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kevacho
09-15-2004, 11:46 PM
Hello all,

I'm rather new to this forum "thing"... so be gentle. :hug

My question is regarding the website www.inktip.com. Has any screenwriter sold, and or, gotten representation from this site? I have dealt with them before, and they seem both professional and polite. However, I'm beginning to learn that it can be extremely difficult discerning between fact or fraud.

Any and all help will be greatly appreciated.

much thanks...
Kevin
www.kevacho.com :coffee

MrJayVee
09-16-2004, 12:21 AM
The folks at INKTIP seem to be highly regarded. In fact, they might just be the best of the bunch (of that type of service). They claim that many writers have gained representation and/or sold material through their site.

They also have a 30-day money back guarantee. If you're not happy with their service, you get your money back.

Give 'em a shot.

joecalabre
09-16-2004, 08:49 PM
I got my manger through them and although I get a lot of hits and a few requests, I have never gone past that point.

My thing is, if it's worth spending the small amount of money to get your name out there. go for it. If you are late on a car payment, then think twice.

noh1
09-17-2004, 02:31 AM
I think it's a good buy. I've had lots of hits, but it really depends on what genre script you're putting out there. Those emails you get from them, listing leads, is pretty cool.

kevacho
09-22-2004, 02:28 AM
:clap Thank you MrJayVee, joecalabre, and noh1 for your replies and your encouragement.

Live to write... write to live

:coffee ...and don't forget the "joe".

www.kevacho.com

NikeeGoddess
09-23-2004, 09:17 AM
it is a good buy
but you'll soon find that they usually attract a lot of low budget producers and those with many specific requirements.

subscribe to their "preferred" newletter for "what producers are looking for leads" and see if you have what they want. ie - if you're Canadian and write horror or quirky family flicks then you'll fare well.

write on!

AaronB
12-02-2004, 11:48 PM
I have been considering marketing my script through InkTip.com. It strikes me as being maybe not the place to get a script placed with an A-grade producer, but might be good for finding an agent.

What say you?

(or, for those of us from New Jersey, "What say youse?")

MrJayVee
12-03-2004, 07:47 AM
Agents aren't looking at inktip.com. But several prodcos (mostly the lower level variety) visit on a regular basis and some writers have supposedly had some pretty decent success posting there. Just $40 for six months, so it's worth a shot. (Keep in mind Inktip gives a 30-day money back guarantee.) Good luck!

NikeeGoddess
12-03-2004, 09:17 PM
you mean you'd turn down a B-list producer that browses at InkTip and may want to buy your script and wait around for an A-list producer from a major studio that you have no access to?! >D

AaronB
12-03-2004, 09:49 PM
you mean you'd turn down a B-list producer that browses at InkTip and may want to buy your script and wait around for an A-list producer from a major studio that you have no access to?!

Oh no, not at all! I only meant that if you wanted to get a script in the door at DreamWorks, for example, InkTip probably wasn't the way to go. That doesn't mean I'd turn down a B-lister. Honestly, at this point I'm not even on a list, so what choice do I have?

NikeeGoddess
12-04-2004, 02:52 AM
determine the market for your script: high concept for the studios, off the wall for hollyweird indy, made for network tv, made for cable tv, direct to video, etc....

based on Inktip's newsletter it seems most of their producers want horror, family, edgy indy, or cheap sci fi

write on!

Ron239
12-07-2004, 04:15 AM
I've been registered off and on with InkTip for over two years.
Altho' my loglines, resume, synopses and, in one case, full script have been"surfed," so far I've only received one email request to read a script. This was from a so-called manager.
You're getting a lot of wannabe prodcos and wannabe manager types mostly surfing the site. Once in a while you'll see a Carsey-Werner or a legit agent's name pop up. But that seems to be rare.
The great thing about it, though, is that when you see someone has read your logline or synopses or resume, you get a sudden rush of false hope. And that keeps you motivated and writing and pursuing this ridiculous and impossible dream. Anything that gets you to write, in my book, isn't a bad thing.
But even the wannabe prodcos and managers seem to be more concerned with "concepts" than with stories that possess some true emotional basis. Everything Hollywood seems to turn out these days is essentially plastic.

mwc scribe
12-07-2004, 12:30 PM
Inktip seems to work best for scripts that can be filmed on a low budget.
_

ananka
12-10-2004, 05:03 AM
At some point in the last two years I had seven different scripts listed at inktip. Got plenty of "reads" from producers I'd never heard of, and a few I had, plus was asked to send scriots to a manager or two. The consensus seemed to be that since my scripts were all fantasies, they were too expensive to produce.

So I wasted alot of money (from credit cards that I'm STILL paying off!) and I completely forgot that they had a money back option - too late now to call that in, huh?

Recently I checked out their "boasting" page, and they hadn't had a sale or option since August! So, I'd say, sign up if you want, but be realistic. It's still easier to win the lottery than to sell a script, with or without inktip!:\

teddy
04-18-2005, 07:36 AM
Just wondering what the verdict is on Inktip? Is it worth placing a scipt there? What is the industry's perception of it?

IWrite
04-18-2005, 08:34 PM
Teddy it can't hurt, but I'm not sure how much it will help.

The movie business is basically a "push" business and sites like inktip are "pull" technology. What I mean by that is the paradigm for the business is that writers and agents submit projects TO the production companies. A site like inktip requires that producers go to the site and seek out projects.

Most production companies (even smaller ones) are literally inundated with unsolicitied queries and submissions by agents. They have neither the time nor the need to go out on the web looking for screenplays.

And sites like inktip have no vetting process, they will post anything submitted so quality is always a concern, which is one reason that many producers don't want to waste their time with the scripts on sites like these - more often than not, they're bad.

That said, there are some producers who do so. It's usually producers with a) very little or no development money who are looking to option properties for very little or no money so they can then go out to investors. or b) producers who are seeking very specific projects (i.e. a biography of Albert Einstein or a film set in a Bulgaria because they have investors and contacts in Bulgaria.)

Almost all the producers who look for scripts on inktip are independent producers seeking to produce on a low budget (under 5 million). Many are specifically looking for non-Guild writers which often (but not always) means that upfront pay will be very low.

If you do post your work on inktip be sure to check out any producer who contacts you. Anyone can hang out a shingle and call himself a producer. Ask for their credits but also check imdb, google, etc. Also try to negotiate a short time-frame for the option. Options normally range from 6 to 18 months. If they want a 12-month or 18-month option, and they aren't paying you alot for the option - some will only want to pay you a dollar or a couple hundred dollars - offer them a shorter one with an option to renew - but if they renew they will have to pay you more money for the extension. Generally speaking, the more money someone has invested in a project the more motivated they are to make it come to fruition.

Finally, if you decide to post on intip, that does not mean you shouldn't be proactive and query agents and producers. You need to actively be seeking representation and/or a sale.

But before you post, make sure that your script is ready to go.

Joe Calabrese
04-18-2005, 08:36 PM
I've used them in the past and for $40 bucks it's pretty worthwhile in my opinion. In the six months I had a script up there, I got about a dozen or so requests, some from larger, well respected companies, most from small fish.

Now, if I took that same $40 and used it for postage and envelopes to submit queries (which would be translate about 80 companies) instead, would I have gotten the same amount of read requests?

Maybe. Maybe not. I would hope that any marketing of one's work would be an all encompasing attack, using cold queries, phone calls, pitch meetings, and any web based avenues-- like inktip. Whatever I can afford to spend.

In other words, I wouldn't just do inktip and sit by the phone. I would look at any and all ways of getting my script out there in people's hands.

Good luck.

Joe

teddy
04-20-2005, 06:58 AM
Thanks guys. Appreciate your responses.

Ron239
04-21-2005, 10:59 PM
I've listed a few of my scripts off and on on Inktip over the last few years.
Had a few people progress from sampling the logline to the synopsis and even, in some cases, sampling my resume. In one instance, they sampled the script itself. But have never had any follow-up requests of any kind. They're good scripts, too. In fact, excellent ones.
However, you can list SCRIPT SHORTS for free on the website, and I've
had several requests for scripts off those listings.
While some legit industry people occasionally surf these sites, I believe most of the smaller production companies that feed there are more like "wannabes" than bona fide outfits with legit industry deals. But I could be wrong.

DrRita
03-21-2006, 05:55 PM
Has anyone here ever offered or sold a script on Inktip.com? A member of our production group just sold one there (his first) and I've heard of others having good exposure/success. Just wondering if anyone else has any experience with the site. www.inktip.com (http://www.inktip.com)

icerose
04-05-2006, 09:01 PM
I haven't but I heard its a pretty great place with an average of 5 options a month from all the members of course.

YOUNGZERO
04-22-2006, 06:16 AM
so what's better... hollywoodlitsales.com or inktip.com???? They're both practically the same thing right???

icerose
04-22-2006, 08:21 AM
hollywoodlitsales is free to use. But they do not check to see if the agents and producers are legitimate or have a good sales record.

Inktips costs to post a script if I remember correctly, BUT, they require 2 sales and 3 industry references of which they do check on from the agents and producers. So you don't have the scammers in there looking at your stuff and trying to suck you in.

Hollywood lit is much more open game so you have to be extra careful.

ALWAYS check out every company on either site before sending them stuff, but inktips does have that extra barrier of protection.

Inktips also seems better put together, as it costs to post, they can put more effort into it types.

billythrilly7th
04-22-2006, 08:28 AM
I really like Inktip.com

If you have a high concept screenplay and you put it up, you will get reads and if it's good you can take the next step.

For $40, you can't go wrong IMO.

As far as "low concept" screenplays are concerned, I don't know.

God jinxed me to only be able to come up with and write high concept.

JennaGlatzer
04-22-2006, 08:30 AM
At one time, I had three scripts posted on Inktip. I did land a screenwriting manager and optioned one of the scripts (it was a free option-- which stinks-- but to a reputable TV production company). Not much action on the other two scripts, but I do feel it was worthwhile. I've also spoken with the heads of Inktip on the phone about their process... good people, and they have their act together.

billythrilly7th
04-22-2006, 08:40 AM
I've also spoken with the heads of Inktip on the phone about their process... good people, and they have their act together.

I agree. Jerrol, the owner, is a really great guy. And their site is 100% legit and how well it works is based on how good your logline and ultimately your screenplay is.

DrRita
04-22-2006, 09:48 AM
I've been watching them and I agree. I am glad that both Jenna and Aqua Dan are in agreement too. I'm about ready to post one, we'll see what happens! Thanks for your input. Now I'm getting excited.

Mike The Mover
11-10-2006, 12:15 AM
Does anybody have any experience with InkTip.com? I've been checking the movies that got produced because of that site. It looks to me like the highest budget was approximately 5 mil.

odocoileus
11-10-2006, 12:48 AM
boski, over on the donedealpro board, has had some experience with them. go there and do a search or post a question.

dpaterso
11-10-2006, 01:01 AM
Also check out previous InkTip threads in this forum, if you haven't already:

http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=39206
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=29463

-Derek

MrJayVee
11-10-2006, 01:52 AM
Yes, the site is legit. Yes, they've had some success. Problem is, the producers that use the site are all fairly low level. Hey, there's nothing wrong with that...but just know who you're dealing with. So, if you're planning to get your script into the hands of Jerry Bruckheimer or Joel Silver, look elsewhere.

Another thing: I went to Inktip's ďsuccess storiesĒ page and took a sampling of fifteen scripts that supposedly were sold or optioned at least two years ago. I checked the titles of these scripts along with the screenwriters' names...and not one name or title showed up on IMDb. Not one. A few of the so-called producers didn't even have a listing on IMDb. Not sure what this means exactly, but I find it rather interesting.

Anyway, I think Inktip is a good service and certainly worth checking into. They have a 30 day money-back guarantee...so if you're not getting any hits on your script, you get your money back.

clockwork
11-10-2006, 02:07 AM
Inktip is 100% legit as MrJayVee says. And he's right about the available markets as well.

It's no good putting your 10 mill + script on there because nothing will happen. If you have the next indie smash then I'd give it a go. You certainly get lots of people reading your loglines.

Jennifer Robins
11-10-2006, 06:40 PM
I have a script with Ink Tip and a director asked for it who was with a production co. that had $10 mil budget. They ended up with another script, but hey, they were interested. I am also getting a lot of views of my logline, over 100 so far and it's only been four months. There have been a few views of my synopsis also.

Jennifer
www.jenniferrobins.com (http://www.jenniferrobins.com)

seanie blue
11-10-2006, 07:49 PM
I went to Inktip's “success stories” page and took a sampling of fifteen scripts that supposedly were sold or optioned at least two years ago. I checked the titles of these scripts along with the screenwriters' names...and not one name or title showed up on IMDb. Not one. A few of the so-called producers didn't even have a listing on IMDb.

Small office near Hollywood & Vine, Wednesday:

ROGERS
I've got a meeting next week with a lawyer flying in from New York who is going to Sundance, and he wants to know if we've go anything new.

GOFER (earning $500 a week, dyslexic but sharp, terrible handwriting)
I'll have a list of the scripts we're looking at in your e-mail in an hour.

ROGERS
Cool. I'll be at lunch. Tell anyone who calls I'm in meetings.

The Gofer goes to Inktip and spends 23 minutes scrolling the loglines, sends eight misspelled and almost unintelligible e-mails asking for a copy of the script. He knows only three people will actually send in the script, and the other five will google Mr. Rogers and see that he is a nobody except for putting $75,000 into a David Mamet movie that lost $7-million four years ago; these five won't send their scripts. Gofer then looks over the 18 scripts being considered for "development", and lists these along with the new eight from Inktip in an e-mail to his boss, so Mr. Rogers can sit at Starbucks with Mr. Foster from New York and talk loudly about the "possibles" he is developing.

Mr. Rogers makes his money from a small shopping center (6 storefronts, four storage) he inherited, and will lose about half a million dollars in 13 years in the entertainment business, but will be listed as a producer (one of seven) in a straight-to-video Daniel Baldwin piece of trash. Mr. Foster will go to Sundance and Cannes and stay in the biz for 20 years, though 99% of his money will come from chasing ambulances. Gofer will be fired by March. He'll be a bartender for two years, a waiter for three, will write two completed screenplays and 47 incomplete screenplays, and at age 29 join the family landscaping business as a manager.

That's Hollywood.

Inktip is 100% useless. For poseurs and desperadoes.

Writers with talent and a finished product (finished movie being worth about 100 finished screenplays) should go to Santa Monica, stay at the Pacific Sands for two weeks (at $89 a night, on the beach), and call lawyers every morning for three hours until a lawyer with connections agrees to meet as long as you pay him his $150/hour discounted for writers rate. The moment you sit down with that lawyer, your Hollywood career begins. Hollywood will NOT find you because it isn't looking for you. Come here and stick your talents in front of people's faces and then you'll learn as all of us other hacks have that Hollywood is

NOT

about writers, writing, or ideas,

but about

the DEAL.

QTPorto
11-20-2006, 05:24 AM
Hollywood is

NOT

about writers, writing, or ideas,

but about

the DEAL.


Well put.

QTP

kitt
11-20-2006, 06:33 AM
ok, if someone were to actually go about breaking into Hollywood this way, what exactly do they look for in a lawyer? I would love a little more details on this plan. I like the idea of getting to the heart of the industry. Is this the way to go about it? Oh wait, I forgot, this industry doesn't have a heart.

Mac H.
11-20-2006, 11:39 AM
Writers with talent and a finished product (finished movie being worth about 100 finished screenplays)..
If it takes 3 months per screenplay, and you start at the age of 25, you'll be 50 when you are ready to ...


go to Santa Monica, stay at the Pacific Sands for two weeks (at $89 a night, on the beach), and call lawyers every morning for three hours until a lawyer with connections agrees to meet as long as you pay him his $150/hour discounted for writers rate.I don't quite understand this.

Let's agree that there are plenty of 'producers' out there with no real chance at getting anything really made, who are just losing money and playing an ego Hollywood game.

Then surely there would also be plenty of 'connected lawyers' out there with no real chance at getting anything really made, who are just MAKING $300 per 2 hour meeting, and playing the same ego Hollywood game while they are getting rich !

I'm sure you are probably a hell of a lot more right than I am, but I don't see the logic. Why will writers be safer with a lawyer with dubious 'connections' who charges them $80 per phone call .. but doesn't get anywhere, compared to a producer who pays a measly $10 for an option ... but then doesn't get anywhere. How can a newbie writer identify who will fleece them and who won't ?


Hollywood will NOT find you because it isn't looking for you. Agreed.

Mac
(PS: Yes, I know 3 months per screenplay isn't an accurate figure. Goldman quoted '13 years of thinking and 7 days of writing' for 'Butch Cassidy'. Guess that will stretch out the deadline a bit longer ....)

seanie blue
11-20-2006, 08:37 PM
Let's agree that there are plenty of 'producers' out there with no real chance at getting anything really made, who are just losing money and playing an ego Hollywood game.

Then surely there would also be plenty of 'connected lawyers' out there with no real chance at getting anything really made, who are just MAKING $300 per 2 hour meeting, and playing the same ego Hollywood game while they are getting rich !


Then surely there would also be plenty of 'connected lawyers' out there with no real chance at getting anything really made, who are just MAKING $300 per 2 hour meeting, and playing the same ego Hollywood game while they are getting rich !

Exactly.

When I make my wild and often silly pronouncements about Hollywood, I do so on the assumption that the writer or movie-maker or artist (you or me) actually has a good project in hand. I assume the screenplay is brilliant: original, tight, late into each scene and early out. I assume the artist has some personality. I also assume the artist has a strategy, or is able to formulate one.

If all of these assumptions are true, then the artist can break into Hollywood (meaning: meetings) by aligning himself or herself with a lawyer with connections. Yes, there are deadbeat lawyers, and plenty of them in Lalaland. It's easy to identify the good ones.

The point of hiring a lawyer for a few hours is that you in effect pay for the first pitch. If the lawyer likes your pitch, he'll go make his own pitches with your property, and you pay nothing. If the lawyer does NOT like your pitch, it's probably not commercial enough for anybody and therefore useless in Hollywood; make the movie yourself. Writers often can't deal with this. They're told their pitch is no good, and they insist since they've put three years and their soul into the 119-page screenplay, properly formatted and bound just right with the two gold metal brads. So the writer keeps carrying the cross of his or her screenplay, and gets nowhere.

It is VERY easy to fly into LA, meet three lawyers on three days and make three pitches. One hour each, at $150 each, plus hotel and flight will set you back around a grand. The beautiful part of this is you get an answer to the worth of your project immediately. There are people on this board and elsewhere who continue to play the Writer's Digest merry-go-round with submissions and competitions and wrietr's clubs for years and years, and their screenplay gets nowhere, and never will. Just look at the sales. Read about the screenplays. Signing with agents and getting announced in Variety means nothing!!! The overwhelming majority of movies made in the USA happen because a producer hooks up with a lawyer and a screenplay, and it doesn't matter if this happens in Lorain, Ohio, or on Santa Monica Boulevard.

The lawyer is an essential, essential ingredient. Writers fool themselves silly without taking this primary aspect of entertainment into account.

So my previous frothing post should be taken with bottles of salt. It is EASY to identify good lawyers with nothing more than the Yellow Pages. But you have the internet; 10 hours of research will yield a dozen "players" in Hollywood. Maybe they won't meet you, but junior partners at their companies will. You just need to identify a young, hungry attorney who wants to make an impression in Hollywood; if you can't do this, why bother writing screenplays to begin with? And if you're willing to pay for that first hour, what lawyer would turn you away? Your offer shows you're willing to work whatever angle needed to get in, and figuring out that the right way in is through the real gatekeepers (the lawyers) rather than some festival flooded with half-witted Tarantino knock-offs shows the lawyer that you have some cunning.

But if you meet three lawyers and they rell you your screenplay is a turgid third-grade derivative, does the writer have the guts and soul to move on?

