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jennifer75
07-10-2008, 05:48 AM
What are the little white root-ish looking things growing out of my potatoes? Does it mean my potatoes are bad and shouldn't be eaten? How do I prevent these things from sprouting? I had my sack in a cubboard, dark and cool(er) than the rest of the kitchen, sure it's been in the 80s outside, but my kitchen hasn't been that hot. Help!

alleycat
07-10-2008, 05:53 AM
Those are a new potatoes plants trying to grow, not roots. Usually by the time they're doing that, the potato is going soft as it expends itself trying to grow a new plant. If they've just started, you can probably still use the potatoes if you use them quickly.

Potatoes are planted by cutting a "seed potato" into pieces (each piece with one or two "eyes") and planting it.

jennifer75
07-10-2008, 06:07 AM
Why is this happening so quickly??? I just bought the bag on the 4th of July.

alleycat
07-10-2008, 06:13 AM
Were they in a plastic bag?

Matera the Mad
07-10-2008, 07:12 AM
Potatoes don't keep well in summer. They just don't. :(

I have to go short on spuds in summer. I can't keep them in my basement -- the coolest place around -- because in my old house there's no keeping the sowbugs out (yeah, gross). No room in the fridge, so I just triage the sprouty ones into the stew and live with it. My taters are in a cardboard box with black cloth over. They still aren't happy.

Siddow
07-10-2008, 07:20 AM
Why is this happening so quickly??? I just bought the bag on the 4th of July.

And you didn't make up a big batch of Tater Salad?

What's wrong with you???

(if they're just little nubs, I pop 'em off and use the potato. If the potato is squishy or has an odor, toss it.)

kikazaru
07-10-2008, 07:49 AM
Keep your potatoes away from onions - the onions give off a gas that cause potatoes to spoil quicker.

Don't store them in plastic, they need ventilation.

My grandmother used to store hers buried in sand. She had a crate in the basement filled with sand and used it to store her root veggies over the winter. But since it's summer it just may be that as others have said, it's too hot.

jennifer75
07-10-2008, 08:34 AM
And you didn't make up a big batch of Tater Salad?

What's wrong with you???

(if they're just little nubs, I pop 'em off and use the potato. If the potato is squishy or has an odor, toss it.)

Actually I did - but not that huge of a batch. I used about half the bag of taters.

So tonight I just boiled half of the half remaining - the ones without new growths. Made some mashed potatos and MY VERY OWN VERSION OF SKILLET-SHEPPARDS-PIE!

Deeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeelish!!!!

You know you want the recipe.....don'tcha?????

jennifer75
07-10-2008, 08:40 AM
Keep your potatoes away from onions - the onions give off a gas that cause potatoes to spoil quicker.

Don't store them in plastic, they need ventilation.

My grandmother used to store hers buried in sand. She had a crate in the basement filled with sand and used it to store her root veggies over the winter. But since it's summer it just may be that as others have said, it's too hot.

Yea. I rarely buy a bag of russets, I usually only cook with baby yellow taters and store in the fridge.

But these suckers, well, they were meant to be used only for the tatersalad last week. And since THE FRIGGIN ECONOMY IS SUCH A PIECE OF SH!T I HAVE TO DO WHAT I CAN WITH WHAT I HAVE!!! DAMN IT ALL TO HECK!!!

Kitrianna
07-10-2008, 08:41 PM
*chuckles* You need to buy P.E.I. potatoes. They never sprout :D...at least mine don't.

jennifer75
07-10-2008, 08:48 PM
What the heck are those???

Kitrianna
07-10-2008, 10:06 PM
Prince Edward Island...it's a province famous for it's potatoes and they really are good!

jennifer75
07-25-2008, 02:41 AM
Gonna boil up another batch of spuds and make my "pie" on Saturday....woohooooooo Piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiyuh!

Gravity
07-25-2008, 03:09 AM
Being a country boy, born and bred, I love spuds, just about any old way they're cooked. And speaking of potatoes "sprouting" (down South we call them "eyes"), the late humorist Lewis Grizzard wrote a book of essays called Don't Bend Over in the Garden, Granny, Don't You Know Them Taters Got Eyes? Great book...

jennifer75
07-25-2008, 03:12 AM
Being a country boy, born and bred, I love spuds, just about any old way they're cooked. And speaking of potatoes "sprouting" (down South we call them "eyes"), the late humorist Lewis Grizzard wrote a book of essays called Don't Bend Over in the Garden, Granny, Don't You Know Them Taters Got Eyes? Great book...

I guess you could call them eyes, but they have long wormy white tentacles emerging from them.

icerose
07-25-2008, 08:29 PM
Yeah they're just sprouting, absolutely make sure if you use the potatoes to cut out the white sprouts. Potatos are a nightshade plant and all the growth from the spuds are poisonous.

jennifer75
07-29-2008, 06:55 AM
well guess what's still in the oven.....MY CRAZY INSANE VERSION OF SHEPARDS PIE!!!!!! Oooooh yea I can't wait!!! I looooooooooooooooooooooove it! With a newer batch of potatos of course. :P

blacbird
07-29-2008, 07:58 AM
Yea. I rarely buy a bag of russets, I usually only cook with baby yellow taters and store in the fridge.

