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Perle_Rare
06-30-2008, 05:58 AM
I'm getting tired of always feeling guilty. I've recently realized I feel guilty when:

When the air conditionning is on in the house. I don't have much of a choice. My family is allergic to the outdoors so I can't open windows. But society tells me I must conserve energy.
When I start my car. Society tells me that I should be using public transit (which is totally unreliable where I live and wouldn't get me where I want to go anyway), or if I must, I should drive a fuel-efficient hybrid or something like that. I've really got no excuse for driving a regular car (other than hubby cannot put up with a car that won't GO when you press the gas pedal) but at least, I'm not driving a SUV. So it could be worse.
When I water my lawn. Society tells me to conserve water. I tried that one summer. I didn't water my grass at all. It all died and I had to re-seed the entire lot and water daily for the rest of that summer for the grass to grow. I don't think I saved anyone anything that year.These are only a few examples. I'm the type of person who does her best. I reduce, reuse and recycle. I avoid waste as best I can. My lifestyle may not be absolutely perfect but I'm simply doing my best.

Does anyone else feel this kind of guilt? If so, how do you cope with it?

Sarita
06-30-2008, 06:00 AM
Therapy?

Devil Ledbetter
06-30-2008, 06:06 AM
Rationalizations?

Ol' Fashioned Girl
06-30-2008, 06:07 AM
Nope. I don't feel quilty at all. A/C's set on 70. I water the grass and the garden when it needs it. We've got two cars and drive just about everywhere we go... to take the bus from my house to work would involve two and a half hours each way - that's five, sports fans, and I only work 7. Oklahoma's mass transit sucks. I quit trying to recycle when I caught them picking up the trash and the recycling with one truck. Nope. No guilt here.

brokenfingers
06-30-2008, 06:07 AM
That's what God invented alcohol for.

Chameleon
06-30-2008, 06:10 AM
I guess it doesn't bother me all that much. I try to conserve energy and water by using them when I need to. But I don't lose sleep over it. Is that too harsh?

Rolling Thunder
06-30-2008, 06:26 AM
I'm getting tired of always feeling guilty. I've recently realized I feel guilty when:
When the air conditionning is on in the house. I don't have much of a choice. My family is allergic to the outdoors so I can't open windows. But society tells me I must conserve energy.
When I start my car. Society tells me that I should be using public transit (which is totally unreliable where I live and wouldn't get me where I want to go anyway), or if I must, I should drive a fuel-efficient hybrid or something like that. I've really got no excuse for driving a regular car (other than hubby cannot put up with a car that won't GO when you press the gas pedal) but at least, I'm not driving a SUV. So it could be worse.
When I water my lawn. Society tells me to conserve water. I tried that one summer. I didn't water my grass at all. It all died and I had to re-seed the entire lot and water daily for the rest of that summer for the grass to grow. I don't think I saved anyone anything that year.These are only a few examples. I'm the type of person who does her best. I reduce, reuse and recycle. I avoid waste as best I can. My lifestyle may not be absolutely perfect but I'm simply doing my best.

Does anyone else feel this kind of guilt? If so, how do you cope with it?

1.) But an inexpensive, reusable micro filter if you're using central air. A HVAC system is most efficient when it brings a hot house down in temp; not so much to keep it there. When the house is cool enough, switch the unit to 'fan' on the thermostat. The air will continue to circulate through the filter. If you're using a window or wall mount AC you can also get a similar filter or buy yourself a decent stand alone air purifier. They do a good job and use far less electricity.

2.) I've read that rushing out to buy a hybird isn't always best when you consider the extra cost of the purchase to your budget; especially since someone else will buy your car, making your new found efficiency a moot point. Maintain the recommended tire pressure; change the oil and have the car lubed regularly; drive conservatively.

3.) Unless you're having a severe drought and aren't permitted to water, make sure to water in the early morning or evening. This conserves water by keeping evaporation to a minimum. You can buy timers that attach to the hose and use a sprinkler head. It's just like washing dishes in a dishwasher, which is also more efficient most times than hand washing.

