghosts...REAL ones? As opposed to the plastic ones you can pick up at your local Walmart, right?

Yup. Real ghosts. And I use this little factoid in my novel.


They also used to sell bricks of dehydrated grape pulp so you could make wine at home.

Wellll, the public library didn't sell the bricks. :) But yeah, during Prohibition, it was common for families to get together and make their own wine using supplies like that.

allen

Parkinsonsd
05-12-2007, 01:48 AM
Those funny little guillotine looking things in your wife's makeup case are not for performing circumcisions, they're for curling eyelashes.

writerterri
05-12-2007, 01:49 AM
:ROFL:

thethinker42
05-12-2007, 04:28 AM
I'm sending you an invoice, as I now need 1) dry chair, 1) dry pair of pants 3) motrin to alleviate laugh headache 15) therapists to send me into past life regression so I can step back 10 minutes from this moment, thus eliminating this information I'll NEVER be able to eject!!:ROFL: :roll: :ROFL:

You want me to PayPal you the nickel now or later? ;)

threedogpeople
05-12-2007, 06:19 AM
Female bald eagles are larger than the males. Once the eggs are in the nest the female won't leave them unattended until they hatch (about 45 days). It is believed that she stays with the eggs because the male eagles see the eggs as "food" vs. "chicks" until after they hatch.

Unless there is ample food, the oldest chick kills the younger chick to keep all the available food for themselves.


=========

Oh, oh when you fold cloths in the dark, static electricity creates a visible spark.

benbradley
05-12-2007, 07:10 AM
One thing I learn that I don't think I'll ever use is that in a certain county where I was renting a room from someone, there's a law that one's lawn should not be allowed to grow past 12 inches high.

PI to 16 places. 3.141592653589793
The capital of Burkina Faso. Ouagadougou

I have used them both to get free drinks.
In the 7th grade I memorized pi to 21 places or so. I can remember a couple digits past yours:
3.14159265358979323 (truncated, not rounded, of course)
But I never used it to get anything, I don't think I told more than one person about it (until now, True Confessions time...), because I knew it just confirmed what everyone already knew about me, I am was a nerd.

Infrasound at 19 hertz can convince the body it's seeing ghosts.
Never heard of a ghost tone, but a sufficient volume at 9 Hz, loud enough for you to feel, is called the "brown tone." The military has tested huge generators at this frequency to, uh, "disable" the enemy, but since sound is pretty much omnidirectional at that frequency, it actually affects everyone in the vicinity. It takes a large, powerful device to make enough sound to do that. However, it's much easier to do it with direct vibration into the body, as discovered by the famous inventor Nicola Tesla. He made vibrating platforms that sat on small motor-driven cams that moved them up and down nine times per second. Legend is he let his friend, author Samuel Clemens stand on this machine, who thorougly enjoyed the good vibrations. After a few seconds Tesla started warning Clemens "You better get off that thing!", though his warning was ignored until - well, the way I've seen it worded, it was unclear whether Clemens actually got to the restroom in time.


The tendency of epoxy to stretch and deform under steady loads is called creep rupture.Take into account my broken zipper mind; WHERE would such an occurance like this happen???:e2brows:
An acoustic guitar bridge, and many other places in the guitar. Use hide glue, or at least the original Titebond, instead.

I know things. Not useful things, but I do know things.

TsukiRyoko
05-12-2007, 07:12 AM
There's a certain soundwave that only children and some animals can hear, but I forget what it's called.

Devil Ledbetter
05-12-2007, 07:17 AM
Angeline Jolie eats bracelets.

Inky
05-12-2007, 11:19 AM
Those funny little guillotine looking things in your wife's makeup case are not for performing circumcisions, they're for curling eyelashes.
:D :D :ROFL:

Inky
05-12-2007, 11:25 AM
Yup. Real ghosts. And I use this little factoid in my novel.



Wellll, the public library didn't sell the bricks. :) But yeah, during Prohibition, it was common for families to get together and make their own wine using supplies like that.

allen

Which book? Published book? As in--you've piqued my curiosity,,,I'm buying...Amazon? What's this book abooot? Yeah, this is the part where you clap your hands to turn me off..kinda like that old commercial with the old woman...'cause once I'm wound up about a potential book to add to my library--yes..I said library...er...makes me kinda snobby/stuffy..but I have one..where the hell was I going with this? It's the espresso, man.
Oh. Ghosts. Books. Tell MEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!
For everything else, there's Mastercrap.

