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Phaeal
06-18-2008, 09:33 PM
In my beta reading, I've recently come upon multiple eruptions of the word "smirk." I hate "smirk." Especially when a character who's supposed to be sympathetic "smirks." No one who is in ANY WAY sympathetic will ever "smirk."

Grrr, I want to wipe that "smirk" right off their fictional faces...

On the other hand, if the character is hateful and arrogant and affected and venal and obnoxious, he might very well "smirk." But he must be hateful and arrogant and affected and venal and obnoxious.

Draco can smirk. Harry can never ever ever smirk. Hermione would rather die than smirk. Voldemort isn't allowed to smirk, either -- he should be too evil for that. Snape can smirk when he's young, but once life has beaten some unwelcome nobility into him, no more. If Dumbledore smirks, you'll know it's an impostor. Ditto McGonagall. Crabbe and Goyle aren't smart enough to smirk. Peter Pettigrew might smirk, in imitation of his idol James Potter, who turned out to be a pretty unlikeable character, after all. Sirius and Remus, nope. Peeves is a natural smirker. The world would implode if Cedric Diggory smirked. Ditto Saint Lily Potter. Got it?

Sarita
06-18-2008, 09:35 PM
I hate the word moist, but only when spoken. On paper, it looks fine, I suppose.

Phaeal
06-18-2008, 09:43 PM
I hate the word moist, but only when spoken. On paper, it looks fine, I suppose.

Oooh, yeah. It's that "oi" sound, followed by the sibilant "s." Moist cakes are good, though. Moist body parts, ick.

Calla Lily
06-18-2008, 09:44 PM
"Wince." It always looks wussy to me. I use it when needed, but...meh.

Bubastes
06-18-2008, 09:45 PM
Cuticle. :shudders:

MrWrite
06-18-2008, 09:46 PM
I hate the word bland. I've been re-reading the Belgariad by David Eddings and have lost count of the times someone did something blandly. Silk smiled blandly. Belgarath said something blandly. It's actually becoming very irritating! Funny thing I never noticed it when I read the series first time round but now I'm a writer it sticks out like a sore thumb. Seems lazy writing really!

willietheshakes
06-18-2008, 10:01 PM
Moist cakes are good, though. Moist body parts, ick.

Hmm.

I've actually always been partial to moist body parts, myself.

(Reading that back, I realize that it makes me sound a bit like a serial killer.)

NicoleMD
06-18-2008, 10:03 PM
preternatural and nonplussed

I don't know why. They just irk me.

Nicole

mscelina
06-18-2008, 10:04 PM
Irregardless.

I always answer this question with irregardless.

Despite the fact that it's NOT a word, it's the overwhelming compulsion of people-who-want-you-to-think-they're-smart to use this word in conversation that drives me nuts. When I see it in print, I want to hunt down the editor of said book and pop them upside the head with a pillowcase filled with oranges nine or ten times.

blacbird
06-18-2008, 10:08 PM
Oftentimes. Especially with the first "t" pronounced.

caw

Bubastes
06-18-2008, 10:08 PM
"Impactful," for the same reasons that mscelina mentioned on "irregardless."

Actually, I hate the word "impact" and its variations, especially when it's used as a verb. Business-speak gives me hives.

Round John Virgin
06-18-2008, 10:27 PM
The verb "to go missing" sends me up the wall, unless a Brit says it. They're entitled, since they hold the patent! In recent years, though, the American press has glommed onto "Young so-and-so went missing" like a bunch of barnacles--and they're sucking it dry! What's wrong with vanish or disappear?

Speaking of words that don't sound right, I'm also intrigued by a problem facing some synesthetes, where a word might appear (when either spoken or written) as a particular color. What if the color doesn't match the sound? Anyone have firsthand experience with this?

Bayley
06-18-2008, 10:41 PM
I hate the word 'one' when people use it to refer to themselves.
'One would hope not,'

It sounds like the royal family. That really gets on my nerves. I dislike anyone who refers to themselves as 'one' or uses their name when referring to themselves 'Bayley believes whatever'. I hate people like that, it really does my head in. Whoever invented that should be shot. Preferably five minutes before inventing it. I hate those people, they're always arrogant nobodies who believe they are better then everyone else. I really feel like saying:

'One thinks you will get punched in the face if you continue calling yourself "one".'

