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BlueLucario
05-28-2008, 05:45 PM
I don't know where to start. :( I had some juices flowing yesterday afternoon, and I started writing on my notebook until my fingers got tired. I was to headachy to type right now and I felt that what I was writing was not enough to type it on the computer.

Now this morning, I was fired up to write, but the moment I got on the computer to read emails, I already lost my juices.. I had a new reply to a post soemwhere, I looked at it and one of the critters are said that my characters are one dimensional and forced, after weeks of trying to flesh them all out, nothing worked. I can't figure out what made them so foreced. I went back to bed and started crying.

I know I shouldn't be asking for feedback, but I just can't write without someone reading it. My beta reader is taking a vacation. I sent my manuscript to over 10 betas months ago and have never got any responses back. I need someone to read my work.

I don't know what to do. I feel so helpless. I even looked back on my own writing and saw it as total garbage. The crappy scenes made me want to pull my hair out, I could just cry. I had that fight scene written out and had no idea why I had that stupid scene written in the first place. I just hated this book over all.

Do you guys have any idea how I can get my juices back? :(

(Hopefully I'm not a nuisance here. I shouldn't be asking for encouragement, I know.)

ACEnders
05-28-2008, 05:49 PM
Sometimes, you just have to write anyway, despite your lack of motivation or juice. Then, it's like once you get rolling down a hill - you pick up speed. :) Good luck - just force yourself to write through the down times. The up times will come back. You're a writer - the up times always come back. ;)

Namatu
05-28-2008, 05:57 PM
When I hate my own writing, I do not write. I'm more prone to destruction then so I stay away.

After a long writing session, I'm usually not capable of any writing the next day. Even if I wanted to, my brain insists on a break.

Take a break. Relax. Bug your betas. Say you really need to get that feedback. If they're not able to provide it to you by (insert date two weeks from now), but they are still willing and able to beta, they should let you know when they'll have that feedback to you. If they're not able to beta now, they need to tell you that too.

James81
05-28-2008, 05:58 PM
Do you guys have any idea how I can get my juices back? :(



Unplug the computer and go out and live your life.

What I mean is, that when the creativity stops, it's probably a sign you've been TOO focused on your writing and not focused enough on living. I'm a firm believer that the creativity within writers stems from their life. The motivation and inspiration to put words on the page are a direct result from the life you lead.

Go take a long walk, go swimming, go hiking...go DO something and take your mind away from your writing for a day or a couple of days.

You need beta readers...what's your story about?

DWSTXS
05-28-2008, 06:03 PM
Unplug the computer and go out and live your life.

What I mean is, that when the creativity stops, it's probably a sign you've been TOO focused on your writing and not focused enough on living. I'm a firm believer that the creativity within writers stems from their life. The motivation and inspiration to put words on the page are a direct result from the life you lead.

Go take a long walk, go swimming, go hiking...go DO something and take your mind away from your writing for a day or a couple of days.

You need beta readers...what's your story about?

I agree with this. I've just finished taking a month off from writing. I sit and try, but it's not coming. So, instead of forcing it, I'm just calling it a vacation.
With me it's not writer's block, or lack of creativity...instead, it's just writer's fatigue. I'm tired, and my body and brain are telling me to take a break.

As soon as I start up again, I'll feel like I'm SO far behind because of this vacation, that I'll write like crazy.

BlueLucario
05-28-2008, 06:05 PM
I already took a *vacation* I havent written anything for days. But now when I have my juices up it's suddenly gone.

James81
05-28-2008, 06:08 PM
I already took a *vacation* I havent written anything for days. But now when I have my juices up it's suddenly gone.

In that case, then, just start typing something. Sometimes, you gotta write badly for a bit before you can get going.

Exir
05-28-2008, 06:15 PM
My art teacher told me: "The wonderful thing about painting is this: when you make a mistake, you can paint on top of it, and cover it."

