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Azure Skye
05-26-2008, 05:26 AM
I've done a lot of research, but I just have a question that I hope could be answered from another's experience. After suffering a stroke, did your loved one, friend, yourself, ever fully recover? And by that, I mean, not so much in the physical sense but emotionally and mentally, did they ever get back to being 100% themselves or were they more like seventy or eighty percent there?

I hope that makes sense. :poke::Huh:

Puma
05-26-2008, 05:33 AM
My husband had a mild stroke about twelve years ago. I'd say he's fully recovered from the stroke. He's had other problems since then that have caused more problems that haven't been so easily overcome. He doesn't really even think about the stroke anymore (he does think about his heart attack and other ailments). From what I know and have seen, I'd say anything close to full recovery would only be possible with a mild stroke. Puma

L M Ashton
05-26-2008, 05:53 AM
I've seen full recoveries with some people and I've seen less than that with others. It varies, but yes, a full recovery is possible. :)

Cranky
05-26-2008, 05:55 AM
My grandmother had a stroke back in 2001. She's had a bunch of ministrokes since then, and she's lost a lot of weight. She's often confused, and her balance is not good.

Then again, she is 70+ years old. Some of her physical problems may be due to her age and history of cardiac problems, in additon to the strokes.

joyce
05-26-2008, 06:12 AM
When my husband was fifty he was having these ministrokes for about six months but nobody realized what was happening. Of course we also didn't know that one carotid artery was 100% clogged and the other was 98% clogged. I guess he was really lucky to have about ten of these strokes and not come out of it messed up. I do think it messed with his memory a little. Now I can't tell if the stokes are messing with his memory or he's just not listening to me. :)

Mom'sWrite
05-26-2008, 06:30 AM
My cousin had a stroke in her 40's. Before the stroke she was a cut-throat attorney. After her stroke she's still an attorney but a kinder, gentler one. Could be that time wore away some of her rough edges or maybe she saw the light, so to speak.

My grandmother's stroke put her in a coma, she died 3 days later.

Mumut
05-26-2008, 06:49 AM
I had a mild stroke a number of years ago and recovered fully after a while. I've had other problems since then so I wonder, reading Puma's entry, whether the stroke made me more susceptible to these ailments. Again with reference to Puma, my wife sent me to the doctor to check my hearing but the verdict was that it was a listening problem, not a hearing one!

HeronW
05-26-2008, 05:05 PM
My dad at 75 had a mini stroke that my mom noticed--since his mouth was turned down a bit. He went into the hospital that day and had at least 6 more TIAs transient ischemic attacks that left him with nonsensical speech for up to 30 min after each attack. In '95 he had the carotid artery cleaned out but they didn't catch a descending aortal aneurism in time that killed him a few days after the surgery.

I'd say up to 3 years prior he was himself then he became--odd. He had been an alcoholic and dried out 7 years --since '88. He became more emotional and less focused on his usual interests. I think part of this was due to the lessening of blood flow to his brain for quite a while before the TIAs. I'm sure there was brain damage to areas for lack of oxygen.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-26-2008, 05:18 PM
My mother had a massive stroke in '98, went immediately into a coma and died 19 days later. My father had three or four mini-strokes back in the 80s... they affected his speech and short-term memory, but brought back his long-term memory. Go figure. They also affected his ability to understand day-to-day happenings and things deteriorated for the two years after, until his death.

Azure Skye
05-26-2008, 05:32 PM
Thanks for sharing your stories. I'm sorry for those who suffered a loss due to stroke. It happened to my uncle a few years back.

Thanks again. This information does help me a lot.

Keyan
05-26-2008, 09:24 PM
A friend had a cerebral aneurysm when he was in his late 30s. It was caught immediately (he collapsed in public) and he was operated on a couple of days later. Then when they scanned his brain, they went in again to correct the position of the clips.

That was more than ten years ago. He's fine now, holds down a senior position in a company. The operations and recovery period were rough, but he recovered fairly quickly and as far as I could tell, completely. He *may* have had some short-term memory problems, but it's difficult to distinguish those from absent-mindedness and normal aging.

Mike Martyn
05-26-2008, 10:33 PM
A friend's son had a stroke when he was five years old. Unusual since one generally associates a cerebreal hemmorage with old age, alcohol abuse, high blood pressure etc. all of which are not part of the average 5 year old's life style.

The boy is now in his 20's and suffers from neurological deficits in short term memeory and a learning disability but he has finished high school and is studying to be a mechanic.

Mr Flibble
05-26-2008, 11:41 PM
My mum had a quite severe stroke three years ago, It's safe to say her personality has never been the same. I'd say she's recovered about 60 - 70% ( at age 68 now) She's still improving however she'll never be free of the wheelchair. Considereing how much of an active and bright woman she was before-- it's strange to think of. She always used to talk for Engalnd, now it's hard to get a word out of her. She'll never be the same mum she was.

