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FashionQueen
06-10-2008, 10:13 PM
Hi, I'm writing a book and I wanted something in Latin or Italian (or another language). As the serial killer could write his name in that language (though I haven't decided yet). Anyway, I can barely speak French, I know two words of Spanish and a word of Japanese. So, I'm not very helpful.

Anyway, I went on translation sights, but as English has so many different meaning, I was unsure of whether I was right.

For instance, if I put 'Love life' in Spanish it would be 'Adore la vide', but that literally translates to something on the lines of 'attracted to living', which isn't what I meant (though I may be wrong, as like I said my Spanish is terrible).

Anyway the words I wanted translated were 'Wednesday's child'

Online I found it translates to
Bambino di mercoledý in Italian, but I'm unsure whether that means Child of Wednesday, or something that doesn't make sense.
Jejunium Liber in Latin, it said that it meant 'fasting as in day' and I'm not sure whether that means what I meant and whether it's plural (as in children). I think it could mean 'fasting children'.

So, if you could confirm that it means what it says, or give me the proper translation of that or another language, I would be very grateful. Now, I wished I'd taken Latin.

PS, if you also know the translation of words that sound similar and could be translated wrong (Adore in Spanish could literally mean adore), then that would be appreciated as I am thinking of getting the translator to translate it wrong.

If you know the answer then thanks so much.

Danger Jane
06-10-2008, 10:58 PM
Latin:

The Romans called Wednesday "Dies Mercurii", the day of Mercury.

"Liber" means child, but if you want to get more specific, "filius" means son and "filia" means daughter.

"Liber Diei Mercurii" is "Child of the Day of Mercury" or "Child of Wednesday". Substitute "Filius" for "Son of Wednesday" and substitute "Filia" for "Daughter of Wednesday."

If you need anything else, go ahead and ask!

Ravenlocks
06-11-2008, 05:01 AM
Translation sites are no good. They can't do context-based translations, and without accounting for the context you can't get a decent translation.

Speaking of context, what's the context for "Wednesday's child"? Do you mean a child born on Wednesday? The supposed personality characteristics of a child born on Wednesday? Something else?

StephanieFox
06-11-2008, 05:08 AM
Wednesday's Child comes from a poem;

Monday's child is fair of face
Tuesday's child is filled with grace
Wednesday's child is full of woe
Thursday's child has far to go
Friday's child is loving and giving
Saturday's child works hard for a living
But the child that is born on the Sabbath day
Is something and something and fair and gay.

Some people have rewritten the Wednesday's child line to read, "Wednesday's child is free from woe," so that kids born on Wenesday wouldn't feel bad.

If you have ever seen an Addams' Family movie or TV show, you know that the daughter is named Wednesday and this poem is why. I'm not sure if this would translate because I don't know if the poem exists in any other language. You might want to check.

FashionQueen
06-11-2008, 07:14 PM
Wednesday's Child comes from a poem. I'm not sure if this would translate because I don't know if the poem exists in any other language. You might want to check.


what's the context for "Wednesday's child"?

The poem doesn't translate, though I don't need it to. The plan is, for the serial killer in my story to name himself 'Wednesday's child' as he kills people on Wednesdays, due to a factor in his upbringing. Anyway, there is already a detective story entitled 'Wednesday's child', so I thought I would use the Latin equivalent , then have the detecctives translate it back into English. Then, they notice it's the line from the poem when it's in English.


Latin:

The Romans called Wednesday "Dies Mercurii", the day of Mercury.

"Liber Diei Mercurii" is "Child of the Day of Mercury" or "Child of Wednesday".

Thanks so much, this is really useful.

JimmyB27
06-11-2008, 07:20 PM
I don't know any other languages, but I have friends who do. I can get you translations into Italian, Swedish, maybe Spanish, Chinese (not sure if it's Mandarin or Cantonese - whichever they speak in Hong Kong), French. Possibly some others I've forgotten.
PM me if you want anything specific.

Yeah, I have some quite cosmopolitan friends. ;)