Pagey's_Girl
05-12-2007, 03:53 PM
There's a certain soundwave that only children and some animals can hear, but I forget what it's called.

Someone posted a .wav file of that on another board, and I could hear it quite well. (Surprising, after years of Walkman/mp3 player abuse and several VERY loud concerts.) Yeow. It sounded like about a million mosquitoes whining around your head while they were dragging their fingernails down chalkboards...

And why am I thinking of a line from The Stand - "That brown soun', she sho do get 'round!"

Pagey's_Girl
05-12-2007, 04:02 PM
There is a pressure point on a horse's butt that will cause it to fart.

No, I'm not making that up.

Hmmm - chase scene, the hero on horseback, being pursued, bad guys getting closer...

One fart button, one lighter = instant flamethrower. No more bad guys following.

Okay, I think the reason nothing I've written has ever made it off the slush pile is now becoming clear...:D

Inky
05-12-2007, 05:38 PM
You want me to PayPal you the nickel now or later? ;)
:wag: :e2moon:

Jacob Spire
05-28-2007, 06:27 PM
Gullible does not appear in the dictionary.

Cath
05-28-2007, 07:17 PM
Gullible does not appear in the dictionary.
Nice try.

BardSkye
06-01-2007, 10:50 PM
7 Hertz can be fatal.

A "barbershop seventh" chord when perfectly tuned causes overtones that sound like bells. It's called "ringing" a chord.

Impromptu quartets are called "woodshedders."

Stijn Hommes
07-13-2007, 12:56 PM
Despite popular belief, lemmings don't throw themselves of cliffs in a bid to commit suicide. It's a myth popularized by a Disney documentary film.

http://www.snopes.com/disney/films/lemmings.htm

Bartholomew
07-13-2007, 02:27 PM
O.K. is an acronym. It stands for "All Correct." Someone decided this after it had entered the common lexicon, of course. Its real etymology probably comes from the Choctaw (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choctaw) word "okeh", which means something akin to "so be it."


Gullible does not appear in the dictionary.

It's true.

Stijn Hommes
07-16-2007, 03:29 AM
In what dictionary?

Tornadoboy
07-22-2007, 07:27 PM
Hmmm - chase scene, the hero on horseback, being pursued, bad guys getting closer...

One fart button, one lighter = instant flamethrower. No more bad guys following.

Okay, I think the reason nothing I've written has ever made it off the slush pile is now becoming clear...:D

Damn... where were you when Mel Brooks was writing "Blazing Saddles?"
Call him immediately, there may still be time to get in on his next film!

Ok let me dig in my absolutely useless-bag some more:

- Unvaccinated, symptomatic rabies is considered the most deadly virus known to man, as there are only 6 known survivors in all of recorded medical history, and most of them became severly brain damaged. However survival rates may be about to improve since it has been recently discovered that inducing a deep coma during the late stages may protect the brain and give the body's natural immunity time to overcome the virus.

- Six people in the deep sea diving bell of an oil rig died instantly when one of them accidentily opened the pressure door before decompression had been completed. One of them exploded and his remains were blown all over the rig.

- Elephants communicated with each other in low groaning noises, in a frequency too low for human hearing.

- When pandas become sick they have a curious tendancy to wind up on the doorsteps of villagers whom live near their forests.

- Jone A. Roebling, the designer of the Golden Gate bridge died of tetnus when he refused conventional treatment after his toes were crushed and had to be amputated. He instead opting for "water therapy", which consisted of simply having water constantly dripped on the wound.

smallthunder
08-11-2007, 04:38 AM
In China, in the days before abortion-on-demand and/or "Plan B" and/or basically any type of birth control ... prostitutes in, say, Shanghai would swallow live tadpoles as a form of "morning after pill."

Yum!
:tongue

The practice was rooted in the belief that the tadpoles had very strong "yang" essences that counteracted the "yin" of pregnancy.

Even more interesting, I believe, is that Chinese scientists in the late 1980s (I could be wrong about the exact time period) decided to check how effective live tadpoles are in preventing/ending pregnancies. Turns out, they're pretty effective!