First, don't refridgerate uncooked potatoes.

The rule is simple: Cool (not cold), dry, dark. Like Dr. Frankenstein's assembled man, potatoes are alive! (So are many other veggies, btw, but that's an aside.) But definitely no exposure to light. That causes them to sprout.

Cool, dry and dark is what caused pioneers to create root cellars for winter storage of potatoes, turnips, carrots and a variety of other veggies. And if they've sprouted very much, with greening of the potato flesh, you shouldn't eat them. Aside from the tubers, potato plants are seriously poisonous, and that greening is a signal that they have begun to produce the alkali organic chemicals that ain't good for you.

Properly stored, potatoes can last numerous weeks, but unless you grow your own, why bother? They are ubiquitously available year-round at the grocery in most places, and I've never noticed much variation in prices. Buy them as you need them, within a week or two at most. They'll be fresher and better that way, too.

caw

Mandy-Jane
07-29-2008, 08:12 AM
Keep your potatoes away from onions - the onions give off a gas that cause potatoes to spoil quicker.

Don't store them in plastic, they need ventilation.


Okay well I'm doin' all the wrong things then! I have no idea!

blacbird
07-29-2008, 08:25 AM
Yes, in addition to what I said about cool, dry, dark, kikazaru added the other major that I forgot: ventilation. In root cellars, potatoes and other veggies are stored on shelves open to the air. And not touching one another, if at all possible. Also, don't wash or peel them until you're ready to use them.

caw

CBumpkin
07-29-2008, 08:27 AM
Here are my potato storing tips.

What others said: Cool, dry, dark place and keep away from onions. Also, if they turn green, don't eat them. Keep them away from moisture or you'll have a very stinky mess on your hands and your potatoes will drip a nasty, deep brown liquid that reeks and is hard to get rid of. You can snap or cut the roots off that grow and still use them as long as there's a firmness to the potato. If they're only slightly soft, peel the potato, along with 1/4 inch of the potato underneath it and they're just fine for using.

Here's a tip that no one mentioned so far that works BEAUTIFULLY!

I keep the potatoes in the original bag they came with but I always toss in an apple. Any kind will do. (Red Delicious are cheap.) The gas emitted from the apple helps your potatoes keep twice as long before they start sprouting. I've kept whole bags of potatoes for two weeks just by putting an apple in the bag when I got it home.

Shadow_Ferret
07-29-2008, 05:56 PM
Yes, in addition to what I said about cool, dry, dark, kikazaru added the other major that I forgot: ventilation. In root cellars, potatoes and other veggies are stored on shelves open to the air. And not touching one another, if at all possible. Also, don't wash or peel them until you're ready to use them.

caw
Is that why, when we leave them in the bag they came in on the floor by the kitchen door, that they turn to mush and leave a black stain on the linoleum?

jennifer75
07-29-2008, 07:37 PM
First, don't refridgerate uncooked potatoes.



But I've always stored my baby whites in the fridge. They last a long time and I notice no real difference in them. They are usually fried and seasoned, so if there is a diff in the taste, I'd never know. My russets stay in a cool dry dark spot, but still end up with roots within a week it seems.

jennifer75
07-29-2008, 07:38 PM
Yes, in addition to what I said about cool, dry, dark, kikazaru added the other major that I forgot: ventilation. In root cellars, potatoes and other veggies are stored on shelves open to the air. And not touching one another, if at all possible. Also, don't wash or peel them until you're ready to use them.

caw

Ok, I store in the cool dry dark place, and I leave them in their bag...should i take them out and lay them loose on floor of the cabinet?

jennifer75
07-29-2008, 07:40 PM
Here's a tip that no one mentioned so far that works BEAUTIFULLY!

I keep the potatoes in the original bag they came with but I always toss in an apple. Any kind will do. (Red Delicious are cheap.) The gas emitted from the apple helps your potatoes keep twice as long before they start sprouting. I've kept whole bags of potatoes for two weeks just by putting an apple in the bag when I got it home.

That sounds insane! Are you sure?????? Only one????

CBumpkin
07-29-2008, 11:33 PM
That sounds insane! Are you sure?????? Only one????

One apple has always done it for me. If you want to throw more in there, you certainly can. It won't damage them. The apples emit an ethylene gas that causes them to sprout more slowly.

Refrigerating potatoes causes the starch to turn into sugar. That's why you have a flavor change.

Here's a blurb of potato storage information from eHow:

Potatoes should be stored in cool, dark place with at about 40F. If potatoes get too warm, they will sprout and if they get too cold, they will get sweet. If potatoes are stored at below 40F, simply let them warm up at room temperature for a few days and their normal flavor will return. Do not allow potatoes to freeze. Potatoes should be stored in a bin or a bag that is at least a few inches off the ground but not piled more than 18 inches deep. If stored in the right conditions, potatoes can be stored for months.