Same thing with your writing. Write some crap for some time and DON'T WORRY ABOUT IT, because if it turns out to be crap, you hit delete and it is gone. On the other hand, if by some glorious stroke of luck, the writing turned out to be wonderful.... :)

dirtsider
05-28-2008, 06:28 PM
Just days, is it? Take a month. Then your muses will start twitching and run back to your computer. Go outside, get some fresh air, then find someplace and people watch. Watch how people interact with each other and do the mental game of "What if". Go to the library and do some research for another story. Just get away from the computer because you associate the computer with writing. Spending time on the computer will only frustrate you because of that.

Or learn how to knit or crochet. That's very meditative and relaxing and will drive your muses crazy 'cause you're ignoring them.

Marian Perera
05-28-2008, 06:33 PM
Blue, if you're dependent on feedback but criticism makes you cry, you might want to either 1. wean yourself off your feedback addiction 2. ask for only positive or very gentle criticism where the critiquer explains everything you need to know.

Birol
05-28-2008, 06:37 PM
Blue, you say you need a reader, but you've also indicated that any feedback you get from a reader that is not positive stops you from writing. That should tell you something right there. Are you certain you need a beta? Maybe you just need a friend to send your writing to who does not offer feedback. Maybe you don't need a reader at all; maybe you just think you do.

BlueLucario
05-28-2008, 06:38 PM
Blue, if you're dependent on feedback but criticism makes you cry, you might want to either 1. wean yourself off your feedback addiction 2. ask for only positive or very gentle criticism where the critiquer explains everything you need to know.

Number two would just scare them away. And do you know how to do #1?

Marian Perera
05-28-2008, 06:41 PM
Number two would just scare them away. And do you know how to do #1?

Yes. Increase your confidence in your own skills. This can be done by reading and writing extensively, doing writing exercises, analyzing your own work and that of others, and basically thinking about writing until your brain bleeds.

Kalyke
05-28-2008, 06:43 PM
I thought you had an actual problem, like you were leaking writer-juice all over!

Well, you know the problem. You are looking for approval, not a beta crit. A beta crit is done after the story (or part) is finished. At least at the verge of being finished, after several drafts. You do a Beta when your chick is ready to fly, not right after you hatch it.

Stroking egos is not what Beta readers are for. I think a lot of the problem is with the modern school system letting kids believe that everyone is a winner, and all work is equally good. This is a total fabrication. 99% of the writing that goes to publishers is garbage. This is a tough business, supposedly. Even getting published in non-paying mags is not easy.

When most people write first drafts (the draft that comes out of your computer right after you think about it) they are much in need of repair. Very few writers are good enough to show their work right after composing it.

You need to be able to write without other people reading it or giving it their stamp of approval. You also should be a good enough editor that you can spot your own mistakes, like making flat characters. A lot of people write for fun, but those who write to be read and make money need to be skilled craftspeople. Lots of people think that writing is a matter of sitting down and magically creating stories. These people get discouraged when they find It's a lot of hard work. You gotta get tough with yourself, and put your nose to the grindstone.

You can actually "do" something with a crit like "your characters are forced and flat." Many times this means they say only the things they need to say to get through the scene. There's a lot of good advice around here for making stiff dialog read "naturally."

Things I can recite off the top of my head are things like: make the character "evasive,"
and, don't say what you are trying to say. Also make the characters less wooden by giving them conflicting details. There are lots of other tricks. You need to study them to get away from flat characters.

I can't help if you think your writing is garbage. But I can say first: it is a real privilege to have anyone take time to read your "awful stuff" and make a probably painful comment possibly knowing that you would feel bad. I have been in this situation before to my embarrassment.

Second: anyone who does something that they put out in the public eye needs to have a thick skin. You need to be able to take criticism with dry eyes, and act on the criticism, if it is correct.

Third: You need to be aware of your own shortcomings, and know the mistakes you always make, and correct that stuff before sending it out for an audience to see (even Beta Readers).

So my advice is "work on it." Read a few books on character building. It couldn't hurt.

