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sassandgroove
05-24-2008, 12:15 AM
Allright, 'fess up! Who has bread machines?

The recent budget thread and the how do you stretch your food threads have me inspired to save dough! (Yay for punny.) Someone mentioned a bread machine. It got me thinkin'. I love bread. I love baking. But I don't have the time I'd like to make bread on a regular basis. (LM Ashton,I'll look at your thread shortly!)

SO: Do you have a bread machine?
Do you like it?
Did you get a mega expensive one or a modest one? Why?
Do you think it saves you time?
Do you think it saves you money?
Why or why not?
If it breaks, are you gettin' a new one or not bothering?

Thanks in advance for responses. :D:D

Adam Israel
05-24-2008, 12:22 AM
I used to have one. I don't remember the model or brand, but it did make loafs that were longer, like the ones you get in the store. I seem to remember a majority of makers make vertical loafs.

I loved having it and plan to get another one sometime. I don't know that it saves time or money, but fresh bread tastes yummy and there are a variety of breads you can make that you don't normally see in the store, like Pizza bread and Chili Cheese bread. Endless possibilities.

Haggis
05-24-2008, 12:22 AM
Allright, 'fess up! Who has bread machines?

The recent budget thread and the how do you stretch your food threads have me inspired to save dough! (Yay for punny.) Someone mentioned a bread machine. It got me thinkin'. I love bread. I love baking. But I don't have the time I'd like to make bread on a regular basis. (LM Ashton,I'll look at your thread shortly!)

SO: Do you have a bread machine? Yes
Do you like it? Yes, it's okay
Did you get a mega expensive one or a modest one? Dunno Why? It was a gift
Do you think it saves you time? No. It's faster to go to the bakery.
Do you think it saves you money? No.
Why or why not? I wind up wasting flour.
If it breaks, are you gettin' a new one or not bothering? Probably wouldn't bother.

Thanks in advance for responses. :D:D

I do love good, fresh, homemade bread. And I am no baker.

Yes, the stuff my breadmaker makes is pretty good, but the odd shape is troublesome, and much of it winds up going to waste.

I think for a family with kids, it might be a godsend. Not so much for me. Besides, I really, really like eggplant.

Adam Israel
05-24-2008, 12:24 AM
Creamed Cornbread? :D

KTC
05-24-2008, 12:28 AM
I'd rather make eggplant parm. (and eat it) than just about anything. Bad choice in a bread maker poll... the eggplant wins every time.

My brother and his wife became socially broken when they got their bread maker. I remember it vividly. It was scary! They made bread morning, noon and night. It was like a high. If their house wasn't filled with the aroma of fresh bread... they might as well have been junkies missing their fix. They jonesed like nobody's business. And it was a challenge to them to make as many different kinds of breads as there were flavours in the universe. It was pretty wild, really. I had a penchant for the paprika and peppered olive oil/rye bread. Yummy!

Honestly... it was amazing how many kinds of bread they always had. But they soon grew to the boundaries of their walls. We call them The Fatties now and no longer invite them to Christmas dinner.

They wouldn't come anyway... they'd be at home. Makin' and eatin' bread.


I say go for it.

alleycat
05-24-2008, 12:28 AM
My mother is a long-time bread maker. She even sells loaves around Christmastime, as well as hand them out as gifts. People drive out to her house just to pick up bread,

One year I gave her a bread machine. Well, she looked it over, said "thank you very much" . . . and promptly put it back in a closet somewhere where it didn't see the light of day until she put it in a yard sale a few years later. So much for good intentions.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-24-2008, 12:29 AM
I used to have one... but I forced myself to learn the making real bread and gave mine away. The crust was always too thick and the bread just wasn't... like mama used to make.

sassandgroove
05-24-2008, 12:29 AM
*Makes a mental note to get my mom's eggplant parmesan recipe for Haggis.*

Yikes, three posts while I read then type this to Haggis!

Sarpedon
05-24-2008, 12:29 AM
I've never made bread in a bread maker, and disliked every loaf I've tasted from one.

