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L M Ashton
06-02-2008, 06:14 AM
Due to skyrocketing prices in general here and more specifically on all imports, I've recently taken to making my own mayonnaise. I follow a fairly basic and common recipe:

2 egg yolks
1/4 t salt
pinch mustard powder (or red chilli powder or...)
1 T lime juice
2 T vinegar
1 c oil (canola in my case)

The recipe's downstairs, but I'm pretty sure I got it. I mix it up with my stick blender and it emulsifies perfectly fine and very quickly. The flavor's fine, although it doesn't taste exactly how I prefer it (my favourite mayos are Best Foods/Hellmans), but it's close enough that I can definitely live with it without too many complaints. :tongue

BUT. It's runny. Pourable. Not spreadable like Best Foods/Hellmans mayonnaise. I like it thick like that. Any tips on how I can get that texture I love?

Bubastes
06-02-2008, 06:33 AM
Instead of adding everything at once and using a stick blender, have you tried using a whisk and adding the oil slowly (drop by drop at first, then in a thin stream)? That might help thicken things up. If you try it, let me know how it goes!

icerose
06-02-2008, 06:39 AM
You can also cook it and add in starch, but you have to take things slowly.

melaniehoo
06-02-2008, 06:55 AM
Mmm, add garlic for some good times.

With your meal.

Rolling Thunder
06-02-2008, 07:00 AM
You use the yolks? I just use the whites and whip everything until it just begins to form peaks. It stays fluffy, that way.

brianm
06-02-2008, 07:09 AM
Either you left an egg yolk off or your recipe needs another egg yolk. That could be the reason you're ending up with a runny product. This is a pretty standard recipe.

3 eggs yolks
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 1/3 cups olive oil
2 tablespoons lemon juice

I put the egg yolks, salt, and pepper in my blender and puree until the yolks start to lighten up. Then I add 1/2 cup of the olive oil, one drop at a time. Then I drizzle in the remaining amount of olive oil, then the lemon juice.

blacbird
06-02-2008, 08:38 AM
Gag. I hate mayonnaise. On anything. It's like snot, only with a worse color.

caw

brianm
06-02-2008, 03:40 PM
This guy (http://www.afn.org/~poultry/recipes/mayo.htm) uses his electric drill to mix the mayonnaise. I wonder if he uses his sawsall to carve the Sunday roast?:D

L M Ashton
06-02-2008, 04:01 PM
Instead of adding everything at once and using a stick blender, have you tried using a whisk and adding the oil slowly (drop by drop at first, then in a thin stream)? That might help thicken things up. If you try it, let me know how it goes!With my problem painful joints, that would be a no can do. As an aside, there are plenty of people all over the Internet who also use stick blenders quite successfully, so it's not just me.


You use the yolks? I just use the whites and whip everything until it just begins to form peaks. It stays fluffy, that way.
How's the taste of yours? Every recipe I've encountered thus far says yolk or, occasionally, a whole egg. I've not yet seen white mentioned. If you tell me the taste and texture are good, I'll give it a try. :)


Either you left an egg yolk off or your recipe needs another egg yolk. That could be the reason you're ending up with a runny product. I use this one from my late friend's cookbook, Richard Nelson's American Cooking.

3 eggs yolks
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 1/3 cups olive oil
2 tablespoons lemon juice

I put the egg yolks, salt, and pepper in my blender and puree until the yolks start to lighten up. Then I add 1/2 cup of the olive oil, one drop at a time. Then I drizzle in the remaining amount of olive oil, then the lemon juice.
You're using 3 egg yolks to 1 1/3 cup oil. I'm using 2 egg yolks to 1 cup oil. There isn't that much of a difference between the ratios. Plus I tried adding an extra yolk once to see if that would make a difference, and it didn't. It was the same texture, but more of an eggy taste than other versions.


Does this mean that y'all who are making your own mayo get stiff stuff that stands on its own and is stiff enough to resemble Hellman's/Best Foods mayo? If you tell me that's true, then, well, I'll just whimper in disappointment. ;)

brianm
06-02-2008, 06:12 PM
Yes, mine is always thick.


There isn't that much of a difference between the ratios.

I respectfully disagree. There is a big difference and it's the eggs that create the stiffness. Just as in baking, where measuring exact amounts is very important, the ratios for making mayo need to be correct or it will never come together properly.

I also think using the boat motor and combining all of the ingredients at once is a problem. All of the egg yolk mixture needs to be working when the initial oil is added or else you're not getting the help you need from the yolks to make it come together. (That's why a balloon whisk is used when you make mayo by hand.) You need to get the emulsification started to give the mayo a base to work from first, and that can only happen by adding the initial oil in small amounts until it comes together. Then you can add larger amounts of oil.

Like I said, I use my blender but it isn't the small bottomed type. It's a wide bottom that I purchased off Amazon last year specifically for making smoothies. It works beautifully and my mayo comes out fine every time.