Guilt isn't something you need to worry about, if you are trying to make good choices. :)

Sarita
06-30-2008, 06:29 AM
1.) But an inexpensive, reusable micro filter if you're using central air. A HVAC system is most efficient when it brings a hot house down in temp; not so much to keep it there. When the house is cool enough, switch the unit to 'fan' on the thermostat. The air will continue to circulate through the filter. If you're using a window or wall mount AC you can also get a similar filter or buy yourself a decent stand alone air purifier. They do a good job and use far less electricity.Huh. Thanks, RT. I didn't know this. I'm going to give it a shot.

Rolling Thunder
06-30-2008, 06:33 AM
I don't have central air, but I do have a furnace. When I turn on my wall mounted AC I also turn on my furnace fan.

Crude, but reasonably effective, central air/dust control.

Mandy-Jane
06-30-2008, 06:51 AM
Yes I do feel guilt, in those instances mentioned and also many others. I also am doing my best, and sometimes wonder if it's enough. But you know, it's all we can do.

I feel guilty when I put the heater on, so instead, I go light the fire. Then I feel guilty about all the trees being cut down to make firewood. But I'm not going to freeze.

I worry about starting my car up all the time, but we live out of town and have to drive everywhere, so that's the way it is.

I worry constantly about water because we're on tank water, but what can I do? We have to drink, we have to shower, we have to flush the toilet.

My point is, it's no use worrying about things when you have no other choice. And if you're doing the best you can with what you've got, then you're ahead of some people. You gotta' live. You just have to do it responsibly.

LaceWing
06-30-2008, 06:58 AM
My A/C is set at 90 most of the time, down to 86 for sleeping, but with most of the vents in the house closed. My xeriscape yard is established and the underground watering system turned off. I drive maybe 100 miles a month. I eat a lot less meat these days, more beans and nuts, and I haven't bought clothes in what, three years? The microwave quit and I relearned stove top cooking.

Guilt? No, but the wine compensates for other miseries!

BardSkye
06-30-2008, 08:14 AM
Even if hubby was willing to put up with a public transit system that turns a 15-minute drive by car into a one-and-a-half hour trip by bus, he can't get there from here on time even by taking the first available bus in the morning.

I don't drive so I have to use public transit or walk. I don't mind, but it does sometimes seem to take forever.

We have no recycling pickups and I'm not schlepping it all over town on the bus.

Haven't had to water our lawn in almost 20 years. It takes all summer to dry out.

Our old Suburban gets better gas mileage than most new cars, so we're not looking to replace it in a hurry.

I keep the house between 75 and 80 degrees in the winter. We both work in very cold environments and I'm not going to freeze at home, too. But we don't have any electric fans or air conditioning in home or vehicle, so we use very little power in the summer.

Guilt? What's that?

Mumut
06-30-2008, 08:17 AM
When I water my lawn. Society tells me to conserve water. I tried that one summer. I didn't water my grass at all. It all died and I had to re-seed the entire lot and water daily for the rest of that summer for the grass to grow. I don't think I saved anyone anything that year.


Your grass died because you always water it. Watering grass makes the roos system stay shallow. If you didn't water, a deeper root system would develop and be able to survive droughts. And don't cut the grass too short - it favours the weeds.

I never, ever water the lawn and it's still there, strong and green even after a drought which still has us at level 6 water restrictions. We can't was the car, water any of the garden, wash the windows etc.

JoNightshade
06-30-2008, 08:29 AM
Of things that keep me up at night, doing my .000000001% to "save the earth" is not one of them.

But since you asked, I don't have a lawn. Or AC. Or dishwasher, for that matter. We do own one car between us, and it's a hybrid. When it's hot, we go hang out at the library or the grocery store.

SPMiller
06-30-2008, 08:37 AM
Where I live, the land is naturally covered by a mosaic of knee-high native grassland with scattered mesquite, post oak forest, and water oak-hackberry-elm Riparian zones. I find this aesthetically appealing and see no reason to overwrite this with decorative gardens, invasive/nonnative grasses, and nonnative trees which all require significant watering. It's the height of foolishness.

