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View Full Version : War of All Forum Wars Starts Here----> BBQ



Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-31-2008, 08:39 PM
I'm amazed, shocked even, no one has posted anything at all about BBQ! So... here we go: North vs South, East vs West, Memphis vs Kansas City vs Texas vs The Carolinas...

I've got a 7.5 pound Boston Butt brinin'... it's going to be slow smoked and pulled.

Rub? No Rub?

And here's the 'Fort Sumter shot' that starts The War:

What kind of sauce? Got any good secret family recipes?

JLCwrites
05-31-2008, 08:57 PM
Joe's Stuff. Great on anything... Eggs, fettuccine, mac & cheese, chicken, beef, tofu... etc..
http://shopping.nosoc.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=77

Haggis
05-31-2008, 09:02 PM
I've got a 7.5 pound Boston Butt brinin'... it's going to be slow smoked and pulled.



Shoot. My butt weighs a lot more than that.


Joe's Stuff. Great on anything... Eggs, fettuccine, mac & cheese, chicken, beef, tofu... etc..
http://shopping.nosoc.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=77


Tofu? I thought this was the food forum.

:D

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-31-2008, 09:12 PM
Tofu. ::shudder::

I'm talking Bar-B-Que here, people. Ribs. Pork butt. Brisket. Chicken. Whole hog!

CatSlave
05-31-2008, 09:19 PM
Aye, here's a rub with a kick:

1/3 cup Kosher salt
1/3 cup dark brown sugar
1/4 cup paprika
3 Tbs chili powder
1 Tbs ground coffee powder
1 Tbs ground cumin
1 Tbs garlic powder
1 Tbs cayenne (or less, to taste)

And a finishing sauce for pulled pork:

1 cup cider vinegar
1 cup ballpark mustard
1/2 cup dark brown sugar
1 Tbs Worcestershire
1 tsp celery seed
1 tsp salt
1 tsp black pepper

Whisk together, then simmer on low 15-20 minutes.

For store-bought fixin's, you won't go wrong with Stubbs rubs and sauces.

Sarita
05-31-2008, 09:34 PM
Joe's Stuff. Great on anything... Eggs, fettuccine, mac & cheese, chicken, beef, tofu... etc..
http://shopping.nosoc.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=77
Mmmmm, tofu. Don't listen to them, Turkey. If you don't like tofu, you're not eating it right. :)

I prefer Kansas City flavor, but since I don't eat meat, I don't have a dog in this fight!

Soccer Mom
05-31-2008, 09:37 PM
Texas.

Texas.

Texas.

Texas.

And I have to get Dad's permission if I post his Rub recipe.

I prefer my pork pulled. Nom. I'm also partial to a good smoked brisket.

ETA: And I second the cat's recommendation for Stubbs if you want over the counter sauces and rubs. They are verra nice, I think.

Bubastes
05-31-2008, 10:26 PM
BBQ? Yes, please!

I have no preference on sauce/no sauce, rub/no rub, tomato sauce/vinegar sauce/mustard sauce. It's all gud.

If it's meat cooked over a slow fire, I'm there. Nom!

Soccer Mom
05-31-2008, 10:30 PM
I like to use mesquite chips in the smoker and rub my briskets with Dad's rub. We smoke them for about 18 hours and then finish in the oven.

Bubastes
05-31-2008, 10:31 PM
:drool:

When's dinner?

Soccer Mom
05-31-2008, 10:49 PM
how soon can u get 2 texas?

Bubastes
05-31-2008, 10:52 PM
Alas, not soon enough.

I may have to find a way to make my own.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
06-01-2008, 12:16 AM
how soon can u get 2 texas?

Depends on which part you're talking about! I can get to Dallas in about 2.5 to 3 hours. :)

Soccer Mom
06-01-2008, 12:21 AM
Add about another hour to get here from Dallas. :D

brianm
06-01-2008, 12:56 AM
We don't BBQ in Ireland. Bit too much weather, you know? ;)

That said, I prefer sauced meats over rubbed. I have always disliked bottled BBQ sauce, but I recently discovered a new one. "Famous Dave's BBQ Sauce" is really very nice and it doesn't have that bottled sauce flavor with the nasty aftertaste, nor is it overly sweet.

I liked it so much, I went back to the market and bought five more bottles. (They were on sale.)