I would LOVE to see there face. But, I'm too nice to say things like that, added to the fact I can't punch hard.

NicoleMD
06-18-2008, 10:42 PM
"My cuticles have gone missing," Betsy said blandly.

Rusty gave her an impactful smirk. "Yes, they oftentimes do. One has to keep them preternaturally moist to avoid it."

Betsy was nonplussed. "Irregardless, my nails look awful. See?"

She shoved her hand in Rusty's face. All he could do was wince.

Blondchen
06-18-2008, 10:47 PM
I hate the word "said." It's so boring. I'd much rather see a book filled with people declaiming, declaring, shouting, vocalizing, remarking, enunciating, uttering, articulating...

I'm kidding.

But seriously, I hate "amongst."

Calla Lily
06-18-2008, 10:58 PM
"My cuticles have gone missing," Betsy said blandly.

Rusty gave her an impactful smirk. "Yes, they oftentimes do. One has to keep them preternaturally moist to avoid it."

Betsy was nonplussed. "Irregardless, my nails look awful. See?"

She shoved her hand in Rusty's face. All he could do was wince.

:roll:

MrWrite
06-18-2008, 11:18 PM
The verb "to go missing" sends me up the wall, unless a Brit says it. They're entitled, since they hold the patent! In recent years, though, the American press has glommed onto "Young so-and-so went missing" like a bunch of barnacles--and they're sucking it dry! What's wrong with vanish or disappear?

Speaking of words that don't sound right, I'm also intrigued by a problem facing some synesthetes, where a word might appear (when either spoken or written) as a particular color. What if the color doesn't match the sound? Anyone have firsthand experience with this?


So it's ok if I say it right? :D

Aglaia
06-18-2008, 11:19 PM
flounce

When someone spoke the word to me, I loved it. "Cindy flounced in." Perfect. A wonderful word - the only word to describe Cindy (you'd have to meet her to understand).

Then I read a book (several in fact, by different authors) and learned that once an author gets hold of the word "flounce," apparently he or she NEVER LETS GO. It shows up everywhere. Every woman flounces. In and out of every room. For no good reason. She doesn't have to have any particular personality to flounce (although she must be a woman, thank goodness for some small favors).

Oh, to have ignorance back. Have people forgotten that absence does indeed make the heart grow fonder?

*sigh*

MrWrite
06-18-2008, 11:21 PM
flounce

When someone spoke the word to me, I loved it. "Cindy flounced in." Perfect. A wonderful word - the only word to describe Cindy (you'd have to meet her to understand).

Then I read a book (several in fact, by different authors) and learned that once an author gets hold of the word "flounce," apparently he or she NEVER LETS GO. It shows up everywhere. Every woman flounces. In and out of every room. For no good reason. She doesn't have to have any particular personality to flounce (although she must be a woman, thank goodness for some small favors).

Oh, to have ignorance back. Have people forgotten that absence does indeed make the heart grow fonder?

*sigh*


Go on have a good flounce. You'll feel better for it! ;)

MrWrite
06-18-2008, 11:26 PM
Hmm. One is very bored stuck at work. One wants to go home but one won't be able to go for another 40 minutes.
So one will have fun on here while one is waiting! :D

Elodie-Caroline
06-18-2008, 11:36 PM
One of my female characters smirks quite often and is very sarcastic towards the man she desires. He deserves it, he's a complete jerk sometimes.

Written words don't bother me at all.

But the one word I really do hate hearing spoken, because it's always by people who think it makes them look intelligent, is 'basically.' I just hate that shagging word!!! :rant:


Elodie

Elodie-Caroline
06-18-2008, 11:43 PM
I'm English, so I can use it, right? :tongue But I can never understand it when someone says, 'I found, it/her/him, missing,'... if it's/they're missing, you don't actually find it/them, do you. Duh! :Shrug:


The verb "to go missing" sends me up the wall, unless a Brit says it. They're entitled, since they hold the patent!

MrWrite
06-18-2008, 11:45 PM
One of my female characters smirks quite often and is very sarcastic towards the man she desires. He deserves it, he's a complete jerk sometimes.

Written words don't bother me at all.

But the one word I really do hate hearing spoken, because it's always by people who think it makes them look intelligent, is 'basically.' I just hate that shagging word!!! :rant:


Elodie

So basically, what you're saying right? is you hate the word basically. That's basically it yeah? :D

C.M. Daniels
06-18-2008, 11:49 PM
Verdant.