Besides, mowing the grassland eliminates the berries and wildflowers which naturally appear between March and June.

But oh no, we need to have our short, neat lawns with our pretty gardens.

Whatever.

JimmyB27
06-30-2008, 01:18 PM
I don't drive so I have to use public transit or walk. I don't mind, but it does sometimes seem to take forever.

I love the fact that it takes forever. Gives me a chance to catch up on my reading.

nerds
06-30-2008, 02:34 PM
Where I live, the land is naturally covered by a mosaic of knee-high native grassland with scattered mesquite, post oak forest, and water oak-hackberry-elm Riparian zones. I find this aesthetically appealing and see no reason to overwrite this with decorative gardens, invasive/nonnative grasses, and nonnative trees which all require significant watering. It's the height of foolishness.

Besides, mowing the grassland eliminates the berries and wildflowers which naturally appear between March and June.

But oh no, we need to have our short, neat lawns with our pretty gardens.

Whatever.


And here it is. Exactly correct. That billions of acres have been given over to lawn, areas mulched with commercial bark mulches, and planting of inappropriate species is in fact a contributor to environmental difficulty. The near-universal use of chems to maintain, fertilize and "control" these billions of acres, the alterations this causes in the systems of insects and the water consumption involved are negative factors. For every "bad" bug killed by chems a hundred more beneficial insects are eliminated. Lawns soaked with chem controls are denied the earthworms and beneficial nematodes essential to the life of soil. Every dose of Miracle-Gro loads soil with salts and depletes it of its natural nourishing content, until it is so starved it can provide nothing until rebuilt naturally or constantly filled with chem ferts.
Only "created" environments are so dependent on watering.

(This is my line of actual lifetime work. Writing/hoping to be published someday just doesn't seem to pay the bills somehow, lol.)

Too, this country is finally paying the price for laying things out in such a car-dependent way. After the second World War having a home in the 'burbs and driving to work became part of the dream. In the 1950s with the advent of interstates and a car in every garage for the first time, architectural sprawl became the order of the day, towns were no longer consolidated into easily-navigated business areas. At the turn of the last century most small business owners still lived above or behind their businesses, no commute.

City planning, town planning, much could have been done better and still can be. There are a few forward-thinking planners creating towns-within-towns where residents can get to everything they need on foot or by bike, and I hope this trend continues.

Right now I live in an old city downtown where things ARE consolidated and I can get everywhere on foot or by bus, but I put myself there deliberately with that in mind. I don't have a car at the moment nor AC, just a couple of fans. Sometimes my feet hurt from walking because I'm on them all day at work too, and maybe I don't feel like the extra walk at the close of the day for a few groceries, but it's not a big deal. Once in a while it's humid enough for me to wish for AC, but not often, I don't really like AC anyway. I recycle, I bring a satchel thingie to the store so I'm not using those feckin' godforsaken feckin' plastic bags, I do what I can do, always have though anyway. Count me among the not-feeling-guilty.

Part of my work is to try to help educate/shift people from the chem mentality of the last 60-plus years back to sanity. Sometimes a tough go, sometimes not, but always worth it.

:)

nerds
06-30-2008, 03:36 PM
. . . Society tells me to conserve water. I tried that one summer. I didn't water my grass at all. It all died and I had to re-seed the entire lot and water daily for the rest of that summer for the grass to grow.


The grass didn't die, and you didn't have to reseed. It browned out, which some lawn grasses do under drought or very dry conditions. Some southern lawn grasses brown out during the colder months, returning green in February/March. Most lawn grasses require two and more usually three consecutive years of sustained drought to actually die. Too, high summer is the worst possible time to seed or reseed - success rate is slim and water consumption tremendous.