Ol' Fashioned Girl
06-01-2008, 01:10 AM
This is a homemade sauce recipe originally conceived by the father of one of my best friends way back in Ye Olden Days:

2 C Ketchup
2 C Water
1 tbsp Mustard
2 tsp Cayenne Pepper
C Sugar
C Liquid Hickory Smoke
tsp Salt

Simmer until desired thickness - and keep a splatter screen over the pot as it gets thick. This stuff can be like lava, and with that sugar, it's not fun to clean up off the stove.

I have gone so far as to make my own ketchup with homegrown tomatoes before proceeding to the first step. Can't say as it's worth the extra work; the store-bought variety works just fine.

I have also added garlic, just 'cause I'm perverse.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
06-01-2008, 01:11 AM
"Famous Dave's BBQ Sauce" is really very nice and it doesn't have that bottled sauce flavor with the nasty aftertaste, nor is it overly sweet.

I liked it so much, I went back to the market and bought five more bottles. (They were on sale.)

I'm a big fan of Head Country and Selmon's... in that order.

joyce
06-01-2008, 02:04 AM
I'm willing to try any BBQ whether it's North, South, East or West. Smoked pork is the best! I do like the Stubbs brand of products and love their pork marinade. If I make homemade BBQ sauce I throw together ketchup, brown sugar, onions, garlic, a little mustard and hot sauce then simmer for a little bit. I do this for baked beans too. I love onions so they are the key factor to me. Now I need some BBQ to eat. Perhaps I should fire up the old smoker tomorrow.:D

Ol' Fashioned Girl
06-01-2008, 03:17 AM
We built Alton Brown's ceramic smoker (couple of BIG flower pots, wire rack, thermometer, single-burner electric hot plate, heavy metal pie pan for the wood chips) and the butt goes on at 6am tomorrow morning. It'll smoke 8-10 hours, depending on the internal temp... then... heaven. Sheer heaven. With baked beans and cole slaw.

Soccer Mom
06-01-2008, 03:33 AM
And peach cobbler for dessert?

joyce
06-01-2008, 03:37 AM
We built Alton Brown's ceramic smoker (couple of BIG flower pots, wire rack, thermometer, single-burner electric hot plate, heavy metal pie pan for the wood chips) and the butt goes on at 6am tomorrow morning. It'll smoke 8-10 hours, depending on the internal temp... then... heaven. Sheer heaven. With baked beans and cole slaw.

Yum, what time is dinner tomorrow? It might take me a while to get there from Florida though. :)

Ol' Fashioned Girl
06-01-2008, 04:05 AM
And peach cobbler for dessert?

Oooo! I hadn't thought that far ahead. I've been mesmerized by the cole slaw and the pork butt! I'll check the pantry... Ol' Boy says that sound like a 'worthy enterprise'.


Yum, what time is dinner tomorrow? It might take me a while to get there from Florida though. :)

I'm thinkin' 6, 6:30. If you start NOW and drive really, really fast...

Ol' Fashioned Girl
06-01-2008, 04:13 AM
This is my mama's peach cobbler recipe:

1 C All Purpose Flour
1 C Sugar
1 T Baking Powder
Pinch of salt

Mix these ingredients with a whisk.

Add:

1 C Milk
1 tsp Vanilla
1/2 tsp freshly grated nutmeg

Stir until a smooth, somewhat thin batter is made. Pour into 9X13 Pyrex dish sprayed with Pam. Arrange the peaches from two 16oz cans (in light syrup) on the top. Sprinkle with as much cinnamon as you like; dot with butter, and bake at 375F 'til the batter rises up over the peaches and gets golden brown and delicious.

I've been known the dot this with raspberry jam before it goes into the oven, too. :)

It's unbelievably good with vanilla ice cream.

JLCwrites
06-01-2008, 08:13 AM
Here is another question to ask....

Propane or charcoal?

We have propane, but I REALLY miss stuff cooked on a charcoal grill.

Bubastes
06-01-2008, 08:16 AM
Charcoal. No question.

StoryG27
06-01-2008, 08:20 AM
Rub or no rub?!?! You've got to be kidding me. Everyone knows you rub. RUB. Always rub.

Go Memphis BBQ!

Haggis
06-01-2008, 08:40 AM
Propane. You can control the temperature.

And, OFG, I'm wanting some of them peach cobblers. If you're dealing with fresh peaches, do you grill them first?

SPMiller
06-01-2008, 09:06 AM
Brisket is my favorite form of American-style barbacoa.