The scientists, however, determined that the efficacy was more due to the impact of the parasites and other yucky stuff that went along with the live tadpoles rather than anything special about the amphibians themselves ...

BlueTexas
08-14-2007, 03:15 AM
Which book? Published book? As in--you've piqued my curiosity,,,I'm buying...Amazon? What's this book abooot? Yeah, this is the part where you clap your hands to turn me off..kinda like that old commercial with the old woman...'cause once I'm wound up about a potential book to add to my library--yes..I said library...er...makes me kinda snobby/stuffy..but I have one..where the hell was I going with this? It's the espresso, man.
Oh. Ghosts. Books. Tell MEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!
For everything else, there's Mastercrap.

I'm not the OP, but the book is Spook by Mary Roach.

SherryTex
08-29-2007, 05:37 PM
Squirrels cannot get rabbies.

There is a society for the collection of useless facts, the symbol for the group is a squirrel.

The Three Little Bears is a story about the wish of every first child when the second child shows up.

The Little Mermaid in its orriginal Hans Christian Anderson version is a cautionary tale that got revised to please the audience, but was created to warn young ladies against impulsive romantic thinking about men.

The motto of one of the bombers used in Iraq is "They can run but they'll die tired."

hazellsephine
09-11-2007, 07:30 AM
Several breeds of sheep (including Jacob and Navajo-Churro) are multi-horned breeds, where the animal can grow 2-6 horns naturally (I believe Navajo-Churro ewes are polled--hornless--but Jacob ewes grow horns although they are smaller than the rams').

Okay, I'd better stop writing about sheep because I will just keep going all night. And then I'd start on goats.

Navajo-Churro ewes and rams can have anywhere from 0-6 horns or scurs. This includes odd numbers, and sometimes the horns will "fuse" or grow together so that 3, 4 or 5 can look like 2 large curls. Rams with good horns will show evidence of them within the first week of life. Some ewes don't really start growing horns until they're around 9 months, while others will grow them in their first few months. this is all known as polycerate.

Also, Coca Cola started out as a cure-all concoction and contained cocaine. (coca-ine)

a group of frogs is called an army. a group of crows is called a murder.
a twit is a pregnant goldfish, or so said my latin teacher years ago...

Tornadoboy
09-25-2007, 05:19 AM
- The song "Happy Birthday to You" is copyrighted


- In the original Sherlock Holmes book series, he never once says "Elementary dear Watson!"


- In the final years of his life, Adoph Hitler was heavily addicted to drugs, suffering from advanced Parkinson's disease and more than likely in the late stages of Syphilis, all of which may have accounted for his increasingly poor military decisions.


- Thomas Edison, a proponent of using DC electricity to power homes, once electrocuted an elephant to demonstrate the dangers AC. And you'll all be happy to know that this was filmed, and is now available on the internet for your viewing pleasure. :scared:

- All species of bamboo, even the giant varieties, are considered forms of grass. So are all species of wheat.

- H.G. Well's tombstone reads "God Damn you all, I told you so." This was done at his request.

- Unbeknownst to most owners hamsters like to take sand baths, and if you give one a bowl full they will roll around in it much like a Chinchilla.

- Raw, freshly picked coffee beans have toxic levels of caffeine, it is the roasting process that makes them edible.

- The video game Pacman was originally named "Puckman", but was changed shortly there after when it became clear of how determined players were to sabotage the P into looking like an F on the machine cabinet's artwork.

zahra
12-19-2007, 01:49 AM
Popular folklore saying, 'Feed a cold and starve a fever' doesn't mean what people think it does. It means, if you encourage (feed) a cold, you will die ('starve' from the old word 'sterve' meaning 'to die' ) of fever.

There's a superstition that looking at poppies makes you blind.

Lyra Jean
12-19-2007, 02:34 AM
I didn't read the whole thread yet.

Marigolds are a natural mosquito repellant. Grow them on your porch (easy to grow in a pot) or boil the petals in water and spray the water on you for natural repellant.

Pine needles can be boiled like a tea and drunk. It's good for Vitamin C deficiency.

Sunflowers takes radiation out of the soil. I wouldn't eat those seeds though.
Spinach takes gold out of the soil.

hubbabubbs
01-07-2008, 06:54 AM
Under Hammurabi's code, surgeons were permitted to practice on infidel's without repercussion. However, if a freeman died under the surgeon's knife, hands could be cut off.