Unless you are devoted to lawn spaces, there are lots of options. You can plant part or all of the area to gardens using plants correct for your area and environment, reducing yard maintenance and water use to near-zero. Not everyone wants options, many love their lawns - I like a good-looking bit of turf as much as anyone but only on small scale because I'm so acquainted with the environmental price tag they come with. Lawn reduction is one of the best things people can do to help this planet. Too, mown grasses are the rejecting environment for butterflies, bees, and beneficial insects - they are, in essence, inert, particularly if treated continually with chems. This in turn affects the whole chain, birds, pollinators, water dwellers, water consumers, and us. Lawnmowers, whether gas or electric-powered, gobble energy and those small gasoline engines, 2- and 4-stroke, are horrible pollutors.

But if you're dedicated to lawn, and there is a dry season or drought, try to be patient with the inevitable brownout. It'll come back green the following Spring absent the 2-3 year measure of true sustained drought. I don't think anyone likes the look of it but it's normally a temporary, one-season thing.

:)

Perle_Rare
06-30-2008, 04:02 PM
Thanks everyone! Sounds like I'm obsessing when I really don't need to. I guess I've just heard these public services messages to conserve and save the world once too often lately and I've gotten to the point where they seem to be nagging rather than informing. Hence my overblown reaction.

I'm doing my best and that's about all I can do unless I go out of my way to replace my perfectly working and fairly new furnaces, appliances or car, which, to me, would be wasteful. I'm also not enough of a gardener to go ahead and re-landscape my yard to get rid of the grass anytime soon.

I'm going to work on changing my perspective so I can ditch the guilt and enjoy life again.

Thank you everyone!

cray
06-30-2008, 05:23 PM
-store guilts in a dark, dry place. keep it out of direct sunlight
-keep guilts away from insects, mice and other vermin.
- don't stack too many folded guilts on top of each other or else the weight of all of the guilts will create creases that are hard to get out. for the same reason, unfold and refold your guilts every 3-6 months to avoid severe creasing.

veinglory
06-30-2008, 05:25 PM
I leave the AC on for my dog, so what I lose in environmentalism guilt I gain in animal welfare smugness.

nerds
06-30-2008, 05:44 PM
-store guilts in a dark, dry place. keep it out of direct sunlight
-keep guilts away from insects, mice and other vermin.
- don't stack too many folded guilts on top of each other or else the weight of all of the guilts will create creases that are hard to get out. for the same reason, unfold and refold your guilts every 3-6 months to avoid severe creasing.


:Thumbs:


This is a honkin' brilliant bit of writing. Thanks cray.


:Thumbs:

Perle_Rare
06-30-2008, 06:07 PM
Cray, Thanks for a good laugh! Made me feel better! :)

mario_c
06-30-2008, 07:00 PM
Are you Catholic? Just wondering.


I'm getting tired of always feeling guilty. I've recently realized I feel guilty when:
When the air conditionning is on in the house. I don't have much of a choice. My family is allergic to the outdoors so I can't open windows. But society tells me I must conserve energy.Get a air cooling fan and leave it where you spend the most time. It uses a lot less electricity than a air conditioner. Or just scale the air conditioner temperature down, one half degree a day, and find the spot where it doesn't cause too much sweat stained laundry. (I do the opposite in the winter, when my heat bill jumps to $8 a day.)



When I start my car. Society tells me that I should be using public transit (which is totally unreliable where I live and wouldn't get me where I want to go anyway), or if I must, I should drive a fuel-efficient hybrid or something like that. I've really got no excuse for driving a regular car (other than hubby cannot put up with a car that won't GO when you press the gas pedal) but at least, I'm not driving a SUV. So it could be worse.Check Consumer Reports for the skinny on which cars put out the least co2 and are best at saving gas. OK it's probably a BMW3 or Mini, or other toy car, but it's a starting point.
Regarding rural life, I can't help you there (I am SOOO glad I live close to the trains/bus routes) but if you can get a used road/comfort bike online (or at your local proletariat shopping center - you know, Walmart/Target et al) do that. Look for the skinny tires, they're better for long distance pedaling (but they cost more). OR get a cheap electric scooter for local travel.