It seems like the authors who use this word tend to use it to death. When it shows up six times in one book, it's time to just use the word "green".

soleary
06-18-2008, 11:50 PM
teat

NicoleMD
06-19-2008, 12:01 AM
Hmm. One is very bored stuck at work. One wants to go home but one won't be able to go for another 40 minutes.
So one will have fun on here while one is waiting! :D

One is not the only one bored at work.


Verdant.

It seems like the authors who use this word tend to use it to death. When it shows up six times in one book, it's time to just use the word "green".


teat

Verdant teats? I feel another story brewing...

Nicole

MrWrite
06-19-2008, 12:02 AM
One is not the only one bored at work.





Verdant teats? I feel another story brewing...

Nicole


Verdant teats could be the sequel to Twin Peaks! :D

TrickyFiction
06-19-2008, 12:07 AM
Guffaw. I especially don't like it as a verb.
Not sure why. It just always sounds wrong to me.

SPMiller
06-19-2008, 12:28 AM
Verdant teats could be the sequel to Twin Peaks! :DAnd the finale of the trilogy would be The Grand Tetons.

Phaeal
06-19-2008, 01:16 AM
No, The Moist Tetons.

TerzaRima
06-19-2008, 01:25 AM
"Concerns" to mean problems. "She has some health concerns." "This child has some behavioral concerns." I always picture someone pulling an anxious face and offering a cup of Ovaltine.

SPMiller
06-19-2008, 02:09 AM
No, The Moist Tetons.I'm telling you. It's the fault of certain bad erotica writers that words such as moist and damp have gotten such bad reps.

tehuti88
06-19-2008, 02:58 AM
I hate "smirk." Especially when a character who's supposed to be sympathetic "smirks." No one who is in ANY WAY sympathetic will ever "smirk."

:/ Someone who's merely human (flawed), but otherwise sympathetic, can smirk. Everyone has moments of weakness when they act less than sympathetic and can crack a smirk. Well, most people. If they don't ever have such moments then they're not very realistic characters.

I'll assume that particular part of the comment was kind of tongue-in-cheek since I'm not good at telling such things without cues...

I can't think of any particular words that jump out at me as being so irritating; I just can't stand when words are misused, like "lay/lie," "they're/there/their," etc.

One thing I detest, however, is "withdrawl." It's not a word--but there are so many people who think it is that it makes me want to run my fingernails down my face. AAAGGGGHHH.

Elodie-Caroline
06-19-2008, 03:19 AM
Yes, I think you could definitely say that without fear of contradiction :D :tongue


So basically, what you're saying right? is you hate the word basically. That's basically it yeah? :D

petronella63
06-19-2008, 03:26 AM
I - egotistical little word and I dislike it.

Not in other writer's works. I just dislike it in my own, and mainly when I have to get rid of it and I can't come up with a way to do so.

You all made me smile :)

Write4U2
06-19-2008, 04:32 AM
Mucous. I HATE the word, and one similar to it, muscilage.:rant:ICK!!!

KTC
06-19-2008, 04:36 AM
scenario. I hate that word. Robert Culp did it... in Greatest American Hero. He used the word about 72 times every episode! I had to watch, though. Believe it or not, it's just me...

Devil Ledbetter
06-19-2008, 05:34 AM
I hate the word "kudos." It's so cheesy!

The Scip
06-19-2008, 05:35 AM
quickly

C.bronco
06-19-2008, 05:37 AM
"Impactful," for the same reasons that mscelina mentioned on "irregardless."

Actually, I hate the word "impact" and its variations, especially when it's used as a verb. Business-speak gives me hives.
Ditto. That's my biggest pet peeve: "impact" used as a verb.

Matera the Mad
06-19-2008, 07:08 AM
Yeah, "impact" impacts me negatively too. (ducks) But the %#^&*@^ worst is still "momentarily" abused as a five-syllable stand-in for "soon". SCREAM

NicoleMD
06-19-2008, 09:40 AM
Basically, this is the scenario: I’ve been going through withdrawl -- you know, when you speak with a twanging accent -- reeeaalll slllloow. Kudos to my parents for dealing with my speech concerns so quickly.

“Just lay their,” said the speech pathologist as she flounced out of the examination room. “I’ll be back momentarily.”