DWSTXS
05-28-2008, 06:43 PM
Yes. Increase your confidence in your own skills. This can be done by reading and writing extensively, doing writing exercises, analyzing your own work and that of others, and basically thinking about writing until your brain bleeds.

and by writing. and NOT giving up.

drachin8
05-28-2008, 06:54 PM
*hugs*

Poor Blue.

I think books are kind of like cookies. When we start off, all we have is a pile of flour, a pile of sugar, a pile of eggs, and a pile of butter. We show these piles of ingredients to people and they say, "That's not a cookie." It isn't their fault--the cookies just aren't ready yet. So we cobble together our first drafts, mixing the flour, sugar, eggs, and butter together and then show our dough to people. This time they say, "Well, that is sort of like a cookie, but I can't eat it yet. How do I know I'll like the cookie if I can't taste it?." And again, it isn't quite their fault. Our cookies still aren't done, and most of the fun of a cookie is in the eating. So we bake our cookies (aka, revise and edit the heck out of our first draft) until it is perfectly crisp or chewy or however we wanted the cookie to turn out. And then we share our cookies with people and some of them say, "What a yummy cookie!" and others say, "You should have made a different kind of cookie," and others say, "This cookie is okay, but I bet it would be better if you changed the regular sugar to brown sugar." But at least they can taste it at that point and offer a real opinion on the cookie.

Do your best to finish baking your cookies, Blue, so your readers can better judge how they taste. Your feedback at that point will be far more useful.

*hugs*


:)

-Michelle

Marian Perera
05-28-2008, 07:04 PM
I’m going to expand on my previous comment and be blunt here (the bad cop to Michelle’s good cop :)).

Blue, you have Asperger’s syndrome. That means you’ll need to make more of an effort than other people do when you try to understand characters, when you try to figure out what “neurotypical” people do and when you tackle the range of emotional interaction. I can’t tell you exactly how to do this because I have no experience with Asperger’s. What I can tell you is that there are hundreds of people who have succeeded in a sport or activity where they had some kind of problem or disability. And they have done so by working extremely hard to overcome their limitations.

How hard are you willing to work?

steveg144
05-28-2008, 07:06 PM
Sometimes, you just have to write anyway, despite your lack of motivation or juice. Then, it's like once you get rolling down a hill - you pick up speed. :) Good luck - just force yourself to write through the down times. The up times will come back. You're a writer - the up times always come back. ;)

Well said. Writers who write boatloads of words when The Muse takes them are a dime a dozen. Real writers write even when The Muse has pulled a disappearing act. It's what distinguishes the real writers from the wannabees. :tongue

BlueLucario
05-28-2008, 07:06 PM
Very hard. :)

Marian Perera
05-28-2008, 07:07 PM
Don't just say it. Do it.

Namatu
05-28-2008, 07:28 PM
And do you know how to do #1?
I used to send all of my work to one particular beta. I'd send and send and send. I'd get loads of good feedback, but I could never just sit on stuff. Had to send it. Then one day it started to click. For me, the problem was: I knew there was a problem, but I didn't know what it was. The answer turned out to be the tone of the story. Once that fell into place and I started rewriting, I felt no need for the feedback. I knew I was on the right path.

This won't necessarily help you if it's not your problem. Instead of seeking feedback from others, try letting a new scene or chapter sit for a few days, then return to it and try to assess it critically. Does the dialogue sound real? Does the story progress? Are adverbs dropped like stray cats from the sky? Looking at your work with a more technical eye can help you feel more confident about the words you're wielding.

Stew21
05-28-2008, 07:57 PM
Ernest Hemingway said, "There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit at a typewriter and bleed."

he also said, "When writing a novel a writer should create living people; people not characters. A character is a caricature."

He also said, " My aim is to put down on paper what I see and what I feel in the best and simplest way."

and, "For a long time now I have tried simply to write the best I can. Sometimes I have good luck and write better than I can."

"We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master."

from his Nobel Prize acceptance speech:
"For a true writer each book should be a new beginning where he tries again for something that is beyond attainment. He should always try for something that has never been done or that others have tried and failed. Then sometimes, with great luck, he will succeed."

There are simply too many wonderful, inspirational and wise quotes that suit the occasion but just one more.