As a result, one-handed men were widely feared in duels.

demann
01-09-2008, 09:50 AM
The nitrogen in your blood will come out of solution at an altitude of 63,000 feet, effectively boiling your blood at room temperature. For physiological purposes, this altitude is referred to as "Armstrong's Line." Wearing a pressure-garment and an oxygen mask with positive pressure (meaning its flow is increased to keep the oxygen pressure in the lungs high) decreases or eliminates this effect. This is why astronauts wear 'pressure' suits (space suits).

U.S. military emergency parachutes are designed to automatically open at a "pressure" altitude of 14,500 feet. There has never been a recorded incident in which this opening device has failed. The 'chute can be opened manually at any altitude.

Tornadoboy
01-19-2008, 09:23 PM
I didn't read the whole thread yet.

Marigolds are a natural mosquito repellant. Grow them on your porch (easy to grow in a pot) or boil the petals in water and spray the water on you for natural repellant.

So's catnip, although I wouldn't want to try it while hiking in mountain lion territory! :D

cress8
01-24-2008, 10:39 PM
Babies don't have knee caps.

Beyondian
05-08-2008, 02:30 PM
There is an island off Auckland, New Zealand, called Waiheke which has a population of 8,000. Someone once stole speedbumps there. Three of them.

Smiling Ted
05-08-2008, 06:13 PM
From an extremely gross conversation I had in WoW one time, I now know several things about sex amongst other species of animals (most of it I never wanted to know... ever). The only one I can repeat here on the forums is that dolphins are the only other creatures that have sex for pleasure.

That's not true. Elephants, at least, have sex for pleasure. I know this because I saw two male elephants doing the deed in Amboseli Preserve, in Kenya.

And now, I guess, we have two other bits of knowledge:
1. Amboseli Preserve is the Elephants' Castro Street.
2. Never get your natural history data from World of Warcraft.

auntybug
05-08-2008, 06:34 PM
In Park Rapids, MN - it is illegal to walk across the street with a duck on your head.

(Could I make that up?)

Bmwhtly
05-08-2008, 07:05 PM
From an extremely gross conversation I had in WoW one time, I now know several things about sex amongst other species of animals (most of it I never wanted to know... ever).That's odd, I was talking about that (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showpost.php?p=2331221&postcount=13305) elsewhere yesterday.

Phil DeBlanque
06-25-2008, 09:27 PM
- In Brazil and France, Alberto Santos-Dumont is considered the creator of the airplane. Quite rightly, if I may add. He is also responsible for the invention of the hangar, the sliding door and, along with a watchmaker named Cartier, the wristwatch.

- Around 1850 Bolivia gave the state of Acre to Brazil (around 150,000 km2 of territory) in exchange for a Railroad.

...

You know, we are still to build that :D

DeeCaudill
07-11-2008, 01:02 AM
Coin Trivia

U.S. quarters and dimes made before 1965 are 90% silver and at current prices, worth about 12 to 13 times face value. Neither were they the last U.S. circulating currency to contain silver--from 1965 to 1970 half dollars were 40% silver.

Pennies made before 1982 (and some but not all from 1982) are 95% copper and currently worth about 2.5 times face value. Current pennies are mainly made of zinc.

Aside from Denver, San Francisco, and Philadelphia, U.S. coins have borne mint marks from Charlotte (c), Dahlonega (d), New Orleans (o), Carson City (cc), and West Point (w).

mirrorkisses
08-06-2008, 10:37 AM
the dot on top of the letter "i" is called a tittle.

MumblingSage
08-22-2008, 12:52 AM
I'm not sure if this qualifies or not as useless info, but...

Teenagers can't wait to learn how to drive, finally get a license, want to go somewhere in particular, but don't know how to get there 'cause they don't know the names of streets or have any sense of direction, so you end up having to give them a ride there anyway.

More useful info: Some teenagers are scared s***less of driving. Especially now that driver's ed spends less time telling you how to drive and more time detailing all the gruesome ways you can die.

Also, apparantly when teenagers weigh pros and cons, the 'pros' weigh heavier. So when they think 'I'll have a fun time...but I might die' they'll end with 'but I'll have a fun time!'