Amongst the magazines, I found a National Geographic with some slug-like creature on the cover showing its huge, gleaming, verdant teats. A violent guffaw surged through me, dislodging a wad of mucous from my sinuses.

And just like that, my withdrawl was gone.

-----------

Okay, I'll stop now. Sadly, this is all the writing I've done today. :(

Nicole

Faolmor
06-19-2008, 11:59 AM
"Burglarized"

To me it's just wrong. WRONG!

kristie911
06-19-2008, 12:19 PM
Mount.

It just sounds icky.

Phaeal
06-19-2008, 05:42 PM
Mounting horses is okay, unless you're Catherine the Great. Mounting podiums is a necessary evil in an election year. Mounting assaults on the enemy fortifications -- where would military fic be without this?

There's also a lot of mounting going on in moist novels, but we won't go there. That's the use of "mount" that makes me giggle.

James81
06-19-2008, 05:48 PM
On the other hand, if the character is hateful and arrogant and affected and venal and obnoxious, he might very well "smirk." But he must be hateful and arrogant and affected and venal and obnoxious.

What the hell? a smirk has nothing to do with any of those things. You don't HAVE to have any of those traits to smirk. A smirk is a slight smile that says "Yeah, I got one up on you".

If it's being overused, that's one thing. But to ONLY use it with these traits? That's another.


Draco can smirk. Harry can never ever ever smirk. Hermione would rather die than smirk. Voldemort isn't allowed to smirk, either -- he should be too evil for that. Snape can smirk when he's young, but once life has beaten some unwelcome nobility into him, no more. If Dumbledore smirks, you'll know it's an impostor. Ditto McGonagall. Crabbe and Goyle aren't smart enough to smirk. Peter Pettigrew might smirk, in imitation of his idol James Potter, who turned out to be a pretty unlikeable character, after all. Sirius and Remus, nope. Peeves is a natural smirker. The world would implode if Cedric Diggory smirked. Ditto Saint Lily Potter. Got it?

I hate it when people use characters from a well known story and just assume that everybody knows what they are talking about. ;)

I have no idea who any of those characters are or what they are like.

mikeland
06-19-2008, 05:55 PM
whom

Phaeal
06-19-2008, 06:07 PM
What the hell? a smirk has nothing to do with any of those things. You don't HAVE to have any of those traits to smirk. A smirk is a slight smile that says "Yeah, I got one up on you".

If it's being overused, that's one thing. But to ONLY use it with these traits? That's another.



I hate it when people use characters from a well known story and just assume that everybody knows what they are talking about. ;)

I have no idea who any of those characters are or what they are like.

I bet you smirk all the time. Shudder.

As for Harry Potter, I can't help it if people who condone smirking haven't read the books. You Draco you.

;)

James81
06-19-2008, 06:17 PM
I'm smirking right now, actually. :D

Perle_Rare
06-19-2008, 06:28 PM
I can't stand the word "like" when it's used to mean like, I have not the slightest clue what I'm about to say next.

Can't people use "like" when they're comparing two things or when they actually have an emotional response to something? What's the deal with like being used as an interjection?

James81
06-19-2008, 06:31 PM
I can't stand the word "like" when it's used to mean like, I have not the slightest clue what I'm about to say next.

Can't people use "like" when they're comparing two things or when they actually have an emotional response to something? What's the deal with like being used as an interjection?

How old are you?

The "like" thing became a hot fad when I was in high school (god has that been almost 10 years ago now?).

Now it's just a staple thing. Younger people tend to use it. Just wanted to say that I remember when that word became popular. :D

Perle_Rare
06-19-2008, 06:47 PM
How old are you?

Well, I just turned 25 in hexadecimal notation yesterday. Sounds much better that way... :D


Now it's just a staple thing. Younger people tend to use it.

IMHO, the use of this speech mannerism makes a person sound rather inane. I consider myself a rather tolerant person but this one causes me to grind my teeth in an automatic Pavlov reaction every time... Needless to say, my daughter has not been allowed to develop the habit... :)

Phaeal
06-19-2008, 08:02 PM
I can't stand the word "like" when it's used to mean like, I have not the slightest clue what I'm about to say next.

Can't people use "like" when they're comparing two things or when they actually have an emotional response to something? What's the deal with like being used as an interjection?