And to really move on does not mean find another three lawyers or revise the screenplay. To me personally, it means make your own movie. If every writer had to make a movie for one thousand dollars out of his screenplay, and then had to sit through the result, 99% of all screenplays would be abandoned, in my opinion. That's the real test.

But if your movie is any good, you'll get noticed. Especially with a lawyer in your corner.

JohnDoe79
11-20-2006, 10:44 PM
There's one problem with these boards. Everyone on here is either an amateur writer, or just someone who has a couple of writing credits. There are no A list screenwriters on this board, yet everyone loves to come across as though they are THE AUTHORITY on screenwriting or on how to break into the industry.

Seanie, what you've said may have very well worked for you, but that doesn't mean that most working screenwriters broke in the industry that way, nor does that mean that most aspiring screenwriters should break in the industry that way.

For starters, a lot of entertainment lawyers who close deals don't necessarily shop projects, or don't necessarily deal with unknown writers. A few might. But anyone who thinks that just by coming to LA for a couple of weeks that they are that likely to break into the film industry in a major way is severely deluded. It may have happened before, but I doubt it's TYPICAL.

English Dave
11-20-2006, 11:11 PM
There's one problem with these boards. Everyone on here is either an amateur writer, or just someone who has a couple of writing credits. There are no A list screenwriters on this board, yet everyone loves to come across as though they are THE AUTHORITY on screenwriting or on how to break into the industry.

.
Unwise words. There are solid pros on this board giving solid advice. Seek and ye shall find. I don't include myself in this. Just sayin'

Oh and get yourself a coupla writing credits and see how hard it is.

billythrilly7th
11-21-2006, 12:58 AM
I love INKTIP.

For $40 you can't go wrong IMO.

AS LONG AS you have a good logline. If you do, you'll get reads from people who both can and can't do anything with your script.

But I like to focus on the "can do" people.

And there are plenty of them who frequent the site.

Good luck.

English Dave
11-21-2006, 01:03 AM
I love INKTIP.

For $40 you can't go wrong IMO.

AS LONG AS you have a good logline. If you do, you'll get reads from people who both can and can't do anything with your script.

But I like to focus on the "can do" people.

And there are plenty of them who frequent the site.

Good luck.

That'll teach me for not reading the title of the thread.

clockwork
11-21-2006, 01:29 AM
There's one problem with these boards. Everyone on here is either an amateur writer, or just someone who has a couple of writing credits. There are no A list screenwriters on this board, yet everyone loves to come across as though they are THE AUTHORITY on screenwriting or on how to break into the industry.

Hello to you too. Yes there are a million unknowns here but there certainly isn't a lack of knowledge. Stick around and you'll find out that there is no "authority" on screenwriting here - just a very impassioned and healthy debate.

Mike The Mover
11-21-2006, 04:09 AM
Don't get me wrong. I love this board.

I've just listed my script on InkTip tonight. I'll see how it goes...

Mac H.
11-21-2006, 07:16 AM
There's one problem with these boards. Everyone on here is either an amateur writer, or just someone who has a couple of writing credits. There are no A list screenwriters on this board, yet everyone loves to come across as though they are THE AUTHORITY on screenwriting or on how to break into the industry.Not quite. This board is a bit like a bar where people hang out and discuss screenwriting.

Some people here have credits I'd envy. Some don't.

But you can't expect a discussion in a bar over a couple of beers to be 'THE AUTHORITY' on anything - we are just chatting.
Remember, too, that the methods an A-list screenwriter uses to get their script read would be utterly useless to me. They have doors open that I don't.

If you want the opinion of someone you KNOW is an A-lister, then try www.johnaugust.com (http://www.johnaugust.com) or www.ArtfulWriter.com (http://www.ArtfulWriter.com)

The general approach Seanie Blue suggested, though, did work for at least one Aussie screenwriter last year. Sure, he didn't get the A-list credits that you'd approve of, but he sold his screenplay for a quite good deal.
(I asked him how he picked his lawyer. He admitted he didn't have the foggiest what to look for, so picked one out out of the Yellow pages that seemed professional. He may have been incredibly lucky, but it seemed to work.)

Good luck,

Mac

Joe270
05-22-2007, 09:42 PM
My screenplay's been on InkTip for a couple months now. I have had logline hits, but nothing on the synopsis or script.

Now I get a screenplay wanted tip, which costs an extra $25 bucks. The tip is dead on my screenplay, my logline needs no alteration for this.

So why didn't this producer search the loglines? I have had no hits for a while, so it seems no search was made. I'm puzzled by this.

Can anyone share InkTip experiences?

dpaterso
05-22-2007, 09:52 PM
Check out this thread:

http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=29463

You can find numerous references to InkTip in other threads if you select Search this Forum and enter: InkTip

-Derek

Rainy Night
05-22-2007, 10:01 PM
I have some shorts on InkTip and get request to read them all the time, but that seems to be about all the farther it goes. I've not spent any money with them so I don't know about the other services.

Joe270
05-23-2007, 02:11 AM
Thanks for the comments. I read that thread before, dpat, and it was a good read again.

The tread doesn't answer my question, but does ease my fears somewhat. I suppose no one who's used InkTip has had this quandry.

I guess it'll be worth the 25 clams to see what happens so I can report on the process.

Joe Calabrese
05-23-2007, 02:33 AM
I'm confused. Who is asking for $25, the producer or inktip themselves? Inktip shouldn't be asking you for more money than what you spent on the submission?

Or... Are you talking about subscribing to the preferred newsletter from inktip?

If that is the case, it is worthwhile. I got some good leads that way.

Joe270
05-23-2007, 03:12 AM
It was a little confusing, but it winds up that it is the subscription to the preferred newsletter. But it's rather convoluted.

The way one area explains the tip is $50, with a $25 discount. Then another explains that the tip comes with the next subscription because it's now past the subscription date. But I'll still get the tip. Then I'll also get the newsletter for June and July.

Problem is, I'll be out of town for most of June and July.

Like my OP says, this tip hits my script nail right on the head. So why didn't the company search for loglines on InkTip? Perhaps this company does not subscribe to Inktip themselves? I dunno.

I think I'll do it. One lead that hits my screenplay right on the nose is worth it.

Man, this rejection is really gonna hurt.

zagoraz
05-23-2007, 06:19 AM
Hey Joe...

My writing partner and I just got an agent after submitting one of our scripts through the preferred newsletter. We're listed about five blurbs down on the most recent "success stories."

The preferred newsletter is cool because they send you 8-10 leads a week by e-mail and you can see if any of your scripts, not just the one you have on the site, match up with what companies and agents are looking for. The script that got us the agent wasn't even the same script we have on the site.

For $25 it was definitely worth it. Like you, we had the occasional logline hit and maybe three people downloaded our script in 4 months. We were about ready to give up when we decided to give the preferred newsletter a shot. Good thing we did.

Joe270
05-23-2007, 07:47 AM
Thanks, Zag, and congratulations.

Joe270
05-30-2007, 09:31 AM
Update: Inktip came through with the tip. I have the lead and a passcode.

So does anyone out there know what I should expect next?

I have a polished screenplay, a pretty decent outline, and an okay logline. Will they want all at once? Or do I need to send a quiry letter only?

Mostly, does that passcode work more than once if I don't have exactly what I need?

Help!

DanielD
05-30-2007, 10:27 AM
To Joe270.
I'm not 100% clear on how they do things over at "Ink Tip".
Though it looks as if they're a wise choice,when it comes to submitting your script.
Your better of going to the "Ink Tip" website,which I imagine has plenty of advice on how the process works.
I had a quick browse the other day, and remember something in regards to "How to submit Screenplays ?" and what other options are available.
I'm going to shoot over to their website, and take another look.
Once I have the gist on how it works, Ill get back to you.
Daniel.

DanielD
05-30-2007, 12:00 PM
To Joe270.
Going by what is said on the Inktip website,it seems that most of the prospective interest is towards the Screenplay, and the Treatment.
I am not sure whether you should send a query letter, or whether the interested party shall request one.
I have heard of instances, whereby a person has sent a covering letter(Query), along with the first 10 to 15 pages of the script ,and a treatment.
I am certain if you ask them(interested party),you will save a lot of time and worry.
Also, you won't send in more/or less, than what is required.
Daniel.

Joe270
05-30-2007, 07:40 PM
Thanks for the input, Daniel. I'm submitting in the next hour or so, so I'll update with the answers. I had a pm from someone who recently submitted, so I'm just about ready to roll.

Joe270
05-30-2007, 10:23 PM
Well, it's submitted.

There were 4 blocks to fill in. The first was for comments, I just put "Thank you for your time". Lame.

Then the logline block, but they wanted 60 words. I had to expand mine a bit on the spot. Mine only ran 20 or so. I managed 47 words, seemed okay.

Then came a synopsis block. Pasted that, no problem. I like the synopsis, seemed pretty good to me.

Then was a resume block/credits. I left that one blank.

I've got my fingers crossed. (Makes it really hard to type, though.)

DanielD
05-31-2007, 02:36 AM
To Joe270
Great news!
Now cross your toes...give those fingers a rest.
I'm just a little curious as to their requirement for a 60 word logline.
It seems contrary, to what I have read about loglines.
I had another browse at their website,it states"Less than 60 words preferably 2 simple sentences".
The information I have says a logline should be a " 25 word or less" description of your screenplay.
NEWS FLASH.
I just found an article on developing the initial idea for a screenplay,it contains all the essentials, Story name,Genre,description of hero,what big event happens to them,what's the solution the hero seeks,what the hero's plan is to achieve this,What complications arise.
This can be done within around 40 or 45 words.
This looks like a great way of writing an indepth logline,with all the important details.

eg:THE FUGITIVE.
The fugitive is a drama about an innocent doctor who after being wrongly sentenced to life in prison for killing his wife manages to escape and wants to clear himself by finding the real murderer.
This becomes increasingly difficult because a determined police detective is hot on his trail.
Hope it helps.
Good luck.
Daniel.

Joe270
05-31-2007, 03:18 AM
Yeah, Daniel, those dang loglines.

I've read everything I could about loglines, and everything seems contradictory. Some folks want them one way, others want something else, no main character name, must have character name, genre, no genre.

I sorta gave up on the whole logline thing, figuring you can only please a few with any given style.

I rather prefer the way you wrote that Fugitive logline. I'd say mine is similar in structure, although I did not mention genre.

The synopsis follows my logline, however, and it starts with "Lighthearted Sports Drama".

Toes are crossed.

NikeeGoddess
05-31-2007, 08:08 AM
I've read everything I could about loglines, and everything seems contradictory.
that's because there's really no one way to write a logline. there are no hard rules just like most everything else in script writing. however, there are anal people who insist that a logline must be this way or that way and fit into this particular formula. but, not all stories are alike so not all loglines can fit in the same formula either.

usually, high concept tentpole flicks can be done in one line but the more complicated your story the more information you need to give. the inktip "less than 60 words" is proof that there is some flexibility in logline writing and styles. do what works for your story and forget about trying to force your logline in someone else's formula. it's just a marketing tool anyway. whatever gets them to want to read your script.

that's my opinion and i'm sticking to it.

Joe270
06-01-2007, 08:57 PM
Update: nada.

They got both the logline and the synopsis but still passed. Oh, well.

I have one other shot at marketing this screenplay, then it hits the trash heap.

NikeeGoddess
06-01-2007, 10:15 PM
joe - here's another marketing site http://scriptpimp.com/
this one is a little more user-friendly and user proactive because not only do they list all their producers, managers, and agents with contact information... they tell you who will work with "new" writers and what they're looking for. and... many will let you query them right from their site. and... you can keep track of who and when (or want to in the future - favorites) you query people on their database.

i won a 5 year free membership in a contest. i haven't utilized everything yet but it's there and waiting for me to take advantage of it. but the membership fee is well worth the access and information.

Joe270
06-01-2007, 10:31 PM
I'll look into it. I have info (thanks dpat) to quiry an actor. I'll see how that works out next.

Thanks for the suggestion.

Rainy Night
06-01-2007, 10:47 PM
I won a 1 year memebership to scriptpimp, I liked it so much I renewed for 5 years. It's easy to use and has some good info.

Joe270
06-01-2007, 10:53 PM
I don't know, maybe the script's too expensive, set during the winter olympics. This seemed so perfect a fit.

Then again, maybe they were looking for team sport stories, not individual sports. You never know.

Either way, sucks for me.

Rainy Night
06-01-2007, 11:22 PM
Don't give up so easily, just because you got one pass doesn't mean it needs to go to the scrap heap. Keep at it.

DanielD
06-02-2007, 02:52 AM
Joe,as RainyNight said, Don't give up so easily.
Correct me if I'm wrong.
Having your Screenplay,Synopsis,logline ect, over at InkTip,does'nt this allow you to recieve continuous exposure to, prospective contacts?
For the period your covered for,of course.
If this is the case,Simply by working on your other projects whilst this one is gaining exposure,would allow you to gain feedback which would be vital in polishing up your other projects(screenplays).
Screenwriting seems at times,one of the easiest, yet at the same time, most complex of crafts.
John Truby says ,"what the companies(interested parties) are looking for is Genre's,others say high concept stories,ect,ect.
Though I'm still of the belief, that they're looking for Good,well written Stories.
Daniel.

Joe Calabrese
06-02-2007, 03:17 AM
Like a soul mate, there's one out there for each of us.

I firmly believe that if you could pitch every producer in the world, you would find one or more who would buy any particular script at any particular time.

The trick is finding that producer in as few pitches as possible.

Bravo
06-02-2007, 03:31 AM
joe, can you post your logline here?

it might be the problem, not inktip.

Joe270
06-02-2007, 03:56 AM
Right, Joe, as usual. But that's some catch, that Catch 22.

Thanks, Bravo, but I had help here with the logline. They (the prodco) had the synopsis, too. I just don't think I'm up for chopping loglines right now, but thanks for the offer.

Maybe at a later date.

shutterspeed
09-15-2007, 05:46 PM
What's the deal with this?

From what I've read, screenwriters agree not to hold "subscribers" (producers, production companies, etc.) liable by signing this release form.

So on the off chance that a script actually does get ripped off (yes, I already know the "odds" of this), does this mean a screenwriter actually would have no legal recourse?

Plot Device
09-15-2007, 06:14 PM
Hold them liable for what? What precisely are you agreeing not to hold them to? How is it worded?

Plot Device
09-15-2007, 06:18 PM
Here's an excerpt from the latest transcription job I did. It's an interview with a Hollywood entertainment lawyer named Paul:




CHRIS: Okay. Now many of us, when we submit a screenplay to a studio or an agency or a production company, we’re asked to sign a waiver.

PAUL: Ah! If you’re asked to sign the one from Warner Bros., it’s one that I wrote many years ago. And it says something like --in tiny little print in Paragraph 22 or something on the second page, it says something like-- “Writer waives the provisions of Title 17 of the US code.” Title 17 of the US Code is the Copyright Act. So everything I’ve just talked about you’ve now waived. All of the protections of the Copyright Act you’ve now waived by signing the Warner Bros., release.

If Paramount is still using the same release that I saw last year, it contains the provision that basically says that “no matter what happens, you can’t sue us for more than $500.00.” So every release is different. And every release has it’s own problems. And the bottom line answer is: don’t sign them.

CHRIS: Really?

PAUL: Or certainly don’t sign them without a lawyer looking at them first.

CHRIS: Okay. And how then --as a writer who hasn’t retained an attorney, or a writer outside of LA-- how do you get your work read? I mean I think most of us in that position would be very glad that they’re even asking to see the script than have them turn the query down flat.

PAUL: Have an agent or an entertainment lawyer submit the script on your behalf and then they wont require you to sign the release. If it’s a recognized entertainment lawyer in LA or New York, or it’s an agent franchised by the Writers Guild, you won’t be required to sign the release.

CHRIS: Okay. So if one of us were to query Warner Bros., cold, and somehow WB actually --we got in over the transom and they said: “Yeah sure. Send the script. Sign this release,” we should then say, “You know what, we’ll submit it through this agent.” And then seek an agent out.

PAUL: Yes. Or submit it through an entertainment lawyer. Not a real estate lawyer or your divorce lawyer. It has got to be an entertainment lawyer who does business in this Town.




So, what is it you agreeing to when you sign the Ink Tip thing?

shutterspeed
09-15-2007, 07:04 PM
Copied from Inktip's "Release Form":

8. Except as otherwise provided in this Agreement, Applicant hereby releases InkTip.com from any and all claims, demands and liabilities that may arise in relation to the Work, or by reason of any claim now or hereafter made by Applicant that InkTip.com or any Subscriber has used or appropriated the Work. IN NO EVENT SHALL InkTip.com OR ITS SUBSCRIBERS BE RESPONSIBLE OR LIABLE TO APPLICANT FOR INDIRECT, SPECIAL, PUNITIVE, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR LOST PROFITS OR REVENUES OF APPLICANT, EVEN IF INKTIP.COM OR ITS SUBSCRIBERS HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE. The extent of InkTip.com's liability, if any, should otherwise be determined, shall be the amount of any sums paid InkTip.com by Applicant.

NikeeGoddess
09-15-2007, 07:28 PM
it's no big deal. inktip is just saying they're not responsible for securing your work if someone steals it. but they tell you that you should copyright and register your work before posting it on their site. that is your protection. they can't force you to protect yourself so if you don't then it's your fault and not theirs.

but everyone should copyright and register their scripts before they start to market them anyway.

Ron Maiden
03-22-2008, 03:58 PM
Hi all,

just mooching about looking for ways to pimp my script, following my other thread on the subject.
does anyone have any comments regarding Inktip? it's seems pretty good, but it's $50 a pop for a six month listing, i've got at least three scripts i'd like to list so we're talking a fair bit of money.
Script PIMP are also pretty expensive, any thoughts on them?

TIA

WriteKnight
03-22-2008, 04:34 PM
I've used InkTip for a number of years. If you don't have a 'pro active' agent - someone who is really actively working for you - then it's the next best thing. I like the fact that they vet the people who can see your script, I like the way I get notified when someone downloads a resume/synopsis or script. I like having a 'paper trail' of who looked at what/when.

Fifty dollars for a six month listing. That's having your script available for professionals to find/search 24/7 @ 27cents a day?

Cheap.


Yes, I've gotten script requests from major production companies and directors. No, my options came from other sources. Yes, I've got three scripts listed currently, and I might put two more up.

When I HAD an agent in Los Angeles, HE suggested I list on InkTip. "Helps me get it out there, saves me time" he said.

I especially like the tip sheet. Its an extra fee, but every friday I get a listing of four procos looking for SPECIFIC types of projects. I often find one or more will suit a script I have.

"Back in the day" - I used to spend fifty dollars in six months on copies and postage alone.

Its the cost of doing business, and yes, I deduct it from my taxes.

NikeeGoddess
03-22-2008, 04:48 PM
ditto what he said
btw - it's called the "preferred newsletter" (not the tip sheet) and they do have a regular newsletter that is free but it only gives you one tip as oppose to 4.

RM - if you sell yourself one good time on the street you could make enough money ($150) to last you the 6 months on their site. now that's a bargain! ;)

WriteKnight
03-22-2008, 05:23 PM
Ouch, I stand corrected - "preferred newsletter" it is - And very handy indeed. (Although it is full of 'tips' ....;))

Seriously, it's a really efficient way to get your work 'out there' to be seen, and professionally run. I think they average something like three writers a week either getting optioned or picked up for representation. (Yes, agents LOOK for writers on the site.)

And to be clear, as a writer, I CANNOT look at other scripts posted on the site. Only the procos/agents/director/producers can search the site for scripts.

Kristy101081
03-22-2008, 10:59 PM
I'll also throw in that the fee is tax deductible.....

Ron Maiden
03-23-2008, 12:47 PM
cheers all.

"RM - if you sell yourself one good time on the street you could make enough money ($150) to last you the 6 months"
the problem is finding a buyer! :'-(

dpaterso
03-23-2008, 01:28 PM
Old joke, this pig of a husband sends his wife out onto the street to earn some bucks. She staggers home at 3am and gives him 44 dollars. "What cheapskate gave you four dollars?" he demands. "All of 'em," she says happily.