"They can't yank a novelist like they can a pitcher. A novelist has to go the full nine, even if it kills him."


eta:
one more I just couldn't resist

"The first draft of anything is shit."

IceCreamEmpress
05-28-2008, 10:09 PM
I know I shouldn't be asking for feedback, but I just can't write without someone reading it.

YOU HAVE TO.

Seriously, you have to. That's so essential to writing. You have to have faith in your own story, or you'll never finish anything.

Writing isn't a conversation. It's a message in a bottle.

Stew21
05-28-2008, 10:14 PM
I have more quotes!

“The first draft—the All-Story Draft—should be written with no help (or interference) from anyone else.” Stephen King

“You’ve finished your first draft. . . . If you have someone who has been impatiently waiting to read your novel . . . then this is the time to give up the goods.” Stephen King

scope
05-28-2008, 11:05 PM
I think you should take to heart the advice of IceCreamPrincess. If you really want to be a writer, you simply have to write. From time to time we all need a break from writing, we all experience lulls, we all encounter frustrations, and more -- but the bottom line is that we must write.

CaroGirl
05-28-2008, 11:14 PM
You don't need to wean yourself from crits, you need to stop cold turkey. There is NO point in receiving criticism for work that is unfinished. I believe that firmly, to the core of my being (not that I've never asked for feedback on an unfinished work myself :)).

Take a break from the novel and write some shorts. And FINISH them. When you write a short story, complete, done, edited, finito, you can ask for criticism. Perhaps that will feed you while you work on your larger project. Be private about unfinished work. Hold it close, baby it, and don't let anyone see it until it's fully formed. Pretend it's a fetus. No one meets her til she's born.

DWSTXS
05-28-2008, 11:50 PM
Blue, you HAVE to finish something. Even if it is a short story.

You have to FINISH something.

Just write it, all the way to the finish. THEN worry about editing, and getting opinions.

BECAUSE, if it's not finished, you'll never know just how close to publishable it is. Once you finish it and get some crits on the work as a whole, then you'll be able to break down, into little manageable chunks, the work you need to do to get it published.

If you don't know where you're going you'll never know if you're on the right track, or not. And if you have no ending planned, you'll never know how to get there anyway.

tehuti88
05-28-2008, 11:51 PM
I know I shouldn't be asking for feedback, but I just can't write without someone reading it. My beta reader is taking a vacation. I sent my manuscript to over 10 betas months ago and have never got any responses back. I need someone to read my work.

I know that feeling all too well. :( My problem is, I'm not looking for CRITICISM (I have never in my life had a "beta reader"...the mere concept is weird to me) so much as just READERS, hence my reasons for not posting any of my writing to boards like this. You have more guts than I do.

Speaking as somebody who has never learned how to get over that feeling, I know that reading work that is related somehow to mine often makes me feel inspired. I don't know what subject you write, but is there ever anything you research or a subject you're interested in which works its way into your writing? E. g. I write about mythology, and about a certain nearby location, and I find that reading about those things really jazzes me. Especially when I learn something new. There's an "OMG!--have to work that into my story!"-type of feeling.

I'm afraid that's no solution to the problem of actually getting people to read and respond to your work, but maybe it could spark some writing ideas...?

Bubastes
05-28-2008, 11:56 PM
I know I shouldn't be asking for feedback, but I just can't write without someone reading it.

You're going to HAVE to learn how. Feedback is useless until you have a finished product. I will say this again: the way you're trying to write right now is like driving with one foot on the gas and the other on the brake pedal while getting different directions from five people. How far do you think that will take you?

Finish your WIP, then ask for feedback (and maybe not even then). Writing cannot be done by committee. The answer to your writing problems is not "out there" in feedback-land. You need to shut the door and just write.

Marian Perera
05-29-2008, 12:15 AM
If you absolutely cannot write without having someone reading it and praising you, consider posting on www.fanfiction.net or where you previously posted stories, before finding AW.

