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AppleTree76
07-05-2008, 12:34 AM
Okay here's the story, and I would like to know how everyone reads this:

I emailed a query letter (yes, I know it's best to get an agent but this editor didn't seem to mind!) to the editorial director of a major publishing firm
who did pass it along to a colleague whom he stated would be more interested in my book, he believed. After some time I did hear back from his fellow editor and she informed me that they had a "very committed fiction list for the forseeible future and have a number of debut author's to launch in this area of fiction and so would therefore be unable to take on another in the current market. Many thanks for giving us the opportunity to cnsider your work...bla, bla, bla."

I sent along with the query, a synopsis, and the first chapter. I am feeling pretty low given this particular rejection. My question is this: do I suck?

alleycat
07-05-2008, 12:59 AM
I read it as major publishers get thousands and thousands of queries and submissions. There are any number of reasons why one publisher isn't interested in your work, which may or may not have anything to do with your writing itself.

Take a look at what you've written. Be sure it's the best you can do. Have a beta reader you trust read it if you haven't already. And then . . . send it out again.

Just remember how many publishers rejected the first Harry Potter book. ;-)

Phaeal
07-05-2008, 02:55 AM
From what you quote, the editor said nothing about the quality of your work, only about the situation of the house. You can't read anything into the letter.

Polish your query and your story -- you have several errors in the post above (a "whom" that should be "who," "author's" that should be "authors," "forseeible" that should be "foreseeable," "cnsider" for "consider." Yeah, I'm being a meanie, but if errors creep into your "official" writing, you aren't doing yourself any good in the eyes of editors and agents.

So make sure everything's just right, then send the query out to agents, or post it in the SYW Query thread, if you want some advice prior to getting back on the sub horse.

But most of all, never read too much into that kind of response. Unless feedback is highly personalized, mentioning actual events in your story (not just the title), you're probably looking at some form of a form.

scope
07-05-2008, 03:20 AM
Ditto to what alleycat and Phaeal said.

You received what sounds like a form rejection letter. Who hasn't?

MDavis
07-05-2008, 03:50 AM
Ditto to what alleycat and Phaeal said.

You received what sounds like a form rejection letter. Who hasn't?

Yes, but I for one have never known that my work was being passed along to someone else for consideration. AppleTree, I can see how this would get you down. It's very unlikely that you suck since that person *did* pass it along to a colleague. I doubt that person would have bothered to waste his colleague's time with something poorly written.

So just step away from writing for a day or so. 24 hours seems to do the trick for me (usually). And then I'm ready to get back up and go, and so should you! Hang in there :Hug2:

Karen Duvall
07-05-2008, 04:07 AM
Don't let the form rejection get you down. It's just one editor. And you didn't have an agent advocate to back you up, which might have been a strike against you. I'm sure you don't suck.

scope
07-05-2008, 07:16 AM
Yes, but I for one have never known that my work was being passed along to someone else for consideration. AppleTree, I can see how this would get you down. It's very unlikely that you suck since that person *did* pass it along to a colleague. I doubt that person would have bothered to waste his colleague's time with something poorly written.

So just step away from writing for a day or so. 24 hours seems to do the trick for me (usually). And then I'm ready to get back up and go, and so should you! Hang in there :Hug2:

My whole point is that Appletree has nothing to feel down about. In fact she has a lot to be thankful for. Sure, her work was rejected by one agent, and although no one likes to be rejected, the first agent she worked with thought enough of her work to pass it along to a fellow agent. That doesn't happen too often. She should look at the positive side and keep querying until she gets an agent.

Sean D. Schaffer
07-05-2008, 07:59 AM
Okay here's the story, and I would like to know how everyone reads this:

I emailed a query letter (yes, I know it's best to get an agent but this editor didn't seem to mind!) to the editorial director of a major publishing firm
who did pass it along to a colleague whom he stated would be more interested in my book, he believed. After some time I did hear back from his fellow editor and she informed me that they had a "very committed fiction list for the forseeible future and have a number of debut author's to launch in this area of fiction and so would therefore be unable to take on another in the current market. Many thanks for giving us the opportunity to cnsider your work...bla, bla, bla."

I sent along with the query, a synopsis, and the first chapter. I am feeling pretty low given this particular rejection. My question is this: do I suck?


I read it as "Sorry, but we don't have room for another client right now."

This doesn't mean that you suck, or that your writing sucks. It simply means that they can't take on another client at the moment.

The best thing you can do is brush yourself off, look over your manuscript, and send it out to another company. This might feel like the end of the world, but it really isn't. :) Like the old cliche goes, there are a lot of fish in the sea.

All the best to you, and I hope you find a good company that will accept your work. :)

AppleTree76
07-06-2008, 12:52 AM
Thank you everybody, I'm starting to feel a little better about myself! Look at the glass as half full instead of empty, right?