PDA

View Full Version : Ouch



LimeyDawg
05-24-2008, 12:41 AM
Form letter rejection is one thing, but I read this as them saying "hey, you suck so badly, don't ever send your crap to this agency again." At least they could have used my name.

I'm slinking off into the dark corners now, putting away my writing for good, lol.

Dear Writer,(Writer?????WTF, try sending a query with 'Dear Agent' and see where it gets you.)

Thank you for your recent query letter.

I'm afraid that at the present time we are unable to encourage you to submit your work to us for further consideration. Our decision is based upon our commitment to the needs of our existing clients as well as our perception of the current publishing climate.

We do wish you the best of luck with your marketing efforts and thank you again for contacting the agency.

The Lazear Group

431 Second Street
Suite 300
Hudson, WI 54016

RainbowDragon
05-24-2008, 01:08 AM
That doesn't mean don't query us on your next book, it just means they don't want to see a partial or full for this book. Don't read anything into it, it's just a form rejection. I have a box full of them, and I don't even print the e-mail ones!

Keep querying!

triceretops
05-24-2008, 01:09 AM
Looks completely stock/form to me. I wouldn't read any more into it. And man I hate those comments about the "publishing climate." You really don't have to tell me how difficult it is to sell fiction these days. I'm in the trenches taking most of the flak, dear agent/editor.

Onward, Limey, onward!

Tri

Karen Duvall
05-24-2008, 01:53 AM
How rude!

JoNightshade
05-24-2008, 02:06 AM
I am actually pretty sure I got that exact letter from the same people. I read it as them being annoyed by people doing follow-ups to less... CONCRETE rejections. (IE if you send out a nice form, a certain percent of people are not going to get the hint.)

LimeyDawg
05-24-2008, 02:43 AM
I'm just aggravated by the fact that agents will go through all this song and dance about how busy they are and how proper a query letter needs to be (god forbid you mispell a name), and then they can't even bother to cut and paste the name of the author into the rejection letter. It's a pretty one-sided game. I guess they forget that those of us not published are writing around our regular jobs, which for me is a 60 hour/week gig.

stormie
05-24-2008, 03:05 AM
I hear you. But at least my name got typed into the top of the form letter. It went on and on about how it's no reflection on my writing, we wish we had the time to comment....
And that was on a full. I perused it and put it in the circular file. http://bestsmileys.com/cleaning/3.gif Onward, Limey!

Pat~
05-24-2008, 03:23 AM
It just looked like a poorly written form rejection letter to me, Limey. We've read your writing, and know it's good, so don't give this another thought--(at least not any more thought than they took in writing the thing).

nevada
05-24-2008, 04:14 AM
Yes, including your name would have been nice. however, you only send out 20 or 30 queries and you want them to invest a whole lot of time and work for which they potentially may never get paid. They, on the other hand, receive thousands of queries. Do you really think they ahve a secretary just to do a merge file for every damn query they get? Personally, I'd rather have an agent spend all his precious time trying to sell my book than send rejection notices to people who should have thicker skins. No is no. What difference does it make if your name is on it or not? Let it go and move on. It won't be the last rejection you get.

Jersey Chick
05-24-2008, 04:20 AM
On personal rejections - my favorite one includes my name being misspelled. Sometimes "Dear Author" doesn't sting as much as not bothering to at least get my name right. :D

soleary
05-24-2008, 04:25 AM
Limey,

All I can say is believe. You were given a gift, and you express it when you write. If someone doesn't see it, it doesn't mean it doesn't exist. Fight through, and use this as the fuel that keeps you going rather than defeats you. YOU CAN DO IT!

LimeyDawg
05-24-2008, 04:50 AM
Yes, including your name would have been nice. however, you only send out 20 or 30 queries and you want them to invest a whole lot of time and work for which they potentially may never get paid. They, on the other hand, receive thousands of queries. Do you really think they ahve a secretary just to do a merge file for every damn query they get? Personally, I'd rather have an agent spend all his precious time trying to sell my book than send rejection notices to people who should have thicker skins. No is no. What difference does it make if your name is on it or not? Let it go and move on. It won't be the last rejection you get.
Which, compared to the amount of time I spent on work for which I might never get paid, is infinitesimally small. They expect me to get thier names right, they should return the favor. It's just good customer service.

LimeyDawg
05-24-2008, 04:52 AM
Of course, after that, there are those with a little more class:


Dear Mr. Moss,

Many thanks for your email regarding your novel PROFESSOR PROOT'S TALES AND FABLES OF AVALON, which I am declining with my regrets.

Given the demands of starting a new agency and continuing to best represent my current clients, I must make difficult decisions every day regarding what new projects I can sign. I appreciate your thinking of me, and wish you the best of luck in your search for representation.

Cheers,

Kate Schafer Testerman


I guess it all evens out in the end.

LimeyDawg
05-24-2008, 05:01 AM
It just looked like a poorly written form rejection letter to me, Limey. We've read your writing, and know it's good, so don't give this another thought--(at least not any more thought than they took in writing the thing).
Pat,

You've always been generous with your reviews of my work. Thanks for the confidence. (There's still a chance my poetry will be getting published, lol)

rugcat
05-24-2008, 05:09 AM
Just a form rejection.

Before I found an agent, I received plenty of them. Several agencies requested a partial along with the quetry letter, then form rejected the same day, clearly having never even looked at the partial. Others, again requesting partials, never replied at all.

Put it out of your mind.