There's no shame in writing for a certain easy-to-please audience. It's not the real thing, but it works for lots of people. Decide what you want when it comes to writing. Then decide what you're willing to do - or willing to sacrifice - to achieve it.

geardrops
05-29-2008, 12:40 AM
You can't write for two days and you call that losing your juices? Wait until you can't write for three years. Then we can talk.

And if you really want people to instantly respond to what you write and gush over it (and this is not me being cruel, this is me being utterly sincere) go cut your teeth on fanfiction. Seriously. You'll get reviews per chapter, depending how active the fandom is. Hell, you may even develop a following.

It's been known to happen to some people.

>.>

<.<

BlueLucario
05-29-2008, 01:39 AM
I have more quotes!

“The first draft—the All-Story Draft—should be written with no help (or interference) from anyone else.” Stephen King

“You’ve finished your first draft. . . . If you have someone who has been impatiently waiting to read your novel . . . then this is the time to give up the goods.” Stephen King
Do you have any more quotes? :D

I'm not writing for praises. It's just for people to read, I only wanted honest opinions, good or bad. What did I do wrong in my writing? Did it bore you?

Phaeal
05-29-2008, 01:57 AM
You can't write for two days and you call that losing your juices? Wait until you can't write for three years. Then we can talk.

And if you really want people to instantly respond to what you write and gush over it (and this is not me being cruel, this is me being utterly sincere) go cut your teeth on fanfiction. Seriously. You'll get reviews per chapter, depending how active the fandom is. Hell, you may even develop a following.

It's been known to happen to some people.

>.>

<.<

But if you want a lot of reviews (Like: "ZOMG, squeeee, I want to have your babies!!!"), make sure you write fan fictions starring whatever the popular funky ship is in that fandom. Harry-Draco, for HP, for example.
;)

Marian Perera
05-29-2008, 02:25 AM
I'm not writing for praises. It's just for people to read, I only wanted honest opinions, good or bad.

Blue, if a writer posts an excerpt and I critique it and the next thing I know the writer's started a sad thread about how she cried over negative feedback and how she can't write now, do you think I'll believe that writer when she says she's not writing for praise?

You got honest opinions in that thread. What more do you want from us than you've already received?

BlueLucario
05-29-2008, 02:27 AM
Blue, if a writer posts an excerpt and I critique it and the next thing I know the writer's started a sad thread about how she cried over negative feedback and how she can't write now, do you think I'll believe that writer when she says she's not writing for praise?

You got honest opinions in that thread. What more do you want from us than you've already received?

Errr....Nothing, just honest opinions.

Marian Perera
05-29-2008, 02:30 AM
Errr....Nothing, just honest opinions.

Well, then, you got them, and if they made you so upset, that's something you need to work on.

mscelina
05-29-2008, 02:35 AM
Blue. Turn off the internet. Sit at your computer and WRITE. Don't write to please anyone but yourself. JUST WRITE. Screw feedback! You don't need it! You just need to WRITE THE DAMN STORY.

Then, after you've done this process until the story is finished, DO IT AGAIN. Write the whole darn thing over, rectifying the mistakes you made.

When you've done that PM me and I'll tell you the next step. Until then, JUST WRITE.

*why do I have a feeling of deja vu...*

Stew21
05-29-2008, 03:31 AM
Do you have any more quotes? :D

I'm not writing for praises. It's just for people to read, I only wanted honest opinions, good or bad. What did I do wrong in my writing? Did it bore you?


Hold off. Instant gratification is not the way to go. You need to make yourself wait for it. Step away from the crits!



p.s. - I used the quotes because I thought maybe if Ernest Hemingway and Stephen King said it you would listen. You seem to have a hard time believing us. Maybe they could help.
:)

BlueLucario
05-29-2008, 03:54 AM
Hold off. Instant gratification is not the way to go. You need to make yourself wait for it. Step away from the crits!



p.s. - I used the quotes because I thought maybe if Ernest Hemingway and Stephen King said it you would listen. You seem to have a hard time believing us. Maybe they could help.
:)

I liked the Stephen King one. :) It's not that I won't listen to you, I'm just too afraid to write stink and i have over a dozen readers emailing me when the next story update would be(I went a bit overboard with the readers.). Now I know how Rowling felt when she was writing her last book. :(


Other than that, I'm afraid to write stink. If I did, it's going to eat me alive later on. :(

(p.s That was a rhetorical question.)

mscelina
05-29-2008, 03:57 AM
JUST WRITE THE STORY.