Don't give up is all I'm saying, Ron. If you can't make $150 from one trick, make $10 from 15 tricks! Or $5 from 30... It just takes patience and persistence. Kinda like screenwriting.

-Derek

RichHelms
03-23-2008, 03:55 PM
Realize you can list your short script on InkTip.com for free.

www.inktip.com/shorts_form.php (http://www.inktip.com/shorts_form.php)

Ron Maiden
03-24-2008, 12:29 PM
i know, but i don't write shorts. although my scripts are short compared to the remake of king kong, i doubt they'd go for that perspective :-D

shutterspeed
04-07-2008, 06:37 PM
Submitted one of my scripts on Inktip for the first time. Pretty cool service.

So far, I've had 5 logline views in a day and a half.

WriteKnight
04-07-2008, 06:42 PM
Yup I think Inktip is a great service. You'll see your loglne and synopsis views slowly start to drop off. That's why its good to 'refresh' them every four months (or whatever the limit is). That way they come up again as 'new' when a search is done.

Don't forget to download and save your search listings each year, keep them in a file.

Good luck!

shutterspeed
04-11-2008, 04:40 AM
I'm curious as to everyone's experience with Inktip. I haven't gotten a handle on it yet. In less than a week, I've had 11 logline hits, with at least two companies viewing it three times. However, I have yet to have a company actually view my script.

Is this about par for most others out there?

NikeeGoddess
04-11-2008, 04:57 AM
i used inktip a few years ago and did get a ton of looks/hits and only a couple of requests. it's a great boost for your ego to get those hits. i let my subscription lapse when i decided to stop marketing and just write for a while. now, i plan to get on the magazine listing and see how that goes. btw - if you're on the magazine listing then you must be on the site as well so we'll see.

WriteKnight
04-11-2008, 05:33 AM
I currently have three of my scripts listed.

This month, (in the last ten days) I have had 9 logline hits, 4 synopsis reads and three script downloads.

But these scripts have not been 'refreshed' in a couple months.

If that's of any use to you.

kullervo
04-11-2008, 05:49 AM
I won a subscription as part of a contest prize package, and kept it a few years before letting it lapse. The script requests were all from companies I'd never heard of, which was no small task when I was reading the trades every day. One request was from another writer who was posing as a prodco to read other people's screenplays.

shutterspeed
04-11-2008, 06:32 AM
I'd love to know what the other end of the screen looks like (from the producer's viewpoint). I wonder how they actually pull up a particular logline as opposed to another. And why certain companies keep pulling up my logline, yet never venture into the synopsis or script.

WriteKnight, congrats on your Inktip popularity. :) I'd kill for just one synopsis read at this point.

Kullervo, how were you able to discern it was a writer viewing your script as opposed to a production company? It gives me goosebumps to think of a writer in disguise perusing my screenplay.

kullervo
04-11-2008, 06:43 AM
He actually emailed me. It turned out we had both written screenplays with the same historical subject. We agreed to critique each other's work. I sent my critique, in which I found one major error that crushed his take on the subject. I never heard back from him.

NikeeGoddess
04-11-2008, 07:03 AM
I'd love to know what the other end of the screen looks like (from the producer's viewpoint). I wonder how they actually pull up a particular logline as opposed to another. And why certain companies keep pulling up my logline, yet never venture into the synopsis or script.i'm guessing some already know what they're looking for and they're very specific like some of those requests in the inktip leads. i'm guessing some are just looking for love at first sight - which means you need to have the perfect logline for them. i'm guessing some are just interns/readers who can't tell one good story from another.


Kullervo, how were you able to discern it was a writer viewing your script as opposed to a production company? It gives me goosebumps to think of a writer in disguise perusing my screenplay.they're suppose to screen everyone but they also have a disclaimer for this very reason. but you do have control over who reads your script. you only have to post your logline and synopsis.

RainbowDragon
04-11-2008, 10:07 AM
Every six weeks, make some sort of change (or make a change then change it back) to your logline or synopsis to bump your listing to the top of the search list. The site will tell you the date you can do this next. It can help increase your number of views. Good luck!

shutterspeed
04-11-2008, 03:07 PM
I sent my critique, in which I found one major error that crushed his take on the subject. I never heard back from him.

Maybe you didn't hear back from him because, after reading an additional screenplay on a similar topic, he miraculously "solved" his problem. ;)

nmstevens
04-11-2008, 09:17 PM
I'd love to know what the other end of the screen looks like (from the producer's viewpoint). I wonder how they actually pull up a particular logline as opposed to another. And why certain companies keep pulling up my logline, yet never venture into the synopsis or script.

WriteKnight, congrats on your Inktip popularity. :) I'd kill for just one synopsis read at this point.

Kullervo, how were you able to discern it was a writer viewing your script as opposed to a production company? It gives me goosebumps to think of a writer in disguise perusing my screenplay.

Well, my wife, who's a producer and a script consultant, subscribes to Inktip -- from the other side.

Sometimes I'll walk in and see her perusing it -- and mostly it just seems to be endless lists of really, really (sometimes comically) bad loglines.

Occasionally, there'll be one that's interesting, and if you click on it, it'll take you to a synopsis -- which more often than not, even if the logline was interesting, turns out to be riddled with typos and in other ways dull, hyped or incomprehensible.

Occasionally, it might actually be interesting -- and then you'll go from there to the screenplay.

I think that she's actually read a number of screenplays off of Inktip, looking for potential projects. I don't think that she's found anything yet that was worth persuing and even finding ones worth reading is apparently involves a substantial winnowing process.

That would only be reasonable. If it was one in a couple hundred that was worth reading, considering that there's no prior vetting process at all, I'd think that would be a high ratio.

NMS

RainbowDragon
04-12-2008, 08:37 AM
Mine are worth reading :) But I have yet to get a feature read from an ad on Inktip. Those are the breaks. . .I have gotten a read or two from their free leads in the e-mail newsletter. Try it all (that you can afford to try), see what works for you. You never know where the "yes" will come from.

kullervo
04-12-2008, 08:43 AM
Maybe you didn't hear back from him because, after reading an additional screenplay on a similar topic, he miraculously "solved" his problem. ;)

His problem was that his main character was gay and he didn't know it. Yes, it was a love story. Ooops.

RainbowDragon
04-12-2008, 08:49 AM
It gives me goosebumps to think of a writer in disguise perusing my screenplay.

Lots of Hollywood readers are also writers. I trust 99% of writers not to steal ideas and stealing a whole script is not smart in this day of digital timestamping and WGA registration. We all should be looking out for each other, right? Hopefully.

DrRita
04-16-2008, 04:12 AM
I sold a short on Inktip back in October of '06. But alas, it never got produced . . . but a sale is a sale.

naimas
04-16-2008, 10:40 PM
The site has a lot of hit and runs. People will read your script and then never respond back. And there are companies up there with bogus information. And some of them are probably not better off than we are. I checked and one guy was an unemployed DJ looking for work. Others had Myspace accounts with like 16 friends. I had several reads and not a single one is responding back even though months have passed. I suspect that some of them are posting bogus info as an alias....and it shouldn't be allowed. I was excited at the start too. I got tons of reads on a logline and tons on a synopsis and even on my bio. I was really excited when I got script reads and requests. But then I started to look at the companies I could find something about and let's just say I began to feel like I would never in a million years allow my script to be done by some of them. And then I got an agent who appeared super interested and kept checking me out. I found her site (not exactly easy) and lets just say that if you are an agent and the only site you have is a free Geocities account where most of the page is ads and popups it is not too reassuring. I don't what their quality control is but producing a youtube video shouldn't qualify you to be allowed to read scripts.

If your script takes place in two rooms, has little props or a cast of three then you might have some luck but if it is a real movie I can't really recommend the site without some serious reservation.

WriteKnight
04-17-2008, 01:40 AM
Yup, its got some pretty small time ops on it. It also has some pretty big time ops on it. I've had reads from William Morris, ABC Family Films, Imagine Entertainment, and others... as well as from guys with one direct to video credit.

It is what it is, and doing due dilligence is always a good idea on people who ask for your scripts.

NikeeGoddess
04-17-2008, 07:14 AM
even though they say they make industry folks verify their positions in the business it's obvious that some cheat and get in there but good companies get in there too. but they do nothing to check the skill of the writer or the quality scripts from writers. i'm sure it's full of crappy loglines like you'd find anywhere else. just another crap shoot. but if your crap is full of cream then it should rise to the top.

Joe270
04-17-2008, 10:23 AM
I got lots of logline hits, and had one submittal, but I never heard anything back.

I guess my screenplay sucks.

I have another hit that's been on my email for over a week now and I haven't responded. I just sorta figure I'll never hear from them anyway.

I might send them the script this weekend. If I don't, then I don't.

I just guess I've lost any faith in folks actually reading the scripts and taking a story forward. It just seems that fantasy is a screenplay steeped in fiction that people still think can happen.

Just look at the crap that's made. Wil Farrell doing yet another sport. Anti-War, anti-republican stuff that's bombing at the box office faster than Sean Penn at the GOP convention.

A script must have either: 1) 'star' power behind it. These are formula scripts with not a hint of originality. You can write these if you know former SNL actors, everyone else need not apply. 2.) A liberal message with a good hook, especially if you can manage to make conservatives look like conspirators at all times and leftists look like people who only do good things at all times. Rather simplistic, but Hollywood loves them. You can get them made over and over, even if they are consistently losing a fortune on them. The last four haven't made back the budget to make them, even with top star power attached. 3.) A sequel. Harry Potter, Spiderman, XMen, whatever. Some of these are said to have contracts for 7 or more films.

That's what's getting made. My script doesn't fit into those three, so I'm not holding out much hope.

There is a 4.) Have an inside contact with power. These are sometimes original and make watching movies interesting.

I'm sorta hoping that one might work out for me.

My view in a nutshell, for what it's worth.

Ron Maiden
04-17-2008, 10:23 AM
still intending to join Inktip, just sorting my loglines and stuff. re this talk of views etc, i take it anyone can view loglines and stuff? i was thinking of browsing about just to see how other people do it, what level of script detail they put in etc.

WriteKnight
04-17-2008, 01:38 PM
No, not anyone can view loglines or scripts. They do have a 'vetting' process for agents, producers/procos and directors - though obviously its possible to fudge your way around it.

As a writer, I can't log on and look at other writers screenplays or loglines.

When some producer/agent DOES look at my loglines/synopsis/scripts - then I get an email notification, and I can check my files to get a note of who looked at what, when. Its a nice paper trail.

Joe270, it sounds like you have a very specific target audience in mind for your script. It might help if you find a production company/producer that shares your views and query them specifically.

NikeeGoddess
04-17-2008, 06:04 PM
inktip is a passive aggressive way of selling

i suggest you try http://www.scriptpimp.com
they have an industry list of agents, managers, and producers that include
- contact information
- how each one likes to be queried
- who will accept submissions from new writers (over 300 btw)
- what they've produced and what they're looking for
- also have a list of new and updated companies so, you know they must be very active with the site to go through that task of renewing their info.

you query them yourself and many you can do right from the site.
it's just a more active marketing tool imo.
i have been a member for quite a while but cannot give you results because i've just been sitting on it and waiting until i'm ready to market.

naimas
05-09-2008, 07:04 AM
The response my friend got back from Inktip was pretty bitchy. I wont use them and will SHOUT to all that they avoid Inktip.

The question to ask would be...

Why pay INKTIP good money to open up your script to companies you never heard of, companies who list false addresses, who KNOWINGLY hide behind FALSE NAMES...which they state they allow companies to do...and then after you get hits you are bound by contract to only snail mail these people? To where? Bogus addresses? WHY pay Inktip and list your script online only to be bound to rules that state you can only snail mail such hits?

INKTIP is bad for writers because it pays them no respect.

1) It makes them pay

2) It MAKES writers list full scripts

3) It allows companies to hide behind false names

4) It protects companies while laying writers wide open. Companies can be anonymous or list false names.

5) Writers on Inktip get spammed by Inktip repeatedly. Inktip tries to get more and more money out of you.

6) It binds writers to only contact companies by snail mail and states they will remove you and not return your money if you email a company who looked at your script. WHAT? Why the hell would I want to cut off my resources?

7) It lists companies that cannot be verified to exist.

8) It has a very problematic user interface that even has companies complaining that it makes it hard for them to find a script.

9) It demands a lot of the writer and gives none of the controls to the writer. It makes writers state the budget, the genre, the location, the number of cast, the themes in the screenplay, the time period. But it also requires the writer to enter in confusing information that could derail a listing. THIS DOES NOT HELP PRESENT A POSITIVE FIRST IMPRESSION. The budget amount is stupid. A lot depends on what kind of cameras are used and if the movie has stars or not. It also depends upon location city. I can get my entire city for free. Any location for free. But if it was in another state it could cost a ton.

10) Just reading and typing in the list of their companies can be scary. My company is the first, second and third hit if you type in the name in a major search engine. But you type in name after name after name on Inktip and you get nothing.

All in all it seems that Inktip is listing sales that never become paying gigs, lists agents who snag scripts and dont get sales and after you have forked over your money and listed your script...any creepy person they allow can read your script....and by their rules you can only play hide and go seek and try to find them.

No thanks Inktip.

mario_c
05-09-2008, 07:16 AM
There's a few companies in InkTip that yes, appear to be 2 Guys and a Camera Productions. That's annoying and a waste of time; I mean, I could do that. Well, I could do it if I sold a spec and could quit my job and do it. Time is more valuable than money in this biz.
They do have some companies that come on with a bitchy and rude attitude. What can you do? It is and will always be a buyers market for specs, so put on your dancing shoes.
Oh, and ScriptPimp is also a controversial contest and referral service. I sent 2 scripts to their contest this year though. The worst thing that could happen is I lose. The worst thing that can happen on Inktip is no one reads my script. At least I tried.

naimas
05-09-2008, 07:48 AM
I won a subscription as part of a contest prize package, and kept it a few years before letting it lapse. The script requests were all from companies I'd never heard of, which was no small task when I was reading the trades every day. One request was from another writer who was posing as a prodco to read other people's screenplays.


Just this one post should make people run away from Inktip. Hey Jeff..get your Inktip site in order! How about you spend a little less time spamming members to fork over more money to you and a little bit more time policing your so-called PRO producer list? Pretty good how people can scam their way and claim they are PROS. REEEEEEAAAAAAL good screening process you got on your site Jeff. Read the post above and listen to the people complaining about the scammers posing as companies and listing bogus info.

WriteKnight
05-09-2008, 08:00 AM
Who is "Jeff"????

Do you mean Jerrol???

Don't use INKTIP if it's not working for you. Don't give your money to someone who is not delivering what you need.

That's part of being a responsible consumer.

The cost of listing on INKTIP is tax deductable, its just a cost of doing business. I don't put all my eggs in that basket, its just one more resource. One more arrow in the quiver, tool in the box, metaphor in the book... whatever. Like I said, I've had good contacts and mediocre ones. I'm sure the site is full of hit or miss scripts as well. It is what it is.

coneflower2001
05-09-2008, 08:58 AM
I just put my script on there last week. The first two days Foursight Entertainment and Thunderball Films pulled up my logline, but they never bit. Does the number of hits mean the company actually read your logline or just pulled it up among a long list?

WriteKnight
05-09-2008, 09:18 AM
The logline comes up on their screen, whether or not the read it or get up to go to the bathroom is anybody's guess.

One way to tell if your logline is working, is to see them pull up the synopsis and/or script.

It's like dangling bait - you can sit there and watch the cork bob up and down all day - with nibbles - and not get a strike. Might need to change the bait or adjust the depth.

And I don't even fish.

naimas
05-09-2008, 11:54 AM
But the important thing about fishing is that when you finally get a bite that the fish is big enough to keep. Check the list of their companies. It is mostly small fish swimming around in that pond. I also looked deeper into some of those getting representation and found that the agents were small fish agents...worse than having no agent at all. Unlicensed agents. Indie, ultra low budget companies. And the companies that did look up my script.....I don't think I would have lowered myself to accept some of them. But some were surprisingly professional. But there is a story behind every sale and I found that it wasn't the incredible success they make it out to be.

I have four requests for me to write something, one request for me to accept writing, one request for me to present my work and one meeting with a company. And I got all of this by something I did on March 15th. I started a Myspace page. And it was free. And I was able to look each company over and contact them by email (something forbidden by Inktip) I could immediately tell if they were creepy or fakers by their page look, their profile and friend list. Atleast with Myspace you get to choose to accept someone as a friend or not. So if you want to deal with small companies, Myspace is better than Inktip and free.

Sure, the big fish dont hang out on Myspace too much, but they don't on Inktip either. And the whole snail mail to contact companies on Inktip is stupid.

naimas
05-09-2008, 12:19 PM
Don't use INKTIP if it's not working for you. Don't give your money to someone who is not delivering what you need.



The thread is about if Inktip is worth it. And many of us have found that Inktip is NOT worth the money and is filled to the brim with small, sleazy companies and even some who are scammers and liars. It would be nice if the site spent more time screening them out. Forum after forum is filled with complaints about the way they let just about anybody call themselves a production company. I own a production company. And my company is WAY more professional than some of the crap that is trolling that site. And if they cared (which they don't) they could easily get rid of the posers and scammers. Instead, they fill their headlines with sales (that were for FREE...NO MONEY PAID) and authors getting representation by unlicensed agents who dont live near LA or NYC.






That's part of being a responsible consumer.



And its part of being a responsible and supportive forum member to warn other writers about scams and sites filled with hype. Inktip has a bad attitude with writers. It makes them pay to be listed and sides with the producers or anybody who wants to call themselves producers. It lets basically anyone read your script, rations the amount of info you can learn about the company, allows companies to post bogus names and false info and does not respond to complaints in a helpful manner. It keeps you from contacting the company for weeks and then tells you that you can only snail mail the company.




The cost of listing on INKTIP is tax deductable, its just a cost of doing business.



Who cares about being tax deductable? Do you work for them? A waste of money is a waste of money. And I refuse the accept your comment...it is just the cost of doing business. Inktip is a site. Nothing more or less. It is not THE WAY OF DOING BUSINESS. The pros I talk to roll their eyes at Inktip. And I find it annoying that Inktip considers SOAKING WRITERS to be business. The weekly spam. The requests for more money. The double and sometimes triple emails.




I'm sure the site is full of hit or miss scripts as well. It is what it is.



And what it is is what this thread is all about. And for many here and on other forums, Inktip is not worth the money or the time you will invest.

In fact, I think I will post Inktips list of companies here and then everyone can have fun trying to find the real ones from the fake and then you can just send an email to the company and not have to wait for them to contact you. They dont list the whole thing. But I started trying to verify the companies on the list. GOOD LUCK!

Ron Maiden
05-09-2008, 01:59 PM
well this recent discussion has really taken my enthusiasm out of signing up there :-/

nmstevens
05-09-2008, 03:25 PM
well this recent discussion has really taken my enthusiasm out of signing up there :-/

The question is -- how does on go about vetting who qualifies as a legitimate producer or a legitimate manager or a legitimate agent?

And I don't know that much about Inktip, in particular -- but you have to come down to a point of reality.

Any producer above a certain level -- and that's not going to be a particularly high level, isn't going to using a service like this. That's because any producer above a certain level is going to be looking for ways to exclude the kind of writer that posts loglines on Inktip, rather than seeking them out.

If that sounds cruel, I'm sorry -- but that's the way it is.

The price of working in an environment in which the producers are vetted and all have significant professional credentials is to work in an environment in which all the writers, likewise, have been vetted and have significant professional credentials.

Otherwise -- what exactly are the credentials that one applies? What made my wife a manager is that I went to her and convinced her to be my manager. So she went out and got some cards printed up and started making calls. And after awhile, she got one script of mine optioned for fifteen grand against a hundred thousand and then sold a script of mine for a half a million dollars.

