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Kalyke
05-28-2008, 05:54 AM
I was a so called "fine artist" way before I started to write. I even subsisted solely off art income for about 7 years. While getting my "writing degree" I realized that there were a lot of areas where the two overlapped. This can be seen especially in "macro/micro" detail, also in composition, and management. Visualization was extremely easy because I had studied observing as an artist would for years. I also find that I learn about my characters by creating drawings inspired by them, and my "subject." For example, If I was writing about cowboys, I would do a lot of "Western" type or cow paintings. I actually began my WIP as a sculpture (now destroyed because it was not great).

So, any visual artists have this sort of overlap into the other arts? Is being a painter, sculptor, even computer graphic artist very common among writers? Do you share the same skill levels at both? Does your art look like or echo your writing? Example, if you write dark goth, do you paint dark goth?

Its an interesting question. It would be interesting to see a chapter of someones work and a painting/drawing/sculpture to compare it to. (I'm not saying do this-- it would just be a neat thing to do)

KTC
05-28-2008, 06:22 AM
I am both a writer and a visual artist. (I could have made a living from 'visual' art, but chose not to.) I did not study either. I hold only 1 degree... in life.

As an artist I did portraits, landscapes, abstracts, still life... whatever. I didn't hold myself to one style or medium. As a writer, I am pretty much the same. I don't believe in formal training for anything. I am of the belief that one DOES, one does not study.

I think what you are saying about juxtaposing someone's art against their writing sounds fabulous. I would actually be willing to do it... had I not retired from all forms of visual arts.

William Haskins
05-28-2008, 06:34 AM
artistic folk are typically talented in multiple disciplines, but rarely in equal measure.

william blake (http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/blake/) immediately leaps to mind as an exception.

tiny
05-28-2008, 06:49 AM
I've been a potter for about 17 years (yes I have a degree, it's tough to figure out how to throw and mix glazes without some formal training) and I write (nope, no degree in that one, but I can spell a bit). Writing started out as a way to get the stories I used to tell myself in the studio out of my head and became a need.

I don't think the two overlap at all for me. I write mostly horror or dark fantasy and I mainly make coffee mugs for Jeep/Adventurers (I carve custom stamps). My "artsy" work tends to be flowing teapots and large jars. They don't sell as much as the custom coffee mugs, but they feed a different need.

Matera the Mad
05-28-2008, 06:52 AM
Ehh...I'm a compleat renaissance salad

rugcat
05-28-2008, 07:03 AM
I'm a writer and a musician (guitar player and songwriter) and I see countless parallels between my writing and my playing, although I don't think it's apparent to others.

I think I have more talent as a writer, though if I'd had a choice, I would have opted for more talent as a musician.

But a funny thing -- in real life I'm rather cynical (though not approaching Haskins territory) and have never been noted for openness or a sense of whimsy. But both my writing and my music are mostly cheerful, positive, and light of foot. (hopefully)

Check out a typical song (http://www.supload.com/listen?s=RW06DFV8AD6T) of mine.

Kalyke
05-28-2008, 07:11 AM
artistic folk are typically talented in multiple disciplines, but rarely in equal measure.

william blake (http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/blake/) immediately leaps to mind as an exception.

Michelangelo also wrote.
but those were poets. Not that it is a bad thing, it is just that I see how poetry is more like painting.

Here's Clive Barker: Horror writer's art-- It's kind of what I am talking about. He incorporates similar visuals with his writing. http://www.clivebarker.info/artindex.html

Chumplet
05-28-2008, 07:12 AM
As an artist, I tend to focus on realism rather than abstract. If you check my blog, you see the pastoral quality of my watercolours. As a writer, I also lean toward real life, trying to depict my scenes with clarity and detail (sometimes too much).

So, I think the two mediums are tied together with regards to style.

Kate Thornton
05-28-2008, 07:21 PM
I am a writer and a painter. I write mostly short mysteries, but paint syneasthesic conceptual pieces. I'm not sure how I link the two pursuits, only that when I am painting well I am usually writing a lot at the same tiime (not exactly the same time, of course - just in the same day or week or whatever. The bursts hit me in both places.)

Tirjasdyn
05-28-2008, 08:12 PM
So, any visual artists have this sort of overlap into the other arts? Is being a painter, sculptor, even computer graphic artist very common among writers? Do you share the same skill levels at both? Does your art look like or echo your writing? Example, if you write dark goth, do you paint dark goth?




I'm a writer, digital artist and a web designer.

I write mostly fantasy steampunk and sci fi/horror. I paint fantasy...though I haven't done much lately and landscapes. Webdesign is pretty much whatever the client wants...so I do all kinds.