Soccer Mom
05-27-2008, 12:45 AM
My mother has had several TIA's and one small stroke. She's never fully recovered. Each one impaired her just a bit more. The most noticable differences are her memory loss and personality changes. For example, she now has a terrible time making a decision or reacting in an emergency. She was a surgical nurse. This is not like her at all. She's different from the Mom I grew up with, and yet still my Mom in many ways. She can still nag like nobody's business. :D

oneblindmouse
05-27-2008, 01:39 AM
I had a stroke six years ago when I was 47. The stroke was highly unusual (caused apparently by a hole in my heart undiagnosed since birth and despite my having had 3 children), and 'only' affected the occipital lobe, leaving me partially sighted, i.e. I lost roughly half my visual field, everything left of centre, and what I do see is out of focus. No longer able to drive and be the active person I was, and deprived of my autonomy, I went into a severe depression. If it hadn't been for the internet I think I would have gone crazy, as for a long time it was my only connection to the 'real' world. To cut a long story short, it's meant drastic domestic/family upheaval. The neurologists said from the very start that no recovery was possible (which only fuelled my depression). Stem cell research may provide 'cures' or treatment, but probably not for quite some years.

As for changes to my personality, I was always very active, impulsive, extrovert, etc., but now there's such a barrier between me and the outside world, I often feel alienated, I feel much more passive, turned inwards. I've gone through the whole gamut of emotions, from shock and despair, to depression and thoughts of suicide, to acceptance. I can now say that I was lucky, and I have a lot to live for. I'm now active in a different way, very involved in a human rights NGO, etc., which helps my self esteem and is my own form of 'recovery'.

I hope this helps your research.

Azure Skye
05-27-2008, 02:24 AM
I had a stroke six years ago when I was 47. The stroke was highly unusual (caused apparently by a hole in my heart undiagnosed since birth and despite my having had 3 children), and 'only' affected the occipital lobe, leaving me partially sighted, i.e. I lost roughly half my visual field, everything left of centre, and what I do see is out of focus. No longer able to drive and be the active person I was, and deprived of my autonomy, I went into a severe depression. If it hadn't been for the internet I think I would have gone crazy, as for a long time it was my only connection to the 'real' world. To cut a long story short, it's meant drastic domestic/family upheaval. The neurologists said from the very start that no recovery was possible (which only fuelled my depression). Stem cell research may provide 'cures' or treatment, but probably not for quite some years.

As for changes to my personality, I was always very active, impulsive, extrovert, etc., but now there's such a barrier between me and the outside world, I often feel alienated, I feel much more passive, turned inwards. I've gone through the whole gamut of emotions, from shock and despair, to depression and thoughts of suicide, to acceptance. I can now say that I was lucky, and I have a lot to live for. I'm now active in a different way, very involved in a human rights NGO, etc., which helps my self esteem and is my own form of 'recovery'.

I hope this helps your research.

:Hug2:

Azure Skye
05-27-2008, 02:27 AM
A friend's son had a stroke when he was five years old. Unusual since one generally associates a cerebreal hemmorage with old age, alcohol abuse, high blood pressure etc. all of which are not part of the average 5 year old's life style.

The boy is now in his 20's and suffers from neurological deficits in short term memeory and a learning disability but he has finished high school and is studying to be a mechanic.

5 years old? Wow. That is unusual. Glad he's able to get along a little.

StephanieFox
05-27-2008, 04:06 AM
My mom had a couple of small strokes when she was 88 years old. I came over to visit her in the morning because the night before she'd been acting 'spacey'. She was on the couch, very confused and unable to stand. I called 911 and she was taken to the hospital in an ambulance.

Her oxygen intake was very low, which was causing the confusion. The doctors were afraid that she would not recover from the stroke, and she was in the hospital for five days. Within a week she was almost back to normal. I have seen no residual effects, something that has astounded her doctor and her personal trainer. It took about another couple of weeks for her to get back to the same level of weight training (7 lb. hand weights). She is now 90 years old and I see no sign she ever had a stroke. There were no personality changes at any time.

However my husband's mother had a stroke that put her into a assisted living facility. Within a week, she'd suffered a massive stroke and is now in a nursing home, needing 24 hour a day care.

Part of the difference, I think is that my mom, who even though is 20 years older than David's mom, was in much better health when the stroke happened. His mom smoked (I think this is a very important difference), mine didn't. His mother was quite overweight, mine was a healthy weight. His mother never got exercise, mine weight and balance trains and walks the dog.

I also think that a lot of recovery depends on how soon after the stroke treatment is received and, of course, genetics. But, yes you can recover 100 percent.

Keyan
05-27-2008, 10:20 AM
I think it also depends on what part of the brain is affected, particularly if its a haemorrhagic stroke.