At the height of my bread making, I'd do it weekly, always in the oven, always hand kneaded, on cookie sheets, with a pan o boiling water.

Down with the bread machines!

sassandgroove
05-24-2008, 12:31 AM
My momma didn't make bread, so I wouldn't be able to compare it to hers. Well, she'd make banananananana bread and such, but not yeast bread.

alleycat
05-24-2008, 12:32 AM
I've never made bread in a bread maker, and disliked every loaf I've tasted from one.

At the height of my bread making, I'd do it weekly, always in the oven, always hand kneaded, on cookie sheets, with a pan o boiling water.

Down with the bread machines!
Hi, mom!

(Just kidding.)

Haggis
05-24-2008, 12:32 AM
Creamed Cornbread? :D

I knew you'd go there. I just knew it. :rant:


*Makes a mental note to get my mom's eggplant parmesan recipe for Haggis.*



Yes! Thank you, thank you, thank you.

Shadow_Ferret
05-24-2008, 12:32 AM
We have a breadmaker. Not sure what it cost, we stole it from my dead aunt. But I love fresh bread and use it quite a bit. I've never been keen on the square loafs it makes, so I generally use it to knead the bread then put the dough into a traditional breadpan and bake in the oven.


I've never made bread in a bread maker, and disliked every loaf I've tasted from one.


That makes no sense. Bread is bread is bread. You follow the recipe and it shouldn't matter if you make it in the breadmaker or the oven.

Unless you're talking about those package bread mixes. Those are awful.

sassandgroove
05-24-2008, 12:35 AM
Interesting Ferret. I have a stand mixer, wonder if I could just use that to knead dough and skip the bread machine.

Shadow_Ferret
05-24-2008, 12:36 AM
Well, if we had a stand mixer, probably. Can't afford $300 at the moment though.

ETA: Oh, sorry, you were asking if you could use it, not if we'd use it. Misread your post.

I'm sure you can mix bread in a mixer, that's all a breadmachine is. A mixer with a little tiny paddle on it.

Haggis
05-24-2008, 12:38 AM
Interesting Ferret. I have a stand mixer, wonder if I could just use that to knead dough and skip the bread machine.

A buddy of mine used to use his Cuisinart to knead his dough, and he made great bread. I see no reason your stand mixer couldn't do the job, as long as it's heavy enough. I'm sure bread making purists would disagree.

KTC
05-24-2008, 12:40 AM
My momma made bread every second morning for all my childhood. I almost didn't notice. I liked that there was always a coffee mug with rising yeast in it on the kitchen counter, though. It was somewhat comforting.

johnnysannie
05-24-2008, 12:50 AM
I have a bread machine, a Sunbeam model that makes a normal shaped loaf. I use it quite a bit but I also often make bread the old-fashioned way, hand-kneading, etc.

We love our homemade bread.

I sometimes make other homemade breads too and this is one of the easiest recipes for a quick homemade bread I've ever used. It's Italian cheese bread, a lot like the foccia (sp?) you can buy in bakeries. I also sometimes make the same dough, substitute tomato sauce for the salad dressing and make homemade pizza.

Here's the recipe:

2 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1 tsp spoon
1 tsp sugar
1 tablespoon yeast
1 cup warm water (120-130 degrees)

Mix first four ingredients, then combine water and oil, add to flour mixture. Add extra flour if needed to make a soft dough. Turn dough onto a floured surface and knead until elastic - not long at all -

Place in a greased bowl, cover, and let rise for 20 min.

While the dough is rising, combine
1/4 to 1/3 cup Italian salad dressing
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1/4 tsp dried oregano
1/4 tsp dried thyme
dash of pepper
1 tablespoon grated mozzarella cheese
1/3 cup shredded mozzarella

Once dough has risen to about double the original size, punch dough down and place on a greased 12 inch pizza pan. Pat the dough out into the circle of the pan then brush with the salad dressing (or if making pizza, spread the tomato sauce).

Combine the other seasonings and cover, sprinkling the cheese on last.

If you are making pizza, here's the time to add whatever toppings you might want - fresh mushrooms, onions, black olives, green peppers, cooked meats, whatever.