C.bronco
05-28-2008, 08:22 PM
Do you share the same skill levels at both? Does your art look like or echo your writing? Example, if you write dark goth, do you paint dark goth?

Its an interesting question. It would be interesting to see a chapter of someones work and a painting/drawing/sculpture to compare it to. (I'm not saying do this-- it would just be a neat thing to do)

When I did the concentration section for AP art in high school, I illustrated my poetry in oil pastels.

I college, I felt obligated to choose between writing and art. I chose writing. I'm definitely a better writer than I am an artist, but I still like to paint, draw and do other creative projects, including home improvements.

My brother is a writer, artist and musician.

Dawno
05-28-2008, 08:28 PM
Moved to Roundtable - not really TIO material :)

pconsidine
05-28-2008, 08:36 PM
I'm an artist (photographer, really), writer and musician in equal measure. I've even got a perfectly useless painting degree, which puts art slightly ahead on the scale, as far as actual training. For me, there really isn't much of an overlap, though I'm sure each informs the others. Which medium I'll use at a given moment is always a question of how best to get what's in my head out. If it's a phrase, I write it. If it's an image, I photograph it. If it's a sound, I play it.

It's made it very difficult to make a career out of any of them, though. For a while, I was doing advertising copywriting and I really enjoyed that. There was a sense of mission, a task to be accomplished there. But I have a very hard time forcing myself to focus on one thing long enough to get any momentum behind it (as evidenced by the myriad unfinished bits and pieces of things I have lying around).

OmenSpirits.com
05-28-2008, 08:46 PM
I was learning to be an illustrator, before I switch to writing, the switched back. In hindsight, I was using words to make up for the images I couldnt draw from a pencil. NOW I'm trying to develop the same depth in my illustrations as I have in my writing.

"round and round I go" :)

Phaeal
05-28-2008, 08:58 PM
I was torn between art and writing in college -- writing won out for the degree track. I still do occasional illustrations -- almost all my drawings and paintings are illustrations of books I love or of my own work. The storytelling urge rules both forms for me.

I studied piano for years, but I'm not a natural musician -- for some reason, I never did learn to read music well enough to play at sight. My dancing is pretty rudimentary. I'm told I'd make a good actor -- I'm loud and histrionic enough. ;)

eveningstar
05-28-2008, 10:11 PM
I'm an artist, mostly acrylic-based mixed media, and currently my art is more productive and lucrative than my writing. One of my goals is to get the whole artist/writer thing to a more even footing.

My writing is rather similar to my painting, stylistically. Both are kind of darkly whimsical, and my novel-in-progress shares more than a few qualities with my tarot deck-in-progress.

Polenth
05-28-2008, 10:48 PM
I've not had training beyond secondary school level in any art.

I do a mixture of visual arts and photography. My traditional art skills are my worst. I don't think I'll ever improve to a professional level. I'm not bad at photography. My shots tend to focus on realistic profiles. I'm unsure where I fall with writing.

The genres overlap. Both my art and writing is fantasy/sci fi, often with a whimsical or abstract flavour. My photographs are of nature, which is a theme that often appears in my art and writing too. The main difference is the writing has more depth and tends to have darker undertones.

tehuti88
05-28-2008, 11:31 PM
I used to be good at drawing (at least, people in school thought I was...I wasn't innovative or experimental or anything, I was just good at drawing), but the ability seems to have waned over time, probably because I don't do it much anymore. I try a piece of art (again, I use the term very loosely) now and then, and people like it, but it's nothing fantastic. I could probably be better at it if I took the time, but the way I see it, I'll never be good enough at any other sort of art to justify taking the time, so *shrug.* I also have quite poor patience when it comes to not getting something right the first time and so artwork leaves me heavily discouraged.

When I try more detailed things they're usually landscape or fantasy related, and fantasy is what I write, so, again...

Hm, I just realized I take lots of photos, which, while not being anything earthshattering, people seem to think are pretty. Again, mostly nature and landscape related.

I find that I can visualize certain things very well, but as for getting them down in art form, it's always a dreadful disappointment.

