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KTC
05-21-2008, 05:27 AM
I don't want to get into this, but I want to ask all who will listen to PLEASE WEAR YOUR SEAT BELT. Whether you are going down the street or across the continent. It just takes a second to snap in. PLEASE WEAR IT.

That's all I'm saying. Don't make this thread an argument/debate. Just take the advice, snap your seatbelt in place from now on. People love you.

Silver King
05-21-2008, 05:30 AM
And teach your kids to do the same before they start driving, and make sure their friends are buckled in also.

Amen, Kevin.

Perks
05-21-2008, 05:31 AM
Always.

sheadakota
05-21-2008, 05:33 AM
No argument here- I have worked as a trama nurse for 23 years and have seen more people die needlessly because they simply were not wearing a seat belt- I'm not trying to start a debate either- just saying...

TerzaRima
05-21-2008, 05:34 AM
head nodding

Williebee
05-21-2008, 05:35 AM
yup

SPMiller
05-21-2008, 05:36 AM
Duh? Are there people out there who don't?

Now I'm worried.

C.bronco
05-21-2008, 05:36 AM
I wear it no matter what. If I didn't, I'd swear to now because you spelled favor with a "u," and that's hawt.

Cranky
05-21-2008, 05:37 AM
Every time, every trip, every person. ETA: Don't jump on me, we don't have pets. :D

Devil Ledbetter
05-21-2008, 05:45 AM
Duh? Are there people out there who don't?

Now I'm worried.Unfortunately, yes.

sheadakota
05-21-2008, 05:47 AM
trust me, yes there are. 90% of my reports start off with "Unrestrained driver..."

mscelina
05-21-2008, 05:50 AM
*shudders*

Amen again. I used to think I'd have to staple seat belts to my girls before I let them drive--I'm gradually winning the war.

Dear God, I hope I am.

Haggis
05-21-2008, 05:50 AM
Okay.

Silver King
05-21-2008, 05:53 AM
I read an article recently that over 70% of teen auto fatalities in Florida during recent years were directly related to failure to use seat belts. That accounts for thousands of deaths. Thousands, in just one state.

It's no surprise that automobile accidents are the leading cause of death among teenagers in Florida.

It's also no surprise that obtaining a driver's license at sixteen is often a recipe for disaster.

choppersmom
05-21-2008, 05:54 AM
I used to hate wearing it, but now I always do. I knew a guy who wasn't once, and he hit a pole while going only 5 miles an hour in a parking lot. He hit his head on the wheel, and had permanent memory loss and speech problems. Mild, but totally avoidable. Click it, people!!

Susie
05-21-2008, 05:55 AM
I hated wearing it many years back, now I feel funny not wearing it. Mr. Susie wears it too.

poetinahat
05-21-2008, 05:56 AM
Even at the dinner table.

Shweta
05-21-2008, 05:58 AM
I've been in at least three accidents that would probably have been fatal if not for the seat belts. Nobody died in any of them, cause we were buckled in.

Little Red Barn
05-21-2008, 06:10 AM
For sure, Kev, always, and around here it's Click it or Tick et.

Smiling Ted
05-21-2008, 06:18 AM
I'm having a spare made so I can click it anywhere I sit down.
Movie theater.
Diner.
On the beach with my hunney.

Just sayin'.

maestrowork
05-21-2008, 06:18 AM
It's also no surprise that obtaining a driver's license at sixteen is often a recipe for disaster.

Teenagers think they're immortal and invincible, even as the news and statistics say otherwise.

Jcomp
05-21-2008, 06:21 AM
My ex got me into the habit. I used to be bad, I admit. Now I feel weird in the car without it...

maestrowork
05-21-2008, 06:26 AM
I buckle up before I even put the top down. It's become second nature.

Soccer Mom
05-21-2008, 06:26 AM
I've been in at least three accidents that would probably have been fatal if not for the seat belts. Nobody died in any of them, cause we were buckled in.

Yup. I've told the story here before and I'll tell it again. I was about three miles from home and was involved in a collision with a paver truck. My eldest was a toddler.

How bad was the wreck? Completely totalled the car. My coffee mug and other untethered items went through the windshield. My son and I hit our seatbelts hard enough that we had cut marks where the straps were and bruises after. But we both walked away.

A seatbelt and a properly installed childseat kept a bad day from being the worst day of my life.

Silver King
05-21-2008, 06:32 AM
This thread reminds me of when my dad taught me how to drive. One of the first things he said was, "It'll take you at least five years to learn how to drive really well. You'll learn the basics real quick, by the time we're finished today. But the rest of it, like staying alive and avoiding accidents, you'll have to master on your own. It takes years."