Stink is good. Stink makes you better. Stink inspires you to do great things. Embrace your stink.



JUST WRITE THE STORY!

BlueLucario
05-29-2008, 03:59 AM
Stink is good. Stink makes you better. Stink inspires you to do great things. Embrace your stink.



JUST WRITE THE STORY!

I get it. I was about to leave anyway.

Sigh. You gave me a heart attack.

Stew21
05-29-2008, 04:05 AM
I liked the Stephen King one. :) It's not that I won't listen to you, I'm just too afraid to write stink and i have over a dozen readers emailing me when the next story update would be(I went a bit overboard with the readers.). Now I know how Rowling felt when she was writing her last book. :(


Other than that, I'm afraid to write stink. If I did, it's going to eat me alive later on. :(

(p.s That was a rhetorical question.)


Don't be afraid to write shit for a first draft. And it IS that you won't listen to us. You're making excuses for continuing to do what we tell you maybe you should not. You are trying to justify actions after you ask for advice on how to stop doing it. You are looking for ways to have us agree with you and getting our permission to do things the way you are doing them. Stop it.
Don't worry about the readers. Cut them off. Tell them you aren't ready for them to read more. Tough shit for them. Wait. This is not about THEM. It is about you and if you want to make a go of being serious about writing. Tell them you won't be sending anymore until you get it finished. They are cluttering your head with crap you don't need. all you need to write the story is writing your book and reading other books.
Write. the. story.
Then rewrite the story.
Readers come WAY later.

blueobsidian
05-29-2008, 04:17 AM
Don't be afraid to write shit for a first draft.

I just wanted to post this again because you need to listen to it, Blue. A first draft is just a draft! Everyone's first drafts stink! That is why you have to rewrite and revise. All you have to do right now is get the story down on paper. Once you have the whole thing written down, THEN you can worry about making it good.

At the end of the day, if you don't believe in yourself then no amount of praise from readers is ever going to be enough. Trust me when I say that it is not worth it to live your life based on what other people think. Stop worrying about it and write the story you want to write. Believe in yourself. You have written much more than most people your age could do. You need to learn to depend on yourself for determination. People aren't going to give it to you forever.

Stew21
05-29-2008, 04:19 AM
Another quote: courtesy of www.Authorscoop.com

“I have never thought of myself as a good writer. Anyone who wants reassurance of that should read one of my first drafts. But I’m one of the world’s great rewriters. I find that three or four readings are required to comb out the cliches, line up pronouns with their antecedents, and insure agreement in number between subject and verbs…My connectives, my clauses, my subsidiary phrases don’t come naturally to me and I’m very prone to repetition of words; so I never even write an important letter in the first draft. I can never recall anything of mine that’s ever been printed in less than three drafts. You write that first draft really to see how it’s going to come out.”

- James A. Michener

ChaosTitan
05-29-2008, 05:46 AM
Hold off. Instant gratification is not the way to go. You need to make yourself wait for it. Step away from the crits!



This is great advice, you know. If you can't show your story to anyone UNTIL IT'S FINISHED, it is a great motivator to FINISH IT. One of the things that always helps me get to the end of a project is knowing that I have at least one loyal reader waiting to get her hands on it. And I don't want to keep her waiting. But I also don't want to show her an incomplete story. I won't.

Tell your readers you won't be sending them anything else until the story is finished. Then they'll start bugging you to finish. Great motivator, that. :)

James81
05-29-2008, 04:24 PM
I liked the Stephen King one. :) It's not that I won't listen to you, I'm just too afraid to write stink and i have over a dozen readers emailing me when the next story update would be(I went a bit overboard with the readers.). Now I know how Rowling felt when she was writing her last book. :(


Other than that, I'm afraid to write stink. If I did, it's going to eat me alive later on. :(

(p.s That was a rhetorical question.)