I use an old New Braunfels offset smoker and I prefer to use mesquite. Oak is also plentiful, but burns way too hot. Rub brisket, smoke for a few hours, then wrap in foil. Keep temperature steady around 200-225 F (not as easy as it sounds when using wood fuel) for up to 16 hours after that, or until you can't wait any longer--whichever comes first. Retain some of the drippings from the foil as the base for the sauce.

I don't have the rub/sauce recipes handy and can't find them. Must be with my parents.

SPMiller
06-01-2008, 09:24 AM
Preparation of brisket, after removal from smoker:

1) There should be a layer of fat on the top which I hope you didn't remove before cooking. Cut this off as one piece if possible and set aside--do not throw away.
2) Your cut won't be perfect. Hack off the remaining fatty/meaty bits and dump them into a saucepan. You can cut these up and mix with a little sauce for sandwiches.
3) Slice brisket to desired thickness.
4) Replace the fat layer on top of the brisket. You don't want the meat to dry out, and the presence of the fat helps with that.

Cake pans make decent brisket receptacles, depending on the size of the cut.

SPMiller
06-01-2008, 09:25 AM
And don't forget the beer.

sassandgroove
06-01-2008, 10:11 AM
the only BBQ i've had I didn't like was the vinegar based one in North Carolina. I'm good with the rest. I am glad Alabama has good BBQ, we had it at our wedding. Mmm....

sassandgroove
06-01-2008, 10:23 AM
OMG Duh! My mom has a good recipe. My Grandma got it from Better Homes and Gardens years ago. I think I know it from memory, let me try.

It's best with Pork, but beef is good too.

BBQ Spare Ribs - mmmm
pork ribs
1/4 c molasses
1/4 c yellow mustard
1/4 c soy sauce
2 tblsp white vinegar
2 tblsp worcestshire sauce

line baking pan with foil. lay ribs in dish, it works best if they fit tight and are touching. Otherwise they get dry. pour the sauce over the ribs. It's lumpy the mustard doesn't mix well, it's ok, it mixes while baking. turn the ribs to coat, then marinate at least an hour. My mom does overnight. oh, in the fridge. covered.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
Place uncovered in the oven for anhour and a half, turn every thirty minutes. Very yummy with with baked potatoes and green veggies like green beans or aspargus.

I like to put the sauce on my potato. After we're done I like to dip bread in the pan and soak up the decadent sauce. Oh so evil and yummy. My husband and I bonded over the pan back when we were just friends. :D Our friends were in the living room and it was fun like we were getting away with something.

Anyway this is a favorite at our house and was when I was growing up. I always asked for it for my birthday. Once when I was single out in California a friend of mine who was older sorta adopted me and my friends and would have us over to her house with her family occasionally. She started asking for recipes for our special meals from home to help us feel less home sick. I gave her this recipe and she did it in the crock pot instead of the oven. It was very very good. It was different, the sauce didn't thicken it was liquidy, but the meat - oh the meat - fell off the bones. I've done it in the crock pot with beef roasts, too. OMG! Let me tell you it makes my husband happy, yes sir. :D

The orig recipe has tabasco sauce, but we omit that. Just you know, if you wanna try.

ETA: I read my mom's recipe today and she specifies bone in ribs pork 1/2 pound per person. nom nom nom...

JJ Cooper
06-01-2008, 10:33 AM
Are we Aussies invited to play? We are the BBQ Kings. We love lamb on the BBQ and here is a clip to prove it.

http://www.benjaminchristie.com/blog/sam-kekovich-australia-day-lamb-ad-2005

And another.

http://www.benjaminchristie.com/blog/sam-kekovich-australia-day-lamb-2006

Or this one.

http://www.benjaminchristie.com/blog/sam-kekovich-australia-day-lamb-2007

JJ

CatSlave
06-01-2008, 10:39 AM
We don't BBQ in Ireland. Bit too much weather, you know? ;)

That said, I prefer sauced meats over rubbed. I have always disliked bottled BBQ sauce, but I recently discovered a new one. "Famous Dave's BBQ Sauce" is really very nice and it doesn't have that bottled sauce flavor with the nasty aftertaste, nor is it overly sweet.

I liked it so much, I went back to the market and bought five more bottles. (They were on sale.)
Famous Dave's has fifteen-some restaurants here in the MD/No.VA area.
My favorite sauce is their Texas Pit; not too sweet and with a peppery bite. Terrific with brisket.
Grocery store sauces all taste alike to me; tomato paste and corn syrup seem to be the main ingredients. Yuck.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
06-01-2008, 03:30 PM
Propane. You can control the temperature.