Mumbleduck
11-07-2008, 09:20 AM
That's not true. Elephants, at least, have sex for pleasure. I know this because I saw two male elephants doing the deed in Amboseli Preserve, in Kenya.


I read somewhere (I forget where, it was a science magazine of some kind, I think) recently that African bull elephants, reacting to the stress of human encroachment on their environment, and the deaths of their fellows due to the ivory trade, have been known to go on rampages where they rape male rhinos.

WTF Elephants?

Horserider
12-31-2008, 05:49 AM
Premarin is made from Pregnant Mares Urine....mmmm, get me some o' dat!

I knew that one. It's sick (in two different ways. the way they treat the horses and the obvious)



Laser pointers aimed at an aquarium will cause the fish to have convulsions. Very bad for the fish.


Do I want to know how you know that?


Teenagers can't wait to learn how to drive, finally get a license, want to go somewhere in particular, but don't know how to get there 'cause they don't know the names of streets or have any sense of direction, so you end up having to give them a ride there anyway.

That is so true! (i'm a teenager)

Post-it notes were discovered by accident.

You can make fire with chocolate and a soda can (i learned this today)

Horserider
12-31-2008, 05:55 AM
I thought of another!

The only non-Indian survivor at the Battle of Little Bighorn was a horse named Comanche, who recovered from his wounds.

smoothseas
12-31-2008, 06:12 AM
Here's a good one:

If you run out of dishwasher detergent, dishwashing liquid is not a good substitite.


In fact, it's probably one of the worst things you can do. :(


quick fix for this is - throw in a capfull of liquid fabric softner - gets rid of all them suds toot suite.

Horserider
12-31-2008, 07:13 AM
Running a lawnmower for one hour creates as much air pollution as driving your car for 350 miles.

I'll have to stop cutting the grass now.


I'll remember that the next time someone wants me to cut the grass.

Lady_of_Myth
01-29-2009, 10:50 AM
You know when someone posts BUMP in a forum it stands for
Bring Up My Post.

The 1st Kentucky Derby was run in 1875 and the race was won by a chesnut colt named Aristides.

The oldest racetrack in the U.S. is Saratoga it opened in 1863, and the oldest race is also at there, its the Travers Stakes. Saratoga Racecourse is also the oldest organized sporting venue of any kind in the United States!!

dirtsider
03-14-2009, 12:15 AM
http://blogs.static.mentalfloss.com/blogs/archives/23209.html

This amused me. For all those searching for unusual college degrees (and by extention, jobs) for their characters, enjoy.

Matera the Mad
03-14-2009, 09:05 AM
I'm idle tonight...


- Cigarettes were invented during the 1918 flu pandemic because people were under the mistaken belief that smoking help protect them from the disease, and cigarettes were invented for women because they seemed more 'lady like' than normal cigars.

The story of the invention of pigsh*tsticks by Spanish beggars who collected crumbs from the cigar factories of Seville in the 1600's is a little more credible. The commercialization of packaged ready-to-suck cr*p may have gotten a jump-start in 1918, but people were rolling their own bitty cigars for centuries.


I have it on good authority that the last living carrier pigeon was female, and named "Martha."

"Carrier" pigeons, properly called homing pigeons, are not extinct. Passenger pigeons are. :tongue
That is a case of careless word-association. One word gets stuck to another (pigeon=carrier) and nothing will get it off. One of my pet peeves is the rabbit=hasenpfeffer knee-jerk reaction. I will fsckn shoot anybody who says the h-word when I mention cooking rabbit.


Squirrels cannot get rabbies.
Sorry, but they can. That possibility is why my stupid sister had to get umpteen shots in a sensitive place after she let a squirrel bite her.

Any mammal can contract rabies. The most dangerous aspect of the disease is that some animals can be carriers without showing any symptoms.


- Raw, freshly picked coffee beans have toxic levels of caffeine, it is the roasting process that makes them edible.
Give. Me. A. Break.
Roasting has very little effect on caffeine content. It is for flavor. Raw beans keep longer than roasted beans. They just taste...raw. The aroma after roasting is fragile, and roasted beans can absorb other odors readily too (don't keep coffee in your old shoes!)