This reminds me of the wonderful discussion in Northanger Abbey, when Henry Tilney scolds his sister and Catherine Morland about their loose use of the word "nice" -- oh, how could this perfectly good word meaning "precise" have devolved into a nothing-meaning adjective applicable to everything!

Like, "like" does suck as, like, an all purpose interjection, like.

DanceGirl
06-19-2008, 08:16 PM
I cannot stand the word "though". I use it *way* too often and now it's hard for me to stop using it. Urgh.

Perle_Rare
06-19-2008, 09:25 PM
I just re-read my second post and I'll add the word "rather" to the list of words I don't like...

I obviously use "rather", rather frequently...

lisake
06-19-2008, 09:55 PM
Miscelina stole my word. I detest the word “irregardless.” I also hate the word “detest.” Do people ever really say that unless they’re running through a list of synonyms to illustrate just how much they “hate, loathe, detest” someone?

ACEnders
06-19-2008, 09:56 PM
Now I hate the word "shrug" because I've used it way too much. I'm in the process of cutting most of them out.

I hate the word "heiny" I hate it. Use, a$$, butt, bottom, rear end...do not say (or write) heiny. And don't use it as heineken shortened. Gross.

Elodie-Caroline
06-19-2008, 10:44 PM
Just put the little picture from here in your work instead then :Shrug::D


Now I hate the word "shrug" because I've used it way too much. I'm in the process of cutting most of them out.

I hate the word "heiny" I hate it. Use, a$$, butt, bottom, rear end...do not say (or write) heiny. And don't use it as heineken shortened. Gross.

gypsyscarlett
06-19-2008, 11:21 PM
I'm another "smirk" hater.

But for the most part, most of the words I can't stand are recent slang terms:

bling bling (for jewelry) - reporters gushing to celebs walking down the red carpet: "Oh, I just loooooooooooooove your bling bling!" UGH

preggers and baby bump (can't you just friggin say PREGNANT!! Or, for that matter, Archie Bunker's favorite term, "Knocked up?" :tongue)

JenUK24
06-20-2008, 01:41 AM
I hate the word "OR" as it means you cant have both.
EG: chocolate or cake... I prefer chocolate and cake...heehee :tongue

C.M. Daniels
06-21-2008, 10:21 AM
One is not the only one bored at work.





Verdant teats? I feel another story brewing...

Nicole

Or an emergency call to the local vet.

VGrossack
06-21-2008, 11:57 AM
What a fun thread!

Words I am prejudiced against: smile, sigh (both overused); indeed; beefy

Sirion
06-21-2008, 12:50 PM
I can't stand the word 'look' (or any variation of it such as 'looked' or 'looking').

There have to be better words; people can 'gaze', 'glance', 'glare', or a myriad of other things.


-Travis

Quossum
06-21-2008, 05:21 PM
"quite" and "actually"

They're both on my personal hit list; I edit out a million of 'em.

--Q

Nyna
06-21-2008, 10:38 PM
Hump. Used in any way, to mean anything. I just don't like it.

Also, my mother once told me, when I was about 15, that my dimples showed when I smirked, thereby ruining a perfectly good dastardly look. It was one of the big disappointments of my life, but I still smirk sometimes anyway. One must live with these things. ;)

SPMiller
06-21-2008, 11:15 PM
Some words I try to eliminate from my narrative:

Really
Then
Actually
Very
Still
Quite
Suddenly
Just
So
Rather
Yet

I leave a few in for effect. I'll tolerate some of these in published fiction, but too many will have me throwing the book against the nearest wall.

Danger Jane
06-21-2008, 11:28 PM
One thing I detest, however, is "withdrawl." It's not a word--but there are so many people who think it is that it makes me want to run my fingernails down my face. AAAGGGGHHH.

I can't pronounce the last two syllables of "withdrawal" very distinctly. So it sounds like "withdraal".

I don't mind "like" as a spacer in speech. Of course too much of it is ridiculous, but spacers such as "like" and "um" generally make it easier to understand someone with whom you are conversing.

My word is, without a doubt, fucking gravitas. Pretentious little journalist word. Fucking HATE it.

BlackViolet13
06-22-2008, 01:12 AM
Does this have to be regarding reading/writing? Because I've always had a feeling for the word cocoa that borders on fear. I don't know what it is about that word, but I always want to scream, "WTH is wrong with saying hot chocolate? Why must you hurt my insides with that other word?"

escritora
06-22-2008, 01:34 AM
dollop

KAP
06-22-2008, 04:22 AM
I don't hate the word. I use it. But other people seem to hate the snot out of it. SNOT. Say it and see how many people wince.