And, OFG, I'm wanting some of them peach cobblers. If you're dealing with fresh peaches, do you grill them first?

We've done some rotisserie stuff on the propane - you're right; the temp is easier to control... but... I dunno. I like the Alton Brown ceramic get-up for the smokin'. Low, even heat, insulated inside the clay... it's really good.


I don't have the rub/sauce recipes handy and can't find them. Must be with my parents.

I hope you check with them... I didn't used to like brisket until my boss made some and it actually came out tender. Everyone else had handed me a plate of shoe leather and looked like I ought to swoon.


Preparation of brisket, after removal from smoker:

<snip>

4) Replace the fat layer on top of the brisket. You don't want the meat to dry out, and the presence of the fat helps with that.

I've never seen or heard of this before... sounds perfect. I hate dry brisket almost as much as I hate tough brisket.


BBQ Spare Ribs - mmmm
.

Mmmmmm! Indeed! I'm trying these next weekend.


Are we Aussies invited to play? We are the BBQ Kings. We love lamb on the BBQ and here is a clip to prove it.

It took me fifty years to work up the stones to try lamb. I was raised by folks who thought that wasn't real meat. Boy, were they wrong.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
06-01-2008, 03:35 PM
Oh, forgot to answer Haggis' question re: grilling the peaches.

I haven't tried that! And we've got some of the best peaches this side of Georgia comin' up soon: Stratford peaches are sold from the back of a truck parked on a corner within a few blocks of my house. I've stoned and washed them, sliced 'em, and poached 'em with sugar. Do the grilled peaches give the cobbler a smoky flavor?

Ol' Fashioned Girl
06-01-2008, 04:17 PM
I've also got a stove-top smoker by Cameron (http://www.cameronscookware.com/Smoker%20Value%20Pack.aspx) that makes some mean smoked chicken, bologna, and pork tenderloin - anything that can be cut to fit inside the flat, wide container. It uses ground up wood chips... I've got hickory, pecan, cherry, and bourbon flavored oak.

I was afraid it would set the smoke alarms off, but it actually doesn't! It's an amazing piece of kitchen equipment - just tiny whisps of smoke escape. I highly recommend it for those long, rainy seasons or ice-encrusted winters when you'd really like some smoked meat and can't do it outside.

Bubastes
06-01-2008, 05:10 PM
OFG, thanks for the tip on the Cameron smoker. I had wondered whether it would set off my smoke alarms. I'm glad to hear that it doesn't!

Soccer Mom
06-01-2008, 07:03 PM
Just a second for Miller and replacing the fat. It does keep it from drying out. Dried out brisket is teh yucky.

CatSlave
06-01-2008, 07:14 PM
When I was young and poor and could not afford a real barbeque, I built one for myself with an old metal wheelbarrow and a cast-off oven grate.
I put sand in the bottom to about halfway, then layered the charcoal on top and put the oven grate over all. The sides of the wheelbarrow supported the grate above the charcoal.
Voila!
And when it was time to clean up, it was easy to roll the wheelbarrow elsewhere to dump the used charcoal.
My neighbors were amused.

You could do the same with a metal washtub.

Haggis
06-01-2008, 08:09 PM
Oh, forgot to answer Haggis' question re: grilling the peaches.

I haven't tried that! And we've got some of the best peaches this side of Georgia comin' up soon: Stratford peaches are sold from the back of a truck parked on a corner within a few blocks of my house. I've stoned and washed them, sliced 'em, and poached 'em with sugar. Do the grilled peaches give the cobbler a smoky flavor?

A little. Yes. I've done this to peaches when making peach ice cream and it's awesome. Never tried it with cobbler, though. I'm thinking it might work fine.


Momma Haggis' all purpose rub and blackening spice.

