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CBumpkin
06-04-2008, 05:45 AM
Alright, fess up! Spill the beans mixed with mustard and sauerkraut! We all eaten certain odd concoctions whether we admit to them publicly or not! Well, now is your chance to stand proud and admit to loving unusual creations that you've either created or got from others!

What weird, odd, unusual recipes do you have that you just love to eat when no one's watching or that no one outside of your family would understand?

I'll start this with two recipes of my own!

1. I just mixed cottage cheese with Garlic Garlic (from Tastefully Simple) and will cut up an avocado into it in the morning for breakfast! Also makes a great chip dip!

2. I was heading to a potluck and forgot to make something. Panicked, I threw open my cupboards and found three things to mix together. OreIda Frozen Mashed Potatoes (I only make my own, now, which works too, of course), a bag of frozen corn (simmered) and a can of Frito Lay Cheddar Cheese and Jalapeno Cheese Dip all stirred together! I brought it to the potluck and people looked as scared as they could be! But, once the first person tried it and raved, everyone else tried it and now I have to bring these along everywhere I go when I have to bring a food dish. (Only now I make it with fresh potatoes.)

Your turn....! Spill it.

Mumut
06-04-2008, 07:34 AM
Soft cream cheese mixed with with black caviar (folded in carefully to preserve the eggs). Even people who don't particularly like fish like this. And if the folk at work want a Friday 13th morning tea, serving up all things black, this is a hit.

If the fruit loaf you've bought doesn't really live up to its name, spread it with crunchy peanut butter and slices of banana.

scottVee
06-04-2008, 10:53 AM
Fried bananas - just a quick tumble in a small amount of butter and sugar in a frying pan. The heat does something to the bananas, very tasty.

And, a very rare craving for ... condensed milk. Just a taste now & then, usually while making something else. Not good for anyone with sensitive teeth!

Peanut butter & honey sandwich. Yum.

Of course, when there are fresh peaches or apricots or plums around the house, no fancy snacks needed.

Had a funny episode last week, where I had cut up some strawberries and cantaloupe to put on some cereal -- only to find there was no cereal. So, I just poured milk on it and ate it. Almost any fruit would work. Who says there has to be cereal in the mug? (Yes, we eat cereal in mugs for some reason.) (BTW, I roasted the cantaloupe seeds too)

Next?

Bubastes
06-04-2008, 04:31 PM
Cream cheese and hot pepper jelly spread on crackers.

Not unusual, but definitely meant to be eaten alone: garlic sauce (more like a spread) from any Middle Eastern restaurant. I can eat a pint of that stuff on anything. It's just garlic, olive oil, lemon juice, and salt whipped together until it's the consistency of mayo. You can imagine how I smell for several days afterward.

brianm
06-04-2008, 05:25 PM
I don't consider this an unusual combination, but when I served these scrambled eggs at Christmas breakfast last year, a few of my guests had never heard of the combination. I would normally use goat cheese, but I knew two of the guests didn't like goat cheese. (Heathens!)

Just before your scrambled eggs set up, fold in pieces of smoked salmon and chunks of cream cheese or goat cheese. Sprinkle with a small amount of dried dill or chopped fresh dill.

CBumpkin
06-04-2008, 06:16 PM
Mumut: I can tolerate caviar but I can see how it would be better with cream cheese! As for the fruit loaf, it's all yours! When it comes to fruit, I like it plain.

scotVee: Fried bananas are great! Many restaurants here serve them and they're pretty popular. I've done the condensed milk thing. LOL Make doubly strong coffee, pour it over a tall glass of ice and add 1/3 can of sweetened condensed milk. Beautious! I grew up on peanut butter and honey sandwiches. Still love 'em! The fruit and milk sounds interesting, but I'll stick to plain fruit. Don't know why but I've never been fond of fruit in anything. Except bananas and chocolate. Combine some peanut butter and I'm set!

MeowGirl: I've not tried the hot pepper jelly yet. I like hot peppers but, as a jelly? I'll have to cave in and try it. An international market here sells Rose Jam, too, that's intrigued me. Maybe it's time to branch out? I love mint jelly, as long as it's the kind with real mint leaves in it. I know the garlic sauce you're talking about! There's a Lebanese restaurant here that serves it with their chicken kabobs and they sell it by the quart because people love it!

brianm: With the cream cheese, those sound like amazing eggs! I'm not fond of goat cheese. I always figured if I wanted to taste a goat, I'd go out and lick one directly. I like my scrambled eggs with the green tobasco sauce on them, and sauteed mushrooms. Not unusual though. Will have to try your recipe, thanks!