HeronW
06-02-2008, 08:13 PM
http://homecooking.about.com/od/howtocookwithcondiments/a/mayonnaisetips.htm

"Avoid making mayo during wet, humid weather. High humidity and heat will weight it down and yield a greasy result."

the above gives dif recipes too.

CatSlave
06-02-2008, 10:10 PM
Are all y'all using room temperature eggs?

Rolling Thunder
06-03-2008, 12:53 AM
How's the taste of yours? Every recipe I've encountered thus far says yolk or, occasionally, a whole egg. I've not yet seen white mentioned. If you tell me the taste and texture are good, I'll give it a try.

It's good if you want low fat. Google no yolk mayo and you'll find a few recipes.

Bubastes
06-03-2008, 12:54 AM
Damn, RT, your new avatar is so...big.

Rolling Thunder
06-03-2008, 12:59 AM
And sexy. ;)

L M Ashton
06-03-2008, 06:11 AM
http://homecooking.about.com/od/howtocookwithcondiments/a/mayonnaisetips.htm

"Avoid making mayo during wet, humid weather. High humidity and heat will weight it down and yield a greasy result."

the above gives dif recipes too.
Aw, crap! That's the only kind of weather we have here!

L M Ashton
06-03-2008, 05:54 PM
I've done some more research, and there are comments on the Internet that an old egg can result in runny mayo. Well, yeah. There are no regulations here and it's pretty common to get old eggs. Plus eggs aren't stored in the refrigerator section at grocery stores, but rather at room temperature. :( This may be contributing to the runniness.

As a further comment on the amount of oil an egg can emulsify, I found something I found quite interesting and very surprising (http://www.vendian.org/envelope/dir1/mayo.html). Apparently, according to the experiments performed, a single egg yolk can emulsify around a hundred cups of oil. Okay, it would no longer taste like mayonnaise, but hey...

Back to the original problem. I have a few ideas of things to try.

Since temperature and humidity is quite possibly a problem (heck, I have difficulty getting cream to whip because of heat and humidity here), I'm considering refrigerating all ingredients for 10 or 15 minutes before making. Alternately, I'll try making the mayo first thing in the morning when the temperatures are cooler. Or I might just have to try making it in our air conditioned bedroom instead of the kitchen. :tongue

It could be the stick blender. I'll try the whisk attachment for the stick blender and, if that doesn't work, I'll try the whipping attachment for my blender since that likely has higher speeds anyway. Or maybe I'll try that first. :)

And if nothing else works, then I'll try adding the oil slowly. I don't see this as a cause of the problem since there are so many people who have successfully made mayo with all ingredients dumped into a container and then mixed with a stick blender or cup blender, but I'll give it a go anyway.

L M Ashton
06-06-2008, 03:00 PM
So, we got eggs delivered yesterday (online grocery shopping finally hit Sri Lanka :)) and, with three-day-old eggs (at least, that's what the label indicates) in hand, I made mayonnaise this morning. At 7am. Before the heat got too bad - I think it was still only around 27 or 28C (or, um, 80-82F). And guess what? It worked! It firmed up nice and thick, so thick that I'm going to have to re-think the narrow just-wide-enough-to-fit-stick-blender-in cup that I use to make the mayo. It doesn't exactly flow over the stick blender, so the mayo almost glops on to the counter when I'm trying to remove the stick blender (yep, didn't use whisk attachment, nor did I resort to my blender or the whipping attachment there, either). :D

I used the recipe I had posted above, but used only coconut vinegar instead of lime/lemon juice and white vinegar. Eh, why not? It gives a nice fermented coconutty taste that actually works for me. Not every time, but, you know, for a change. :D I changed nothing else about the method except the time of day and corresponding heat and humidity levels. I have no idea how old my previous eggs were, so I don't know if that's really a variable or not, although I don't recall making mayo this soon after grocery shopping, but my memory is lousy, so who knows. Anyway, I'm not going to call that a change at the moment. The point is, at this point in time, by resorting to making mayonnaise at the same time I get us breakfast, I now have the thick mayonnaise capable of making a mole hill into a mountain. :D

Thanks for all your help and your many suggestions. I'm ever so grateful that it didn't take me five more tries to get it right. :)

L M Ashton
06-18-2008, 06:05 PM
I ran out of mayo a couple of days ago, but I tend to wait to make another batch until I know I need it. You know, minimizing waste and all that. Today, I needed mayo, but didn't realize it until I started making lunch. Uh oh. Heat and humidity. Like, today was a really noticeably hot and humid day. Will it work?

So this time, I went the paranoid slow route. Mixed the egg yolk with vinegar and everything else first, then added the oil drop by drop initially, using my stick blender to emulsify.

I did three egg yolks in successive single-yolk batches. No deal. Each one was runny mayo.

This confirms to me that heat and humidity are major deal breakers. :(