PDA

View Full Version : Buy This Book With Cash



loosebricks
06-23-2008, 05:24 AM
Is just one idea for the title of my memoir. The other is something along the lines of Popped-Collar Criminal: The Miseducation of An American College Student.

I know that it always comes down to the writing, but I am wondering how much interest there is in the story itself. Friends and party acquaintances seem interested in the story, but I'd like some non-biased opinions.

As an upperclassman at a top 30 university I sold three million dollars of marijuana, give or take a million. I cultivated clients in order to fund a grow-house and deliberately turned one thousand dollars from a federal student loan into $150,000 (and who knows how much for resellers).

As my reputation and business grew I met people across the spectrum of student life, from middle-class kids to those whose surnames were synonymous with campus buildings and scholarships. There were no clique biases; the only bias was against bad pot. Along the way, I found success was inversely proportional to sobriety.

After this, my description starts to become pretty cliche (if it doesn't already seem that way) - the rise and fall of a [college] drug dealer. However in my research I haven't found a similar book.

There are personal conflicts (much like characters in the Wire, I was neither bad nor good) - I struggled with identity and sexuality, stayed away from hard drugs, grappled with the idea of civic responsibility, and was otherwise an average college student trying to find his way. Friends even looked up to me, coming to me for advice on drugs, love, and life.

The allure of 'the game' was too great and eventually I was arrested. Asked to snitch, I declined, choosing instead to take responsibility for my actions even while most everyone abandoned me.

As for market, there are 11 million Americans who admit to using pot on a regular basis. And for those outside that 11 million, I think a description of how easy and innocently one can grow such an empire highlights the impact of social networks and the ineffectiveness of the so-called War on Drugs. (Or maybe its just vain male ennui).

michelle25
06-23-2008, 07:53 PM
Sounds interesting to me. How much time did you serve? (You said you were arrested). What are you doing now (besides writing)?

loosebricks
06-23-2008, 10:15 PM
Sounds interesting to me. How much time did you serve? (You said you were arrested). What are you doing now (besides writing)?

I only spent 24 hours in jail after I turned myself in to the police (for all the supposed surveillance they conducted, they raided my house after I left town for the weekend).

These days I'm sitting around on probation and staying out of trouble, thinking about business school for an MBA related to sustainable development.

jerrywaxler
06-24-2008, 01:00 AM
I like that you say it "all comes down to the writing" but probably not just the writing style. It's the slant, the inner tension. What is the driving force? Getting caught, making mistakes, growing up? What was the inner change that took place? If you portray it as someone who only stopped because they got caught, it would be a very different story than if you realized the error of your ways.

If you want to read an interesting memoir of someone who stretched the law and got caught, try Foster Winans Trading Secrets, about a Wall Street Journal reporter who leaked insider information. It's a good fall from grace memoir.

Jerry

jerrywaxler
06-24-2008, 02:29 PM
Hi Loosebricks,

There was something else on my mind when I was writing my previous response but I was having trouble putting words on it. This morning I realized what it was.

Holy smokes! You're still in the thick of an extraordinarily intense period in your life. In 30 years, you'll be able to look back and place this whole (pretty crazy) experience in perspective. But now, you're so close to the parts you can't see the whole. In fact, writing about it may be the absolutely best way for you to understand why you did it, how you feel about it now, and where you expect to be heading next.

When the pieces of your life are out in a pile on the table they don't make sense. When you turn them this way and that and start fitting them together, they start shaping into something that is whole. What that "whole" is will depend on your life and your tenacity as a writer.

Jerry

loosebricks
06-24-2008, 08:11 PM
Hi Loosebricks,

Holy smokes! You're still in the thick of an extraordinarily intense period in your life. In 30 years, you'll be able to look back and place this whole (pretty crazy) experience in perspective. But now, you're so close to the parts you can't see the whole. In fact, writing about it may be the absolutely best way for you to understand why you did it, how you feel about it now, and where you expect to be heading next.



Hopefully by 30 years from now pot is decriminalized/legalized and the whole story becomes an interesting albeit moot footnote, much as stories about prohibition era booze runners are today.

As for seeing the whole, I'm not sure that'll ever be possible. It seems like there are a lot of reasons and circumstances that just ended up putting me in the wrong place at the right time, as the 70's soul song goes.

Ritergal
10-21-2008, 02:46 PM
Your original question was whether we think there would be interest in the story. Yes, I think there would be interest in the story, and I agree with Jerry about the value of the writing process for the other reasons he mentions. So how could you lose? Go for it! If it doesn't sell, the experience will still be worthwhile, but beyond the memoir, a movie script comes to mind...

About your title? Get the book written. You may use that title, or maybe another.

BrittaMoline
03-09-2009, 08:21 AM
Like the idea, like the title (though don't get married to it). Start writing!

Wayne K
03-09-2009, 04:31 PM
and deliberately turned one thousand dollars from a federal student loan into $150,000
Thsi will need to be changed. Legal money in an illegal enterprise (especially if you put it in print) will get you in serious trouble. They'll probably want the three million as well, so you would need twenty or thirty weeks on The New York Times Bestseller list to break even.