Can't wait to read more! Anyone else finding combos they're interested in?

icerose
06-04-2008, 06:31 PM
Instead of making zuccini or banana bread, take the fruit portion and split it three way between apple, carrot and zuccini, substitute the oil for applesauce and some of the sugar for mashed banana. It comes out fruit packed, lower fat, and absolutely delicious. You can also put in some apple juice and reduce some of the liquid and some of the sugar as well if you're serving a diabetic.

Take a pie crust, I prefer the ones with butter and milk vs the oil and water (but olive oil and water work well too), insert diced apples that have soaked in apple juice, cinnimon and nutmeg over night. Make small mini pasteries, about the size of your palm. Sprinkle cinnimon and sugar over t he top of the pastry and bake at 350 degrees until the crusts are lightly golden brown, about 20 minutes, depending on the size of your pies.

Take an 8oz box of cream cheese, cream it, dice up strawberries and mix in some strawberry jam. Thin homemade strawberry jam works best. When pies have cooled enough to handle, dip in creamcheese mixture and enjoy.

Make your stew the night before, with potatoes and rice and carrots and sausage, and a good spice mix, (This is a broth based stew). Eat it for supper that night. Refridgerate the leftovers. The next day for lunch heat up the stew, the rice should soak up the juice pretty good, roll them up in tortilla shells and enjoy.

That's all I can think of for now.

CatSlave
06-04-2008, 06:58 PM
A block of cream cheese on a serving dish with Pickapeppa sauce poured over.
Eat with crackers.

You can also do this using mango chutney or other highly-seasoned sauce or spread.

Haggis
06-04-2008, 07:13 PM
I was invited to a friend's house for a scotch tasting, and decided to bring an appropriate snack along. I decided on scotch eggs (http://www.fabulousfoods.com/recipes/appetizers/snacks/scotchegg.html). But rather than using all ground pork, I used 50% ground lamb, 50% pork.

They were good.

icerose
06-04-2008, 07:28 PM
Here's one, not sure if it's unusual.

But either buy or make cinnimon and sugar chips. You can take tortilla shells, cut them into triangles, rub with olive oil and sprinkle on the cinnimon and sugar. Bake them in the oven until crunchy but not burnt.

Take a box of strawberries, dice, 6-8 kiwis, dice, (Or any other fruit combination) add in some juice, get creative, and 3 T of strawberry jam until it looks like salsa. You can add in some sweetened and condensed milk, or some creamcheese if you want, then serve with the chips.

brianm
06-04-2008, 07:53 PM
You can also do this using mango chutney or other highly-seasoned sauce or spread.

I warm it up in the microwave just before serving and it is delicious.

CatSlave
06-04-2008, 08:00 PM
This is not a recipe, just a snack.
I like to halve an avocado, remove the pit and fill the cavity with a French dressing.
Eat out of hand with a spoon.

CBumpkin
06-04-2008, 08:36 PM
That IS an unusual recipe, CatSlave!

Anyone have any more on the UNUSUAL side? You know, those things you're too embarrassed to eat in front of anyone outside the family or don't admit to liking!

Shadow_Ferret
06-04-2008, 08:36 PM
Gah. You people eat some disgusting things!

Kitrianna
06-04-2008, 09:00 PM
I don't eat anything unusual and not admit to it. I like to see the look on peoeple's faces when they go "EWWWWWWWWWWWW that's gross!", but hey, that's just me.

CatSlave
06-04-2008, 11:40 PM
That IS an unusual recipe, CatSlave!

Anyone have any more on the UNUSUAL side? You know, those things you're too embarrassed to eat in front of anyone outside the family or don't admit to liking!
You mean like standing in front of the open refrigerator door, squirting whipped cream
directly into your mouth from the container when no one is looking? :D
Not lately.

Kitrianna
06-05-2008, 01:12 AM
You mean like standing in front of the open refrigerator door, squirting whipped cream
directly into your mouth from the container when no one is looking? :D
Not lately.