He was right. Even something as simple as hesitating before powering through an intersection when the light turns green has helped me to avoid certain death when another driver runs a red light.

Man, I miss my dad.

mscelina
05-21-2008, 06:39 AM
I used to hate wearing it, but now I always do. I knew a guy who wasn't once, and he hit a pole while going only 5 miles an hour in a parking lot. He hit his head on the wheel, and had permanent memory loss and speech problems. Mild, but totally avoidable. Click it, people!!

My seat belt was the difference between serious facial and neck trauma and the (comparatively) small inconvenience of my bad back. The accident? I was the passenger in a car at a dead stop, hit full on on the passenger side by a vehicle traveling fifty miles per hour. If I hadn't had my seat belt on, I would have gone straight through the windshield or worse.

The moral of this story is? Fasten your seatbelt BEFORE you put the car in drive. We were pulling out of a parking lot at the restaurant where I worked.

Serious injury does not always involve high speed or highway accidents. Just my two cents. My back may be messed up (ok, it is) but at least I can move my lower extremities and have an unscarred face.

Yeah, I know--the face thing is vain, but I was in professional theatre for a long time...I LIKE my face.

MsK
05-21-2008, 06:45 AM
Always. And I'm going to have my, almost 16 year old, son read this thread also.
16!!! I am so not looking forward to him driving. He's a great guy and very responsible, but, it still scares me. Luckily for me, he isn't that anxious to get his license yet. He still likes his mama to drive him around. And, I'm just fine with that.

JoNightshade
05-21-2008, 06:45 AM
I've been in two accidents that would have seriously, seriously injured me if I hadn't worn my belt. (The second time, my truck rolled - I ended up hanging in midair by the belt. All the other crap in the cabin with me was plastered ALL OVER.)

Now I have a car that freaks out if anyone is NOT wearing a belt. Has sensors or something. Can't even go five feet without it screaming at me!

WEAR IT, people. If you don't, you're an idiot. And I say that with all possible niceness. You're an idiot.

Bubastes
05-21-2008, 06:49 AM
Yes, PLEASE wear your seatbelt. One of my relatives died when he was nineteen simply because he refused to wear a seatbelt.

choppersmom
05-21-2008, 06:51 AM
I've been in two accidents that would have seriously, seriously injured me if I hadn't worn my belt. (The second time, my truck rolled - I ended up hanging in midair by the belt. All the other crap in the cabin with me was plastered ALL OVER.)

Now I have a car that freaks out if anyone is NOT wearing a belt. Has sensors or something. Can't even go five feet without it screaming at me!

WEAR IT, people. If you don't, you're an idiot. And I say that with all possible niceness. You're an idiot.

OMG Jo. Thank God for that belt!!

Yeah. Idiotic not to wear it. Pass it on.

choppersmom
05-21-2008, 06:52 AM
My seat belt was the difference between serious facial and neck trauma and the (comparatively) small inconvenience of my bad back. The accident? I was the passenger in a car at a dead stop, hit full on on the passenger side by a vehicle traveling fifty miles per hour. If I hadn't had my seat belt on, I would have gone straight through the windshield or worse.

The moral of this story is? Fasten your seatbelt BEFORE you put the car in drive. We were pulling out of a parking lot at the restaurant where I worked.

Serious injury does not always involve high speed or highway accidents. Just my two cents. My back may be messed up (ok, it is) but at least I can move my lower extremities and have an unscarred face.

Yeah, I know--the face thing is vain, but I was in professional theatre for a long time...I LIKE my face.

Crap. That's freakin' scary. Again, thank God for the belt.

benbradley
05-21-2008, 06:59 AM
I don't want to get into this, but I want to ask all who will listen to PLEASE WEAR YOUR SEAT BELT. Whether you are going down the street or across the continent. It just takes a second to snap in. PLEASE WEAR IT.
I always do, and it's not for you, it's because it's doing ME a favor. The older I get, the more "conservative" I am about safety and health and such.

Driving or riding in a motor vehicle on the public roads is the most dangerous thing most of us do, and (IMHO) it behooves us to take advantage of every safety device, feature and action we can.

benbradley
05-21-2008, 07:08 AM
Always. And I'm going to have my, almost 16 year old, son read this thread also.
16!!! I am so not looking forward to him driving. He's a great guy and very responsible, but, it still scares me. Luckily for me, he isn't that anxious to get his license yet. He still likes his mama to drive him around. And, I'm just fine with that.
I encourage you to have him get his license. You can still drive him around if he has his license, but at least he will have had enough driving experience to get the license (which really isn't much in the USA comared to many other countries!) and will be able to legally drive in an emergency, such as YOU getting sick enough you can't drive and you need to be taken to the hospital.