Bake at 450 degrees (pre-heat the oven first) for about 15 minutes or until golden brown. Serve warm.

It's good and it's quick to make.

dolores haze
05-24-2008, 01:02 AM
I love my Breadman!

I love the smell of baking bread. My kids love the different kinds of bread and even eat the crusts. I have to make a loaf every two days to keep up with the demand. I don't think it saves me money. I could go buy a cheap, air-filled sliced loaf for much less than the cost of bread flour and yeast. But the homemade bread is fresher, healthier and so much tastier.

I'd buy another machine very quickly if mine broke, but I've been using it several times a week for two years and have had no problems with it. Fresh bread with hearty, home-made soups in winter and with delicious salads in summer - what could be better?

I want to try sourdough, but have no starter. My most popular loaf with the kids is Italian Herb; my husband's favorite is Rye; my favorite is pulling the ready dough out and baking fresh, crusty baguettes in the oven.

Yeah, I love my Breadman!

Kate Thornton
05-24-2008, 01:02 AM
I make bread from scratch once in a while & don't have room for a machine. I do have a stand mixer with a bread hook, though.

I am diabetic and have to watch carbs, so making lots of heavenly homemade bread slathered with butter is out for me. But I do it once in a while anyway, especially if company is coming so I have to share.

DeborahM
05-24-2008, 01:15 AM
[quote=johnnysannie;2381388]I have a bread machine, a Sunbeam model that makes a normal shaped loaf. I use it quite a bit but I also often make bread the old-fashioned way, hand-kneading, etc.

We love our homemade bread.

I sometimes make other homemade breads too and this is one of the easiest recipes for a quick homemade bread I've ever used. It's Italian cheese bread, a lot like the foccia (sp?) you can buy in bakeries. I also sometimes make the same dough, substitute tomato sauce for the salad dressing and make homemade pizza.

Here's the recipe:

2 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1 tsp spoon
1 tsp sugar
1 tablespoon yeast
1 cup warm water (120-130 degrees)

Mix first four ingredients, then combine water and oil, add to flour mixture. Add extra flour if needed to make a soft dough. Turn dough onto a floured surface and knead until elastic - not long at all -

Place in a greased bowl, cover, and let rise for 20 min.

While the dough is rising, combine
1/4 to 1/3 cup Italian salad dressing
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1/4 tsp dried oregano
1/4 tsp dried thyme
dash of pepper
1 tablespoon grated mozzarella cheese
1/3 cup shredded mozzarella

Once dough has risen to about double the original size, punch dough down and place on a greased 12 inch pizza pan. Pat the dough out into the circle of the pan then brush with the salad dressing (or if making pizza, spread the tomato sauce).

Combine the other seasonings and cover, sprinkling the cheese on last.

stormie
05-24-2008, 01:23 AM
I've had my bread machine for about eight or nine years now. It's a Breadman with touch controls, at that time it cost about $170, and I use it on average once a week (less in summer, more in winter). It is getting on in years, as it sometimes gets quirky. If I feel like it, I don't bother with the machine and get all my aggressions out on kneading the dough. That's rare lately, as I've been keeping calmer. :D

If my machine broke, yeah, I'd look into another one, but the price would have to be okay.

zenwriter
05-24-2008, 04:05 AM
I love making bread -- but no machine for me. When I'm in a rush, I make beer bread. It's very fast and easy to make. Highly recommended.

L M Ashton
05-24-2008, 05:49 AM
I want to try sourdough, but have no starter.
You can make your own starter (I think there's at least one link to instructions) or you can join a sourdough group (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sourdough/) and put out a plea for sourdough starter, and most likely you'd get offers to mail it to you for the cost of postage. I went the make-my-own-starter root cuz I live in Outer Darkness, and where am I going to find someone with a starter here? Mine was bubbling enough that I was using it at day three, and it raised bread fine. Azure Skye decided to start her own and she's got bubbles and the right kind of smell at day two. Hers will likely be ready for making bread in a couple or three days, possibly sooner. It's honestly not at all difficult to make a sourdough starter.