It's more fun to do that when someone is looking, but then again you usually get yelled at for it in my house. It's yummy though.

TerzaRima
06-05-2008, 02:05 AM
Peanut butter and onion sandwiches, flavored with a little salt. So very good.

Marian Perera
06-05-2008, 02:41 AM
Here's a Sri Lankan recipe for something called pol sambol :

Freshly grated coconut
1 finely chopped onion
Red chili powder (as much as you can stand, keep tasting dish as you prepare it to find your cutoff point)
Lemon or lime juice (freshly squeezed is best) and salt to taste

Optional : finely chopped green chilies, ground dried red chilies

Mix all ingredients well. The sambol should be a fiery orange-red color at the end. It's very versatile. I ate it with rice in Sri Lanka, made sandwiches with it in the Middle East and used it as a chip dip in the States. You'll want something cold to drink, though.

CBumpkin
06-05-2008, 03:03 AM
Peanut butter and onion sandwiches, flavored with a little salt. So very good.
Ladies and Gentlemen, we have a winner! The grand prize belongs to you, TerzaRima!

Never, in a million years, would I have thought to do this. :flag:

MsK
06-05-2008, 03:29 AM
I don't know if this is unusual. But, when I used to eat steak, I liked to put gobs of sour cream on it. Lot's of fat, but, I was pretty much eating Atkins style back then.

katiemac
06-05-2008, 03:59 AM
But either buy or make cinnimon and sugar chips. You can take tortilla shells, cut them into triangles, rub with olive oil and sprinkle on the cinnimon and sugar. Bake them in the oven until crunchy but not burnt.

Icerose, how long and at what temperature do you bake the tortillas? I love cinnamon and sugar chips but never thought to make my own. The store brands are expensive, and I almost always have tortillas on hand.

icerose
06-05-2008, 05:19 AM
Icerose, how long and at what temperature do you bake the tortillas? I love cinnamon and sugar chips but never thought to make my own. The store brands are expensive, and I almost always have tortillas on hand.

350 degrees for about 7 minutes then rotate the pan and bake another 7 minutes. Keep a really close eye on your first batch in case your oven cooks fast or slow. My oven cooks in half the time.

You can use corn or white, depending on the flavor you are going for.

Jo
06-05-2008, 06:44 AM
Not unusual, but definitely meant to be eaten alone: garlic sauce (more like a spread) from any Middle Eastern restaurant. I can eat a pint of that stuff on anything. It's just garlic, olive oil, lemon juice, and salt whipped together until it's the consistency of mayo. You can imagine how I smell for several days afterward.

Okay, I dabbled with the ingredients you listed, and the sauce below is what I came up with. :) You can make as little or much as you like--this is a small batch. All ingredients can be adjusted for taste--the trick is how you put them together.

Garlic Sauce a la Jo :D

Whisk 2 tsp minced garlic, quarter tsp (or less) of salt and about 1 Tbs lemon juice in a medium bowl. Gradually drizzle in about half a cup of olive oil, whisking all the time into a paste. (I added the oil, whisked for a while to thicken the sauce, then added more oil, etc.)

ETA: You could probably mix the sauce in a food processor (may be useful if using garlic cloves instead of minced garlic). The oil would still need to be drizzled in, though.


Now I reek, too. :tongue

CatSlave
06-05-2008, 07:11 AM
Try smashing the minced garlic with the salt to a paste with a mortar and pestle, or crush them together with the flat side of your knife.
Then mix in the lemon juice, and finally whisk in the olive oil drop by drop until you get a thick emulsion.

Depending on the quantities you use, this makes an authentic sauce or even better, a marinade for chicken.

Bubastes
06-05-2008, 07:13 AM
That's it. I'm making a pint of garlic sauce this weekend. Thank you for posting tips on how to make it!

Jo
06-05-2008, 07:38 AM
Depending on the quantities you use, this makes an authentic sauce or even better, a marinade for chicken.

Or lamb. *drool*

I love it on a Greek Yiros (http://www.recipezaar.com/261496). (That's slivers of meat--lamb/beef/chicken cooked on a large skewer and sliced off--and lettuce, tomato and onion, wrapped in pita bread.)