I'm horrid at anything having to do with three dimensions (sculpting, e. g.). Other art forms, such as digital or jewelry work or anything, I either haven't the materials necessary or haven't anywhere near the patience required to learn it.

sheadakota
05-28-2008, 11:43 PM
I'm an artist (mostly portraits in charcoal or pencil) and a writer, but not formally trained in either. I almost always draw my MC in my WIP. It gives me a better sense of who he is and lets me 'see' him'. I also play the guitar but would never call myself a muscian-

Danger Jane
05-29-2008, 12:10 AM
I'd say my talent is pretty evenly distributed between drawing/painting, writing, and music, but well, I had to prioritize and over the last few years because high school gives you...not as much free time as middle school does. So I've still had good training in drawing and painting, but I've devoted hundreds more hours to writing and studying violin. I'm studying writing in college for a degree starting next fall, and doing whatever I can to continue improving at violin--lessons, quartets, local orchestras, whatever.

Although visual cues in my scenes help a lot with tone, because I see them as finished movie scenes, complete with fancy digital editing and everything, my details tend to be more aural than visual, just since I spend so much time thinking about sounds.

Polenth
05-29-2008, 04:44 AM
I'm an artist (photographer, really), writer and musician in equal measure.

I liked your photos, from the link in your signature. I don't have much dynamic to say, but it might encourage others to look. :)

Just Jack
05-29-2008, 05:14 AM
I almost went to art school, but decided against it. Honestly, I probably should have gone.

I also play the bass guitar. I've been playing for years, and I always found that whatever style of music I played, would influence my style of writing based on the mood of the song.

So when I need help writing an angry part of a story, sometimes I'll play fast and angry songs, to get me into the right emotion.

rubarbb
05-29-2008, 05:38 AM
I have been painting (and selling) for 27 years. I work in abstract reality and abstract. I live in reality (my wife says I don't) but paint out of my mind (abstract). Abstract is a challenge as is abstract reality. But they say to write about what you know. I am writing a non-fiction about life and being a caregiver to my mother who was a home hospice patient... ergo reality. So, that's my story of writing and painting. Oh yeah, I also write short stories (true ones) and poetry (illusion)... so go figure... :D

Hollan
05-29-2008, 06:14 AM
I was really into photography in college, but I didn't get a degree in it. I consider it a hobby that I wish I could make some money off of, but I'm not really interested in becoming a professional. I also draw comics for fun. I'm not sure how they overlap with my writing. My photography is mostly landscapes and natural portraits while my writing is fantasy/sci-fi and my comics are about work or living in Japan. I'm sure they kind of feed off of each other though.

NicoleMD
05-29-2008, 07:26 AM
Hmmm...Interesting. I paint controlled and write controlled, but the subject matter is usually whimsical and absurd. I take my silliness very seriously.

Nicole

Fraulein
05-29-2008, 07:53 AM
I don't get photography. The past makes me sad. Photographs are always in past tense. Therefore, photographs make me sad. Creepy pictures of the olden days just make me think of how dead the people are. :Shrug:

pconsidine
05-29-2008, 08:14 AM
I liked your photos, from the link in your signature. I don't have much dynamic to say, but it might encourage others to look. :)Aw shucks. :)


Photographs are always in past tense. Therefore, photographs make me sad. Creepy pictures of the olden days just make me think of how dead the people are.Funny. I would never think of it that way. To me, a photograph is the eternal Now. The photographs I take are always documents of a moment that I was truly present for and are timeless because of it. But I suppose that might have a lot to do with being the one taking the photo.

Polenth
05-29-2008, 08:32 AM
I don't get photography. The past makes me sad. Photographs are always in past tense. Therefore, photographs make me sad. Creepy pictures of the olden days just make me think of how dead the people are. :Shrug:

You probably don't want to see my gravestone pictures then...

Do all photos make you feel that way, or just ones of people? I don't think of people at all when I'm photographing nature stuff.

Fraulein
05-29-2008, 12:15 PM
Aw shucks. :)

Funny. I would never think of it that way. To me, a photograph is the eternal Now. The photographs I take are always documents of a moment that I was truly present for and are timeless because of it.
I see what you mean about capturing the present. How do you feel about memories?


But I suppose that might have a lot to do with being the one taking the photo.
Yeah. A picture's worth a thousand words, but only if the photo means something to the person viewing it.


Photos have to be balanced in such a way that they become art, or it's just another photo to me. It's almost like I want to see the Earth's artwork. Here's an example (http://englishrussia.com/images/darvaz_door/4.jpg). (Each layer is independent of the next, but together they become one entity.)

Fraulein
05-29-2008, 12:33 PM
You probably don't want to see my gravestone pictures then...