When I water my lawn. Society tells me to conserve water. I tried that one summer. I didn't water my grass at all. It all died and I had to re-seed the entire lot and water daily for the rest of that summer for the grass to grow. I don't think I saved anyone anything that year.Do you have a collection bucket under your gutter drain? That would be ideal - save rainwater for the hot season.


These are only a few examples. I'm the type of person who does her best. I reduce, reuse and recycle. I avoid waste as best I can. My lifestyle may not be absolutely perfect but I'm simply doing my best.That's all you can do. You know and you care and that is half the battle. Most of the waste really comes from businesses who aren't given any impetus to change their habits because it would cost them 2 cents on the dollar. So the powers that be foist the load, as usual, on the taxpaying citizen.

tjwriter
06-30-2008, 07:06 PM
Oh, is there where we list what we feel guilty about?

I feel guilty when I clean the house and when I don't.

I feel guilty when I take time for myself and when I don't.

I feel guilty when I don't spend enough time with my family, and when I spend all my time with them (See clean the house.).

I feel guilty about feeling guilty.

I feel guilty about all the stress I've felt lately and how that might hurt my unborn child.

My life sooooo needs some balance right. 2008 has not been great. *Goes and pulls hair out.*

stormie
06-30-2008, 07:10 PM
I used to feel guilty if I put even one recycleable item in the trash (such as a peanut butter container. Ever try to wash those out?!). Now, if it's a sticky substance in the jar, I toss it. No guilt because I spent more money on water and soap to soak the thing and wash it.

I keep the A/C on 80 during the day, 79 or 78 at night. (One of my sons feels the heat and cold more than the average person.) And I only turn on the A/C on hot days when there's high humidity and no breeze.

I try to make all my shopping trips in one day, and mentally map out the shortest distance by car.

So--guilt? Nope. I try my best, that's all.

nerds
06-30-2008, 07:16 PM
Do you have a collection bucket under your gutter drain? That would be ideal - save rainwater for the hot season.



Your whole post was great but this bears emphasis - there are excellent rain collection systems for homeowners now, easily researchable online, or just use a barrel or whatnot to collect it.

:)

Mela
06-30-2008, 07:33 PM
I 'm not feeling guilty now, but I'll probably feel damn near terrified this winter when the temperature drops to single digits and I have to turn up the thermostat - we just got our fuel oil payment plan for the next year. When we moved into the house we were paying $177 every time they filled up - so every 2-3 months or so. Now we're paying $323 a month.

We have a fireplace that we've never used since we owned the house but I don't know if that would help to heat anything but the living room.

Perle_Rare
06-30-2008, 09:07 PM
there are excellent rain collection systems for homeowners now, easily researchable online, or just use a barrel or whatnot to collect it. :)

Even that can get me going on a guilt trip. On the one hand, I'm told I should collect rain water to use on a dry day, thereby conserving water. On the other, I'm also told I should make sure that no water collects on my property because mosquitoes breed in standing water and mosquitos might carry the West Nile Virus. So I'm encouraged to empty bird baths and drill holes at the bottom of all containers.

:Soapbox:

But as of this morning, I'm done with this type of guilt, so there!
:tongue

Perle_Rare
06-30-2008, 09:10 PM
Oh, is there where we list what we feel guilty about?

I feel guilty when I clean the house and when I don't.

I feel guilty when I take time for myself and when I don't.

I feel guilty when I don't spend enough time with my family, and when I spend all my time with them (See clean the house.).

I feel guilty about feeling guilty.

I feel guilty about all the stress I've felt lately and how that might hurt my unborn child.

My life sooooo needs some balance right. 2008 has not been great. *Goes and pulls hair out.*

Boy, can I ever relate! :)

Best of luck on the pregnancy, btw!

Perle_Rare
06-30-2008, 09:19 PM
Are you Catholic? Just wondering.

Just curious, but why are you wondering? I might be mistaken but the only reason I can see for your question is so you can put me in a box with a convenient label and proceed to pin all sorts of stereotypes to me.