CatSlave
06-05-2008, 08:07 AM
I'm assuming you start with fresh garlic cloves, not the minced kind in a jar.
I just smash the whole cloves with salt in a mortar, but some people might find it easier to chop the cloves up a bit first if using the side of a knife on a cutting board.

katiemac
06-05-2008, 08:12 AM
350 degrees for about 7 minutes then rotate the pan and bake another 7 minutes. Keep a really close eye on your first batch in case your oven cooks fast or slow. My oven cooks in half the time.

You can use corn or white, depending on the flavor you are going for.

Thanks!! Can't wait to try these. I'll probably use wheat tortillas, since that's what I have.

Jo
06-05-2008, 09:17 AM
That's it. I'm making a pint of garlic sauce this weekend. Thank you for posting tips on how to make it!

After reading CatSlave's method, it clicked! (It's all in the lingo, yanno?) You may also want to look up aioli (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aioli) (which is garlic and olive oil sauce) on the web--there are plenty of recipe variations to peruse. Yum.

Bmwhtly
06-05-2008, 03:03 PM
You mean like standing in front of the open refrigerator door, squirting whipped cream
directly into your mouth from the container when no one is looking? :D
Not lately.That's not unusual!
In fact, I wouldn't trust anyone who has a can of squirty cream and doesn't do that.


My only slightly unusual recipe was an accident. I made my bolognese sauce (store-bought sauce, but add mince, onions, mushrooms and worcestershire sauce.) then found I didn't have any pasta. So I used rice, it's much nicer. Also it clings together better.


Also, if you take a mushroom, snap of the stem and fill the cavity with Branston Pickle... it's pretty tasty.

L M Ashton
06-05-2008, 04:45 PM
Cream cheese and hot pepper jelly spread on crackers. What, is this not normal? It's fantastic! I used to make my own hot pepper jelly just because I went through so much of it and it cost a whole lot less that way. Yeah, I'm cheap. :)


Not unusual, but definitely meant to be eaten alone: garlic sauce (more like a spread) from any Middle Eastern restaurant. I can eat a pint of that stuff on anything. It's just garlic, olive oil, lemon juice, and salt whipped together until it's the consistency of mayo. You can imagine how I smell for several days afterward.And this is a problem why? ;)


Here's a Sri Lankan recipe for something called pol sambol :

Freshly grated coconut
1 finely chopped onion
Red chili powder (as much as you can stand, keep tasting dish as you prepare it to find your cutoff point)
Lemon or lime juice (freshly squeezed is best) and salt to taste

Optional : finely chopped green chilies, ground dried red chilies

Mix all ingredients well. The sambol should be a fiery orange-red color at the end. It's very versatile. I ate it with rice in Sri Lanka, made sandwiches with it in the Middle East and used it as a chip dip in the States. You'll want something cold to drink, though.

Yeah, we eat that stuff fairly frequently. It's positively ambrosia! Actually, when my mother in law makes it, she makes at least double if I'm there cuz I eat that much of the stuff.

For the onions, we use shallots, not regular onions (very optional - mostly we don't add onions). We also add a teaspoon of Maldive fish flakes and always lime juice (Key lime only). Ours ends up being a fairly dark red because we add so much red chilli powder. My mother in law grinds it on her stone grinder in the back yard - it's a cylindrical rock bigger than a rolling pin sitting on a rock slab and it's ground between the two. Grinding it this way, the traditional way, makes a far superior Pol Sambol than any Pol Sambol made in a food processor. Don't know why. Maybe because it can grind it much finer than a food processor?

Okay, funny story. :D Pol Sambol, when made properly, is fairly hot. Most foreign white people can't handle it. At all. So, when the hubby's brother was getting married and all sorts of relatives were in town and we sat down to eat breakfast of string hoppers, pol sambol, and probably bittera hodi (egg in coconut gravy - oh, heaven!), I slapped a huge amount of pol sambol onto my plate. One of Fahim's uncles took one look at that pile of pol sambol and, extremely, shall we say, concerned, nay, worried for my very health, said, "You can't eat that." I took a bite of the pol sambol, smacked my lips, and said, "Why not?" :D I knew exactly what he meant, but I love shocking people, and he was shocked that I could eat it. And he was shocked at how much of it I could eat. :D

Queen of Swords, when were you in Sri Lanka, how long did you stay, and, uh, you know, that stuff?

icerose
06-05-2008, 05:33 PM
I remember an unusual sandwich I made a while ago that was pretty good.