I had a breadmaker in Canada which I used somewhat regularly. I don't have one here and won't be getting one. The low-knead techniques I use mean that there's a sum total of less than a minute of kneading, so why would I need a bread machine when I've already got methods that make it so easy and so hassle-free to make bread? I mean, seriously, in the middle of the worst of the chikungunya virus that Fahim and I caught, I had seriously nasty dizziness issues and bone crunching pain and it still wasn't a hassle to make bread. Cook anything to eat, yes. Make bread, no. Besides, most bread machines can't handle the longer rising times that sourdough bread requires.

soleary
05-24-2008, 05:50 AM
I own the dang thing, but can't remember how to make bread in it. UGH.

kristie911
05-24-2008, 05:58 AM
I have a breadmaker. I got it several years ago, used it a few times, wasn't impressed with the bread and it now sits, covered in dust, in a cupboard in my laundry room.

I only ever made bread from the kits you buy in the store, never from scratch, but I thought the bread was tolerable when it was warm but once it cooled off, I'd throw it away. It was too thick and heavy and kind of nasty actually.

I'd say not worth the money. I'll give you mine if you want it. :)

icerose
05-24-2008, 06:48 AM
My mom has one, she hated the pre-mixed breads, but enjoyed her own altered recipes to suit the machine.

She used to bake homemade bread all the time, but her arthritis bothered her so much she had to switch, so with some experimenting she could get it close. Though it always leaves a hole in the bread where the mixer was during baking.

Jo
05-24-2008, 07:29 AM
I've used our Sunbeam Bakehouse breadmaker for years, especially for chocolate bread (yummiest when toasted) and cheesy mustard bread (topped with Vegemite hehe). I use both breadmix (with tweaks) and my own recipes. The blade doesn't collapse, so the loaves have big chunks missing from when I pull them out (even though we oil the blade, the bread sticks...). We're looking at replacing it with a Breville (http://www.breville.com.au/products_detail.asp?prod=130) model with collapsible blade. It has similar features to the one we have (including rapid bake, which is handy) but it's pricey.

I now use our machine for kneading, and pop the loaf to rise in a bread pan and cook in the oven. Or I plait it, make rolls, or make other shapes for fun, and sprinkle sesame seeds or poppy seeds on top. It's also good for pizza bases, damper and hot cross buns, and I can set a loaf up the night before and have steaming, crisp bread in the morning. The enders are choice!

I think the best thing about baking your own bread is you can flavour it how you want.

stormie
05-24-2008, 06:35 PM
...especially for chocolate bread (yummiest when toasted) and cheesy mustard bread....

Do we have the same recipe book?! I've made the above from recipes I got in a great hardcover, thin, breadmachine book.

(Oh, no. There's that bug again, crawling across my monitor. No matter how many times I hit it, it won't die!)

para
05-24-2008, 07:10 PM
SO: Do you have a bread machine? Yes
Do you like it? Yes
Did you get a mega expensive one or a modest one? Why? I had a cheap one then it started going wrong so I got one of the Panasonic ones. The Panasonic is the most expensive breadmaker out there but it was on special offer and it had such great reviews.
Do you think it saves you time? Yes
Do you think it saves you money? Depends - on the cheapest loaf you can get in the shop? Not at first but with prices rising it is about the same now.
Why or why not? I love the smell of fresh bread and it does taste much nicer than store bought bread. Also I know exactly what has gone into it.
If it breaks, are you gettin' a new one or not bothering? I already did but hopefully this one won't break.

sassandgroove
05-25-2008, 09:51 PM
thanks everyone for your input. I'm thinkin' I'll try my stand mixer first and bake in the good ol' oven. Don't know why I didn't think of that. I'm inspired to try making a starter, now, too. :D

L M Ashton
05-26-2008, 04:57 AM
Yay!:banana:

TerzaRima
05-26-2008, 06:19 AM
I had a bread machine, back when, and gave it away. Half the pleasure of bread baking, for me, is kneading, and I missed it.

And have any of you tried the NY Times no-knead bread recipe? Not bad.