But what were her "credentials" before that? None.

The writers that post on Inktip are, mostly, "hopeful" writers -- but you also have to realize that a lot of the producers and managers and agents that go looking for material there are in the same category -- people with very limited or sometimes no significant "credentials" at all.

So where and how, exactly, does Inktip set the bar (with the exception of companies that are shown to be fraudulent)?

NMS

WriteKnight
05-09-2008, 07:08 PM
It costs seven dollars a month to list my script in a pond that has some pretty big fish swimming in it. Fish like IMAGINE Entertainment, 20th Century Fox, ABC Family, Hallmark Films and the William Morris Agency, have all looked at my loglines/synopsis or scripts. (Yes, I’ve had some interesting discussions and it’s opened some doors that now allow me to submit directly to some people.) And yes, the vast majority of my hits are from new pro-cos and agents. But I like the quality of my work, and trust it to reel in the big fish – at least for a ‘look see’.

Seven dollars a month - less than two gallons of gas – is what this exposure costs me for each script.

Its CHEAP for me - obviously you can't afford it. Don't spend your money there.

Like NMS, my wife (An IP Attorney) reps my scripts. She got my six figure options WITH NO EXPERIENCE as a 'film agent', after I hustled up some contacts. I've HAD an agent in Hollywood, and he got me meetings with 'mid level' and some 'new' pro-cos - same as INKTIP does, as well as a few high level meetings.

I get my work by 'hustling' - making calls, (Having a cell phone costs money)not every call gets me work - going to 'lunch' (meetings cost money for lunch and parking - not every meeting results in work) - attending seminars (Lots of times, the speakers are 'mid-level' and don't tell me anything new- but I MIGHT meet somebody) - joining film co-ops(Memberships cost money, but I've met people who have gotten me work)-I enter scripts in contests - (Some, not all - it costs money, I've won awards, gotten calls from companies and MET producers and distributors because of it and yes, gotten work)

When I get a nibble or request from INKTIP, I can google up or call around and find out if I want to deal with the company or not - that's part of MY job.

Like I said INKTIP is just another tool in the toolbox. They HAVE made sales, films HAVE been made. Hey, if you can't afford seven dollars a month to put your film in a pool, and trust that your logline and synopsis will get you a request for a script (you don't have to put the script up there) THEN DON'T SPEND SEVEN DOLLARS A MONTH.

You've made it quite clear that you don't think INKTIP is worth seven dollars a month. You say people are unhappy with it, you think others should share your viewpoint. Some do, others don't. People who have had success are happy with it. (That's why they post those success stories).

As you've pointed out, you don't like their policy - which is stated on the website, so no-one is surprised by the rules or restrictions. I’ve got no problems with it. I’m not looking for an agent, but in a few weeks, I’ll send a nice letter to the Willaim Morris Agency who downloaded a script of mine. It’s not keeping me awake at night – its just another thing on my long list of ‘to do’s’ that I make every day to keep advancing my business AND my craft.

I've got eight completed spec features, some award winners, some have been optioned, I've produced some of my shorts, won awards - I write for industrial and commercial stuff all the time - I'm working on a new feature and have a fairly big 'fish' on the line for a project right now - I don't put all my hopes on ONE SCRIPT in ONE PLACE.

I completely agree with your assessment that it takes constant personal effort to sell one's work. INKTIP is just ONE tool for getting your script out there... like paying for copy services, cell phones, seminars, postage and 'lunch/parking' - It would be a mistake to place all your eggs in this one basket, all your money on this throw of the dice - and let it ride. But for seven dollars a month, I look at it as an inexpensive listing service. Hell, maybe NMS’ wife will read one of my loglines and like one of my scripts. I'll probably start using SCRIPTPIMP too... But then, I can afford it as well.

I’m a bit confused by your position relative to cost. You seem to think that fifty dollars for a six month listing is too expensive – and yet somehow not worth enough to write off on your taxes? I don’t know how you run your business, but I keep every receipt – every parking ticket, piece of software, magazine subscription, lunch ticket, ream of paper and ink cartridge, box of brads – EVERYTHING goes into that ‘expense pile’ – nothing is ‘too small’ – and by the end of the year, it all adds up. But I’ve been in the production business for more than twenty years, so maybe you know something I don’t.

Like I said, if you don't want the service, or can't afford it - DON'T BUY IT. I don't consider the cost a 'soaking' - and I don't feel like I'm getting 'spammed' by one email a week. But my threshold for expense and spam are obviously different from yours. I guess your PERSONAL experience on the site and your listings have left a bad taste in your mouth... (Or are you speaking about your 'friend' who listed?)

It's a site. It costs money to list there. ITS A CHOICE NOT A REQUIREMENT. It's a cost I choose to incur as part of 'doing business' as a screenwriter. If you think screenwriting is NOT a business, or it doesn't have monetary costs to engage in - you're in for a surprise.

There are TONS of bad scripts on it and TONS of small pro-cos, but there are a few real deals on it too. Is it worth the money to risk the exposure? Each person has to make that call. I'm not saying its right for everybody - But I'm not saying its WRONG for everybody either.

DrRita
05-09-2008, 07:26 PM
Wow Naimas, sounds like you got bit pretty hard. With scars . . . something more than just a bit of anger going on? If you don't like Inktip and felt driven to expound all their foibles, you did that. Good job. But you're beginning to sound like a bit like Richard Dawkins talking about God.

Hope you are doing well otherwise.

naimas
05-09-2008, 08:25 PM
So. If I can cause one person to see past the hype and to think clearly before they use that site I will have done my job. The site hypes its producers as PROFESSIONALS and when a writer, especially a newbie sees their work being viewed it causes some real excitement. A bad contract is worse than no contract. And the hits many people are getting are not exactly groups that, in hindsight, we would have been climbing the ladder of success with. And I am sick of the site listing a company as having acquired the works of MULTIPLE writers on that site and yet nothing ever happened after that. You have small companies snatching up the bait and once that is done your script is GONE. You cannot list it anywhere else. You cannot try to get a better offer. You cannot walk away. (Depending on the contract) According to industry pros, most companies who sign Inktip writers get them for no money options and then sit on the script. Most of the time nothing happens. That is WASTED TIME. It is worse than not being signed. You can throw away a year or more that could have been spent trying to put your script into the hands of real companies.

And I am glad we are having this discussion. It will only help people look at the site more clearly before they give money to them. And money is money and time is time. And a stolen script or a bad deal is worse than doing it on your own. I don't care that people like Inktip. It seems more like I should go easy on them because they aren't so expensive. I resent that. The site is all over the internet acting like a savior to writers when it really just connects people to mostly small companies. I am just not buying into the hype and I have every right to tell people to look at some of those sales, look up the movies that were made (are they super low budget Grade D movies?) and investigate. Its not good that Inktip hypes its producers as pros when many are not. The names you listed are the hype names Inktip lists. I would HOPE that they would be listed on their so-called PRO list. I can email, snail mail any of those companies right now. People should be aware of that and think clearly when doing business with them or not. The Pro list is basically low budget companies with a sprinkling of name companies thrown in. If you want that then go for it. Just be aware that the pro list is NOT what they are hyping it to be and many of those types are trolling for ideas and will read scripts and then disappear. And you wont like the response from Inktip when you complain about it. Just be aware thats all.

coneflower2001
05-09-2008, 08:45 PM
If I did catch a small fish in InkTips big pond, I as the writer have a choice to throw the thing back into the pond. It's all about choices. I agree that you use all the tools you damn well can. If you don't like a company just simply say your opinion and leave it alone.

nmstevens
05-09-2008, 08:47 PM
So. If I can cause one person to see past the hype and to think clearly before they use that site I will have done my job. The site hypes its producers as PROFESSIONALS and when a writer, especially a newbie sees their work being viewed it causes some real excitement. A bad contract is worse than no contract. And the hits many people are getting are not exactly groups that, in hindsight, we would have been climbing the ladder of success with. And I am sick of the site listing a company as having acquired the works of MULTIPLE writers on that site and yet nothing ever happened after that. You have small companies snatching up the bait and once that is done your script is GONE. You cannot list it anywhere else. You cannot try to get a better offer. You cannot walk away. (Depending on the contract) According to industry pros, most companies who sign Inktip writers get them for no money options and then sit on the script. Most of the time nothing happens. That is WASTED TIME. It is worse than not being signed. You can throw away a year or more that could have been spent trying to put your script into the hands of real companies.


What you fail to mention is that for all of the above to happen the *writer* has to agree to the offer.

You say "most of the time nothing happens."

The fact is, even getting a free option from a small company is vastly more than most writers of most screenplays will ever see no matter what strategies they employ. For them, nothing will ever happen -- all of the time.

So you post your script on one of these services - or send it around, or whatever -- it's very likely that, for a beginning writer, you'll run into one of these "free option" deals.

You might bump into it by way of Inktip, or all on your own.

But if you take the deal and you end up the worse for it, there's only one person in the world who's to blame for it. That's you. No one holds a gun to your head and forces you to take a bad deal. It's your responsibility to know who you're dealing with and what their track record is and how reliable they are and what the risks are.

Now, if you're a grown-up and there's nothing else on the table and you've never sold anything before and somebody gives you a convincing song and dance and offers you a no money option -- then you have a choice.

You can say no and try to negotiate a better deal. And they'll almost certainly refuse. So you can refuse altogether and you can go looking for a better deal. And maybe you'll find one and you'll sell your script for a lot of money and become rich and famous -- or maybe you won't ever get another offer on the script.

And maybe you'll come back to the first producers looking to accept the original offer. And maybe that offer will still be open. Or maybe it won't -- in which case you won't even have the benefit of having gotten a free option on your work and the chance of maybe having your script produced, albeit it would have been a long shot at best.

Those are the chances you take. Those are the decisions you get to make being a grown up.

So you make them.

And having made them you have to accept that they're your decisions, win or lose. If it's good decision, congratulations. If it's a bad decision -- it's your bad decision. Your fault.

Not Inktip's, or anybody else's.

NMS

coneflower2001
05-09-2008, 08:53 PM
I spent more than seven dollars at Starbucks. Geez, InkTip is cheap.

WriteKnight
05-09-2008, 09:27 PM
NMS nails it once again. The decision to sell/option your property is THE WRITERS choice not InkTips.

I got a hit from an agent repping an 'up and comming young action star'. I googled around a bit - and yeah, he had some action bits in some small Direct to Video releases - He may yet have potential. They thought one of my scripts was PERFECT for him to 'break out' in. We talked on the phone. They wanted an exclusive free option for six months. I said I couldn't do that, that we both agreed the script was perfect for him. I offered them a three month option for a couple of grand against a flat 100 grand sales price. They wouldn't do it.

I said "No thanks".

That was my choice, not InkTips.

I make these decisions all the time. Its part of doing deals. Can this person deliver? Will they put SOME money where their mouth is? Do they have any kind of a track record? Yeah, that's what you have to ask when you get a hit or a request. Same thing I ask when I get a call from 'a friend of a friend who heard of your script'. Gee, people spend money on the Nicholls competition, and win it - and STILL DON'T GET THEIR SCRIPTS MADE - There's no guarantee on any particular path.

I listed the William Morris Agency cause I got a hit from them recently. That's a legit agency with real power in the biz. That's PROOF POSITIVE that there are real 'big' fish in the pond. As I recall, they don't accept unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, so my seven dollars this month was exceedingly well spent - and I don't mind taking the time to write them a letter later on.

So this thread has established that there ARE big 'fish' in the pond. We've acknowledged that it's the writer's responsibility to vet requests from pro-cos and negotiate the best deal they can get. (Which is true with or without InkTip.) We've established that the price is too high FOR YOU. We've established that you think the site sends out too much spam for your taste. We've established that you don't think they should represent the fact that there are SOME big companies fishing in the pond, and that SOME writers get representation and sales... you would prefer they mention the fact that the number of BIG companies and agencies are far exceeded by the number of SMALL companies or agencies.

You seem to think some sort of 'fraud' is being committed. If you believe that, you've got a class action case you can file. Be my guest.

WriteKnight
05-09-2008, 09:47 PM
Naimas,

I've been rereading your posts trying to find out why you are so angry and upset by the company. It sounds like you are really frustrated and fear that 'newbies' will be led astray with overly optimistic expectations?

That's a valid concern - You see it all the time on this board when someone posts a 'how long should I wait for a reply?' sort of question. Any interest in their work, sends them into a flury of excitement and expectation which - almost invariably, because of the odds - ends in rejection and dissapointment. A close reading of any of the posts by the experienced writers will indicate a "Don't take it personally, get used to dissapointment" sort of response. Because really - its all about how long you can keep pounding your head against the wall while taking criticism constructively and still continue to create.

Sure, INKTIP hypes their product - everyone touts their successes - whether it's removing bathtub rings, improved gas mileage, or 'three writers optioned this month'... its up to us as consumers of ANYTHING to look beyond the hype.

I hear your concern that New writers will take the hits with too much excitment and expectation - that's a valid concern for any query response. Its a long roller coaster ride, best not to get too excited OR TOO DEPRESSED by the hits and misses.

INKTIP is just one more way to increase the odds of BOTH - hits and misses. Not the only way, not necessarily the best for everyone - (You seem to have found the kind of success you need from Myspace) - It's just a tool for upping the rate of exposure for your work. Period. Closing the deal is up to the writer.

naimas
05-10-2008, 01:53 AM
No biggie. I said my view of Inktip. Others can praise it. The truth is somewhere in the middle. Its not just listing your script online, its about then paying to get the preferred newsletter, and then when you get that its about paying to have your logline put in the mailer they send out. It adds up. I just want people to think soberly and clearly.

zagoraz
05-10-2008, 02:40 AM
For what it's worth, my agent found me through Inktip last year. Granted, she isn't at one of the big agencies, but the truth is I would rather have a small agent with a handful of clients who gives me the time of day than a junior agent at a major who is trying to keep track of 30 clients and barely knows me or my work. I have a friend who is being hip-pocketed by an agent at Endeavor. He won't return her phone calls. I can call my agent any time and get the rundown.

I'm getting meetings at studios and with major prodcos. I'm negotiating my first option.

So, Inktip opened a door for me. Was it worth $50? You bet your ass it was.

naimas
05-10-2008, 09:46 AM
So people can praise or raise concern about a site here and people can judge for themselves.

One lady on another forum stated that the same company kept downloading her script over and over again. She said she tracked them down and they looked like they did wedding videos. She said they were really creepy. And those types are worse than no contacts at all.

Maybe some are desperate newbies who would salivate at a free option or an unlicensed agent but it causes more damage in the long run. Believe me. I was so happy for my first non paying option. And guess what? It STILL hasn't paid! So, do your research with the companies that might hit on your script and don't accept their free options. Look past the hype and do your research. And my free option had nothing to do with Inktip. My gripe is that Inktip tells people that its list is a PRO list when in reality it is a list of mostly small companies (non-union) with some bigger ones mentioned. It has been established that people are complaining about the creepy lack of quality on their so-called Pro list. It has been established that most get no success with the site. It has been established that some do. It has been established that readers should look past hype and enter into anything with sober and professional actions regardless of the cost of a site. I am noticing that it is rural, new writers who are singing the praise of Inktip. I would only caution you to think clearly, look past hype (which both sides admit Inktip is using) and investigate the hits from the so-called pros on the list.

Ron Maiden
05-10-2008, 06:18 PM
so, if InkTip is dubious, or their client base is "small fry" producers etc, who SHOULD i look at, to list my scripts and loglines? i tried e-query direct, didn't think much.

icerose
05-10-2008, 07:05 PM
Part of the problem is for these sites to really work for you, your writing needs to be ready. If it isn't ready you won't attract the big fish even if there are thousands of them in the pond.

As for the ratio of big fish to little fish, there are only a few big fish to begin with, so I don't understand the disappointment that they're outnumbered. They always have been and always will be. Focus not on the numbers but instead on your own writing. Keep praciticing, keep writing until you get it right. And it's hard to tell when you're there. Keep sending out queries, if you don't get any bites, work on your query. If you aren't getting hits on your synopsis, change your logline, if you are getting hits on your synopsis but not your script, change your synopsis.

As for 0 money options. It's a no risk for the company who offers it and instead ties up your script. If they want your script on hold they have to pay for it, simple. If they don't have the money now but want a shot at it, tell them to come to you when they do have the money.

And if you're only getting interest from D-grade companies, perhaps you need to look and see if you have a D-grade script.

naimas
05-10-2008, 10:31 PM
Has anyone here sold a single thing by Inktip? And I would like proof if you did. And those who got agents from Inktip...I would like the name of them. I would like to see just where these companies are from.

icerose
05-10-2008, 10:43 PM
Has anyone here sold a single thing by Inktip? And I would like proof if you did. And those who got agents from Inktip...I would like the name of them. I would like to see just where these companies are from.

I have never used inktip.

Ron Maiden
05-11-2008, 10:54 AM
this thing about snail mail seems really stupid to me if it refers to any contact at all, but the page is somewhat ambiguous. it seems to say that the snail mail only refers if your contacting an "industry pro" who has d/l'd your stuff but hasn't got back to you after the 3-6 weeks. can i assume that normal corres COULD be done via email? surely if someone wants to strike a deal with you it's up to them to decide how they want to contact you?

Ron Maiden
05-11-2008, 11:03 AM
"Otherwise -- what exactly are the credentials that one applies? What made my wife a manager is that I went to her and convinced her to be my manager. So she went out and got some cards printed up and started making calls. And after awhile, she got one script of mine optioned for fifteen grand against a hundred thousand and then sold a script of mine for a half a million dollars."

that's awesome :-)
so, what exactly is the position regarding managers? could i set myself up as my own manager, and try the same tack, or does that just come off as real unprofessional? Sadly, i don't have a wife/girlfriend i could talk into doing that, the other option is to try and pursuade a friend, but given they're thin on the ground too ~ and/or have better things to do that spend time pimping a wannabe writer ~ i might be outta luck there too.

nmstevens
05-11-2008, 12:33 PM
"Otherwise -- what exactly are the credentials that one applies? What made my wife a manager is that I went to her and convinced her to be my manager. So she went out and got some cards printed up and started making calls. And after awhile, she got one script of mine optioned for fifteen grand against a hundred thousand and then sold a script of mine for a half a million dollars."

that's awesome :-)
so, what exactly is the position regarding managers? could i set myself up as my own manager, and try the same tack, or does that just come off as real unprofessional? Sadly, i don't have a wife/girlfriend i could talk into doing that, the other option is to try and pursuade a friend, but given they're thin on the ground too ~ and/or have better things to do that spend time pimping a wannabe writer ~ i might be outta luck there too.

You can certainly "manage" yourself in the sense of picking up the phone and marketing your own material. People have done it. People do it. Bill Martell, who has sold a great many screenplays, has no agent or manager. He sells his own material and does quite well at it.

Before my wife managed me, I used to be the one looking up names in the HCD and making cold calls -- and I did okay, but never achieved anything like my wife's success because, fundamentally, I'm an introvert and she's an extrovert. I used to come home and she'd be talking on the phone and twenty minutes later she'd hang up and I'd ask her who she was talking to and she'd reply, "Oh, I called up to order some sheets." She'd just been having a conversation for twenty-five minutes with the woman she called to place the order with.

It's the ability to be able to pick up the phone and establish that kind of connection and build that kind of rapport with a total stranger -- that I totally lack, but which she has.

Maybe you have it. Maybe you don't. Even if you don't come by it naturally, it's a skill that can still be improved upon, if you have no alternative.

Now, if you're wondering -- I do know of a case in which someone literally pretended to be his own manager, in the sense of pretending to actually be another person, and apparently it worked for him. I think that that's really dangerous.

Now, we didn't go out of the way to advertise the fact that we were married. My wife used her maiden name when she called. But that's pretty common. A great many women use their maiden names for business. We never misrepresented the fact that we were married if the question came up. It's just we didn't advertise it up front by having Neal Stevens being managed by Judith Stevens.