It was an open faced sandwich slathered with guacamole and topped with a slice of roasted ham.

Jo
06-05-2008, 05:46 PM
To spice up our tuna mornay that we normally serve with rice, pasta or in a jacket potato, my hubby added copious amounts of curry, chilli, paprika and Thai seasoning. We now have this tuna with garlic or creamed mashed potatoes.

I also like to scoop my fries in my Macca's super choc. sundae. And... I like eating Magnum icecream (choc-coated vanilla) with Sweet Chilli Corn Chips.

L M Ashton
06-05-2008, 05:48 PM
I, um, frequently put guacamole in sandwiches...

Marian Perera
06-05-2008, 05:52 PM
<slaps forehead>

I forgot about the Maldive fish. Though I don't even know if that ingredient is available in the Great White North. I must check in the small Asian-run shops.

I don't know if there's a name for the little shallots, but when my mom made sambol, she'd soak ten or so little shallots in water for an hour to make it easier for me (the involuntary cook's assistant) to peel them.

My grandmother had one of the heavy grinding stones you mentioned, but unfortunately the only Sri Lankan piece of culinary equipment I have is a coconut scraper which hasn’t been out of its box since I moved here. I'm going to grate the coconut myself the next time I make sambol - the first time I bought pre-grated coconut in a bag and it wasn't anywhere near dry enough.


Queen of Swords, when were you in Sri Lanka, how long did you stay, and, uh, you know, that stuff?

I was born there. :) By nationality I'm Sri Lankan, but my family left when I was six and emigrated to Dubai. I've visited Sri Lanka off and on since then (specifically, Colombo and Kurunegala), but the extended family there doesn't really approve of me since I'm very Westernized and don't adhere to their beliefs and traditions. I still love Sri Lankan food, though, and hope to go back some day to visit a few more historic sites and tourist attractions.

]I take it you’ve been living there for some time now? Do you speak the language (Singhalese or Tamil)?

L M Ashton
06-05-2008, 07:20 PM
*laughs* You left Sri Lanka for Canada. I left Canada for Sri Lanka. :) I've been here since Aug 2003 and speak about fifty or a hundred words of Sinhala, mostly around food and ingredients thanks to the mother in law. :) I'm also very Westernized (surprise, surprise) and it's taken a lot for them to accept me (including me wearing shalwaars around the extended family), and a lot of them think I'm crazy just because I'm so different, and they don't understand me, but... Now, Fahim's parents are sibs are fine, perfectly fine. But it's bed time and Fahim is shutting off the router, so more tomorrow... :D

CatSlave
06-05-2008, 07:35 PM
After reading CatSlave's method, it clicked! (It's all in the lingo, yanno?) You may also want to look up aioli (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aioli) (which is garlic and olive oil sauce) on the web--there are plenty of recipe variations to peruse. Yum.
Oh, good grief... the thought of aioli never crossed my mind. *slaps forehead*
I was explaining the technique I learned for making Syrian and Lebanese salad dressings and marinades from cooks of those countries.

I guess it just goes to show some food basics are universal. :D

Bubastes
06-05-2008, 07:36 PM
I can't believe I didn't think of aioli either! I think it's the egg in the aioli that threw me off (garlic sauce doesn't have egg). I had assumed that it would be impossible to get that thick texture without the egg. Apparently, I was wrong!

tjwriter
06-05-2008, 08:02 PM
At one of the restaurants I worked at, the chef introduced me to mayo mixed with chipotle peppers as a dip for french fries. When I was pregnant with my daughter, all I wanted at the end was spicy mayo and homemade french fries. Kraft makes a spicy mayo, which works if you add enough cayenne pepper to it.

shawkins
06-05-2008, 08:28 PM
the chef introduced me to mayo mixed with chipotle peppers as a dip for french fries.

That sounds really good.

There was a restaurant in the town where I went to school that made my favorite sandwich evar:

1 baguette, split lengthwise but not cut all the way through. Stuff with
smoked turkey (50%)
roast beef (50%)
top with swiss cheese & bacon bits

Nuke for about a minute

serve with about 1/4 c of 1000 Island dressing (which I normally hate) as a dipping sauce.

L M Ashton
06-06-2008, 03:09 PM
You know y'all are making me want to start experimenting some more, right? ;)