And yes, I apologize to whomever hates "wince." And now I also apologize to whomever hates whom. Times two.

Snot, it's hard to avoid all the words one hates.

Sorry "one" hater.

Snot!

stormie
06-22-2008, 04:36 AM
Clearly. As in, "Clearly, you can see my point." or "Clearly, she hated that word."

Steven Howard
06-22-2008, 04:56 AM
Utilize. I don't think I've ever heard or read a sentence where utilize couldn't be replaced with use. Just the other day, I was filling out some form or another, and it helpfully advised me to "utilize blue or black ink."

BfloGal
06-22-2008, 04:59 AM
I hate "crap" and "puke." They're very ugly words, probably well suited to what they depict, but I still don't like them.

Matera the Mad
06-22-2008, 06:48 AM
poop? barf? :D

"powerful" doesn't turn me on.

Hey, nobody's picked on "orientate" yet!

blueobsidian
06-22-2008, 07:47 AM
Succulent. I have a coworker who likes to use it in regards to the desserts we make (probably just to drive me crazy). No one would suffer if this word was never seen again. Supple is a close second.

SPMiller
06-22-2008, 08:55 AM
Hey, nobody's picked on "orientate" yet!Orientate?

Orientate???

Are you serious? Such a word actually exists?

Why don't they just write orient?!?!?!

Aaarugh!!!

It's kind of like analyzation. Just write analysis!

gypsyscarlett
06-22-2008, 09:37 AM
Does this have to be regarding reading/writing? Because I've always had a feeling for the word cocoa that borders on fear. I don't know what it is about that word, but I always want to scream, "WTH is wrong with saying hot chocolate? Why must you hurt my insides with that other word?"

Hi BlackViolet,

Hot chocolate and cocoa are actually two different things. So people using "cocoa" are just being precise. (I'm sure they're not trying to terrorize you :)

I've always liked the word, "cocoa". But then, a family member used to have this adorable dog with that name. Maybe I associate it with that cute little pup. :)

HeronW
06-22-2008, 04:18 PM
refresh--pertaining to food--i.e.
'isn't that refreshing' uh, no, because if you have to 're' do something then how fresh can it be?
Kind of like refried beans--shapeless and overdone.

BlackViolet13
06-22-2008, 07:08 PM
Hi BlackViolet,

Hot chocolate and cocoa are actually two different things. So people using "cocoa" are just being precise. (I'm sure they're not trying to terrorize you :)

I've always liked the word, "cocoa". But then, a family member used to have this adorable dog with that name. Maybe I associate it with that cute little pup. :)

I bet the dog was cute, and I can definitely see how associating a word with something sweet would work like that. Now I need to dig up my past and see where I went wrong with cocoa LOL

BlackViolet13
06-22-2008, 07:09 PM
refresh--pertaining to food--i.e.
'isn't that refreshing' uh, no, because if you have to 're' do something then how fresh can it be?
Kind of like refried beans--shapeless and overdone.

Eeeeew...you have a point, Heron!

MrWrite
06-22-2008, 07:38 PM
refresh--pertaining to food--i.e.
'isn't that refreshing' uh, no, because if you have to 're' do something then how fresh can it be?
Kind of like refried beans--shapeless and overdone.


LOL I never thought about that!

Mr Flibble
06-22-2008, 08:06 PM
Orientate?

Orientate???

Are you serious? Such a word actually exists?

Why don't they just write orient?!?!?!

Aaarugh!!!

It's kind of like analyzation. Just write analysis!

In case you were serious :

To Orientate: determine one's position with reference to another point; ( like when you wake up in a strange bed. Where the hell am I , and who is that strange person? Where am I in relation to home? ) also as in the activity of orienteering -- using a map and compass to find your way across unfamiliar terrain, often in competition.

Danger Jane
06-22-2008, 09:27 PM
In case you were serious :

To Orientate: determine one's position with reference to another point; ( like when you wake up in a strange bed. Where the hell am I , and who is that strange person? Where am I in relation to home? ) also as in the activity of orienteering -- using a map and compass to find your way across unfamiliar terrain, often in competition.