But having Neal Stevens being managed by John Jones -- who also happens to be Neal Stevens -- that's a whole other thing.

At worst, it's outright misrepresentation, which comes close to fraud. At best you risk making the people you're trying to sell to look like fools, which will destroy your ability to be in business with them.

So don't do it.

But managing yourself *as* yourself -- people have done, and still do it, and can do it successfully.

NMS

mario_c
05-12-2008, 06:16 AM
I heard of another writer who got called by William Morris because an agent liked his Inktip submission.

I don't understand the panic and wringing of hands over low-to-no budget studios downloading your script. It's not like they make you send in a bradbound copy Fedex with your checking account enclosed. I'm a member and someone could be downloading my script right now. So what? My scripts are copywritten, WGA registered and entered in select venues. And studios know it's cheaper to buy a script they like than face a plagiarism suit.
And besides, if a secretary at 2 Guys and a Camera Productions downloads my script, and gives it to Joe Dinklefwat her boss, who gives it to some chick he met at a bar in LA, who has a reader job at Endeavor, where's the crime? I hope that's what happened when I hand delivered a script to an agent here in NYC; I followed up a month later and he had quit the agency. Should I be worried, or optimistic that he got a gig with Paradigm or CAA or whoever?
If you feel that strongly about strangers reading your work, fine - just don't be upset if it takes a lifetime to sell it.
OH, and regarding the $40 biannual fee - I guess you're not sending in your $30 EACH for Nicholls, or Slamdance or Zoetrope or Page. There's no guarantee there, even if you win, right?

naimas
05-12-2008, 09:59 PM
this thing about snail mail seems really stupid to me if it refers to any contact at all, but the page is somewhat ambiguous. it seems to say that the snail mail only refers if your contacting an "industry pro" who has d/l'd your stuff but hasn't got back to you after the 3-6 weeks. can i assume that normal corres COULD be done via email? surely if someone wants to strike a deal with you it's up to them to decide how they want to contact you?

Hi, GREAT QUESTION! And I spoke to them and they said, no. It is a clear violation of user agreements you signed. You will be warned and told if it happens again you will be removed and not have your money refunded. I had companies contact me by email and I sent a script and never heard back so I emailed (I sent the script by email) and even waited a month before contacting them. I was immediately told by Inktip that it was a clear violation even though the company had contacted me by email first. WTF? So yeah, that part of the rule sucks. Reading some other posts here I see that others have broken that same rule. Why? Because the rules are a bit blurry and who on earth would not welcome the chance to reply to emails sent to them? This just recently happened to a friend of mine which was what prompted me to write in the first place because it had happened to me. We BOTH also had script downloads that spontaneously disappeared. That means that if our script was downloaded three times and we waited the necessary month to contact the company....when we went back to the site we found that those very valuable downloads just vanished. Lucky for me I wrote down the names of the companies as soon as they downloaded the script and did my homework, BUT, since the site didn't show any memory of them downloading my script (same as a friend) we were in violation for contacting the companies at all!!

And Mario, I don't have a problem with people reading my scripts. You are right that you couldn't sell a script if you didn't put them out. In fact, I have just bought a new printer because the old one was tired of printing scripts over and over again. The problem is listing someone as a PRO when they are not. Imagemovers, ScreenGems, Lionsgate, Bold Films, Dark Castle, Rogue Pictures and other companies have copies of my scripts. So there is no problem getting my stuff into the hands of real pros.

Perhaps my issue with the site has to do with horror companies and if you don't write horror then you might not have a problem with the site. The horror genre is having a real problem with rip offs. Smaller companies creating carbon copies of other movies. And then you have super small companies that create copies of even more movies but with a super low budget. It is very easy to carbon copy horror by just changing names and a few elements.

I would rather have Inktip say that they would present my script to 20 bigger companies and say 50 smaller companies with credits or real backing than to open up a read to 5000 companies when I am limited in how I can contact that company, they are allowed to post false info and fake names and people are complaining how easy it is to fake your way onto the PRO list. It is the writers who pay the money, not just the fifty bucks but the money to get on the preferred newsletter, and then money to get into the mailer....and yet for all of this they favor the production companies. And since they state, you will need to snail mail your script to the company after....it really isn't all too helpful. At least with a snail mail script you have proof it was sent. With the internet, people with no real companies can download your script and you have no real way of getting in touch with them and the rules limit you as to how you can with the real ones!

I don't mind when I snail mail a script to someone and they don't reply back. (Actually it has never happened to me but I am sure it happens) But I don't like it when a company I never heard of and can't verify downloads my script and then disappears. And since it has happened to others I felt the need to write.

WriteKnight
05-12-2008, 10:55 PM
Don't upload scripts you don't want downloaded.

That way, they have to email you and request a script snailmailed. At which point, feel free to vet the company yourself.

There is no REQUIREMENT that you upload a script, although you did state that in your
post #24, bullet point 2. So I think you have a misunderstanding of requirements.

Don't BUY the extended print mailout if you don't think you need it. (I don't). Dont pay for the larger lead bulletin, if you don't feel the need for it. (You get one free lead a week anyway.)

You are ultimately responsible for the safety of your scripts. If you don't want unknown, low budget companies to review your scripts, make sure you vet them before sending them out.

You're probalby right. You're not going to attract the type of interest you would like though INKTIP. I've gotten request from Major Companies (see my earlier posts) so its working fine for me.

As usual, much depends on quality and genre, as you have stated.

NikeeGoddess
05-13-2008, 12:26 AM
i have done inktip in the past but it's too passive for me.

i prefer and recommend the more pro-active http://www.scriptpimp.com site. once you become a member you can see all the production companies, agents, lawyers, and managers with their information. they tell you who will work with new writers (over 350) and also how they want to be queried... match these up with what they're looking for and if you have it then a good match has been made.

mario_c
05-13-2008, 07:11 AM
Good response, thanks. You're right about ripoff artists in Hollywood, but this is nothing new. The monster movie craze of the 50s, the "grindhouse" and drive-in scenes, up to the slasher craze of the 80s - the B movies have always been all about greedy producers and desperate artists teaming up to leech off the successes of recent blockbuster hits. I don't do that. So some sleazebag crew isn't going to use my scripts for those purposes because they're not torture porn or pseudo-anime monster mayhem. Maybe I should write those, I'd get more action that way. Those I would sell direct.

Ron Maiden
05-13-2008, 01:10 PM
" sent a script and never heard back so I emailed (I sent the script by email) and even waited a month before contacting them. I was immediately told by Inktip that it was a clear violation even though the company had contacted me by email first"

?
how did they know you'd mailed?! did the other company inform them? that's the one thing i don't understand, how can they police a rule for personal email accounts?

naimas
05-13-2008, 08:52 PM
I wrote to Intip because I learned I was not the only one with that problem. It was then that I was informed I was in violation of the rule. And I understand and RECOMMEND that folks don't have to upload their script. You do have to have a finished script to post on the site. You also have to pay to have it registered. As far as posting the script people can upload the first ten pages of it and state that you would be willing to send more. And then try to do some homework on the company before they send it to them. At least that would be a cover. It might cut down on some of the trolling.

And in answer to your question, whatever complaint they get from the prod-cos is viewed as you being in the wrong. That one comes from multiple users of the site.

WriteKnight
05-14-2008, 02:38 AM
Yes, you have to 'pay' to register the script with the WGA or the Copyright Office.

Registering with the Copyright Office is more expensive, but lasts longer and is a good idea as it increases the ammount you can collect for damages for copyright infringement. (Yes, it's 'protected' without registration, but as I said, it increases the ammount you can collect)

Just another cost of doing business.

mario_c
05-15-2008, 07:56 AM
Yes, you have to 'pay' to register the script with the WGA or the Copyright Office.

Registering with the Copyright Office is more expensive, but lasts longer and is a good idea as it increases the ammount you can collect for damages for copyright infringement. (Yes, it's 'protected' without registration, but as I said, it increases the ammount you can collect)

Just another cost of doing business.I do both. It won't protect you from getting screwed in a contract, but it is essential to having basic legal rights to your work.

shutterspeed
05-20-2008, 10:39 PM
NMStevens:

Does a prodco do anything special to pull up a logline, or does it simply flash across its screen? I've had 26 logline hits and one synopsis read by a total of 15 different prodcos in 1.5 months (some viewing several times). I'm interested to know if these logline hits actually amount to anything special or if it's some kind of default notice.

velveeta
05-29-2008, 10:31 AM
Just an FYI that InkTip is putting a link under the name of the professional who viewed your synopsis or script so you can click and see their credits. It's not on the logline page and not every professional is linked on the synop/script page but it may be a feature they're just starting or..I'm oblivious and they've been doing it for some time. Whatever it is, it's a nice feature.

Vel

NikeeGoddess
05-29-2008, 06:12 PM
i didn't know about that feature. it is good to know because there are so many obscure production companies out there as well as many start-ups.


Does a prodco do anything special to pull up a logline, or does it simply flash across its screen? I've had 26 logline hits and one synopsis read by a total of 15 different prodcos in 1.5 months (some viewing several times). I'm interested to know if these logline hits actually amount to anything special or if it's some kind of default notice.when you place a logline you select all the elements that go into your story. i think a prodco decides which loglines they want to read based on these categories. then they decide whether to read the synopsis. then the script. the logline hits don't amount to much if they don't continue with the synopsis and the script. it's about a return of your investment. if the returns are low then you need to fix the logline. if the returns on your synopsis are low then you need to fix your synopsis. and so on.

nmstevens
05-29-2008, 08:11 PM
NMStevens:

Does a prodco do anything special to pull up a logline, or does it simply flash across its screen? I've had 26 logline hits and one synopsis read by a total of 15 different prodcos in 1.5 months (some viewing several times). I'm interested to know if these logline hits actually amount to anything special or if it's some kind of default notice.


I've only ever seen the site when I've strolled past my wife's computer, but it just seems to be a listing -- you've got rows of loglines -- you can click on a logline and the synopsis comes up -- and then I guess you can then tell the program whether you want to read the script or something.

I haven't really paid all that much attention to the layout -- but I'm willing to bet that you don't have to do anything in particular to indicate that you've read the logline or the synopsis.

Just every so often, Judy will call me in if she comes across one that she finds particularly funny. That is funny/bad.

NMS

Mystery Man
06-04-2008, 02:58 AM
I know some people rave about InkTip but the idea of spending $60 to maybe land a $1 option doesn't impress me.

nmstevens
06-04-2008, 06:04 PM
I know some people rave about InkTip but the idea of spending $60 to maybe land a $1 option doesn't impress me.


It's not a matter of spending $60 per se. The amount of money that you spend over time in marketing your material -- making copies, postage, entering contests, making calls -- etc. will certainly (or certainly ought to) far exceed sixty dollars in any reasonable interval of time.

The overwhelming response to that investment will not be offers of "dollar options" or even free options -- but no response at all. Flat rejections.

So if you look at it the way you're looking at it -- is it "worth" sixty dollars to get ten rejections? Or twenty rejections?

It's not as if you have a choice -- well, gee, can I spend my sixty dollars to get a dollar option or -- or what? A thousand dollar option? Or a million dollar sale.

Oh, well wow -- I think I'll spend my sixty dollar option on the million dollar sale. That sounds like a much better deal.

For the money that you invest in marketing your script, whatever that script may be, ultimately, the best return on that investment will be the best offer that you can get on any particular script.

If that "best offer" is a dollar option which will likely not result in your movie being made (which it very likely won't) -- then that's the best offer you're going to get.

Now, when someone makes you an offer like that -- you have a choice. You can so no and keep trying to sell it, or you can try to negotiate a better deal, or you can say yes.

But you have the option of doing that whether you've received such an option by way of Inktip or by way of marketing your script through any other means.

And if you say no off the bat, or if they refuse to negotiate a better deal and you say no -- maybe you'll get a better deal and maybe you won't -- and maybe that dollar option will be waiting for you if you go back, or maybe it won't -- and your script will simply go back to the bottom of the drawer and you won't even be able to say tell people that you have a script under option.

Those are always the risks that you take when you make decisions.

If all your script is able to muster up is a dollar option, that doesn't mean that it's a bad script -- it simply is a measure of the risk that the market is willing to bear in respect to an unknown quantity.

The producer has to roll the dice with a lot of projects in the hopes that maybe one will hit and end up turning into an actual movie. You have to roll the dice with your one script.

Or not. But chosing not to go with the option is a risk too.

Spending the sixty bucks is a risk. Not spending is a risk too. Or spending it on something else.

I had to choose between an offer of a free option on a script I wrote and an offer of a fifteen grand option from Twentieth Century Fox for fifteen grand. It sounded like a pretty straight-forward choice at the time -- but looking back, twelve years later, with the movie still unproduced (they ultimately exercised the option and bought it three years later), and with something like seven figures of development fees piled on top it, and the chances of it ever being made essentially non-existent, I'm actually sorry now that I didn't go for the free option.

So whatever you do - you takes your chances.

NMS

coneflower2001
06-04-2008, 07:43 PM
I have had zero luck with InkTip after more than a month....I will not be putting another script on their site. I have changed loglines and everything...I have gotten 0 views for the last three weeks....I'd advise, save your money and query the old fashion way.

Mystery Man
06-05-2008, 06:26 AM
It's not a matter of spending $60 per se. The amount of money that you spend over time in marketing your material -- making copies, postage, entering contests, making calls -- etc. will certainly (or certainly ought to) far exceed sixty dollars in any reasonable interval of time.

The overwhelming response to that investment will not be offers of "dollar options" or even free options -- but no response at all. Flat rejections.

So if you look at it the way you're looking at it -- is it "worth" sixty dollars to get ten rejections? Or twenty rejections?

It's not as if you have a choice -- well, gee, can I spend my sixty dollars to get a dollar option or -- or what? A thousand dollar option? Or a million dollar sale.

Oh, well wow -- I think I'll spend my sixty dollar option on the million dollar sale. That sounds like a much better deal.

For the money that you invest in marketing your script, whatever that script may be, ultimately, the best return on that investment will be the best offer that you can get on any particular script.

If that "best offer" is a dollar option which will likely not result in your movie being made (which it very likely won't) -- then that's the best offer you're going to get.

Now, when someone makes you an offer like that -- you have a choice. You can so no and keep trying to sell it, or you can try to negotiate a better deal, or you can say yes.

But you have the option of doing that whether you've received such an option by way of Inktip or by way of marketing your script through any other means.

And if you say no off the bat, or if they refuse to negotiate a better deal and you say no -- maybe you'll get a better deal and maybe you won't -- and maybe that dollar option will be waiting for you if you go back, or maybe it won't -- and your script will simply go back to the bottom of the drawer and you won't even be able to say tell people that you have a script under option.

Those are always the risks that you take when you make decisions.

If all your script is able to muster up is a dollar option, that doesn't mean that it's a bad script -- it simply is a measure of the risk that the market is willing to bear in respect to an unknown quantity.

The producer has to roll the dice with a lot of projects in the hopes that maybe one will hit and end up turning into an actual movie. You have to roll the dice with your one script.

Or not. But chosing not to go with the option is a risk too.

Spending the sixty bucks is a risk. Not spending is a risk too. Or spending it on something else.

I had to choose between an offer of a free option on a script I wrote and an offer of a fifteen grand option from Twentieth Century Fox for fifteen grand. It sounded like a pretty straight-forward choice at the time -- but looking back, twelve years later, with the movie still unproduced (they ultimately exercised the option and bought it three years later), and with something like seven figures of development fees piled on top it, and the chances of it ever being made essentially non-existent, I'm actually sorry now that I didn't go for the free option.

So whatever you do - you takes your chances.

NMS

Notice that certain InkTip users are like Claymates? They can't bare to hear anything negative about their obsession?

Anyway...

My poin still stands. Going with InkTip (where various people in this thread alone have had zero success which tends to be the same result for most people who shell out the $60) is being passive. Instead of paying money to throw a logline online and then twiddling your thumbs while you simply hope to God someone with real money and real contacts likes it and wants to move it forward, you should be acting proactive in your career and calling people. Get a good phone plan and you won't have to pay for individual phone calls. I pay something like $20 a month for my phone service and I have unlimited calls throughout the entire US. Also, I've been optioned so I know what that's all about. But the difference between you and me apparently is that I option to people who can get a movie made and not some loser who trawls for scripts online and jerks writers around from the comfort of anonymity while dangling a carrot in your face.

nmstevens
06-05-2008, 10:20 AM
Notice that certain InkTip users are like Claymates? They can't bare to hear anything negative about their obsession?

Anyway...

My poin still stands. Going with InkTip (where various people in this thread alone have had zero success which tends to be the same result for most people who shell out the $60) is being passive. Instead of paying money to throw a logline online and then twiddling your thumbs while you simply hope to God someone with real money and real contacts likes it and wants to move it forward, you should be acting proactive in your career and calling people. Get a good phone plan and you won't have to pay for individual phone calls. I pay something like $20 a month for my phone service and I have unlimited calls throughout the entire US. Also, I've been optioned so I know what that's all about. But the difference between you and me apparently is that I option to people who can get a movie made and not some loser who trawls for scripts online and jerks writers around from the comfort of anonymity while dangling a carrot in your face.

Actually, I don't exactly know who *you* are -- nor, I think, do you know who I am.

But let me be clear.

I've never used Inktip, or any other on-line service. I have no row to hoe on the subject of using such services or not, or entering contests or not, or querying agents by mail or e-mail or not.

Lots of people have done all of these things. Some have succeeded. Most, inevitably, will fail at all of them.

In fact, when asked, I've always recommended cold calling production and development companies as the method that's most likely to get the highest success rate -- success being measured in terms of getting your script read.

As far as your snippy little response about who I option to, I could go on at length about the choices I made in respect to that script -- which I optioned well over ten years ago (in fact the third script I'd optioned) if I wanted to drag it out to epic length.

The point is -- it's clear now, in retrospect, that the big company who put money down turned out to be the scumbags while the smaller indie company who didn't have the money probably would have gotten the movie made.

At the time, I made what I thought was the best decision. It put fifteen grand in my pocket, which certainly came in handy at the time -- but you just never know.

But since you option to people who can get your movies made, I'd be interested in knowing which movies of yours have, in fact been made.

Of the fifteen features that I've sold, optioned, or been assigned to write in the last twelve years or so, three have been produced -- an original screenplay was turned into one of the Hellraiser sequels (not a fate I'd ever hoped for for it, but that's another epic) -- Hellraiser:Deader.

I also wrote the new version of Thirteen Ghosts.

And an original spec script of mine has just finished production and is now in Post -- currently under the title of Hybrid, although that will probably change.

So -- how about you?

NMS

zagoraz
06-05-2008, 10:38 AM
Of the fifteen features that I've sold, optioned, or been assigned to write in the last twelve years or so, three have been produced -- an original screenplay was turned into one of the Hellraiser sequels (not a fate I'd ever hoped for for it, but that's another epic) -- Hellraiser:Deader.NMS


I have just one question --- What's Pinhead like when he's not killing people?

coneflower2001
06-05-2008, 11:20 AM
Okay, Okay...this is not the war of who done what...but about InkTip, which sucks in my opinion.

We are all writers with the same goal...let's not start the she/he is better than thou.

In my opinion...I hate doing phone business...so I'm in trouble, big time. I think I'll stick to novels. Good Luck to all...God Bless!

nmstevens
06-05-2008, 05:32 PM
I have just one question --- What's Pinhead like when he's not killing people?

I actually didn't intend for there to be a smiley face in there. It's actually "Helraiser: Deader"

My strong suspicion is that when Pinhead isn't killing people he's actually vacationing in a time share in West Palm Beach where he can be found sunning himself, playing cards at the community center, or taking advantage the many Early Bird specials (the soup/half sandwich is especially popular).

For those who don't know him personally, his real name is actual Bert.

NMS

nmstevens
06-05-2008, 06:07 PM
Okay, Okay...this is not the war of who done what...but about InkTip, which sucks in my opinion.