Do all photos make you feel that way, or just ones of people? I don't think of people at all when I'm photographing nature stuff.
Graveyards are fine. I pass a few on the way to work everyday. The people are buried above the ground. Pictures of graveyards are ok, because the people are dead already. :tongue

It's mostly photos of people or events. I only have one picture of people on display in my apartment. I would rather display something timeless like art or keepsakes.
I can't stop thinking of the past when I see certain pictures. It's like I can never be part of what's in the pictures. I would rather stick them in my drawer forever than take them out and stare at something that's so permanent.

kuwisdelu
05-29-2008, 09:21 PM
There was a similar thread abut writing a music a few weeks ago, which is where I fall into the picture. I used to like painting and drawing now and again, but have since focused more attention on writing and music after having realized I have little to no talent with the former. I enjoy making movies, however, and think I may still have some lurking talent in the moving pictures. It's been far too long since my 8th-grade masterpiece The Delicate Sound of Brutal Destruction.

pconsidine
05-29-2008, 11:01 PM
I see what you mean about capturing the present. How do you feel about memories?Memory and I have a pretty contentious relationship. :) But that does bring up the real value of photography for me it forces me to be present in the current place and time. If I'm not focused on what's in front of me at that very second, I can easily miss something really special. I don't think I ever have that experience with writing (though I can sometimes have the same experience with music).

But even when I look at old pictures, it doesn't make me think of "the past" as much as it makes me think of the "now" that was when the picture was taken. For example, when I look at my grandparents' wedding photos, I'm not reminded of the fact that they're dead as much as I'm reminded of the fact that they were alive. My feeling about the photo is more based on the moment that's recorded than whatever meaning the even might have accumulated since then. A Matthew Brady photo of a Civil War battlefield will make me sad, but that's because the moment itself is sad, not because of how I might feel about the Civil War or the particular people depicted.

That could be just me, though.

sheadakota
05-29-2008, 11:32 PM
I just learned how to post pictures (with a lot of help!) So I thought I would share; As I said I have no formal training and I'm not claiming to be any good, but here is my MC in my latest novel- meet Quinn-


http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn210/sheadakota/th_annieshane2.jpg (http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn210/sheadakota/?action=view&current=annieshane2.jpg)

relenat
05-30-2008, 08:59 PM
O.K., I am a writer, artist (both 2-D and 3-D, but primarily a carver), and (was) a scientist. 'Though I no longer do research, all my degrees are in science - including Ph.D.

I have taken enough art studio and history courses for a BFA, but never got one. Only studied writing through a smattering of workshops and continuing ed courses. Most of what I know about it I learned through doing, i.e., writing and reading, participating in strong writers' critique groups, and teaching undergrads. It is amazing how one's own writing improves after grading others' work.

Interestingly, I found that creation in ALL media (including science theory) felt the same... Maybe because I was an "exploratory scientist" using exploratory statistics (not the hypothesis testing stuff you may have met in a basics course).

Science theory creation felt like tracking an elusive beast thru a dense jungle - trying desperately to record my tracks. The end result, the theory, was not so much the beast but a map of the way to find the beast - a discovery of the innate order of the jungle - which emerged through a kind of shearing away or seeing through the tangles to the core meaning/underlying structure.

As a carver (especially of wood where the grain rules), I do something very similar - or it feels similar. I draw plans, choose wood that seems to support my plans - and since I do furniture I have to be really anal in meeting rigid engineering constraints in my plans. But then I start carving. The grain & inherent, energetic structure in the wood takes control as I listen to what it is saying and help that inherent structure emerge.

Creative writing feels much the same.

In all three arenas (creative writing, visual art and scientific theory generation), that unitive state where my separate, rational, little 's' self disappears into a flow of creative inspiration feels exactly identical. Like catching and riding a huge wave (in comparison to which my conscious self is a tiny speck). All I have to do is keep my puny ideas, ego and fears out of the way and let 'er rip.

relenat
05-30-2008, 09:01 PM
I don't get photography. The past makes me sad. Photographs are always in past tense. Therefore, photographs make me sad. Creepy pictures of the olden days just make me think of how dead the people are. :Shrug:

I hope you are writing stories expressing this POV on photos. It is very interesting and NOT common. I'd love to read a story where the character or plot is somehow driven by this.

rubarbb
05-31-2008, 12:03 AM
I don't get photography. The past makes me sad. Photographs are always in past tense. Therefore, photographs make me sad. Creepy pictures of the olden days just make me think of how dead the people are. :Shrug:

Glad to see you appreciate the lighter side of life... :D (BTW... my avatar is always a painting of mine)



There are worse things than dying.


Here's a little ditty of mine that you might find helpful.