4 tablespoons mild paprika
4 teaspoons sea salt
2 teaspoons garlic powder
4 teaspoons onion powder
teaspoon ground hot pepper
2 teaspoons ground black pepper
2 teaspoons ground coriander
2 teaspoons ground ginger
2 teaspoons ground star anise
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

makes about cup. Combine in food processor pulsing to mix well. Store in a clean air tight glass jar. Keeps for about 3 months as long as it is moisture-free and cool.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
06-01-2008, 11:09 PM
We just peeked at the pork butt - it's beautiful. Temp's up to 150F... about another four hours and YUM. :)

Ol' Fashioned Girl
06-02-2008, 04:06 AM
It was excellent. Flavor was outtasight. Needed a couple more hours to be 'pull apart' tender, but was very tender to chunk up for some chopped pork. We cut the end off and did just that - couldn't wait any longer! The rest of it - about 7/8th of the whole butt - is in the oven now, sealed in a cookin' bag. Tyler Florence's cole slaw dressing was great... but, I gotta tell ya, I should've gone with my gut instinct and passed up the Bush's Grillin' Beans. They were just 'okay'.

These are the ones I should've made - my brother's recipe:

Gary's Baked Beans

Cut 3 or 4 slices thick, hickory smoked bacon into half-inch pieces. Fry 'til looking good... we want the grease. When crisp, add half of one chopped onion, three cloves minced garlic and some diced green and/or red peppers. Brown all of this and add one tablespoon of dark brown sugar and one tablespoon of wet yellow mustard. Add one can of diced tomatoes or an equivalent amount fresh, chopped tomato. Blend it all in and then add one teaspoon liquid smoke, or to taste.

Let simmer to cook down a little. Then add three cans of Van Camp Pork and Beans. Do not drain. Gently blend. (Pick out that icky fat thingy!)

Heat them up then check for seasoning - adjusting to suit your and/or your family's tastes. Cook down more if desired. Let them cool and put in fridge to use as desired - the flavors meld and develop as they age.

Remember: Do NOT drain the bacon grease! That's why they taste so good!

Opty
06-04-2008, 10:08 AM
I actually run a BBQ RibHouse (no, I'm not kidding) so it'd be unfair of me to participate in this thread. I don't want to give away any of our secrets.

:)

Opty
06-04-2008, 10:12 AM
Famous Dave's has fifteen-some restaurants here in the MD/No.VA area.
My favorite sauce is their Texas Pit; not too sweet and with a peppery bite. Terrific with brisket.
Grocery store sauces all taste alike to me; tomato paste and corn syrup seem to be the main ingredients. Yuck.

I just gotta go on record and say that our rib house chain totally kicks Famous Dave's ass.

Dommo
06-04-2008, 10:45 AM
Charcoal is mandatory in BBQ.

While the temperature is a bit harder to control, the flavor is much better. However, if I'm just going to toss burgers or brats on the grill, then I'm going propane.

CatSlave
06-04-2008, 02:49 PM
I actually run a BBQ RibHouse (no, I'm not kidding) so it'd be unfair of me to participate in this thread. I don't want to give away any of our secrets.

:)
Oh, go ahead...no one will tell on you. :D
We don't have a lot of choices since the local Red, Hot & Blue moved away.

I don't think I've ever had bad BBQ, though.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
06-04-2008, 02:59 PM
I actually run a BBQ RibHouse (no, I'm not kidding) so it'd be unfair of me to participate in this thread. I don't want to give away any of our secrets.

:)

Awwww, come on.... please? Just one li'l ol' tiny secret? That won't hurt! And if we don't know which BBQ RibHouse you run, we won't even know whose secret it is! :D


I don't think I've ever had bad BBQ, though.

I have. I was served a plate of boiled pork ribs once with bottled smoke flavoring and cold sauce. ::shudder::

Opty
06-04-2008, 10:28 PM
This (http://www.stickyfingers.com) is where I work.

The secrets (if you're smoking), are the wood (hickory is the best, apple wood is great, too. Oak, even red oak, gives it too ashy a flavor), the temp (around 240 ish), the time (depends on the size/type of the meat), and the seasoning (secrets, secrets). The cut of meat you're using don't hurt, neither.

But, that's all I'll say for now.

;)

Soccer Mom
06-04-2008, 10:32 PM
:sniffs: Oh. Memphis style.

I'm still partial to Mesquite wood.

Shadow_Ferret
06-05-2008, 12:35 AM
Colloquially, we call grilling barbequeing.

And what you guys are talking about, I don't bother. Too much mess.

Opty
06-05-2008, 12:36 AM
I like Mesquite more for grilling than smoking. I like the flavor Mesquite gives chicken and beef when it chars on the grill.

CatSlave
06-05-2008, 01:43 AM
Some experts recommend smearing the piece of meat with prepared mustard before applying a rub and letting it rest.