We are all writers with the same goal...let's not start the she/he is better than thou.

In my opinion...I hate doing phone business...so I'm in trouble, big time. I think I'll stick to novels. Good Luck to all...God Bless!


Look, here's the deal with Inktip and places like Inktip.

Top Hollywood execs and top agents aren't going there because they don't have to go looking for scripts. Scripts come to them.

But guess what? They are not going to read a spec script by anybody, let alone an unsold unknown writer unless it is already seriously vetted beforehand in any case.

So low to midlevel prodcos, agents, and execs are the best anybody could reasonably expect to have look at your material at this site.

But that's the best you could reasonably expect to gain access to, barring a connection by way of a family of a friend connection - in any case.

You can always query higher -- but to no effect. Spielberg or Scorcese or a top agent will not read your spec script based on a cold query that comes across the transom.

The larger point is -- and it is a painful point -- most people, irrespective of whatever method they use, will never succeed. That is because their "writing" isn't good enough, even if their marketing abilities are.

The farthest that good marketing can get you is to get your script in front of potential buyers. After that, the script has to sell itself.

The measure of the success of a service like Inktip -- which is a marketing service -- is not whether scripts get sold.

The measure of the success of querying isn't whether your script will get sold.

The measure of the success of cold calling isn't whether your script will get sold.

The measure of the success of these measures is the ratio of *attempts* to reads.

How many times do you try to get a read -- how many times do you actually get a read.

You obviously want to get the script read as many times as you can -- because that increases the chances of the script selling, provided that it's good.

Because whether or not it sells, has to do with how good your script is.

But in all of these things -- the "method" can't be judged in a vacuum. Because at the heart of each method -- is you.

It isn't simply the "method" of the query letter that determines your success rate -- but your particular query letter and who you attempt to query.

It isn't simply the "method" of cold calling, but who you attempt to cold call, how you do it, and how good you are at doing it.

And it isn't simply Inktip, in itself, or services like it -- but most critically it's what you post there -- your logline, your summary, that is going to determine whether your script gets read.

I've looked at the logline listings on Inktip and I have to tell you -- a lot of them are really shockingly bad. Unbelievably amateurish. Incomprehensible. Or totally generic. Or misspelled.

You see, the original poster is on his high horse because he feels that the prodcos aren't up to snuff -- up to his high standard and that, thus, those who pay their sixty dollars are somehow not getting their money's worth.

But I have kind of a different take on it. I almost feel as if the vetting should go the other way -- that someone should take a look at these scripts and say -- sorry, your writing isn't up to snuff -- so we're not going to accept your script and we're not going to accept your sixty bucks to list it.

Because the reason that sites like this one cannot and *never will* attract anything other than the level of professional interest that they do, is because they are completely unvetted on the writer's side. So you end up with a vast quantity of chaff with only a very occasional grain of wheat. And the process of winnowing is a very time-consuming one.

Anybody can post anything that they want, provided that they pay the money.

And they do.

NMS

Stealth66
06-05-2008, 11:34 PM
But I have kind of a different take on it. I almost feel as if the vetting should go the other way -- that someone should take a look at these scripts and say -- sorry, your writing isn't up to snuff -- so we're not going to accept your script and we're not going to accept your sixty bucks to list it.

I agree. This makes so much sense because then no one wastes their time, and the scripts that do get listed could be taken more seriously.

clockwork
06-07-2008, 02:42 AM
This one's more than run its course.

As always, let's refer to the newbie guide (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=66315) for anyone who hasn't read it yet...


Getting Along on Absolute Write:

So there's only one real rule here: Respect your fellow writers.

If that seems sort of vague, it translates more plainly this way: Don't be a jerk.


Seems simple enough to me.

aceinc1
06-08-2008, 09:34 AM
I have a reputation of writing good busniess letters in my MBA classroom.

but when it comes to show biz, I'm ending up in problems.

for example: if I were to target Dreamworks, and I address the letter to Steven Spielberg. it'll go to the trash can.

if I were to find out an intern and then address to him, he may change companies in weeks so that he can get more pay. so whom do I target.

It is the same even with the smallest Producer co/agent/management firm. how do I solve this.

so I decided to go to www.inktip.com (http://www.inktip.com) and maybe www.scriptpimp.com (http://www.scriptpimp.com) (because NikeeGoddess has referred) in the locked thread. it is okay, that you'll meet a few frauds because this industry is not a handshake deal-closing industry.

sorry administartor for opening up the topic but I did have a question there and you've locked it there.

which else are the other recommended sites for presenting your work on the net so that it is accesible to prod co.s/agents/managers.

regards,
Ace.Inc1

Mac H.
06-08-2008, 10:10 AM
which else are the other recommended sites for presenting your work on the net so that it is accesible to prod co.s/agents/managers.Your question assumes one thing ... that production companies, agents & managers are looking on the web for scripts.

But is that true?

You have a couple of options:

1. Use a service that delivers your query letter directly to a desk at the targeted production company -or-

2. Use a service that put your query up on the web along with 14 billion other pages in the hope that someone at the targeted production company happens to read it.

Why go for option (2) when option (1) is so convenient?
Why go for option (2) when option (1) has been proved successful on many other occassions?

Sure, display sites are slightly more convenient, but it isn't as if the traditional method involves using the mystic art of acupuncture to write Braille onto specially trained carrier pigeons - it's just putting the letter in a damned envelope and posting it.

Mac
(PS: You may have a reputation for writing good 'busniess letters' in your classroom but, at the risk of being blunt, the business world has MUCH higher standards than your classroom.

I know that English isn't your first language, but your sentence construction and written communications here will not be taken seriously in the business world... especially when you are trying to sell your writing.

Good luck though - with time and effort you will be always able to improve - as long as you can see the need for improvement)

clockwork
06-08-2008, 03:05 PM
sorry administartor for opening up the topic but I did have a question there and you've locked it there.

which else are the other recommended sites for presenting your work on the net so that it is accesible to prod co.s/agents/managers.

regards,
Ace.Inc1

I don't mind the Intktip discussion continuing (as it inevitably will now, until the end of time) but I'd appreciate it if you could do a search for other Inktip threads before starting new ones. As well as the locked Inktip thread, there have been ten others in the past four years.

So from now on, we'll have one giant Inktip thread with all those other posts and threads combined. Any new Inktip threads will be merged with this one.

Obviously this re-opens the locked Inktip thread which I closed because things started to get ugly. Suffice to say I don't think any thread on this board is worth getting ugly over so I'd appreciate a little bit of tact and little bit more self-control if you're thinking about it.

[/rant]

WriteKnight
06-08-2008, 09:03 PM
For me the answer is not "Either-Or". Why not do both? Especially if you can afford the listing?

I've written direct query letters to Major Agencies - Like CAA - and gotten them returned with "We don't read unsolicited queries, we're returning this letter that includes a synopsis of your latest work. Understand we might already have something like this in the works... yah da yah da..."

AND

I've had Major Agencies such as William Morris download my script from Inktip.

I won't stop direct queries to anybody I know in the biz, and I won't stop listing on Inktip.

I'm going to continue to work every angle possible.

naimas
06-09-2008, 07:21 AM
Look, here's the deal with Inktip and places like Inktip.

Top Hollywood execs and top agents aren't going there because they don't have to go looking for scripts. Scripts come to them.

NMS

It is important that you stated that.






So low to midlevel prodcos, agents, and execs are the best anybody could reasonably expect to have look at your material at this site.

NMS

Again, good point. That is all I was saying. LOW to midlevel. If you want that then go for it.







The larger point is -- and it is a painful point -- most people, irrespective of whatever method they use, will never succeed. That is because their "writing" isn't good enough, even if their marketing abilities are.

NMS

I agree.




The measure of the success of a service like Inktip -- which is a marketing service -- is not whether scripts get sold.
NMS

Wrong. Then tell Jerrol to stop hyping how many sales his site has. Some of those options are bulk options, meaning, that the same zero company goes bargain basement shopping and snags up MULTIPLE scripts for nothing and makes NONE of them. One of the agents there has her name appearing again and again, she loves to sign on to represent people, yet she hasn't sold a damned thing. But sure enough Jerrol puts her name on front page for every starry eyed newbie she snags into her web. He makes it sound like a Wonka Land of selling scripts. HE does that. So the sizzle is the script sale and it is what he is selling.




The measure of the success of querying isn't whether your script will get sold.

NMS

If you mean that you can be great at writing a query and still suck as a writer then I agree.





You obviously want to get the script read as many times as you can -- because that increases the chances of the script selling, provided that it's good.

NMS

You want to make sure that script only gets into the hands of people who can actually make a movie. Ideas are not protected. I could read a script on Inktip and tell YOU the idea and YOU are not stealing the idea if you start to write something similar to it.



Because whether or not it sells, has to do with how good your script is.
NMS

Not exactly. You can have a great script or book and have it be passed up by everyone. You could write an epic and quite easily NOT sell it on Inktip, no matter how many extra listings you let Jerrol talk you into buying, quite simply, because the average company on that site will run from a serious budget movie. But maybe a bigger company could buy it. It all depends on your script. A script that takes place in a house with three people might get snagged up quick on Inktip. A script with a car crashing into a house and hospital scenes might very well be passed over because of budget. It all depends on the size of the bite on the hits you are getting.




And it isn't simply Inktip, in itself, or services like it -- but most critically it's what you post there -- your logline, your summary, that is going to determine whether your script gets read.
NMS

This is screenwriting 101 and although it isn't entirely wrong, it isn't entirely truth either. Nepotism is huge in the film industry. I get side deals now that would have pissed me off as a writer. I see so many of my friends picking friends to write scripts or work on projects. The logline, summary, skill at writing is true, but if your script doesn't sell, especially on Inktip, it doesn't mean you suck as a writer.



I've looked at the logline listings on Inktip and I have to tell you -- a lot of them are really shockingly bad. Unbelievably amateurish. Incomprehensible. Or totally generic. Or misspelled.
NMS

Yup, and that is why many big fish jumped the pond because they saw that the quality wasn't worth the hype. And that is from a pro who actually warned me not to tell any serious company I had tried Inktip because they said it smacked of desperation. Whether I agree with that isn't clear. I think you just need to go in with eyes wide open.



You see, the original poster is on his high horse because he feels that the prodcos aren't up to snuff --
NMS

Who would that be? You just stated that big company execs don't hang out there and that it is a place for low to mid companies. So, use Inktip if you want to jump into a pond of small and not so small fish. Fine. Eyes wide open.





those who pay their sixty dollars are somehow not getting their money's worth.

NMS

If you think free options from small companies with names that you can't find on the net or IMDB, who then take your script and then often try to sell it to bigger companies and mostly fail is worth tying up a year in the life of your script then go for it. You could succeed, wildly. You could also fail miserably.



sorry, your writing isn't up to snuff -- so we're not going to accept your script and we're not going to accept your sixty bucks to list it.
NMS

I agree, but then again, the site would close. It is about money and making money. Not that it is a crime, and not that they are horrible folks, just go in with eyes wide open. Again.






Anybody can post anything that they want, provided that they pay the money.

And they do.

NMS

And they do so because they believe they are submitting their script to a huge list of pros. You said it yourself. Don't expect big companies, make sure you writing is as good as it can be. I totally agree, only I would add, don't get blinded by hype. Just be wise and research the companies. Sometimes that is hard considering some are hard to track down. It doesn't mean your script sucks if you are getting hits from lowlife companies. It just means they have the time to surf the site more. Believe me, on another forum I compared the names of my hits with those of others. We ALL had the same companies giving us hits again and again. All of us. This thread was about people giving their opinion of Inktip. Some love it, some hate it. Just go in with both eyes open.

aceinc1
06-09-2008, 05:26 PM
I am a subscriber of Inktip's newsletter,

it usually consists of 5-6 movies wanted in the budget of $500k to $1 million for production.

I'm happy to begin on such budgets.

I have many scripts that'll fit into that budget.

F.Coppola began by writing scripts, he wrote one for Roger Corman, king of B-cinema, before going on to writethe oscar winning screenplay Patton ,

I ain't saying you are gonna end up being be the next F.coppola if you go to inktip, but the I think we all need to begin at zero. I am of the opinion that I am at zero.

regards,
Ace.inc1

naimas
06-09-2008, 07:57 PM
Ace,

I wish you success. I would never be able to write a feature for 500k, but if you can, then, perhaps Inktip is a good match for you. I am sure you are not at zero. Don't low-ball yourself.

Monaco
06-10-2008, 06:23 PM
Yup, and that is why many big fish jumped the pond because they saw that the quality wasn't worth the hype. And that is from a pro who actually warned me not to tell any serious company I had tried Inktip because they said it smacked of desperation. Whether I agree with that isn't clear. I think you just need to go in with eyes wide open.

Who would that be? You just stated that big company execs don't hang out there and that it is a place for low to mid companies. So, use Inktip if you want to jump into a pond of small and not so small fish. Fine. Eyes wide open.

Do you know a better site where those who post are more professional? I mean, the site that the agencies like better. I read some of those loglines and was shocked by how poorly they were written. Some ideas were interesting but the writing was horrible, lots of typos and such. Sometimes it was hard to make a sense of what they were trying to say. I wouldn't want to post in a place like that. I wonder why people spend half a year writing a script and don't take a few days learning to write a good logline and synopsis.

naimas
06-10-2008, 09:07 PM
I would probably say Scriptshark. But, I have never used the site and probably wouldn't use it. It is very expensive and refuses to accept most stuff it is sent. It is not set up like Inktip though. It doesn't allow you to post your stuff. It is more like a screening site. If they like it and it is professional then it gets passed to professional companies. But I have never used the site before. I heard that they give you a response sheet to your script that lists its strengths and weaknesses and why they wouldn't accept it. Inktip looks better simply because it costs WAY less. If you go by the money aspect.

Monaco
06-10-2008, 10:21 PM
I read their success stories (http://www.scriptshark.com/Success.cfm) and it doesn't look like they have a lot of them, comparing to the InkTip.

naimas
06-10-2008, 11:23 PM
I don't use Scriptshark, so I don't know. But, I can tell you I am sure Scriptshark isn't listing no sale agents signing newbies with a winter shovel as a success. They also wont have the managers who are pretending to be production companies. Those types LOVE to option scripts by the ton for free and then spend forever not doing anything with them. They troll the site for scripts and then try to partner with you on it and sell it to a real company. By their track records I found time after time where the options had run out. Just having the name of the script on a web page that could be easily brought up cheapened the image of the script because it was associated with such company. Especially when it states the option had expired. I had several such options offered to me and I turned every one of them down. I know the difference between a production company and somebody who is trying to be a manager. Agents with no sales and a company who had acquired twenty scripts who had only managed to make two of them? And both looked worse than a Youtube video? I am sure that Inktip listed every single one of them as a sale. If the company got them from naive writers on Inktip. I am sure that Inktip has given screenwriters real success. I am sure of it. Again, I am sure they have some real success.

But it appears to reward those who are bargain basement shopping for scripts and act as managers because every dozen scripts they snag up for no money gets STELLAR attraction on the site and is listed on the "success" list.

Tell you what, send me your script. I have a company. Let me try to get your script into Hollywood hands. I am sure that I qualify to be a producer on that site. I am not some bitter writer. My year is full with my own projects being filmed and written. But, back to the idea. You send me your script. Someone you don't know. Can't really research much. I agree to take your script....for free of course. And really, what do you have to lose, I already downloaded your script and it is mine mine mine. At least the idea is now. Naked and wide open. So, newbies, give me a try with your script. Would you do it? No. Would I be able to do anything with it? Maybe. But let us look at it this way. What if Absolute Write took and put your name and my company name on the site to make it look like a sale just happened because I agreed to take your script for nothing? And what if twenty people from here sent me their scripts? And me being generous I decided to hang on to all of them? Well, if Absolute Write was like Inktip then it would be listing EVERY SINGLE SCRIPT I TOOK ON as a success and putting it on the success board! I think they should list ONLY the movies that ACTUALLY get purchased and made into movies. The success list would be quite short. But they do have them. And my ONLY problem with Inktip is the trolls and Inktip doesn't stop them because every time they snag up a script it makes the site look like it has more successes than it does. And my emotion is not from someone who is just a writer, it is from the other side of this. The business side. I am tired of creepy people riding to success on the backs of naive writers. I am sick of script doctors and sleazy managers deceiving newbies into thinking they are real production companies or professionals. And all I said was go in with both eyes wide open and don't always believe the success list. If you can't find a real movie being made, it wasn't really a success.


I won't use Scriptshark but you asked for a site with MORE professional writers. Scriptshark appears to have very high standards. I don't use them however. They appear to be very hard.

The measure of success here should be sales. So, all of the names who posted here. I will check back in six months and see if even one of you sold a single thing. If not, then perhaps it is time for a little bit of realism to set in. And if you sell? I will congratulate you publicly.

nmstevens
06-11-2008, 01:20 AM
I don't use Scriptshark, so I don't know. But, I can tell you I am sure Scriptshark isn't listing no sale agents signing newbies with a winter shovel as a success. They also wont have the managers who are pretending to be production companies. Those types LOVE to option scripts by the ton for free and then spend forever not doing anything with them. They troll the site for scripts and then try to partner with you on it and sell it to a real company. By their track records I found time after time where the options had run out. Just having the name of the script on a web page that could be easily brought up cheapened the image of the script because it was associated with such company. Especially when it states the option had expired. I had several such options offered to me and I turned every one of them down. I know the difference between a production company and somebody who is trying to be a manager. Agents with no sales and a company who had acquired twenty scripts who had only managed to make two of them?

That you imagine that this is a bad success rate, I'm afraid, only indicates that your experience with how things work, even at the highest levels within this business, is a bit lacking.

One in ten is about the best that any development company does. Of projects sold and optioned by me personally, only about one in ten has actually been made.

A producer or a manager (and many, if not most managers are also producers) who achieves that level of success, is doing very well indeed.

And once again, the idea that optioning a project and looking to set it up with another company is somehow cheating or means that you're not a "real" company, once again, makes it clear that you are not as clued in to how things work in the business as you seem to suggest.

That is standard operating procedure for most development companies, who don't have the money to make movies themselves, but only have enough money to "develop" projects -- that is, to buy or option scripts. And depending on the company, they may not have much money to do even that. Yet those companies are still able to take those projects and parlay them into real movies.

Yes, they take them to studios or to other companies who can take them to studios and get them made -- and maybe your feeling is -- why shouldn't I just take it directly to the studio?

Because you can't. That's what they're selling -- the ability to take a project into a studio. Or a relationship with companies that can do that, which an unsold writer does not have.



And both looked worse than a Youtube video? I am sure that Inktip listed every single one of them as a sale. If the company got them from naive writers on Inktip. I am sure that Inktip has given screenwriters real success. I am sure of it. Again, I am sure they have some real success.

But it appears to reward those who are bargain basement shopping for scripts and act as managers because every dozen scripts they snag up for no money gets STELLAR attraction on the site and is listed on the "success" list.

Tell you what, send me your script. I have a company. Let me try to get your script into Hollywood hands. I am sure that I qualify to be a producer on that site. I am not some bitter writer. My year is full with my own projects being filmed and written. But, back to the idea. You send me your script. Someone you don't know. Can't really research much. I agree to take your script....for free of course. And really, what do you have to lose, I already downloaded your script and it is mine mine mine. At least the idea is now. Naked and wide open. So, newbies, give me a try with your script. Would you do it? No. Would I be able to do anything with it? Maybe. But let us look at it this way. What if Absolute Write took and put your name and my company name on the site to make it look like a sale just happened because I agreed to take your script for nothing? And what if twenty people from here sent me their scripts? And me being generous I decided to hang on to all of them? Well, if Absolute Write was like Inktip then it would be listing EVERY SINGLE SCRIPT I TOOK ON as a success and putting it on the success board! I think they should list ONLY the movies that ACTUALLY get purchased and made into movies. The success list would be quite short.

