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BarbaraKE
05-31-2008, 10:37 PM
I'm drawing a blank and my cheap thesaurus is no help. My characters are in a situation where they're trying to be fairly quiet. One of them practically yells at another, but he's still using a 'whisper' voice, i.e. vocal cords are not involved.

Is there a word for this?

Thanks in advance.

mscelina
05-31-2008, 10:39 PM
stage whisper.

CatSlave
05-31-2008, 10:45 PM
"Shut up," she hissed.

Marian Perera
05-31-2008, 10:57 PM
Oxymoron?

BlueLucario
05-31-2008, 11:38 PM
Oxymoron?

:roll:Yeah, that!

But there aren't any words for a loud whisper. If your using it for your writing, you might as well use 'said' for now.

johnnysannie
06-01-2008, 12:01 AM
sotto voice

Willowmound
06-01-2008, 01:17 AM
Lousper.

BarbaraKE
06-01-2008, 06:04 PM
Hmm, none of these is quite right (though I appreciate the suggestions).

This has been driving me crazy. Oh well, guess I'll try some more online thesauruses.

Thanks anyway.

Sandi LeFaucheur
06-01-2008, 07:13 PM
It's "sotto voce", not "sotto voice".

johnnysannie
06-01-2008, 11:18 PM
It's "sotto voce", not "sotto voice".

In Italian, that's absolutely right.

In English, it has become very common (and considered correct usage) to also say "sotto voice".

IceCreamEmpress
06-02-2008, 07:34 AM
In Italian, that's absolutely right.

In English, it has become very common (and considered correct usage) to also say "sotto voice".

Can you provide a reference for that? Because I've never seen "sotto voice" in print. Not even very inclusive, non-prescriptivist references like Dictionary.com (http://dictionary.reference.com/wordoftheday/archive/2003/10/30.html) or Merriam-Webster (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sotto+voce) include it. I think that anything other than "sotto voce" looks like a typo.

mscelina
06-02-2008, 07:44 AM
I agree. If it's been used as 'sotto voice' it almost has to be a typo. Why have the first word in Italian and the second in English?

I've always seen it as 'sotto voce' -- always.

Sarpedon
06-02-2008, 05:08 PM
well, there's the 'stage whisper' which sounds like a whisper but is loud, used by actors on stage.

sheadakota
06-02-2008, 05:37 PM
This may sound stupid- but could you just say- "Hey!" He said in a loud staged whisper.

Mr Flibble
06-02-2008, 06:04 PM
Can you provide a reference for that? Because I've never seen "sotto voice" in print. Not even very inclusive, non-prescriptivist references like Dictionary.com (http://dictionary.reference.com/wordoftheday/archive/2003/10/30.html) or Merriam-Webster (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sotto+voce) include it. I think that anything other than "sotto voce" looks like a typo.

It's an eggcorn? :)

When english people say it, it sounds like sotto voice ( I've never heard it pronounced any other way tbh, because well, the english have no idea how to pronounce italian), so when writing it you would naturally spell it that way.

IceCreamEmpress
06-02-2008, 10:35 PM
It's an eggcorn? :)

You know I love me some eggcorns!


When english people say it, it sounds like sotto voice ( I've never heard it pronounced any other way tbh, because well, the english have no idea how to pronounce italian), so when writing it you would naturally spell it that way.

Still, that's a misspelling. Now, in the US people say "sotto voce" more or less ("sotto voh-chay" or "sotto votch-ee"), but almost EVERYONE pronounces "chaise longue" as "shays lounge." Still, it's correctly spelled "chaise longue" rather than "chaise lounge."

Sassee
06-03-2008, 12:45 AM
It's a stage whisper. The first time I heard that term I knew exactly what it meant - a whisper that's too loud to truly be considered a whisper.

slcboston
06-03-2008, 12:55 AM
as has been mentioned, "stage whisper" is the correct term though it isn't, properly speaking, a single word.

And anyone using "sotto voice" ought to be smacked across their knuckles with a ruler. It's just wrong. Doesn't matter how we ignorant Americans pronounce it. :D

slcboston
06-03-2008, 12:56 AM
but almost EVERYONE pronounces "chaise longue" as "shays lounge." Still, it's correctly spelled "chaise longue" rather than "chaise lounge."

I still think of it as a "chase" lounge. No idea what it means - though I have this image of the Roadrunner and Coyote racing around inside a hotel piano bar. :D

BarbaraKE
06-03-2008, 01:19 AM
Well, this has been interesting. I am familiar with 'sotto voce' (which I always thought meant 'whisper') but I always thought it was 'chaise lounge'. (Luckily, there are no chaises of either type in my book.)

Getting back to the 'loud whisper'. I think of a 'stage whisper' as something that is meant to be overheard. It's deliberately loud so that (the audience/whomever) will hear it.

But the situation in my book is a bit different. Imagine two people are hiding and people are looking for them. The first person (Bill) already a bit angry because the other person acted like an idiot and got them into this mess. Bill quickly outlines a plan ("you go that way, I'll go this way, etc.). The second person starts to argue. Then Bill cuts him off...

"No," Bill whispered fiercely. "That won't work."

"No," Bill whispered back, cutting off his objections with a sharp look. "That won't work."

"No," Bill whispered emphatically. "That won't work."

Obviously, none of these are quite right. 'Whispered' just doesn't convey the right tone, yet 'yelled', 'snapped', 'shouted', etc. don't work either.

I guess I could just use 'ejaculated'...

StephanieFox
06-03-2008, 01:56 AM
How about 'hissed.' That's one word that can mean a loud whisper.


"Stay away! I'm not doing that," he hissed.

IceCreamEmpress
06-03-2008, 04:51 AM
You can't hiss "No, that won't work" because there aren't any sibilants in it.

I think "whispered fiercely" is good, actually. Or "No, that won't work," said Bill in a fierce whisper.

ebwatt
06-03-2008, 06:02 AM
You can't hiss "No, that won't work" because there aren't any sibilants in it.

I think "whispered fiercely" is good, actually. Or "No, that won't work," said Bill in a fierce whisper.

How about rasped?

Kalyke
06-03-2008, 06:54 AM
softly bellowed, gently snarled, yelled inaudibly...

BarbaraKE
06-03-2008, 07:39 AM
How about rasped?

Now that's a good word and one I hadn't thought of. I don't think it quite fits here but it would be perfect in a situation where someone has gotten hit in the throat (or somehow injured his vocal cords).

Thank you - I might use that somewhere else.

(Don't worry - I don't often use synonyms of 'said'. But 'said' doesn't always work.)

MarkEsq
06-03-2008, 11:05 PM
Growled? You can do that quietly and it fits the woods motif....

Terry L. Sanders
06-04-2008, 01:24 AM
You might want to waste a few extra words and just describe it. Maybe--

"It won't work!" he yelled. It sounded painful. Yelling in a whisper usually does.

--or something.

Miguelito
06-04-2008, 05:14 AM
Murmur.

Mutter.

KikiteNeko
06-05-2008, 06:57 PM
"Whispered harshly" or "hissed" or "snapped." If you establish in your narrative that they are whispering, you could just use any of those three, or "said." I don't recommend "Stage whisper" or "sotto whisper" or anything like that. Use a term your reader will definitely know. It's never, IMO, a good idea to get creative with your "said"s

Example:

Huddled in the darkness, they kept their voices low.
"Shut up," she hissed.