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Exir
05-24-2008, 11:56 AM
Dropping "g" in "ing" (ing --> in')
Dropping "d" in "and"
"Your" becomes "yer"
"You" becomes "yeh"

dpaterso
05-24-2008, 12:16 PM
Working class. Could be encountered anywhere in the UK. May be smothered by stronger regional accent.

-Derek

Exir
05-24-2008, 12:17 PM
Is there any American accent like that?

CalGrave
05-24-2008, 12:30 PM
southern, Ebonics, "country" actually not exclusive to that anyone without a normal "accent" could do it when talking casually. Southern is the easiest answer that you are looking for.

pdr
05-24-2008, 02:48 PM
Brum to me, do they say filum for film and rowud for road?

Puma
05-24-2008, 03:30 PM
The characteristics you ask about are fairly common in some areas of the US - dropping the G from ing and the D from and especially. The your to yer is more Appalachia on out to American Western. The oddball in your group is the you to yeh - not common. In the south it would be you-all (y'all), In the hill belt out to the west it would be youse (if possessive or plural). I think what you may be getting at is the "Can I come with ya." which is again, fairly common. Overall, I'd say your examples (with the ya on the last one) could be quite a few places - Midwest, Appalachia, Plains, far West. It would be considered regional dialect but would also be quite acceptable in historical dialogue set in those areas. Puma

jclarkdawe
05-24-2008, 04:05 PM
Probably much more than you could ever want http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_English and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regional_accents_of_English

As well as different pronounciation, different regions use different words for the same object, for example soda, pop, cola, tonic. Place names that are used throughout the country, for example Concord are pronounced differently depending upon where you are.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

Kalyke
05-24-2008, 07:15 PM
I don't think non-working class (rich) people speak with more distinct enunciation than working class. English, like French has vowel transformations when words are surrounded by specific consonants, it is just not "written." I would simply call it "lazy."
Compare:
Whatcha doin? (What are you doing?"
Nutin. (Nothing.)
Jeet? (Did you eat?)
Na. (No)

Medievalist
05-24-2008, 07:26 PM
There's not enough data there to identify dialect; you'd need to more data about phonology, and, perhaps most importantly, word choice. Vocabulary is really important in dialect identification.

Mr Flibble
05-24-2008, 08:16 PM
There's not enough data there to identify dialect; you'd need to more data about phonology, and, perhaps most importantly, word choice. Vocabulary is really important in dialect identification.

Absolutely. Because the examples given could be me ( south east) or my mate from the borough ( north east)

Saanen
05-25-2008, 02:46 AM
The characteristics you ask about are fairly common in some areas of the US - dropping the G from ing and the D from and especially. The your to yer is more Appalachia on out to American Western. The oddball in your group is the you to yeh - not common. In the south it would be you-all (y'all), In the hill belt out to the west it would be youse (if possessive or plural). I think what you may be getting at is the "Can I come with ya." which is again, fairly common. Overall, I'd say your examples (with the ya on the last one) could be quite a few places - Midwest, Appalachia, Plains, far West. It would be considered regional dialect but would also be quite acceptable in historical dialogue set in those areas. Puma

Just to clarify for those who don't know, the southern "y'all" is for plural-you only. Singular-you is still said "you."

And I agree with Puma about the you to yeh being unusual.

StephanieFox
05-27-2008, 04:16 AM
American white southern accents developed out of the Scottish/Irish accents of the people who settled the South and particularly the mountains of the east and midwestern south. While I traveled there, I heard people refer to what sounded like a Far Tar. In Arkansas, that meant 'fire tower.' It took me a while to figure it out.

There's a central south (Arkansas, Missouri) accent, too. And then there's Texas, which isn't just another state, it's a whole other planet.

SupplyDragon
06-09-2008, 07:59 PM
Just to clarify for those who don't know, the southern "y'all" is for plural-you only. Singular-you is still said "you."

And I agree with Puma about the you to yeh being unusual.


Let's not forget you-ins... Which is Y'all + 3. :D

Many thanks to Jeff Foxworthy for that one.

HeronW
06-10-2008, 04:56 AM
here I was thinking Cockney :}

RJK
06-10-2008, 07:18 PM
With the exception of 'Yeh' you would fit in comfortably in western New York

Bo Sullivan
06-10-2008, 07:50 PM
When I saw it I thought of East End Cockneys.