On that basis, my success list would be quite short, yet I've been writing -- and I like to think successfully, for close to twenty years.

I sold a treatment (unproduced, for little money) and had two scripts optioned for very little money before my first sale (to a TV series) that was actually produced.

Should I pretend that those sales never happened? That they don't count?


But they do have them. And my ONLY problem with Inktip is the trolls and Inktip doesn't stop them because every time they snag up a script it makes the site look like it has more successes than it does. And my emotion is not from someone who is just a writer, it is from the other side of this. The business side. I am tired of creepy people riding to success on the backs of naive writers. I am sick of script doctors and sleazy managers deceiving newbies into thinking they are real production companies or professionals. And all I said was go in with both eyes wide open and don't always believe the success list. If you can't find a real movie being made, it wasn't really a success.

There's no doubt -- especially when you're talking about the pernicious phony agent/script doctor deal, that there are people in this business who make their money by exploiting naive writers.

But what you are talking about above -- "riding to success on the backs of naive writers" -- doesn't make any sense at all.

How in the world would an agent, or a producer, or anybody else, ride to success by way of somebody who posts on Inktip?

If they acquire the property and it gets made into a movie, then the writer is going to benefit substantially.

If it doesn't get made into a movie, then certainly the producer doesn't benefit. If the writer has been paid an option fee, at least the writer has received some money.

The only downside is if the movie gets made but the writer has (foolishly) agreed to some sort of deferred payment deal -- which would make the writer a dope who's never going to see any money.

But by your standards, this would still qualify as a "success" -- because a "real movie" ended up being made.

Or are you suggesting the classic paranoid writer's fantasy that someone is stealing his brilliant idea, sneaking off, writing their own script based on it, selling it, making it into their own movie -- and the poor writer, left bereft on Inktip, can do nothing but bemoan his fate?

I wouldn't say that it *couldn't* happen, but it's one of those things that, like all of civilization being destroyed as a result of the Earth being hit by a rogue comet, fails to cause me to lose any sleep.





I won't use Scriptshark but you asked for a site with MORE professional writers. Scriptshark appears to have very high standards. I don't use them however. They appear to be very hard.

The measure of success here should be sales. So, all of the names who posted here. I will check back in six months and see if even one of you sold a single thing. If not, then perhaps it is time for a little bit of realism to set in. And if you sell? I will congratulate you publicly.

Again, what is the test? Sales/options or having your script made into a movie? They are not the same thing.

NMS

naimas
06-11-2008, 07:18 AM
Dude, you are pretty condescending in your posts. I own my own company and all I can say is that my investors will laugh at the idea I don't know much. I have a novel sold (this year alone) as well as now two script sales to other companies and one movie my group is doing. I am ignoring another company's request that I write for them because they fired a writer and want me to do a rewrite on movie script. But I am passing it up because another investor is writing a big check to put another feature into production. I don't have time to lecture people here and I am just a small company. I honestly don't see how someone with the sales you list would have the time either. You tend to have a fatalistic view. I found your other post about blacklisting to be rather negative and extreme. You don't know it but you are knocking the wind out of people's sails. I am just giving a heads up about avoiding pitfalls. I have to go and write another 30 pages today because an investor and the city we are filming in needs a finished script by the 23rd. Filming will begin six weeks after that. But since you just write scripts and don't own a company, you probably wouldn't be aware of that side of the business. Does that feel good? No. Then please stop. You didn't need to attack me personally. It was extreme and you are doing it to others. Gophergrrrl, don't listen to negative advice. I turned down an offer to write a Halloween script. A far bigger series than Hellraiser. So please, don't attack me. I agreed with MUCH of what you wrote. I actually respect your views.

You say you have never used Inktip? Fine. I have used it. I have friends that have used it. I have successful friends who used it and regretted it. It is laughed at on other forums. I stated my view.

If you don't think that script ideas get stolen then I don't even know what to say. Scenes and lines of dialogue can be stolen and have been. Trolls wouldn't troll if they couldn't steal ideas. The movie business is like any other business. You CAN steal so long as you tweak it just enough. And the law states that you have to prove that someone had access to the script.
On that site I noticed several well known idea stealing companies. They listen to pitches and then go and write scripts, or they read your script and then tweak it. If this site wasn't so easy to look at I would GLADLY list the companies. I will say this. They have a site that you buy pitches for. And they LOVE to hang out at Screenwriting Expos. They listen to pitches, ask for scripts, reverse engineer them and make movies. Sorry, it gets done. A company has every legal right to do a movie JUST LIKE a script you sent, it just can't be THE SCRIPT that you sent or use exact dialogue from it. There is no law forbidding a very similar script to be done by a company and especially not by one with a different name. You would have to PROVE that they (under their name) had access to your script. Virtually impossible to do. Why do you think I said that people should stick to sending out queries to REAL companies? Why say I don't have a real company? Is it because I don't like Inktip? It sure sounds like it. It sounds very much like it.

I didn't get my success from Inktip. I got it from going to Hollywood and meeting with people. I got it from going to Hollywood parties. I got it from befriending the same types of people you claim don't talk to people. I have news for you. They LOVE to talk to people in the business, just not writers. It sucks and I hate it because I always considered myself a writer. But a fact is a fact. Eyes wide open just like I said. Writer's are a penny a million in Hollywood. They are cockroaches. Well paid cockroaches, but still considered pests or pets. If you want a movie made you have to start thinking and acting like a movie maker. The last thing anyone in Hollywood wants to hear is I wrote a script. When the ink is dry on the 150 million dollar deal my company is in I will gladly list my info. I agreed to write the novel because the movie was snatched up so quick. I want a bigger piece of the pie. My name will be on the novel and you will see that I am legit. Until then, I am not blowing the biggest deal of my life. The quick success shattered my views of the industry and I am just trying to pass on some info to others. I paid 4000 dollars to a top script advisor so I wouldn't have a problem with paying 60 bucks to list a script on Inktip. I would love to say the company that is taking my script. I would love to. But I can't right now. But that success came because I met a company exec face to face and I found to my surprise that he was encouraging, approachable and respectful like most of the companies I meet. Real companies. When you meet them and get to know them you tend to learn to detest the sharks preying on people on the way up. And sorry, Inktip has some. So, whoever uses the site, I wish you the best of luck. Eyes wide open. Don't accept a sucky option. Investigate the company and if you can't find anything on them then ask Inktip to tell you.

dpaterso
06-11-2008, 11:39 AM
Putting moderator hat on...

Gentlemen, please! You're scaring the kids! :)

I think it's great that we get comments and info feed from so many pros working within the industry. Without this, the forum's value is much diminished.

But dare I suggest 'twould be nice if you could shake virtual hands and agreed to disagree rather than butt heads. Different experiences and successes are bound to produce different viewpoints and opinions. These should generate interesting discussion (and we are interested!) rather than conflict.

We now return you to your regular Inktip thread...

-Derek

nmstevens
06-11-2008, 03:57 PM
Dude, you are pretty condescending in your posts. I own my own company and all I can say is that my investors will laugh at the idea I don't know much. I have a novel sold (this year alone) as well as now two script sales to other companies and one movie my group is doing. I am ignoring another company's request that I write for them because they fired a writer and want me to do a rewrite on movie script. But I am passing it up because another investor is writing a big check to put another feature into production. I don't have time to lecture people here and I am just a small company.

Well, for someone who doesn't have any time for lecturing, you seem to be doing an awful lot of it, and also making a great many assumptions about what I know about and I won't further inflame an already rancorous discussion by disputing them.

The points that you wanted to make about the usefulness of Inktip, you made a very long time ago. I don't question your experiences, but others have clearly had different experiences. For some reason, you have felt the need to question the validity of their experiences.



I honestly don't see how someone with the sales you list would have the time either. You tend to have a fatalistic view. I found your other post about blacklisting to be rather negative and extreme. You don't know it but you are knocking the wind out of people's sails. I am just giving a heads up about avoiding pitfalls. I have to go and write another 30 pages today because an investor and the city we are filming in needs a finished script by the 23rd. Filming will begin six weeks after that. But since you just write scripts and don't own a company, you probably wouldn't be aware of that side of the business. Does that feel good? No. Then please stop.


Why would the fact that you have your own little film company and have an assignment make me feel good, bad, or indifferent? A movie I wrote just went into post and I've just about finished a spec that my agent is about to go out with. How does that make you feel? How should it make it you feel?

My success doesn't depend upon your failure, or upon the failure of anybody. I don't root for other people to fail. I'm happy to have them succeed.

But I'm not a phony cheerleader, like a great many people seem to be. I'm not in the business of marketing false hope.

I went to NYU Grad Film School, which is one of the top film school in the country. The odds of success for people who go there have to be better than for most people. And yet, for students who went there, the majority of whom aspired to be directors, the number of graduates who actually became full time working directors ten years after graduation was less than one per graduating class.

Every year -- 50,000 screenplays registered with the guild -- maybe several thousand are bought, maybe, including TV movies, DTV movies, and indie films, four to five hundred are made into features, of which the overwhelming majority are *not* spec screenplays.

Now, if you want to deliver that news in a way that sounds encouraging, go ahead.

Obviously, people beat the odds, but that doesn't change what the odds are.

It sounds to me as if you want to deliver a cold hard dose of reality about Inktip -- but somehow aren't prepared to be equally cold, hard, and realistic about the rest of the screenwriting world.



You didn't need to attack me personally. It was extreme and you are doing it to others. Gophergrrrl, don't listen to negative advice. I turned down an offer to write a Halloween script. A far bigger series than Hellraiser. So please, don't attack me. I agreed with MUCH of what you wrote. I actually respect your views.

Then let me make my position clear. I had no intention to make a personal attack on you. If that's how it came across, then I apologize. I questioned your conclusions and I questioned your level of experience.

And again, not meaning to attack you but simply as a matter of clarification, as for "turning down an offer to write a Halloween script" -- were you actually offered the script to write, which you turned down, or were you offered the opportunity to pitch, which you turned down?

If the latter, welcome to club. I've also turned to the chance to pitch on the remake of Texas Chainsaw Massacre and a whole bunch of other movies.

It's no badge of honor, particularly.

And likewise, it's not as if I necessarily disagree with much of what you are saying. [/quote]


You say you have never used Inktip? Fine. I have used it. I have friends that have used it. I have successful friends who used it and regretted it. It is laughed at on other forums. I stated my view.

If you don't think that script ideas get stolen then I don't even know what to say. Scenes and lines of dialogue can be stolen and have been. Trolls wouldn't troll if they couldn't steal ideas. The movie business is like any other business. You CAN steal so long as you tweak it just enough. And the law states that you have to prove that someone had access to the script.
On that site I noticed several well known idea stealing companies. They listen to pitches and then go and write scripts, or they read your script and then tweak it. If this site wasn't so easy to look at I would GLADLY list the companies. I will say this. They have a site that you buy pitches for. And they LOVE to hang out at Screenwriting Expos. They listen to pitches, ask for scripts, reverse engineer them and make movies. Sorry, it gets done. A company has every legal right to do a movie JUST LIKE a script you sent, it just can't be THE SCRIPT that you sent or use exact dialogue from it. There is no law forbidding a very similar script to be done by a company and especially not by one with a different name. You would have to PROVE that they (under their name) had access to your script. Virtually impossible to do. Why do you think I said that people should stick to sending out queries to REAL companies? Why say I don't have a real company? Is it because I don't like Inktip? It sure sounds like it. It sounds very much like it.[/quote]

Look, it's difficult to dispute such claims when you make them without attribution. All I know is that I worked for Laurel Entertainment, one of the few companies that was willing to look at unsolicited material -- basically anybody who filled out a release form could send us their stuff and we'd read it -- and over the course of six years I looked at thousands of scripts and we never saw anything that was even worth a free option, never mind stealing.

Why would these rogue companies go to all of the trouble of paying a writer and "back engineering" a plagiarized script based on one swiped off of Inktip when they could probably buy the original script for next to nothing from the original writer?

Do things get stolen in this business? Sure they do. There's "legal" stealing (like somebody "stealing" your idea) -- which nobody can do much of anything about, and there's illegal stealing, which you might be able to do something about -- but it isn't all that common.

The reason that it isn't common isn't because people in this business are particularly moral. It's because scripts are cheap and writers have no sense of self worth, so it's generally less risky and cheaper to buy or option scripts or treatments or ideas than it is to steal them.



I didn't get my success from Inktip. I got it from going to Hollywood and meeting with people. I got it from going to Hollywood parties. I got it from befriending the same types of people you claim don't talk to people. I have news for you. They LOVE to talk to people in the business, just not writers. It sucks and I hate it because I always considered myself a writer. But a fact is a fact. Eyes wide open just like I said. Writer's are a penny a million in Hollywood. They are cockroaches. Well paid cockroaches, but still considered pests or pets. If you want a movie made you have to start thinking and acting like a movie maker. The last thing anyone in Hollywood wants to hear is I wrote a script. When the ink is dry on the 150 million dollar deal my company is in I will gladly list my info.

Well, Naimas, that's where you and I differ. I've never lived in Hollywood. Never did manage to master the Hollywood party thing or did much in the way of networking.

Nor have I ever risked counting chickens, in this business before they've hatched, been fried, and eaten.



I agreed to write the novel because the movie was snatched up so quick. I want a bigger piece of the pie. My name will be on the novel and you will see that I am legit. Until then, I am not blowing the biggest deal of my life. The quick success shattered my views of the industry and I am just trying to pass on some info to others. I paid 4000 dollars to a top script advisor so I wouldn't have a problem with paying 60 bucks to list a script on Inktip. I would love to say the company that is taking my script. I would love to. But I can't right now. But that success came because I met a company exec face to face and I found to my surprise that he was encouraging, approachable and respectful like most of the companies I meet. Real companies. When you meet them and get to know them you tend to learn to detest the sharks preying on people on the way up. And sorry, Inktip has some. So, whoever uses the site, I wish you the best of luck. Eyes wide open. Don't accept a sucky option. Investigate the company and if you can't find anything on them then ask Inktip to tell you.

Naimas -- sharks, snakes, rats, jackasses, liars, idiots, egotists -- I've met them all, and at ever level of the business, from the bottom to the top.

And also smart, decent, loyal people who know what they're doing and can be incredibly helpful.

Once again -- Most of what you say, I agree with. Never accept a bad deal. Know who you're doing business with. Don't give away your work.

The people you'll be dealing with know that you're hungry for approval and praise and will try to give you "approval and praise" rather than money. But you can't put approval and praise in the bank.

We've both had our experiences in the business, and I, like you am simply trying to pass on my experiences.

If I come across sounding like the voice of doom and gloom it's because I've seen the inverse and it has bothered me -- programs and websites and newsgroups that seem to suggest that pretty much anybody can "make it" with enough work and the right attitude.

You might as well say that anybody can play for the Knicks with enough work and the right attitude.

No. They can't. Most people will never play for the Knicks, no matter how much work or whatever their attitude is. Or for any other pro sports team.

And that's about what the chances are of becoming a professional screenwriter. It's that competitive.

I'm just the messenger. Don't blame me for it.

NMS

dpaterso
06-11-2008, 05:20 PM
Yes, super, ignore my previous plea for less confrontational attitude, just keep bangin' away there. Let's give the thread another time-out so it can get its breath back.

-Derek

aceinc1
07-08-2008, 10:31 AM
I know the admins will be angry at me for this. but I am desperate.

there are three websites where in you post your material fro agents/managers/producers,

www.inktip.com (http://www.inktip.com),
www.scriptpimp.com (http://www.scriptpimp.com)
www.scriptshark.com (http://www.scriptshark.com)

I want to go all out into marekting,

so if you guys know any other sites kindly do the needful.

BTW, HCD need to update the addresses of some of the agenst in its agent list, I sent some 12 query letters to agencies and 7 were returned with the post master saying these addresses don't exist.

regards,
Ace.Inc1

p:s: one request, don't make it like the previous inktip thread. I badly need to get into marketing of screenplays. so keep this in mind when you post replies.

Raghu
07-08-2008, 11:30 AM
Ace,

From all that I have read and seen on this forum, it is next to impossible to market your screenplay via the net. You'd better pack your bags and shift your a** to L.A.

All the best and don't forget to mail me after you've reached Hollywood, I've got a couple of screenplays to market too.

Raghu.

:):):)

nmstevens
07-08-2008, 05:22 PM
I know the admins will be angry at me for this. but I am desperate.

there are three websites where in you post your material fro agents/managers/producers,

www.inktip.com (http://www.inktip.com),
www.scriptpimp.com (http://www.scriptpimp.com)
www.scriptshark.com (http://www.scriptshark.com)

I want to go all out into marekting,

so if you guys know any other sites kindly do the needful.

BTW, HCD need to update the addresses of some of the agenst in its agent list, I sent some 12 query letters to agencies and 7 were returned with the post master saying these addresses don't exist.

regards,
Ace.Inc1

p:s: one request, don't make it like the previous inktip thread. I badly need to get into marketing of screenplays. so keep this in mind when you post replies.


Ace, there is really only one reply that I can make to you.

I have worked for close to twenty years in this business, both in development, evaluating the work of others, and as a writer, having my own work evaluated by others.

I have looked at the material that you posted and you are not ready to market your material.

Not even close to being ready. Based on my reading of your stuff, there is zero chance of your selling your screenplays. Not a small chance, not a long shot -- which is par for the course for most newbies going out trying to sell.

Zero.

There isn't a single agent, manager, producer, development exec, reader, or anybody anywhere in this industry, who would read more than one page of anything that you have written, without giving it an immediate pass.

Call me the bearer of bad news, Mr. Negative, or anything else you want.

I have no horse in this race. It doesn't effect me one way or the other whether your stuff is great, awful, or anywhere in between.

Irrespective of what anyone else may have told you, what you are getting from me is the objective evaluation of an industry professional.

Your work cannot sell. Period.

For you to try to sell it at this point is a waste of time.

If you are serious about pursuing this as a career then you must first accept that you are at the bottom of a very, very long learning curve.

This is not "just my opinion." It is not "just a matter of taste." It is my evaluation of your work as a professional screenwriter and as a one-time development exec.

You can certainly ignore it if you want, but you do so at your own peril.

NMS

Mac H.
07-08-2008, 05:52 PM
Ace,

Why are you trying to market these now, when everyone is telling you that they need to be fixed first?

You have an awful lot of energy .. why not put that energy into getting a script into a position so it won't get dismissed after reading only a page?

The problems aren't things that will get fixed by the proofreader you are paying.

Good luck,

Mac

clockwork
07-08-2008, 09:07 PM
I know the admins will be angry at me for this. but I am desperate.

Not angry, ace. Just very... very tired.

Merging your latest with the Inktip super thread.

icerose
07-08-2008, 10:02 PM
I don't know if this subject has been breached yet or not, but Inktips has announced they're raising their rates soon.

zagoraz
07-09-2008, 12:18 AM
It may be a tough pill to swallow, Ace, but you would do well to heed NMS's advice. The worst thing you can possibly do is put yourself out there too early before your writing is up to snuff. You don't get that many chances in this business to make a first impression. Sometimes you only get one.

I've only been a screenwriter for four years. I have worked in development for both a management company and as a contest reader. I've been lucky in that my writing has improved enough to where I have an agent. I just got my first option this year. Looking back at my first script from 2004, I cringe. I'm so glad I never showed it to anyone in any sort of position to affect my career.

You've written a lot of scripts. Quantity doesn't always mean quality. It would behoove you to pick the one you love the most and spend the next six months to a year dissecting it, re-writing it, re-writing it again, polishing it, then getting some peer critiques before you even think of sending it out to be considered by any production company or agency.

If you're absolutely positively set on sending something out now, send it to a contest that offers written feedback. Feedback is what you need right now. And maybe a little discipline as well. ;)

Good luck with everything. I wish you the best.



Ace, there is really only one reply that I can make to you.

I have worked for close to twenty years in this business, both in development, evaluating the work of others, and as a writer, having my own work evaluated by others.