First meaning of orient from Merriam-Webster:

1 a: to cause to face or point toward the east; specifically : to build (a church or temple) with the longitudinal axis pointing eastward and the chief altar at the eastern end b: to set or arrange in any determinate position especially in relation to the points of the compass c: to ascertain the bearings of

Mr Flibble
06-23-2008, 12:20 AM
While technically it has that meaning, I've only ever heard people use orient for The East.

Maybe it's a Brit thing?

If somebody said to me, 'I'm trying to orient myself,' my answer would be 'Are you moving to China?'

I've never heard it used for anything else -- orientate is used instead. I take it you use it that way in the US though.

Matera the Mad
06-23-2008, 06:10 AM
The verb is "orient" as well. The pseudo-word "orientate" is derived by ignorant reverse-engineering of "orientation".

SPMiller
06-23-2008, 07:16 AM
While technically it has that meaning, I've only ever heard people use orient for The East.

Maybe it's a Brit thing?

If somebody said to me, 'I'm trying to orient myself,' my answer would be 'Are you moving to China?'

I've never heard it used for anything else -- orientate is used instead. I take it you use it that way in the US though.Well, I did some research, and I found it's definitely a British thing.

We never use Orient to refer to the East. Instead we say the East, or Asia, or Southeast Asia. We also rarely (if ever) describe someone from Asia as Oriental. Instead we call them Asian.

To me, orientate sounds pompous and overblown, like something I'd expect to see in a business report crammed with meaningless, self-conscious business-speak. I realize British speakers don't intend it that way, but that's how it probably comes off to American readers.

Sorry if I offended you.

Mr Flibble
06-23-2008, 04:35 PM
Well, I did some research, and I found it's definitely a British thing.

We never use Orient to refer to the East. Instead we say the East, or Asia, or Southeast Asia. We also rarely (if ever) describe someone from Asia as Oriental. Instead we call them Asian.

It's getting more that way here too -- Asian rather than Oriental I mean.


To me, orientate sounds pompous and overblown, like something I'd expect to see in a business report crammed with meaningless, self-conscious business-speak. I realize British speakers don't intend it that way, but that's how it probably comes off to American readers.

Pompous? Moi? How very dare you!:D I'm just going by common usage -- right or wrong that's how it's used ( in my neck of the woods at least) and to me, to orient yourself sounds odd.



Sorry if I offended you. How could my very own viking offend me? I love finding all these little differences in usage / meaning.

channeller
06-23-2008, 11:11 PM
I don't like the word "body". It's pretty unavoidable, and worse saying than writing, but even in writing I don't like it (funnily enough, I seem to feel okay about it when it's used for corpse... who knows.)
A word I've been told (rightly) that I overuse is "turn". My characters are spinning through the stories, turning all over the shop :)

SPMiller
06-24-2008, 02:39 AM
Pompous? Moi? How very dare you!:D I'm just going by common usage -- right or wrong that's how it's used ( in my neck of the woods at least) and to me, to orient yourself sounds odd.I was just explaining my initial reaction to it. It sounds like the sorts of words created by American businesspeople to make boring, ordinary things sound important. I now know better.


How could my very own viking offend me? I love finding all these little differences in usage / meaning.Me too. It has been a learning experience for me, anyway.

Now excuse me, I have a coastal town to pillage.

(P.S. -- isn't it interesting how Vikings are still demonized in modern culture, when in reality they were mostly well-behaved, hygienic people displaced from their homes?)

Alex667
06-24-2008, 06:03 AM
Delicious.... no matter how it's used. (whether to refer to the taste of food or drink or *shudders* when it's used to refer to gossip or something scandalous.)

Gynn
06-24-2008, 07:22 AM
Looked and Walked.

I'm tired of trying to find ways of describing when my characters see something or go somewhere.

"He looked over there."
"She looked at him."
"He walked into the room."
"He stared as she peered at the dog that was bounding into the backyard."

With some work, I might be able to get rid of most of them, though. I'd hate to have to bust out the thesaurus for those two crappy words.

Jt/Js
06-24-2008, 08:01 PM
quickly

Ditto to that! I wanted to scream when I realized how many times I used "quickly" in one of my chapters...so then my characters had to do things rapidly, swiftly, or hastily. Arggggghh. ^^ Has anyone ever heard someone say the phrases "galavanting around" or "no comment" way too many times? I have. They should DIE! (the words, not the people...although... *evil grin*)

Perle_Rare
06-26-2008, 07:10 PM
nother

As in "That's a whole nother year!" to quote Luke Skywalker.