There is a fish called, in Hawaiian, humu-humu-nuku-nuku-apu-a-a. I used to amaze people just by saying it without falling over my tongue.

Broadswordbabe
03-14-2009, 11:35 AM
If you dye your hair with henna and it comes out too red, you can tone down the colour by rinsing it with gin. (Don't know if this works with non-henna dyes, though - and you then have to wash your hair again so you don't smell like you've overdone the partying)

Horserider
03-14-2009, 06:13 PM
The 1st Kentucky Derby was run in 1875 and the race was won by a chesnut colt named Aristides.

The oldest racetrack in the U.S. is Saratoga it opened in 1863, and the oldest race is also at there, its the Travers Stakes. Saratoga Racecourse is also the oldest organized sporting venue of any kind in the United States!!

I did not know that. :)

The first winner of the Triple Crown was Sir Barton, before the Triple Crown was invented.

On the back of a Monster energy drink can, it says "Consume responsibly. Limit 3 cans per day. Not recommended for children, pregnant women, or people sensitive to caffeine." (if you're wondering how I know that, I'm sitting on the bed with a can of Monster next to me)

Tocotin
03-15-2009, 04:16 PM
In feudal Japan, it was legal for a samurai to cut off a peasant's head to test the sharpness of a new sword.

Go, fedualism!

This is only partially true... Swords were usually tested on criminals (sometimes dead ones). Actually, peasants were the second highest class after warriors, merchants being the lowest.

Cyia
03-15-2009, 05:32 PM
If you dye your hair with henna and it comes out too red, you can tone down the colour by rinsing it with gin. (Don't know if this works with non-henna dyes, though - and you then have to wash your hair again so you don't smell like you've overdone the partying)


If you dye your hair with regular commercial dye and it comes out too dark/bright, wash it with Dawn (liquid dish soap) and it'll strip part of the color off. Then wash it again to get rid of the smell of lemons.

Stijn Hommes
03-15-2009, 05:46 PM
It's illegal to hunt camels in Arizona! No it's not. http://www.snopes.com/legal/arizona.asp

DMarie84
03-17-2009, 10:41 PM
This is only partially true... Swords were usually tested on criminals (sometimes dead ones). Actually, peasants were the second highest class after warriors, merchants being the lowest.

I always find it interesting that the merchant class was considered the lowest, but I know it stems from the fact that they were considered as living off the spoils of others.

SouthernFriedJulie
04-26-2009, 08:01 PM
Works for male and females:

Drinking a bunch of pineapple juice a few hours before oral sex will make the results much more favorable to the recipient.

SirOtter
04-27-2009, 01:01 AM
The story of the invention of pigsh*tsticks by Spanish beggars who collected crumbs from the cigar factories of Seville in the 1600's is a little more credible. The commercialization of packaged ready-to-suck cr*p may have gotten a jump-start in 1918, but people were rolling their own bitty cigars for centuries.

No, cigarette production had been around for several decades before 1918. Baseball cards were included in cigarette packs as early as 1886. Mass consumption of cigarettes probably resulted from doughboys being supplied with billions of free packs of Camels during WWI. They returned from France in 1918, which is possibly why the myth of cigarettes as having been invented that year came about.

SirOtter
04-27-2009, 01:28 AM
Four US presidents died in office in the 19th Century, four in the 20th. The four who died in the 19th all died or were fatally wounded in Washington, DC:

William Henry Harrison caught pneumonia after his inauguration and passed away a month later in Washington.

Zachary Taylor died in Washington in 1850, from gastroenteritis.

Abraham Lincoln was shot at Ford's Theater in 1865 and died a few blocks away.

Although James A. Garfield died in New Jersey, he was shot at the Washington train station in 1881 by Charles Giteau.

The four who died in the 20th died significant distances away from Washington.

William McKinley was shot by Leon Czolgosz at the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, NY, and died there a week later.

Warren G. Harding was in San Francisco on his way back from a tour of Alaska when he died at the Palace Hotel in that city in 1923.

Franklin D. Roosevelt was at Warm Springs, GA, when he suffered the cerebral hemorrhage that killed him.

John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, TX in 1963.

The 25th Amendment was not passed until 1967, so there was no provision for replacement of a vice president prior to that year. None of the vice presidents who succeeded to the presidency because of death had a vice president during the remainder of their predecessor's term. Only Gerald Ford, who became president after the resignation of Richard Nixon, has so far had the opportunity to select a vice president to replace himself while president.