I have looked at the material that you posted and you are not ready to market your material.

Not even close to being ready. Based on my reading of your stuff, there is zero chance of your selling your screenplays. Not a small chance, not a long shot -- which is par for the course for most newbies going out trying to sell.

Zero.

There isn't a single agent, manager, producer, development exec, reader, or anybody anywhere in this industry, who would read more than one page of anything that you have written, without giving it an immediate pass.

Call me the bearer of bad news, Mr. Negative, or anything else you want.

I have no horse in this race. It doesn't effect me one way or the other whether your stuff is great, awful, or anywhere in between.

Irrespective of what anyone else may have told you, what you are getting from me is the objective evaluation of an industry professional.

Your work cannot sell. Period.

For you to try to sell it at this point is a waste of time.

If you are serious about pursuing this as a career then you must first accept that you are at the bottom of a very, very long learning curve.

This is not "just my opinion." It is not "just a matter of taste." It is my evaluation of your work as a professional screenwriter and as a one-time development exec.

You can certainly ignore it if you want, but you do so at your own peril.

NMS

aceinc1
07-12-2008, 02:14 PM
now it is

1) inktip (http://www.inktip)
2) scriptshark
3) scriptpimp
4) http://www.soyouwannasellascript.com/Source/market.cfm
5) http://www.soyouwannasellascript.com/Source/bugle.cfm
6) http://www.soyouwannasellascript.com/Source/selling.cfm#express

regards,
Ace.Inc1

Monaco
07-16-2008, 01:26 AM
I have a quick question for those who have used InkTip. How long does the synopsis have to be? A short one (just a few sentences like in a query letter) or a longer one (a page or so)?
Thanks!

WriteKnight
07-16-2008, 01:52 AM
The logline is a sentence or two, the synopsis is no more than a page.

mario_c
07-16-2008, 06:25 AM
When I reply to a newsletter ad, I send a logline. If I think it needs two sentences to sell the story (the ads are usually quite specific) it goes in the synopsis field. Maybe I should put in six lines worth of synopsis?

ap0110
07-16-2008, 01:00 PM
Ace, there is really only one reply that I can make to you.
I'm a member of several writing forums and I'd have to say this is unnecessarily harsh. Regardless of whether or not it's true, is there any reason this was posted publicly rather than in a private email? It's one thing to take someone aside and tell them, with compassion, that you think they have some areas to improve on. It's another to publicly ridicule them. The former is for their benefit. The latter is for yours.

Mac H.
07-16-2008, 06:25 PM
I'm a member of several writing forums and I'd have to say this is unnecessarily harsh. Regardless of whether or not it's true, is there any reason this was posted publicly rather than in a private email? It's one thing to take someone aside and tell them, with compassion, that you think they have some areas to improve on. It's another to publicly ridicule them. The former is for their benefit. The latter is for yours. The whole reason of a public feedback forum is to get public feedback - so it benefits the people on the sidelines as well as the individual getting the feedback.

If negative feedback is somehow exempt from that rule, then it defeats the purpose of a public forum - both positive and negative feedback need to be public.

NM's response wasn't ridicule. The worst you could say of it is that it stated that 'You aren't ready market your material. For you to try to sell it at this point is a waste of time. Your screenplays need more work. You need to accept that this will involve a long learning curve'.

This a long, long way from ridicule. It is not making a personal attack.

Given the way that this is a public discussion, how would YOU give feedback in this example - being necessarily harsh, but not unnecessarily harsh?

Mac

ap0110
07-17-2008, 12:46 AM
Here's how...


Ace, there is really only one reply that I can make to you.

I have worked for close to twenty years in this business, both in development, evaluating the work of others, and as a writer, having my own work evaluated by others.

I have looked at the material that you posted and you are not ready to market your material.
Ok, done. Good feedback - to the point, honest, but not overly harsh.


Not even close to being ready. Based on my reading of your stuff, there is zero chance of your selling your screenplays. Not a small chance, not a long shot -- which is par for the course for most newbies going out trying to sell.
Ouch. Ok, well...uh, thanks, I guess.


Zero.
Ok, ok. I get it.


There isn't a single agent, manager, producer, development exec, reader, or anybody anywhere in this industry, who would read more than one page of anything that you have written, without giving it an immediate pass.
All RIGHT, I get it! Lord.


Your work cannot sell. Period.
Please stop. I feel a sudden compulsion to slice off my fingertips.


For you to try to sell it at this point is a waste of time.
And both hands. Using my feet.


If you are serious about pursuing this as a career then you must first accept that you are at the bottom of a very, very long learning curve.
And both arms, while plummeting from the roof of a 50-story building.


This is not "just my opinion." It is not "just a matter of taste." It is my evaluation of your work as a professional screenwriter and as a one-time development exec.
Can't hear you. Falling...


You can certainly ignore it if you want, but you do so at your own peril.
Too late.

ap0110
07-17-2008, 01:13 AM
Oh, and looking back, perhaps I've missed another thread, but I think the original request was "how do I market", not "how am I doing." Given the context, I think it's a great suggestion to hone your craft before putting your stuff out there - Zag is absolutely right about first impressions. And if someone's asking how to market, I think it's fine to say "not quite yet," especially when it's coming from someone with experience. But if you take it upon yourself to evaluate someone's ability when they haven't explicitly requested that type of feedback, then at least exercise discretion and do it privately. Better yet, ask first.

Hope this isn't too OT.

zeprosnepsid
07-17-2008, 03:22 AM
Ap, I think you need to go read every post Ace has written and then come back and tell us if you think NMS was out of line. He was being so repetitive because Ace has proven that he has no idea how the industry works and never ever pays any attention to what those of us around here who know what we are talking about tell him. He needs a reality check. Don't worry about whether it's harsh or not because Ace will simply ignore it and end up wasting even more of his time.

Unless Ace focuses on making one script better, instead of writing 400 first drafts, and does something about his grasp of English, he really doesn't have a chance. But this won't happen, because he will never take any of our advice. So don't worry about him.

If NMS was being harsh to someone who posts here who was trying to learn and trying to do their best it'd be a different story. But how are you supposed to get through to someone who doesn't listen?

ap0110
07-18-2008, 06:47 AM
Ah, thanks Zep. That puts everything into perspective. This may be a case of me just coming late to the party and not knowing everyone's history. At first glance, it looked like a pretty intense exchange.

robertmblevins
07-18-2008, 09:40 AM
First, don't post your WIP's at those websites unless you enjoy the ideas of both having your ideas stolen and receiving no attention. The screenplay game consists of writing, printing them up on paper according to strict parameters, and following the rules. Producers and agents do NOT use these sites to 'discover' new talent. Writers and bottom-feeder wannabe agents go there, that's basically it.

If you are not developed as a screenwriter, you may want to take on a partner or two. Check out major shooting scripts and see how many are actually written by multiple people, as well to find out how it's done.

That's all I can offer.

aceinc1
07-22-2008, 11:19 AM
First a few things,
There is a pattern in the way I get responses.
The age group of 50ís and 60ís reply to me in a way I can digest, I get along well with them. One of the reasons being I had a father of that age, and the other is I think they know, their time has come and they gotta bid bye and they know somebody younger will overtake them and thatíll be a guy in his 20ís (no matter what quality as you do know the quality of most of Hollywood or even Bollywood for that matter.)
the 30ís and 40ís are hard to deal with. Theyíll say, ĒIíve just begun whatíll happen to me?Ē. And a 20ís dev.exec. will think, ďwhat if this writer in his 30/40ís will shun him by saying kid, behave your ageĒ. And it is harder to order a man of that age for the same reason. The 60ís will laugh and take the order but 40ís might end up getting into the butts of the 20ís.
It is understood the agents and managers donít want them around in meetings even after they like the scripts written by them. Itíll piss me off, if that happens to me.
Enough of this ageism, letís get back to me, I admit English is a second language to me and there is little I can do about it, I donít think it should stop me from trying my luck.
Here are my reasons,
1. My scripts can be produced on a production budget of $500k-$1million.
2. I have directed one outline to a movie so it is easier for me to write such scripts.
3. Iím still in my 20ís. sorry folks, that is a fact.
4. Theyíll always bring in the closet writers
5. And my proof reader thinks I write directorís script and not a writerís script, I think it is a compliment.
6. The coverage readers said that I have excellent premise only the language barrier shows up so maybe an American partner might just be enough for me to deal with this problem.
Counter these reasons, Iíll fight back again, if you wanna have discussions turn into debates.
Regards,
Ace.Inc1

clockwork
07-22-2008, 02:24 PM
Your problem, quite simply, ace, is that you do not listen. You only hear what you want to hear and that's going to be cancerous to whatever screenwriting career you make for yourself. I've lost track of the number of questions and offers of assistance I've extended both here and through private messages that you've either forgotten to respond to or have flatly ignored.

No-one here will ever try to convince you to stop or give up and if you look back over the many, many posts directed at you and your work, you'll find that all people have done is offer good advice and tough love - something you desperately need to take heed of if you have any hope of succeeding.

You didn't even thank people for the generous critiques you received for the sample script pages you posted in Share Your Work. That's just rude and, teaches people not to care when you post pages in future. An awful lot of your success in this business will depend on your ability to listen, absorb and adapt to what people are telling you. Getting adversarial with the people who have offered you nothing but assistance since the day you joined is not a good idea.

I've been on this site a while now and the one thing that always irks me is when people bemoan the responses they get from other members, as though that alone is to blame for the quality of their interaction. The problem is, ace, you've taught people to be this way. And all you're teaching them right now is to not care. You could go a long way towards fixing that by doing one thing; having the courtesy to address what people say. Right now you seem to post in a state of blissful ignorance of whatever has come before and you'll find in future, little by little, people will stop trying to help you and will skim over your posts.

I don't want that to happen and I'm sure you don't but unless you start seeing this place for what it really is; an amazing resource that can help you, rather than what you currently use it for; a dumping ground for information and demands for help, that you almost always receive and then flatly ignore, then I can't see anything but that happening.

To other members; I'd appreciate it if this didn't turn into a pile-on. This is supposed to be the Inktip Super Thread, so let's try to get it back on-topic. Have your say if you feel so inclined but do it respectfully or this thing may have to take a short break again.

nmstevens
07-23-2008, 09:44 PM
First a few things,
There is a pattern in the way I get responses.
The age group of 50ís and 60ís reply to me in a way I can digest, I get along well with them. One of the reasons being I had a father of that age, and the other is I think they know, their time has come and they gotta bid bye and they know somebody younger will overtake them and thatíll be a guy in his 20ís (no matter what quality as you do know the quality of most of Hollywood or even Bollywood for that matter.)
the 30ís and 40ís are hard to deal with. Theyíll say, ĒIíve just begun whatíll happen to me?Ē. And a 20ís dev.exec. will think, ďwhat if this writer in his 30/40ís will shun him by saying kid, behave your ageĒ. And it is harder to order a man of that age for the same reason. The 60ís will laugh and take the order but 40ís might end up getting into the butts of the 20ís.
It is understood the agents and managers donít want them around in meetings even after they like the scripts written by them. Itíll piss me off, if that happens to me.
Enough of this ageism, letís get back to me, I admit English is a second language to me and there is little I can do about it, I donít think it should stop me from trying my luck.
Here are my reasons,
1. My scripts can be produced on a production budget of $500k-$1million.
2. I have directed one outline to a movie so it is easier for me to write such scripts.
3. Iím still in my 20ís. sorry folks, that is a fact.
4. Theyíll always bring in the closet writers
5. And my proof reader thinks I write directorís script and not a writerís script, I think it is a compliment.
6. The coverage readers said that I have excellent premise only the language barrier shows up so maybe an American partner might just be enough for me to deal with this problem.
Counter these reasons, Iíll fight back again, if you wanna have discussions turn into debates.
Regards,
Ace.Inc1

Ace, I've about reached the end of what I have to say to you. I have no interesting in fighting with you, and it is impossible for us to "debate" because you are utterly unqualified to debate with me in this field.

I am fifty-two. I've been working in this business, in one way or another, since before you were able to speak *any* language -- and I'm still doing fine. My latest movie is in post-production right now.

While luck plays a part in any endeavor, success as a screenwriter is, by far a matter of skill, not luck. Primarily skill as a *writer.*

What I am telling you is that not only is your writing sub-standard, but your premises, as such, are also hackneyed. More to the point, even if they were not, your "ideas" as such, are not copyrightable. You don't own them -- only their particular expression in your screenplays -- which are terrible.

When I go out to pitch a movie, the producers I pitch to aren't simply "buying my idea" -- they're looking to hire me to execute that idea. That's at the heart of a pitch meeting. That's why they can't simply take my idea (at least in principle) and use it. It's not a copyright violation, but contract law.

The hope that you can take your terribly written screenplays and get someone else to "partner up with you" to turn them into something marketable is an empty dream.

In fact, pretty much every professional writer gets presented with this constantly by amateurs -- "I've got lots of great ideas for a book/play/movie/tv series. What if I give you the idea. You write it. Or we'll write it together. And then we'll split the money." Sorry. No. Any writer good enough to be able to do you any good has plenty of ideas of his own. Probably more than he'll have a chance to write.

Writing partnerships consist of *two* writers, both of whom know how to write.

I'm no "proofreader." I'm not somebody who does coverage. I'm a professional screenwriter. I'm also somebody who worked in development for years.

When I read your stuff and tell you something, you're getting the low down from somebody who knows what he's talking about.

There's nothing to be debated. Quite simply, you don't know enough to debate me. Not about screenwriting, not about the business of selling screenplays, not about the movie business -- about which your comments above clearly demonstate the range of your ignorance.

I am sorry if this is harsh but there is a point at which you simply exhaust whatever patience you are owed.

To be serious about selling you first have to be serious about producing something that's worth buying.

If you want to do that, then you can't look to some phantom partner to do the work for you. You have to master the skills.

If you're not willing to do the work, then it'll never happen.

That's it. End of "debate." End of story.

NMS

nmstevens
07-24-2008, 06:53 PM
First, don't post your WIP's at those websites unless you enjoy the ideas of both having your ideas stolen and receiving no attention. The screenplay game consists of writing, printing them up on paper according to strict parameters, and following the rules. Producers and agents do NOT use these sites to 'discover' new talent. Writers and bottom-feeder wannabe agents go there, that's basically it.

If you are not developed as a screenwriter, you may want to take on a partner or two. Check out major shooting scripts and see how many are actually written by multiple people, as well to find out how it's done.

That's all I can offer.

Regarding multiple writers on shooting scripts -- the overwhelming majority of such scripts were not written by writers writing in partnership, but represent the work of writers writing on drafts *consecutively* -- that is, they hire one writer, he writes a bunch of drafts, then they get tired of him, hire another writer, then another, then another, then another.

Often there are a number of writers who contribute work uncredited, so frequently there are more writers even than are listed on the title pages of the shooting scripts.

As a point of information, one can distinguish between such consecutive writers and genuine writing partners because partners are grouped together with ampersands, as in "John Smith & Maggie Jones" while consecutive writers are listed with "and" as in, "Bob Morgan and Larry Wilson."

Of course, it can get even more confusing when writing partners are given writing credit with other writers consecutively, and you can find odd credits like this, "Screenplay by John Smith and Maggie Jones & Bob Wilson" or even scripts that have been written by multipe writing partners, so you have, "Screenplay by John Jones & Maggie Barnes and Peter Wilson & Bob Bingham" which means that they hired the first set of writing partners, then later hired the second set of writing partners to re-write them.

NMS

ricetalks
08-03-2008, 06:49 AM
Thinking "If I get an American Partner to do the work" is like thinking "I want to win the Gold medal in the Olympics but I can't really run that fast. But if I team up wtih a guy who can, he can carry me across the finish line and then I'll get the medal."

Why would he do it?

xhouseboy
08-04-2008, 08:38 PM
5. And my proof reader thinks I write director’s script and not a writer’s script, I think it is a compliment.



Sorry to say it Ace, but this 'proof reader' is one of your biggest problems, rather than the major boon that you perceive him/her to be. Time and again you receive excellent advice on this board, but you tend to ignore it in favour of a proof reader whose only real function seems to be to massage your ego (and perhaps lighten your wallet in the process?)

I've queried you about these people (person) before, but never received a response. And that's fair enough. But I'd hazard a guess that s/he is not all they're claiming to be. In fact, I'd bet the mortgage on it.



6. The coverage readers said that I have excellent premise only the language barrier shows up so maybe an American partner might just be enough for me to deal with this problem.



Again sorry, but this just isn't so. They're telling you what you want to hear, and as a consequence you're then ignoring bona fide advice.



Counter these reasons, I’ll fight back again, if you wanna have discussions turn into debates.
Regards,
Ace.Inc1

Anyone can fight. It's knowing whether the fight's worth the trouble, and yours is a fight that you'll never win if you don't wake up soon and smell the coffee. And even then, you've a long hard road in front of you.

dpaterso
08-04-2008, 09:20 PM
I can appreciate the overwhelming temptation to reply to Ace's... statements.

But do bear in mind please that this is The One & Only Inktip Super Thread

-Derek

ricetalks
08-04-2008, 10:45 PM
Yes. Back to Inktip. There are certainly bonafide, functioning companies that are looking for screenplays and screenplay writers on this website and in their leads. I know this because I have seen leads in the newsletter that are companies that I recognize and I know their work.

Joe270
08-05-2008, 06:07 AM
In a bit of an InkTip aside, I paid the $25 bucks for the preferred letter over a year ago now, and it was for June and July of last year.

Then they extended my subscription. Then extended it again.

I'm still getting it.

I did get a contact out of the blue, but didn't respond to it. (That story is in another thread here somewhere.) But that might have been the one, I might have blown it. I'll never know because I didn't respond.

ricetalks
08-09-2008, 09:23 PM
Well, you do have to use your caution and instinct because, certainly, all of the companies that are listed are not worth while. But there are certainly many legit companies that are serious about getting work done.

Wtrailer
08-11-2012, 03:57 PM
I just signed up. Anyone have any stories to share about this? Very curious to read others' experiences.

alleycat
08-11-2012, 04:02 PM
Have you done a simple search for InkTip? I don't remember a thread dedicated to InkTip, but it's been mentioned several times over the years.

dennis7490
08-11-2012, 05:55 PM
Good "place." I've had two options through INKTIP. 1rst one died of natural Hollywood causes, and 2nd one is very alive with a director and A list star attached. So, we'll see. But well worth the effort. For the money you just can't beat it.

WriteKnight
08-11-2012, 07:31 PM
I find the most useful element of INKTIP to be the newsletter. GO ahead and list your script on the site, it may or may not lead to some hits. I don't bother with the mail out desktop 'logline' catalog - I've seen it, not impressed. But the weekly newsletter is handy for knowing SPECIFICALLY if there are people looking for your type of script.

Most of the proco's on InkTip are small to mid-level, with SOME big ones 'lurking' - usually anonymously. The newsletter will list companies or agents looking for specific types of projects. "Looking for horror film set in a house by a lake" - "Looking for RomCOM for male lead in his forties" - "Looking for action script by CANADIAN writer, funding in place" - That sort of thing. The good thing about the tipsheet is, these are 'hot' leads. These are people (usually) with funding and resources - perhaps a star or specific location - in hand, and ready to exploit them. IF your script meets their needs - you'll at least get a request for a lead. This is a more focused approach - than shotgunning it out. Of course, if you've got more than one script - of more than one type - you're in a better position. And by 'type' that can mean the same genre - horror - but different budgets. Say you've got a horror script with car crashes, explosions, and gorgeous locations - AND you've got one that takes place in a limited location with six actors. You're more likely to hit a 'request' if you've got more than one script ready to go.

It's not a lot of money to spend for tips. That's my opinion.

clockwork
08-11-2012, 10:47 PM
Have you done a simple search for InkTip? I don't remember a thread dedicated to InkTip, but it's been mentioned several times over the years.

Yeah we used to get lots of inktip threads so we combined them into this one. Merging a'now...