:Headbang:

rosiecotton
06-26-2008, 08:07 PM
Panties! Makes me cringe every time I hear it (doesn't help that I moved from Cheshire, UK, to Kansas City!) Please just say underwear. Or, being a Brit - 'Me knickers!'

amityyankee
06-26-2008, 08:28 PM
"My cuticles have gone missing," Betsy said blandly.

Rusty gave her an impactful smirk. "Yes, they oftentimes do. One has to keep them preternaturally moist to avoid it."

Betsy was nonplussed. "Irregardless, my nails look awful. See?"

She shoved her hand in Rusty's face. All he could do was wince.

You, my friend, have just made my day.:ROFL:

Phaeal
06-26-2008, 09:32 PM
Panties can be briefs, bikinis, thongs, boy cuts. Particularize to avoid the problem word.

I don't mind panties, though. Especially when they get in a wad. ;)

Sarah_Jane
06-29-2008, 04:13 AM
toward and towards

TrickyFiction
06-29-2008, 05:47 AM
I want to add the verb "gift/gifted/gifting" to the list. It's awful. I suppose there must be a difference between gifting and giving. It's so subtle, though, I can't see it. It just seems like unnecessary fancy-speak to me.

Karen Duvall
06-29-2008, 08:49 PM
I'm opposed to nouns used as verbs, usually in an effort to express an emotion. It's like fingernails across a blackboard for me. These two examples come to mind:

Terror knifed through him.

Sadness arrowed through her.

It just sounds so... forced. Ugh.

Linda Adams
06-29-2008, 10:05 PM
Leverage--I see this word in business so much that it's almost a cliche.

Dialogue--when it's used in something like "Let's have a dialogue." :eek:

cyates
06-29-2008, 10:37 PM
use of the phrase 'like so much ___."

nerds
06-30-2008, 12:20 AM
Panties! Makes me cringe every time I hear it (doesn't help that I moved from Cheshire, UK, to Kansas City!) Please just say underwear. Or, being a Brit - 'Me knickers!'



I agree, I cringe as well. I'm reaching a true gross-out factor with the word. It is everywhere the past few years.

There's a fiction author I won't name whose overuse of and seeming fascination with the word in connection with the MC made me stop reading a series I had initially enjoyed. Each successive book had ever more useless scenes involving the MC and her panties. Blech. And these are not erotica books, far from it.

I have sentiment for the old word, unmentionables.

And I love lingerie. There's a word.

nerds
06-30-2008, 12:38 AM
I don't hate the word. I use it. But other people seem to hate the snot out of it. SNOT. Say it and see how many people wince.

And yes, I apologize to whomever hates "wince." And now I also apologize to whomever hates whom. Times two.

Snot, it's hard to avoid all the words one hates.

Sorry "one" hater.

Snot!



:roll:


The snotty rich kid winced as whomever this stranger was who thought he could beat the SNOT out of him winced in pain while snotty rivulets rivuletted down his upper lip and formed a green lagoon on the pavement. Turning away from the wincing, prostrate figure, snotty rich kid winced at the thought that he himself had winced. "What kind of a word IS that anyway?" he thought to himself. "One should avoid that word, whomever one is."

jgold
06-30-2008, 02:42 AM
"Stay true to yourself."

It doesn't even MEAN anything, and it annoys the crap out of me every time I hear it.

Also the phrase "Each and every one of you."

It's freaking redundant.

ynoirb
06-30-2008, 10:56 AM
I think someone else has already said mine - bland.

For some reason its the text equivalent of nails on a blackboard to me!

Buddikins
06-30-2008, 11:37 AM
Horny.

It makes me uncomfortable for some reason lol.

I call it the h-word. It's funny when people try to guess what I'm saying... One girl was convinced it was 'happy' ... Hmm, maybe she wasnt so wrong

sheadakota
06-30-2008, 04:11 PM
I didn't read the whole thread so forgive me if someone said this one already-

Whatever!

I hate- hate HATE! that phrase!
(There's a story there, but suffice to say I HATE that words(s))

Ken
06-30-2008, 04:23 PM
...ones I can't remember how to spell.