The past is past,

what’s now will pass,

your future will pass,

reflect the past,

savor the past.

batgirl
05-31-2008, 02:43 AM
I've sold one short story and one painting. The short story got me $90. The painting (medieval pigments on goatskin parchment) got me $700. Maybe I should reconsider writing? On the other hand, I may have already saturated the market for imitations of early 14th c. East Anglian illumination...
-Barbara

Shweta
05-31-2008, 03:03 AM
I'm a writer and a visual artist. My subject matter overlaps but I don't see an overlap in style.

I do find that when I'm drawing I cannot write and vice versa, and that drawing sort of helps me muse about the writing. I come back from drawing-periods with better thought out stories. So to me it's more that they're two separate things I do, but one informs the other.

Anyone else have that sort of experience?

Fraulein
05-31-2008, 05:46 AM
I was the president of the Art club in high school. Does that count? :tongue I like to sing too, which is sort of visual in a extroverted kind of way.

Danger Jane
05-31-2008, 06:35 AM
I'm a writer and a visual artist. My subject matter overlaps but I don't see an overlap in style.

I do find that when I'm drawing I cannot write and vice versa, and that drawing sort of helps me muse about the writing. I come back from drawing-periods with better thought out stories. So to me it's more that they're two separate things I do, but one informs the other.

Anyone else have that sort of experience?

Definitely. Sometimes the best remedy for a writer's block is to throw myself into some concerto or other, and sometimes after only 45 minutes or so, I open up my laptop and I type faster than ever.

Plus then I've learned the concerto.

pconsidine
05-31-2008, 06:48 AM
Anyone else have that sort of experience? Ayep. I think I've always been a natural storyteller, but I can never tell the same story in more than one way at the same time. It either comes out as a picture or it comes out in words. It drives my mother crazy that I'm a writer and an artist, but I have no interest in illustrating my own work. It seems so logical to her.

ZakJarvis
05-31-2008, 06:58 AM
For me art and writing have a constantly evolving relationship. Sometimes I cannot manage to do them both at once and other times I'm almost violently compelled to write a bit then paint/sculpt/draw a bit.

Most commonly, really immersing myself in art renders me nigh-unto non-verbal. It's usually easier for me to switch from writing to art than the other way around.

The same impulse drives both disciplines, so I tend to write in a wide variety of styles and genres. Likewise, I tend to do a lot of different things with art. There are some things I don't stray too far from. My stuff tends to be dark and realistic. Though I like to push realism around like a rodeo clown in a barrel full of nails. Otherwise, pretty much anything goes.

Shweta
05-31-2008, 06:58 AM
It drives my mother crazy that I'm a writer and an artist, but I have no interest in illustrating my own work. It seems so logical to her.
Oh snap!
I'm the same way. Only I don't think my mother's noticed.

In other news, Zak Jarvis pointed me at this (http://cabinet-of-wonders.blogspot.com/2008/05/lovely-locks.html), which is surely something other writer-artists will like :)

ETA: wtf, Zak, timing! :D

Jo
05-31-2008, 07:01 AM
I do find that when I'm drawing I cannot write and vice versa, and that drawing sort of helps me muse about the writing. I come back from drawing-periods with better thought out stories. So to me it's more that they're two separate things I do, but one informs the other.

Anyone else have that sort of experience?

Yup. I get almost manic, so can only work in one medium at a time, but the change in creativity fuels the other medium. Does that make sense?

I'm an artist, writer and muso. My art is realistic (facial portraits, sun/weather-inspired landscapes and seascapes), I write children's fantasy and my music is mainly rock and roll. Nothing mixes with the other, and I can't listen to music when I write or paint because then I want to play the music.

And yeah, I couldn't illustrate my own manuscripts. I don't "see" them like that.

Danger Jane
05-31-2008, 07:16 AM
I could probably illustrate my stories in images, although with some difficulty. I'd rather just stick with portraits. Lazy, huh? But my whole AP drawing/painting concentration was out of my head...very taxing, after a few months.

It would not be hard, though, to illustrate them musically. Give me enough time, and I could either come up with something all on my own, or else cut little pieces from symphonies and quartets here and there until I had the whole story. I have my phases...sometimes I think in words, but usually I think in three-note repeated snippets of whatever I've been listening to recently.

Luckily I tend to think before I speak.

eveningstar
05-31-2008, 08:30 PM
I can't illustrate my own work, either. And I've had several people suggest that I try graphic novels but they're not really my style art-wise.

Though I have written stories that started as paintings.


Most commonly, really immersing myself in art renders me nigh-unto non-verbal. It's usually easier for me to switch from writing to art than the other way around.


This is true for me as well. I've had a very productive art week and going back to my WIP it seems kind of odd and alien.