LimeyDawg
05-24-2008, 05:15 AM
It's out, John. It just struck me as funny, that's all, especially after all the agents with blogs go out of their way to explain how busy they are, and how they'll reject for something as innocuous as mispelling their names. I'm honestly not bothered because I'll get these little stories published anyway.
Speaking of published, how about kicking your agent in the ass and getting your next book into print? That was pretty damned good stuff. We're waiting.......

Haggis
05-24-2008, 05:16 AM
The letter was harsh, classless and poorly written. In my opinion, that reflects badly on the agency. It makes me wonder how they treat the writers they do represent. I worry for them.

That said, I'm sure it's boilerplate. Blow it off and get to work sending out more queries. But I'd avoid that agency like the plague in the future. If they have that little control over their communications, what kind of assurances might you have about the quality of their work for writers?

nevada
05-24-2008, 05:17 AM
i give kate shafer testerman 6 months before she starts sending out form letters

LimeyDawg
05-24-2008, 05:21 AM
The letter was harsh, classless and poorly written. In my opinion, that reflects badly on the agency. It makes me wonder how they treat the writers they do represent. I worry for them.

That said, I'm sure it's boilerplate. Blow it off and get to work sending out more queries. But I'd avoid that agency like the plague in the future. If they have that little control over their communications, what kind of assurances might you have about the quality of their work for writers?
Meh, I saved it, as I do all rejection letters. When I'm old(er) and famous, I'll call them out in my autobiography. As a final act of revenge, I'll query them with that MS. LOL.

LimeyDawg
05-24-2008, 05:23 AM
i give kate shafer testerman 6 months before she starts sending out form letters
Probably right, and a damned shame that will be.

soleary
05-24-2008, 05:24 AM
My first professional job was writing jokes for Happy Meal boxes. I lived for the release of a box, so I could see my jokes in writing. One day, I was walking home from the office and saw some of my "work" smashed in the gutter on Michigan Ave in Chicago. It was at that moment I realized that how I felt about my work was much more important than anyone else's take on it. HANG IN THERE!

LimeyDawg
05-24-2008, 05:33 AM
My first professional job was writing jokes for Happy Meal boxes. I lived for the release of a box, so I could see my jokes in writing. One day, I was walking home from the office and saw some of my "work" smashed in the gutter on Michigan Ave in Chicago. It was at that moment I realized that how I felt about my work was much more important than anyone else's take on it. HANG IN THERE!
Well, if it's any consolation, I'm sure it was an editorial on the food, not the packaging...

soleary
05-24-2008, 05:39 AM
I'm lip kissin' you through cyber land for that, my friend :)!

MsJudy
05-24-2008, 07:16 AM
More and more editors and agencies aren't even bothering to reply. You'll hear from us if we're interested, otherwise....

so we won't be dissecting the form letters for much longer. Only trying to interpret the silence...

nevada
05-24-2008, 07:30 AM
I don't understand this great fascination with rejection letters and the unending dissection of it. Unless it's addressed to you and it specifically mentions the work and it has helpful hints, it's a no. Move on. There are no hidden messages. This is not National Treasure: the rejection letter saga. It's a no. no no no. Send it to the next one on the list.

And before you write me off as a cold heartless bitch, I take everything personally. If I'm driving down the road and the guy behind me changes lanes, I'm thinking "what did I do wrong? Am i going too fast? Am i going to slow? What is wrong with him? What is wrong with me?" Yes, yes I do, and yes I am in therapy. :D But rejection letters? Pshaw. They're a dime a dozen. Easiest thing in the world to get and easiest thing in the world to get over. They don't want it? Fine, I'll find someone who will. Certainly not going to be the thing I lose sleep over. I got way more important things to keep me up at night.

Limeydawg, that was not directed at you. It was just a general thought I had that resulted from your post. lol

Phaeal
05-24-2008, 05:30 PM
The only thing I find really irritating is no response at all. Come on, how long can it take to hit the Reply button and type NO? Or to scrawl NO over my letter and stuff it back in the envelope I'VE paid the postage on? Then I can at least scratch you off my list, instead of wondering whether you ever got my query or material.

Not to respond to a polite request, however curtly, is just rude. No excuses.

sheadakota
05-24-2008, 06:24 PM
The only thing I find really irritating is no response at all. Come on, how long can it take to hit the Reply button and type NO? Or to scrawl NO over my letter and stuff it back in the envelope I'VE paid the postage on? Then I can at least scratch you off my list, instead of wondering whether you ever got my query or material.

Not to respond to a polite request, however curtly, is just rude. No excuses.
I agree. at least have the courtesy to TELL me you are rejecting me!:mad:

Karen Duvall
05-24-2008, 07:55 PM
Not to respond to a polite request, however curtly, is just rude. No excuses.

I couldn't agree more, and it's about the only gripe I have with the literary agent community. And I have a theory.

See, agents are always telling us how they talk to each other so they know what we're saying about them. We should watch what we say on public forums and in our blogs. Fine, that's a given. But they may not realize the gravity of some of the things we're talking about. The next Stephanie Meyer or Jim Butcher or Harlan Coben or Ayn Rand may be reading our words as they research agents to query. Will they bother approaching an agent who may not dignify their query with a response? Possibly not. And agents must realize that great writers of great books are a gold mine their careers depend on. But if they want to cave in those mines before digging up the nuggets, well, I guess they're not so serious about this business after all.

Stick a fork in them. They'll be done soon.