I've heard of the driver's tests in various European countries - it costs hundreds of dollars and takes several hours, so it's worth it to go through extra training before you take the test. I can only wish there were such tests for a driver's license in the US - sure, a lot more woukd fail it, but it would surely save thousands of lives every year.

Jersey Chick
05-21-2008, 07:13 AM
Not a problem. If it ain't fastened, I ain't movin'. That simple.

MsK
05-21-2008, 07:14 AM
I encourage you to have him get his license. You can still drive him around if he has his license, but at least he will have had enough driving experience to get the license (which really isn't much in the USA comared to many other countries!) and will be able to legally drive in an emergency, such as YOU getting sick enough you can't drive and you need to be taken to the hospital.

.

Yes, I have told him we can get his permit going this summer. He is one of the older kids in his freshmen class, due to his July birthday, and most of his friends won't be eligible to drive until sometime next year. I think that is why he isn't in such a rush.

choppersmom
05-21-2008, 07:15 AM
I encourage you to have him get his license. You can still drive him around if he has his license, but at least he will have had enough driving experience to get the license (which really isn't much in the USA comared to many other countries!) and will be able to legally drive in an emergency, such as YOU getting sick enough you can't drive and you need to be taken to the hospital.

I've heard of the driver's tests in various European countries - it costs hundreds of dollars and takes several hours, so it's worth it to go through extra training before you take the test. I can only wish there were such tests for a driver's license in the US - sure, a lot more woukd fail it, but it would surely save thousands of lives every year.

I DID NOT know this about European driving tests! But it is a good thing, and I agree that the standards should be raised here, to prevent many of the senseless accidents that happen every day.

Serenity
05-21-2008, 07:18 AM
Always do. One time I sat down in a seat at a movie theater and reached for my seatbelt-- I kid you not. That's how ingrained it is in my mind. I'll put it on even when I'm too lazy to walk the 200 feet from my apartment and drive to the rental office to drop of my rent check. And that's only through a parking lot that is littered with speed bumps.

Lyra Jean
05-21-2008, 07:27 AM
When my tire blew out last month, I was going down on I-75 at 70mph, I did a 180 and ended up in the grass. Luckily I wasn't hurt and part of that was due to my seatbelt. Another part of it was I didn't hit anything and I didn't flip over.

MsK
05-21-2008, 07:44 AM
Okay. I just finished going over some of the posts with my son and he said, "I understand."
He's not a big speaker and, from him, that's all he needed to say to let me know he got it.
I showed him where I wrote that he "doesn't mind his mama driving him around", and, I got the eye roll. But, hey...
He's a teenager. That's what they do.
I talk to him all the time about things, such as this, and I find that if I keep it simple, he really does listen and understand.

Mumut
05-21-2008, 07:51 AM
I heard that when the UK made seatbelts compulsary, they nearly ran out of organs for spare-part surgery - the reduction in road deaths was so great. What more proof is needed?

paprikapink
05-21-2008, 08:20 AM
I have -- had -- an aquaintance who, as a passenger, unclicked for a minute to grab her purse out of the back. That was the minute when another driver cut them off on the freeway and their car flipped. Click it and keep it clicked.

KTC
05-21-2008, 02:08 PM
Thank you everybody for taking this thread seriously. I'm so happy to hear that you're wearing your belts. Your family thanks you. Your friends thank you. Your community thanks you.

JoNightshade
05-21-2008, 02:18 PM
I encourage you to have him get his license. You can still drive him around if he has his license, but at least he will have had enough driving experience to get the license (which really isn't much in the USA comared to many other countries!) and will be able to legally drive in an emergency, such as YOU getting sick enough you can't drive and you need to be taken to the hospital.

I agree with this. In the US, the best time to get your permit/license is when you are a teenager because they MAKE you take those driving courses where they make you memorize all the rules of the road and show you horrible accident videos. So if you are a parent, this is the best opportunity to make sure your kid gets educated in the rules of the road. Later on, you won't be able to enforce it.

When you get older, they don't require that, at least not in California. I know this because I had to teach my husband to drive when we were about 22. He's still a much "weaker" driver than I am and I do all the city driving. It was pretty scary at first because I wasn't sure exactly what to cover, etc. It was a learn-as-you-go sort of thing.

Yes, we were stupid. Looking back I shoulda made him take a class, but we were both broke and I had a car. Thank God nothing horrible happened.

tjwriter
05-21-2008, 02:22 PM
I read an article recently that over 70% of teen auto fatalities in Florida during recent years were directly related to failure to use seat belts. That accounts for thousands of deaths. Thousands, in just one state.

It's no surprise that automobile accidents are the leading cause of death among teenagers in Florida.

