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Danger Jane
07-05-2008, 05:12 AM
Quick question about sweat dripping in your eyes. Assuming you're a species that's cool with swimming in salt water, would sweat dripping in your eyes on land still sting? I'm hesitantly predicting yes, because there are other chemicals in sweat, but does anyone have a better idea of this than me?

Ol' Fashioned Girl
07-05-2008, 05:15 AM
It would still sting. One of the survival guys on TV (either Bear or Les, can't remember which) said one way he knew he was getting dehydrated was when his sweat didn't sting.

Danger Jane
07-05-2008, 05:26 AM
It would still sting. One of the survival guys on TV (either Bear or Les, can't remember which) said one way he knew he was getting dehydrated was when his sweat didn't sting.


All right, awesome. Thanks!

hammerklavier
07-05-2008, 06:50 AM
What do you mean by species? A sea otter? Do furry animals seat? I don't think so.

I would answer no, because it's the salt that causes the sting, hence the post above, the guy is worried because he's out of salt -- which is a bad thing.

WriteKnight
07-05-2008, 06:58 AM
Yes. Yes it stings. I've had sweat pour into my eyes while on horseback, in armor, with a helm on... and yes. Yes it stings.

Danger Jane
07-05-2008, 07:08 AM
I guess I'll clarify. I do know sweat in the eyes stings, but my MC is a mermaid, and I don't reeeally want to go through and give her a third eyelid, or something, so if we could just suspend disbelief enough to buy that she has some kind of coping mechanism to adapt to dry air, rather than, uh, wet water? And to buy that she sweats at all. Would sweat sting the eyes of someone whose eyes are not bothered by constant exposure to salt water? I was unsure whether the stinging was caused by the salt in the sweat alone, or also/partially by the other chemicals, such as urea, that are also in sweat.

GeorgeK
07-05-2008, 09:14 AM
I guess it would depend, is the mermaid simply made to look human? In that case I'd think that sweat (being buffered and having far less salt and other extraneous stuff than sea water) would not bother her eyes at all. They might even be refreshing. OTOH, if she is transformed into a true human, then she would be bothered by sweat in the eyes and being a totally new sensation would be particularly bothersome.

That might be an intersting test for an inquisitor. It's a little more scientific than tossing her into a lake to see if she floats.

Danger Jane
07-06-2008, 02:28 AM
I guess it would depend, is the mermaid simply made to look human? In that case I'd think that sweat (being buffered and having far less salt and other extraneous stuff than sea water) would not bother her eyes at all. They might even be refreshing. OTOH, if she is transformed into a true human, then she would be bothered by sweat in the eyes and being a totally new sensation would be particularly bothersome.

That might be an intersting test for an inquisitor. It's a little more scientific than tossing her into a lake to see if she floats.

Aah, great idea! Yes, she does transform into a human later, and just a few weeks ago I realized that my characters just don't sweat enough. The wheels are a-turning...

FinbarReilly
07-06-2008, 12:04 PM
Wouldn't a mermaid have a third eye lid just to see underwater?

And due to that, the sweat wouldn't sting (wouldn't get in her eyes)...

FR

Willowmound
07-06-2008, 03:47 PM
I am thinking a sea creature wouldn't sweat at all. Your mermaid's problem temperature-wise would be with cold, not heat.

How do various aquatic mammals regulate temperature? I'm thinking, not through sweating. I'd look into it if I were you. (Seeing as you care about the realism aspect enough to ask this question! :) )

Robert Toy
07-06-2008, 03:55 PM
You may a clue/hints from Dolphins eyesight:

Eyes are on the sides of the head, near the corners of the mouth. Glands at the inner corners of the eye sockets secrete an oily, jellylike mucus that lubricates the eyes, washes away debris, and probably helps streamline a dolphin's eye as it swims. This tearlike film may also protect the eyes from infective organisms.

Dolphins have acute vision both in and out of the water. A dolphin's eye is particularly adapted for seeing in water. In air, certain features of the lens and cornea correct for the refraction of light caused by the transition from aquatic to aerial vision. Without this adaptation, a dolphin would be nearsighted in air.

The retinas of odontocetes have two central areas that receive images (human eyes only have one). Due to this feature of the retina, bottle-nose dolphins have binocular vision in air, and may have both binocular and monocular vision under water. A dolphin's retina contains both rod cells and cone cells, indicating that they may have the ability to see in both dim and bright light. (Rod cells respond to lower light levels than cone cells do.) The presence of cone cells suggests that dolphins may be able to see color, although studies have not actually determined this yet.

Dolphin's eyes have a well-developed tapetum lacidum, a light-reflecting layer that reflects light through the retina a second time, giving them enhanced vision in dim light