PDA

View Full Version : Don't you just hate it when



Shadow_Ferret
07-11-2008, 12:02 AM
...you've written, revised, edited, and gone over your novel with a fine toothed comb, think it's absolutely as perfect as it'll ever be, then you punch up your query and synopsis, send the whole thing to your most coveted agent and then...

...wake up the next day absolutely excited because you had an epiphany of an idea that will end up making the entire book that much better?

Can you email the agent and go, "Please disregard my last!"?

I can't believe this idea hasn't occured to me over the last several years that I've been writing this!

Aargh.

Anyone else think you were done and then BLAM! get hit with an essential element?

Cybernaught
07-11-2008, 12:23 AM
Yeah. I'm looking at one of my published stories and I can't wait for the rights to revert so I can burn it up.

mirrorkisses
07-11-2008, 12:31 AM
Well, here's my suggestion, but you don't have to take it.

See if the agent is even interested in your novel. If they are and they request a partial, keep going as normal. Then if you actually get to the stage where they've decided they want to rep you, then talk to them about your idea. If the agent really agrees with you, a revision will probably not be a problem.

Another thing to do is write your newer version and send the new synopsis and query to other agents. And just don't worry about this agent you've already sent it to. They might think your original version is better than your new version. You never know.

mirrorkisses
07-11-2008, 12:32 AM
Oh, and BTW. Sending a letter asking them to disregard is a bad idea:

http://editorialanonymous.blogspot.com/2008/07/all-answers-are-no.html

mscelina
07-11-2008, 12:39 AM
That's what I'd do.

As a matter of fact, that's why I usually only send ten queries at a time. That way, I can implement my 'next morning wake up ideas' in the next batch.

At this point, I'm querying an entirely different book. *rolls eyes*

Shadow_Ferret
07-11-2008, 12:52 AM
Oh, and BTW. Sending a letter asking them to disregard is a bad idea:

http://editorialanonymous.blogspot.com/2008/07/all-answers-are-no.htmlActually, I was kidding about sending an email. I'll wait and see if she accepts and then say, "Oh, by the way, I had this idea...blah blah, which only effects a few pages in the manuscript. Hardly noticable. But makes it much more forceful."

Matera the Mad
07-11-2008, 04:21 AM
affects, dammit, affects

Shadow_Ferret
07-11-2008, 06:16 AM
It's my conversation.

Effects.

Bartholomew
07-11-2008, 06:17 AM
affects, dammit, affects

His effection affected her effectively.

maestrowork
07-11-2008, 06:36 AM
...you've written, revised, edited, and gone over your novel with a fine toothed comb, think it's absolutely as perfect as it'll ever be, then you punch up your query and synopsis, send the whole thing to your most coveted agent and then...

...wake up the next day absolutely excited because you had an epiphany of an idea that will end up making the entire book that much better?


But are you sure the agent won't accept it because it didn't have the new idea? Or do you think the agent will definitely love it because of the new idea?

The thing is, you don't know either way.

Wait until you cross the bridge.

I agree that once the agent wants to rep you, you can tell her all about the new idea and how to rewrite parts of the novel. Until then, I think you should just sit tight. Telling the agent "Wait, wait, wait, I'm not done yet..." would be very amateurish.

Unless, of course, you're sure the agent won't accept the ms. as is now.

SPMiller
07-11-2008, 07:53 AM
His effection affected her effectively.That almost sounds dirty.

mirrorkisses
07-11-2008, 08:32 AM
That almost sounds dirty.

No that would be his erection.:Ssh:

You can always count on me to go there.

SPMiller
07-11-2008, 08:36 AM
No that would be his erection.:Ssh:

You can always count on me to go there.Oh, I can, can I? ;)

Shadow_Ferret
07-11-2008, 06:03 PM
But are you sure the agent won't accept it because it didn't have the new idea? Or do you think the agent will definitely love it because of the new idea?

The thing is, you don't know either way.

Wait until you cross the bridge.

I agree that once the agent wants to rep you, you can tell her all about the new idea and how to rewrite parts of the novel. Until then, I think you should just sit tight. Telling the agent "Wait, wait, wait, I'm not done yet..." would be very amateurish.

Unless, of course, you're sure the agent won't accept the ms. as is now.I'm NOT sure. Until I thought of this new story quirk, I loved what I had submitted and it's still good. I just think the new idea is what has been bothering me internally about the story. Its one of those things that only I, as the writer, would ever notice, but it seems significant in the telling of my story.

Does that make sense?

I'm going to leave her submission as is, but when I submit to other agents, they'll get the newer version.

Nicki B
07-13-2008, 12:07 PM
...you've written, revised, edited, and gone over your novel with a fine toothed comb, think it's absolutely as perfect as it'll ever be, then you punch up your query and synopsis, send the whole thing to your most coveted agent and then...

...wake up the next day absolutely excited because you had an epiphany of an idea that will end up making the entire book that much better?

Can you email the agent and go, "Please disregard my last!"?

I can't believe this idea hasn't occured to me over the last several years that I've been writing this!

Aargh.

Anyone else think you were done and then BLAM! get hit with an essential element?

Oh, have I done this a little too frequently!

To avoid these incidences, I finally threw my hands up in the air and gave in to my friend's suggestion to post my stuff online first to see how it looks published (should I really use that word if it's on the internet? I guess...) and am currently using Triond.com (http://www.triond.com) to submit my writing (they also let me edit my writing after it's already up). I am currently working on a travel book for Orange County, California, as told by a local (you can see "Your Guide to the Real O.C." here (http://www.trifter.com/writers/Nicki%20B.45059)). Triond publishes it on a niche site for travel articles, which is kinda cool, since I get feedback from people searching for the type of stuff I'm writing.

Anyways, my best advice on this is to draft publish it and take a quadruple look, have your friends take a double look, and share it with others to get their input. That way, after you've gotten enough feedback and revised about a billion times, you can send it to your agent, confident and reassured.