L M Ashton
05-26-2008, 06:30 AM
I did and didn't like it, personally. BUT I don't have a Dutch oven, so there was no way I could duplicate the baking environment and conditions, so that may have to do with it not working out so well. That, and there's a distinct possibility that my oven may not be working properly, and besides, it's pretty difficult to guess temperatures accurately. It's a longer story, but basically, I'm working with gas marks and a propane tank, and when stoves are fed on propane tanks, there's a lower gas pressure (apparently), so it never gets as hot, so I can't even go by standard gas marks... I guess a lot. At any rate, the short version is it just didn't work out at all impressively for me.

But there's also a no-knead / low-knead bread thread started you can check out if you like. :)

Kitrianna
05-27-2008, 07:11 PM
Cheaters! That's all I have to say to you bread maker owners, well that and learn to knead...it's great therapy and a workout all in one. Alleycat...you're mom did exactly what I would do if someone bought me one of those confounded countertop dust collectors, but it was the thought that counted. As far as the eggplant goes...never tried it. I'm still working up the nerve cause I loathe throwing good food out and I'm the only one who would eat it in my house.

Shadow_Ferret
05-27-2008, 07:15 PM
I only ever made bread from the kits you buy in the store, never from scratch, but I thought the bread was tolerable when it was warm but once it cooled off, I'd throw it away. It was too thick and heavy and kind of nasty actually.

I'd say not worth the money. I'll give you mine if you want it. :)
Don't use the box stuff, that is just awful! Find some real bread recipes (probably plenty online) and just use the breadmaker to knead the dough.

Then put it in the oven in a real bread pan. :)

Sarpedon
05-27-2008, 07:21 PM
Shadowferret: the answer is Texture, moisture content, consistency. Its more than just ingredients.

Shadow_Ferret
05-27-2008, 07:48 PM
Shadowferret: the answer is Texture, moisture content, consistency. Its more than just ingredients.
If you say so. I say it's the box stuff.

I've tried both and making it from scratch always tastes better.

Sarpedon
05-27-2008, 07:50 PM
I'll agree that the box stuff is worse.

I won't agree that the bread machine gives you a more pleasing consistancy until I eat one that does. (eat the bread, that is)

Shadow_Ferret
05-27-2008, 08:14 PM
I'll agree that the box stuff is worse.

I won't agree that the bread machine gives you a more pleasing consistancy until I eat one that does. (eat the bread, that is)
No, no, no. I never said I baked the bread in the machine. I merely use it (because I'm lazy) to knead it.

The baking is done in a real oven.

I don't like how the machine-baked bread's consistency is. Nor do I like the square loaf. Nor do I like the hole the paddle punches into the bottom of the loaf.

Kitrianna
05-27-2008, 08:54 PM
SF, the bread tastes even better when you do ALL the work yourself.

Shadow_Ferret
05-27-2008, 08:57 PM
SF, the bread tastes even better when you do ALL the work yourself.
No, it doesn't.

stormie
05-27-2008, 09:10 PM
Cheaters! That's all I have to say to you bread maker owners, well that and learn to knead...it's great therapy and a workout all in one.
But then there are people who have arthritis or some other malady that prevents them from being able to knead or punch the dough down. (Not me, but someone mentioned it once.) But I find I make more different types of breads with the machine. A mind-set, I guess!

Shadow_Ferret
05-27-2008, 09:16 PM
But then there are people who have arthritis or some other malady that prevents them from being able to knead or punch the dough down. (Not me, but someone mentioned it once.) But I find I make more different types of breads with the machine. A mind-set, I guess!
And those of us who don't have the time, or patience, to devote 4 hours to making bread dough.

And those of us who don't like getting their hands dirty.

sassandgroove
05-27-2008, 09:26 PM
hey- no pickin' on the bread machine owners!

Sass- who is going to try her stand mixer, and is accepting a bread machine gift. :D

L M Ashton
05-28-2008, 05:12 AM
But then there are people who have arthritis or some other malady that prevents them from being able to knead or punch the dough down. (Not me, but someone mentioned it once.) But I find I make more different types of breads with the machine. A mind-set, I guess!
Yeah, that would be me. Although not arthritis, but another problem that causes extremely painful joints. Well, that, and dislocating joints, and I don't really want to dislocate all my fingers just because I want bread...