Do, please, let me know if I've completely misunderstood. It wouldn't be the first time... ::D

tjwriter
06-30-2008, 09:21 PM
Even that can get me going on a guilt trip. On the one hand, I'm told I should collect rain water to use on a dry day, thereby conserving water. On the other, I'm also told I should make sure that no water collects on my property because mosquitoes breed in standing water and mosquitos might carry the West Nile Virus. So I'm encouraged to empty bird baths and drill holes at the bottom of all containers.

:Soapbox:

But as of this morning, I'm done with this type of guilt, so there!
:tongue


Put some mineral oil in your standing water. It makes it a little difficult for the mosquito spawn to, er, breath.

Red-Green
06-30-2008, 09:39 PM
Well, guilt is a waste of energy. I figure, do what you can and enjoy it now. Because the truth is...we can't go on this way. Eventually we'll end up losing all of our "necessary" comforts, because we'll run out of the resources that make them possible. It's already happening in lots of places, where there's no water to irrigate crops, let alone grass. See? Now you don't feel guilty, you just feel mildly doomed. No need to thank me. :D

mario_c
07-01-2008, 06:44 AM
Just curious, but why are you wondering? I might be mistaken but the only reason I can see for your question is so you can put me in a box with a convenient label and proceed to pin all sorts of stereotypes to me.

Do, please, let me know if I've completely misunderstood. It wouldn't be the first time... ::DIt was only a joke. No. More of a quip. I grew up catholic.
I'll go away now.

Perle_Rare
07-01-2008, 07:02 AM
It was only a joke. No. More of a quip. I grew up catholic.
I'll go away now.

See? I had misunderstood. Don't feel bad and don't go away too far... ;)

Joycecwilliams
07-01-2008, 07:46 AM
I'm getting tired of always feeling guilty. I've recently realized I feel guilty when:

When the air conditionning is on in the house. I don't have much of a choice. My family is allergic to the outdoors so I can't open windows. But society tells me I must conserve energy.
When I start my car. Society tells me that I should be using public transit (which is totally unreliable where I live and wouldn't get me where I want to go anyway), or if I must, I should drive a fuel-efficient hybrid or something like that. I've really got no excuse for driving a regular car (other than hubby cannot put up with a car that won't GO when you press the gas pedal) but at least, I'm not driving a SUV. So it could be worse.
When I water my lawn. Society tells me to conserve water. I tried that one summer. I didn't water my grass at all. It all died and I had to re-seed the entire lot and water daily for the rest of that summer for the grass to grow. I don't think I saved anyone anything that year.These are only a few examples. I'm the type of person who does her best. I reduce, reuse and recycle. I avoid waste as best I can. My lifestyle may not be absolutely perfect but I'm simply doing my best.

Does anyone else feel this kind of guilt? If so, how do you cope with it?
Some answers

1.Well adopt the use it or lose it attitude. :)

2. Replace your lawn with outdoor carpeting. :)

3. Find someone to give you piggyback rides to work. :)

Sean D. Schaffer
07-01-2008, 11:14 AM
I'm getting tired of always feeling guilty. I've recently realized I feel guilty when:

1. When the air conditionning is on in the house. I don't have much of a choice. My family is allergic to the outdoors so I can't open windows. But society tells me I must conserve energy.
When it's 100 degrees outside and muggy as all get out, I frankly don't care what society thinks about my energy consumption. ;)

2.
When I start my car. Society tells me that I should be using public transit (which is totally unreliable where I live and wouldn't get me where I want to go anyway), or if I must, I should drive a fuel-efficient hybrid or something like that. I've really got no excuse for driving a regular car (other than hubby cannot put up with a car that won't GO when you press the gas pedal) but at least, I'm not driving a SUV. So it could be worse.
Beings that I do not have the option of starting a car, I would sure as heck love to have that feeling of guilt weighing heavily upon me. Buses are the pits, especially when you have to walk a mile and a half to get to the nearest bus stop!