Thoughts?

johnnysannie
06-05-2008, 01:45 AM
Here is another question to ask....

Propane or charcoal?

We have propane, but I REALLY miss stuff cooked on a charcoal grill.

Charcoal.

No choice there.

Charcoal.

CatSlave
06-05-2008, 01:50 AM
Three Guys from Miami roast a pig:

http://cuban-christmas.com/pigroast.html

:Hail: All hail to the masters.

cray
07-25-2008, 04:54 AM
the bbq song (www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ubTQfr_tyY)



eta: i'm not 100% sure but i think that's rt on harmonica

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-03-2009, 03:28 PM
And I have to get Dad's permission if I post his Rub recipe.

Didja ever talk to Dad, SC? Hmmm? Didja?


I don't have the rub/sauce recipes handy and can't find them. Must be with my parents.

And how 'bout you, SP? I'm still looking for my favorites. :)

MaryMumsy
05-04-2009, 02:35 AM
Interesting to catch up on the BBQ war thread. I'll just stand off to the side and watch sauce mops be thrown. I belong to the 'smoking my meat is fine, but don't put any of that gloppy sauce stuff on it' club. There is a great little restaurant in Jerome AZ (people come an hour and a half over the mountain to get the ribs) that is noted for their ribs. I love them cause I can get them without sauce. MMMM

MM

jodiodi
05-06-2009, 11:28 PM
My husband is scary when it comes to grilling anything. I fix our Boston Butts in the oven or slow cooker, depending on what I want to do with them. I've had several rub recipes, which I can't find now, of course, and I usually rub the whole Butt down with salt, pepper, garlic powder, curry posder, minced garlic, and some other stuff I don't recall like sage, thyme, rosemary. Then I pour a little orange juice over the butt, fat side up. Cover the whole thing and put it in a 325 oven and roast all day, or overnight, depending on size. When it's done, I slice it and we can have barbeque sauce with it (regular or Korean). I skim the fat off, then cook rice in the cooking juice. Mmmmm.

pjlove51
05-07-2009, 12:49 AM
I like to bake my ribs in the oven real slow for 2hours then slather them with bbq sauce. They fall off the bone. I prefer charcoal, but I inherited a gas grill.

SPMiller
05-07-2009, 02:07 AM
And how 'bout you, SP? I'm still looking for my favorites. :)I have learned that my uncle now uses pre-mixed rub, not any recipe from my childhood. I have not found a recipe for the sauce (from late grandfather), either at my parents' or my uncle's house. It may be that it was never written down.

So, drawing from memory, I can verify that it contained the brisket drippings (drained from the foil and/or pan), Worcestershire sauce, a tomato paste (possibly ketchup), and Trappey's vinegar (the stuff with little tabasco chiles in it). Then salt and garlic, but beyond that, I have to speculate.

S.C. Denton
05-07-2009, 11:17 AM
Is it just me or does this thread make you want to go get reacquainted with the fridge? See how she's been doin' in your absence.

BBQ is one of man's most thoughtful inventions. I go now to eat junk that will in no way be near as satisfying as anything posted in this thread but will have to do, for now.

Robin
05-07-2009, 03:55 PM
Is it just me or does this thread make you want to go get reacquainted with the fridge? See how she's been doin' in your absence.

BBQ is one of man's most thoughtful inventions. I go now to eat junk that will in no way be near as satisfying as anything posted in this thread but will have to do, for now.

QFT. There's left-over roast in my fridge, but this is where I plan to get lunch today:

http://www.theshedbbq.com/gulfport/


Um... is it lunch time yet?

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-07-2009, 04:24 PM
GAH!tm

Now I want BBQ for lunch! The menu at The Shed sounds delicious!

BardSkye
05-07-2009, 09:45 PM
:cry:


Never had authentic Southern/Texas/Mississippi/Louisiana/Anything else like that BBQ.

WANT SOME!

The closest we come to it up here is Tony Roma's ribs, or Stampede sauce. I'm sure I'm missing something great. And they don't serve beans with it, just French fries, mostly.


I'm hungry.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-07-2009, 11:24 PM
Got to have cole slaw with BBQ. And baked beans. Oh, yeah.

BardSkye
05-08-2009, 08:25 AM
One thing I have noticed on this thread: authentic BBQ seems to insist on the meat being smoked first. Can it taste authentic without?