That's why I go with the low-knead methods I mentioned in another thread here. Does the same job as kneading for the 8 or 10 or whatever minutes, but without the pain. :D


And I had no idea - until this thread - that there were bread making kits in a box. That's just... Why? It's not like it's that hard to measure out four or six ingredients. Yanno?

mscelina
05-28-2008, 05:19 AM
I love my bread machine! Nothing beats homemade bread--I even have a cookbook with recipes for all sorts of things to make in your bread machine--including pastries and fancy breads. :D

But, when I have the time, there's nothing better than making it all yourself from scratch. Just the smell of it baking....mmmmmmmmmmm.

But the bread machine gets lots of work in my house because I'm usually too busy to spend six hours from start to finish with homemade bread.

If anyone wants some recipes, btw--let me know. ;)

Gary
05-28-2008, 06:33 AM
I wore out the first one I bought about 10 years ago, and the second one is used nearly every day. Considering there are just two of us, we go through a lot of bread.

I don't care for any of the packaged mixes I tried. I modified one of the standard recipes that came with the machine, and make sure I use only good bread flour.

I've made bread by hand, but the machine is much more consistent and takes only a few minutes of my time.

Sarpedon
05-28-2008, 06:31 PM
No, no, no. I never said I baked the bread in the machine. I merely use it (because I'm lazy) to knead it.

The baking is done in a real oven.


Oh! thats different of course. There's no reason not to use a machine for kneading, though I'm just not the type to buy a machine to do something that is so easy to do by hand.

Shadow_Ferret
05-28-2008, 06:45 PM
And I had no idea - until this thread - that there were bread making kits in a box. That's just... Why? It's not like it's that hard to measure out four or six ingredients. Yanno?
They are made specifically for bread machines so they are exactly the size the machine makes. That way the dough doesn't blow out the top.

Plus, this is America. Why work for it when you can just add water?

You know why most cake mixes have you add water AND eggs?

Because women wanted to feel like they were still part of the process, so the companies made the mixes so women had to add a couple ingredients. (I think I heard that on a Food Network show.)

sassandgroove
05-29-2008, 12:15 AM
Well- i can't speak to bread mixes, but I use biscuit mix and pancake mix because the results are more consistant and I like the results. I am sure if I took more time to practice - especially on the biscuit front- I would eventually get consistant (good) results, but I have mixes with results I am happy with. Now someone said she tried a mix for the bread and didn't like it. If I didn't like the results, I'd make it from scratch. See?

stormie
05-29-2008, 12:20 AM
I'll use mixes for cakes and doctor it to my liking. That's because, no matter what recipe I use, my cakes from scratch don't turn out well at all. I've even bought fresh baking powder and baking soda if called for, yet the results are certainly a far, far cry from Martha Stewart's cakes. Or bubbly, bouncy Rachel Ray.

As for bread mixes for the bread machine, I use them sometimes. I can't remember the brand I use, but it's a good one. I do prefer from scratch (and I just made a whole wheat and walnut bread from allrecipes.com) and they do turn out good, too.

L M Ashton
05-29-2008, 05:33 AM
I don't use mixes for anything - I never have. BUT I think one major difference for me vs. most other people is that I've been cooking and baking since I was 5, by myself with no assistance. Long story there. My mother refused to make desserts of any kind, so if we wanted cakes, cookies, puddings, pancakes, or anything else like that, my sister (two years older than me) or I had to make it from scratch (no mixes there, either). So I learned from a very very young age, and now, as an adult, it's easy and second-nature. I never had a chance to get used to mixes - it's always been from scratch. And, you know what? The results are better than the mix cakes or whatever that I've had at other people's houses. And since it really isn't that hard, I'll stick with cooking from scratch. :)

One thing I've read recently is how much variation there is in the way people measure ingredients. Like one cup of flour can be anywhere from 100 grams to 260 grams (http://www.sourdoughhome.com/measureit.html)(or something like that) depending on how it's measured, never mind that how much is a cup varies from country to country (1 Canadian cup=227ml, 1 US cup=237ml, 1 Sri Lankan cup= anywhere from 160-200ml - don't know about the rest of the world), and then you're just increasing the potential for variation. So how much is a cup, really?