3. When I water my lawn. Society tells me to conserve water. I tried that one summer. I didn't water my grass at all. It all died and I had to re-seed the entire lot and water daily for the rest of that summer for the grass to grow. I don't think I saved anyone anything that year.I don't feel any guilt at all watering my lawn. As I live in an apartment, and our lawn is watered by the local landscaping company through a set of their special built-in sprinkler systems, all the guilt is weighing down on the company that waters our lawn.


These are only a few examples. I'm the type of person who does her best. I reduce, reuse and recycle. I avoid waste as best I can. My lifestyle may not be absolutely perfect but I'm simply doing my best.

Does anyone else feel this kind of guilt? If so, how do you cope with it?I honestly wish I could feel the guilt. But as, with one listed exception, all those options are closed to me, I'll just have to sit back and dream.

And what a dream it is!

:e2cloud9:

Unique
07-01-2008, 05:00 PM
Society = other people telling you how you should think, feel, act about things.

Don't listen. How do you think we ended up in this mess in the first place?

Do what you think is best for you. No one else can make those decisions for you. But guilt? No way. Don't buy into it.

Back in the old days we had a saying: Fuck the Noise.

If you can take it to heart, guilt will disappear. Guaranteed.

Perle_Rare
07-01-2008, 05:51 PM
... I'll just have to sit back and dream.

And what a dream it is!

:e2cloud9:

Lucky guy! :)


Society = other people telling you how you should think, feel, act about things.

Don't listen. How do you think we ended up in this mess in the first place?

Do what you think is best for you. No one else can make those decisions for you. But guilt? No way. Don't buy into it.

Back in the old days we had a saying: Fuck the Noise.

If you can take it to heart, guilt will disappear. Guaranteed.

Thanks. I think that's exactly what I was looking for!

nerds
07-01-2008, 10:11 PM
I'm not doing anything I do out of a guilt motivation, and guilt may well, arguably, be the faultiest motivator within the human spectrum. I have had a lifelong personal interest in and care for environmental and natural issues and have spent for all intents and purposes my life's work in them. I like the idea of cooperating as well as I can within the chain of things and leaving the smallest footprint I can, but I've always felt that way.

Everybody's a resident here, every person, critter, plant tree fish and bug, and we're all trying to share a finite space, which is getting harder and harder to do without sacrifice on the part of some or all of those residents. This planet is full up with people.

It can be shown and argued that the pressures of "society" can sometimes be useful things which move social constructs forward - history is filled with examples. But it can go in negative directions as well, as history also shows.

Actions taken out of guilt are evanescent. Brief. Undertake what you feel in your own heart is doable and correct, regardless of the issue or dilemma, whether it's a patch of grass or a piece of your heart.

benbradley
07-02-2008, 01:25 AM
I'm getting tired of always feeling guilty. I've recently realized I feel guilty when:
...These are only a few examples. I'm the type of person who does her best. I reduce, reuse and recycle. I avoid waste as best I can. My lifestyle may not be absolutely perfect but I'm simply doing my best.

Does anyone else feel this kind of guilt? If so, how do you cope with it?
When I was younger "society" told me that a 50 year old man was supposed to drive a Cadillac and smoke cigars. I'm now 50 (but not for much longer!) and I suppose I could do those things (I did smoke a few Swisher Sweets in college), but I choose not to.

Just who the heck is this Society, anyway?

Inkdaub
07-02-2008, 10:53 AM
I couldn't shake the bad vibes about my car so I sold it. It didn't feel so much like guilt as a it did that I should be part of the solution and not the problem.

I feel guilty when I see animals that need to be adopted. Also when I don't take my dog to the park because he has such a good time there.

I feel guilty when I lose my temper.

SherryTex
07-02-2008, 09:00 PM
Guilt trips don't leave carbon footprints but they also aren't any fun and are counterproductive to just about everything.

There is a big difference between being enviornmentally concious and being stressed out over whatever sins of emission/omission one might be committing by owning a car, having a lawn, desiring not to have the people you love suffer unnecessarily.

Do what you can. Who is riding you this hard other than you?