None of the 19th Century 'accidental' presidents were later elected in their own right, so John Tyler, Millard Filmore, Andrew Johnson and Chester Alan Arthur never had a vice president serve under them.

All of the 20th Century vice-presidents who succeeded through death were elected in their own rights, so Theodore Roosevelt, Calvin Coolidge, Harry S Truman and Lyndon Johnson did have vice presidents under them.

Kazel
05-01-2009, 11:02 AM
These are kinda of nerdy. And in the right circumstances, not useless. Though probably not essential for daily life.

Metal alloys are mixtures of two or more metals. The different metals in the alloy melt at different temperature, so when heated, the alloy doesn't liquefy uniformly. The technical term for the state between fully liquid and fully solid is the mushy zone. I love that mushy is used in a technical term.

If you get metal cold enough, it become brittle and will shatter. The temperature that this happen at is called the ductile-brittle transition temperature. One of the theories on why the Titanic sank is that how the metal on the ship was processed introduced sulfur into the metal, raising the ductile-brittle transition temperature to just below freezing: the temperature that the water near the ice burg was lower. So, when the ship hit, instead of the ice berg causing the metal to dent, it caused it to crack.

Fractures caused by small movement repeated several times is called fatigue fracture. Thats what happens when you wiggle the tab on the top of the soda can until it comes off: fatigue fracture. Bridges in windy places can suffer from fatigue fracture.

SouthernFriedJulie
05-07-2009, 06:10 AM
When your cat stands on its' toes as you rub its' back, he's offering his anal glands to you for a sniff.


People have orgasmed from urinating.

There is a tree that spreads by exploding. After a drought when storms come, lightining ignites the forest around the tree and it explodes, scattering seeds. {picked this up years ago, may have it a little wrong}

MumblingSage
07-30-2009, 03:54 AM
People have orgasmed from urinating.



...do I want more explanation...?

When the Spanish conquered the new world and sent thousands of pounds of Aztec and Inca gold and silver back to Europe, it caused the biggest spike of inflation in history up until that point.

Lucky Jim
08-14-2009, 02:36 AM
You don't need to drink alcohol to get drunk.

Drink 60 glasses of water in one hour and you will be legally drunk and feel all the same effects.

That's what I heard on the Discovery Channel.

Would that be 6 ounce, or 8 ounce glasses?

Chances are you'd also be legally dead. Too much water is poisonous.

Lucky Jim
08-14-2009, 02:50 AM
There is a beagle brigade at many international airports. Beagles are used to check incoming luggage for food.

If you own a beagle, you'll know how good they are at finding food!

Beagles have a larger area of their brain devoted to smell. Dog psychologist and author of doggy books, Stanley Cohen, UBC. He at first had a hard time convincing authorities to use Beagles for detection work because they don't have the right appearance to be accepted as such.

semilargeintestine
08-14-2009, 02:50 AM
You'd almost certainly be dead, in which case the fellow concerned about peeing needn't be.

On an unrelated note, in order to kasher liver so that you can eat it, it must come from a kosher animal slaughtered in the proper method and without blemishes just like the other edible parts; however, instead of salting etc, it must have hashes cut into one of the surfaces and then broiled. It must also not be left sitting in the blood, so this is usually done on a rack. The rack and pan that catches the blood is rendered impure.

Lucky Jim
08-14-2009, 02:53 AM
> Dolplins are the only other mamals besides humans that have sex for fun

Don't tell that to Bonobo Chimps. If there is reincarnation, I want to come back as a Bonobo.

AlterEgox5
12-15-2009, 04:04 AM
Figured I'd add to some of this "useless info."

23 chocolate chips (like the kind you put in cookies) gives you enough energy to walk one mile.

When a dogs are excited and position their heads down and front legs low on the floor and butts in the air, that position is called a "play bow."

Smoking the poison ivy plant can kill you.

When Hugh Jackman was starring in Oklahoma and Van Helsing at the same time, at one point the director caught him practicing singing and dancing in his trailor while in full Van Helsing costume. Apparently he told Jackman, "Don't ever tell anyone about this." (Jackman obviously didn't listen).