I'd like to try some of the recipes here, but have no smoker. (Cigarettes probably wouldn't do the trick.) Would a touch of liquid hickory smoke work?

dclary
05-08-2009, 10:25 PM
One thing I have noticed on this thread: authentic BBQ seems to insist on the meat being smoked first. Can it taste authentic without?

I'd like to try some of the recipes here, but have no smoker. (Cigarettes probably wouldn't do the trick.) Would a touch of liquid hickory smoke work?


Liquid smoke works in a pinch.

Another option is this:

take some wood chips, put them in a oven-safe bowl filled with water, and put the bowl on your grill while you're grilling. Keep the lid of your grill closed during the cooking.

But you don't always need smoked meats. It just helps add to the richness of the meat's flavor.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-08-2009, 10:32 PM
Get one of these... they're great! (http://www.amazon.com/Cameron-Cookware-Stainless-Stovetop-Smoker/dp/B00004SZ9D/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1241807484&sr=8-1)

dclary
05-08-2009, 11:24 PM
That DOES look pretty awesome.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-08-2009, 11:43 PM
I've had one for a few years. It's awesome! I've smoked everything from chicken to pork tenderloin to bologna to hamburger patties. I was afraid at first it would set off the smoke alarm in the kitchen, but it doesn't. It's a pretty tight unit... you can see tiny wisps of smoke, but that's it.

Easy clean up, too. Wait for the ash to cool and dump it in the trash - I put a sheet of foil under and above it - not sealed around the edges - and then just wad it up when it's done. Everything else goes right in the dishwasher.

Seaclusion
05-09-2009, 12:01 AM
Here is my super-secret southern baked beans recipe that we usd to serve in my family's restaurant when I was growing up. The recipe makes a little over 5 gals of beans. Divide by whatever number to get the amount you want to make.




5 #10 cans Great Northern beans (Each #10 can is approx. 1 gal.)

2 1/2 lbs bacon, chopped into very small pieces. (substitue leftover smoked pulled pork if avail)

2 large yellow onions, chopped very fine

1 lb white sugar

1lb dark brown sugar

1lb light brown sugar

4 oz molasses.

2 tablespoons salt (To taste if more is desired. Depends on how much salt is in the canned beans)

2 tablespoon black pepper (To taste if more is desired)

2 teaspoons Wright's liquid smoke. (If not using smoked pulled pork)

Combine ingredients thouroughly. Bake 2 1/2 to 3 hours in oven 225 - 250 degrees. May want to boil over in oven. Use spill pan to catch drips.



Richard

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-09-2009, 05:15 AM
Those sound great, Richard! Especially with the pulled pork. How much pulled pork for the 5 gallon size recipe?

Manix
05-09-2009, 05:20 AM
Aw, we just had BBQ pork sandwhichs last night. And I sliced up some home-fries and fried them in bacon drippings in the frying pan with garlic and seasonings--I hoped to have the leftovers for lunch today, but it was all gone :(

SouthernFriedJulie
05-09-2009, 04:00 PM
NC.

No doubt about it.

Not many people know about the north-central stuff, most notably from a little town of Ruffin. I wasn't a huge fan of pulled pork until my mom had a BBQ cook-off deal for her wedding reception. Um, that was her in-law's idea.


Anyway, these folk slow smoke the pork overnight, then pull and chop the meat fine. I swear it just melts in your mouth. My husband, a Buffalo,NY native, just fell in love with the sauce that is poured over the meat after it is piled on top of a fresh bun.

The best sauce I've had for the pourin' is from Short Sugar's, a BBQ joint in Reidsville NC and with a branch in Danville,VA. Working on re-creating it.


BardSkye- an easy re-creation for anyone who wants to try something similar is to take a pork roast that's left over asnd chop/tear/pull the meat fine. Pop it in a saucepan with a BBQ Sauce with brown sugar in it, then add in about 2 tablespoons of vinegar. Use just enough sauce to moisten everything, should look a little like Sloppy Joes.

Mound on top of hamburger buns, I prefer homemade.

It ain't perfect, but it's good to use up leftovers! When I make sauce again, I'll try to remember to post the ingredients.

TabithaTodd
05-09-2009, 05:55 PM
Spice it up, slap it on the arse and send it in. I love my meat and I love it rare and on the barbie.

(I know, dangerous isn't it)

TT

BardSkye
05-09-2009, 07:13 PM
:Shrug:Leftovers? That's, like, when there's food left on the plate after the meal?

Heard about them.

Great tips, thank you all.