The recipe that you're looking at - how did that person measure her cup of flour? Was her cup of flour 200 g and yours is 140 g or vice versa? How can you possibly tell?

It's no wonder that some people have lousy results. It's also why I'm converting my recipes to weights - it's a more reliable way to predict how a recipe will turn out.


ETA: You know, I'm going to port the weights vs. volumes portion of this response to another thread.

nicolen
06-02-2008, 03:40 AM
I very briefly owned a breadmaker, but ended up giving it away. Did not like the bread, and the shape of the loaf was just about unusable.

I make bread from scratch, and to be honest, there's not a heck of a lot of hands on time involved. As an example, I've got a loaf proving at the moment - I mixed the yeast, sugar and water together and left it to sit while I was having breakfast. Came back and mixed in the flour and did the kneading and left it to rise while I went to the gym and when I got back here I shaped it and it's doing its final rising at the moment before I bake it. Total time commitment from me is around 20 minutes work total- the yeast does all the work with little need for me to hover around. The yeast is really forgiving as well - if you get busy, you can leave the dough and come back to it when you're ready and it's fine.

I know there's a lot of people out there who adore their breadmakers, and that's great, but for me, I'm quite happy to mix and knead myself.

Cranky
06-25-2008, 07:20 PM
The hubby got me a bread machine! It showed up on my front step yesterday, and I had no idea it was coming.

I love a good surprise. :D

Cranky
06-25-2008, 07:37 PM
I'll use mixes for cakes and doctor it to my liking. That's because, no matter what recipe I use, my cakes from scratch don't turn out well at all. I've even bought fresh baking powder and baking soda if called for, yet the results are certainly a far, far cry from Martha Stewart's cakes. Or bubbly, bouncy Rachel Ray.

As for bread mixes for the bread machine, I use them sometimes. I can't remember the brand I use, but it's a good one. I do prefer from scratch (and I just made a whole wheat and walnut bread from allrecipes.com) and they do turn out good, too.

If you get a chance, can you PM or rep me the name of the mix? I'm going to try mixes first, and then my own concoctions. :D

*squeee*

stormie
06-26-2008, 02:47 AM
Here (http://www.krusteaz.com/brands/krusteaz/bread_machine_mixes/) you go, Cranky! (He-he--guess he wanted a not-so-cranky-wife!) The Italian Herb is really good for dinner. I find these mixes at my A&P. Most supermarkets have them in the baking aisle. From scratch, though, it's not hard to do. There are tons of recipes online.

truelyana
08-04-2008, 02:46 AM
I don't have a breadmachine, but I know someone that does! Does that count?

I remember watching my grandmother as a pup, preparing for bread in the forno. It was such a delightful time, with all the smells and baking and than you had the meat hanging upside down at the top of the roof, being smoked with the fire underneath. Good times. That is one of the best memories of bread making.

stormie
08-04-2008, 04:23 PM
Some good things about a bread machine:
You still get that wonderful smell of rising dough and baking bread.
It's far less effort than kneeding, letting it rest, kneading...especially if you have arthritis or fibromyalgia or any other difficulty with your hands and/or fingers.

The not-so-good things:
It costs money to buy (duh)
It uses electricity to run (though I don't know how much).
But: Then again, you'd use gas or electricity with an oven. Unless you have a cooking fireplace with a brick bread oven next to it. Then you'd be polluting the air with the smoke rising from the chimney.

I go with the bread machine.

chevbrock
08-11-2008, 10:01 AM
I like my bread machine. I use a packet of grain bread mix, and then throw in other stuff, usually oats, nuts, sultanas, maybe an overripe banana. I toast it in the morning, slap on butter and honey, and it's like eating a bowl of muesli except much quicker.