Do you use that google docs for all your writing? If you do, then DON'T. lol Use a word processor of some kind. I think they are right that you have to just finish the story.

You're afraid it's going to eat you alive later on...well, I can tell you that it won't. I say that from EXPERIENCE. My first finished novel was written in 41 days. I didn't go back and edit what I wrote. I didn't re-read anything (other than to skim for a detail that I had forgotten). I just wrote.

When I was finished, I thought "Dear God this is going to be complete trash". So I read it. And I was absolutely amazed at how well it DID turn out. There are mistakes here and there and like ONE minor plot inconsistency (from what I've found anyway), but it's no worse than most of my other first drafts that I labored over intensely for the right words.

You're going to surprise yourself the day you finally let go. The day your writing becomes truly YOURS and the day you write for yourself, not the validation from others.

I believe you'll get to that point someday.

tehuti88
05-29-2008, 05:16 PM
There's no shame in writing for a certain easy-to-please audience. It's not the real thing, but it works for lots of people.

Not to hijack the thread...I won't post to it further...but this comment kind of niggled at me. Is it saying that writing purely to entertain and not for publication isn't "real" somehow...? Because I find that kind of a strange thing to say. :/ I struggle myself with the fear that because I'm not seeking publication, I'm not a "real" writer, yet people are always quick to insist this isn't so. Now this seems to contradict that. ?...

BlueLucario, you have people (over a dozen!) BEGGING you for the rest of your story?? I would die for something like that! The thought that there are people you are actually entertaining should help to stimulate your desire to write again. If they're begging to read more, then at least those readers can't think that what you write "stinks." At least you're trying to improve, which is more than what many writers do. Just keep writing it and they'll read it. Otherwise...they might get tired of waiting.

Stew21
05-29-2008, 06:11 PM
Not to hijack the thread...I won't post to it further...but this comment kind of niggled at me. Is it saying that writing purely to entertain and not for publication isn't "real" somehow...? Because I find that kind of a strange thing to say. :/ I struggle myself with the fear that because I'm not seeking publication, I'm not a "real" writer, yet people are always quick to insist this isn't so. Now this seems to contradict that. ?...

I think you misunderstood the comment, but I will let QoS clarify for herself.



BlueLucario, you have people (over a dozen!) BEGGING you for the rest of your story?? I would die for something like that! The thought that there are people you are actually entertaining should help to stimulate your desire to write again. If they're begging to read more, then at least those readers can't think that what you write "stinks." At least you're trying to improve, which is more than what many writers do. Just keep writing it and they'll read it. Otherwise...they might get tired of waiting.

This goes against what many of us have been saying, and I'm curious why you think this is wise. Can you explain?

Marian Perera
05-31-2008, 03:23 AM
Not to hijack the thread...I won't post to it further...but this comment kind of niggled at me. Is it saying that writing purely to entertain and not for publication isn't "real" somehow...?

No. What I'm getting at is that part of what I consider real writing (whether one is paid for it or not) is having it criticized so that one can learn from one's mistakes and improve. This may not be working for Blue. Therefore, she may want to consider settling for fanfiction or for some other audience, like the one she had previously, which will provide her with less critical feedback.

For me, what a person seeks to achieve from their writing isn't as important as how they approach said writing. If they have Golden Word syndrome and react badly to criticism, they can be an author with ten novels on the NYT bestseller list and I'll think less of them than I will of someone who wrote a short story never intended for publication, but who accepted criticism graciously and did her best to learn.

BlueLucario
05-31-2008, 03:50 AM
I got my juices back now. I started writing again. I don't know what happened it sudden;y came back. Don't get me wrong, I really want to improve. That last one I posted wasn't for critiquing, I just needed it for school. It had to be good enough for a good grade and I am not good with humor.

I did write something for the May challenge though.
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?p=2399457

I really want to participate in the challenge though.