It's also no surprise that obtaining a driver's license at sixteen is often a recipe for disaster.


Teenagers think they're immortal and invincible, even as the news and statistics say otherwise.

Not to be controversial, because I completely believe in wearing a seatbelt, but it does help to point out a couple of things.

1) As you said in another post SK, it takes years to gain the driving experience to make you a good driver. It doesn't matter how mature or responsible you are, you have to be out there doing it to get the experience.

2) Medical research is showing that teens are hardwired to make risky choices (http://www.webmd.com/parenting/news/20070413/teens-are-hardwired-for-risky-behavior). Which means that sixteen year olds may not be the best new drivers. It's why they think they are invincible. Yet, no one has taken the medical research into account for the things teens are left responsible to handle.

I've been driving for 10 years, and I've yet to even be pulled over. It'll happen one day, but that day hasn't happened yet. I've always driven carefully because I realized how dangerous being on the road is. Too many people I know have been killed in auto accidents.

Wearing your seatbelt is very important.

Staroffurby
05-21-2008, 02:34 PM
I am not aware of the laws in America but here it is compulsory to wear them, but on many occasions i have seen people not caring and not wearing them. It does not seem to be one age group either. I am here today because of a seat belt so i strongly agree with thread, something so simple that take no time at all is a life saver. Not going into details but a car i was in over turned due to a stolen car losing control and hitting the car i was in. All of us inside just had bruising or cuts and medics clearly said it was the belts that saved us.

It really annoys me when people say i don't need to wear a belt, crash helmet, blah, blah. the stupid reason they give is "I am a safe driver" you may well be, but what about other that are not. So please people who ever you are, whatever country it may be, please wear that belt!

Bartholomew
05-21-2008, 02:53 PM
I don't want to get into this, but I want to ask all who will listen to PLEASE WEAR YOUR SEAT BELT. Whether you are going down the street or across the continent. It just takes a second to snap in. PLEASE WEAR IT.

That's all I'm saying. Don't make this thread an argument/debate. Just take the advice, snap your seatbelt in place from now on. People love you.

Every time, mate. Every time.

JJ Cooper
05-21-2008, 03:06 PM
May I add that ensure infants are buckled in correctly.

I do some work for a lawyer friend at times and I came across a young woman in a devastating situation. Three years ago she went to her fathers work to take him home, as she did every day. On the way home she ran into the back of another car when the vehicle had stopped to turn. The accident wasn't major to look at it. When she got out an older woman was screaming at the front of her car. A child no older than 18 months was deceased on the road.

The child was being minded by her grandmother and they were taking a short trip. The child was facing the wong way in the car (we have weight restrictions about baby capsules that can turn and face front or back). It is compulsory to have two anchor points. Because it was a short trip, the granmother considered one anchor point suffice. The result was the child was 'flicked' out of the seat through the windscreen.

Devastation for all involved that was preventable. Buckle up according to the manufacturers instructions.

Seatbelts have also saved my life on a couple of occasions.

JJ

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-21-2008, 03:31 PM
Looks like you're preachin' to the choir here, Colonel... and that's a beautiful thing. Ol' Boy and I both click it every. single. time. we get in.

Devil Ledbetter
05-21-2008, 03:33 PM
May I add that ensure infants are buckled in correctly.We were at a riverside park with the kids the other day when I overheard a young mom getting into her car with her 3-year-old say "You don't have to buckle up this time, it's only a short trip." They proceeded to zoom out of the packed parking lot and onto a busy road.:rant:

I used to have LLL meetings at my house (lots of moms and babies). I made it a habit to check the buckle positions on departing newborns in carseats. Nine times out of 10, the mothers had the buckle way down low, thinking this was more "comfortable" for the baby. It's supposed to be across the chest. Anything lower, and the baby can fly right out of her carseat in a wreck.

JimmyB27
05-21-2008, 03:46 PM
It seems inconceivable to me that there are people who don't. I mean, why? Do they get a thrill out of the increased risk? Do they also like to drive on the wrong side of the road sometimes as well? I just can't see what benefit you gain from not wearing a seatbelt.
People are weird.

Me, I don't even think about it. It was drilled into me from an early age, and now putting a seatbelt on when I get into a car is as natural as not punching myself in the face.

tjwriter
05-21-2008, 05:59 PM
May I add that ensure infants are buckled in correctly.


We were at a riverside park with the kids the other day when I overheard a young mom getting into her car with her 3-year-old say "You don't have to buckle up this time, it's only a short trip." They proceeded to zoom out of the packed parking lot and onto a busy road.:rant:

I used to have LLL meetings at my house (lots of moms and babies). I made it a habit to check the buckle positions on departing newborns in carseats. Nine times out of 10, the mothers had the buckle way down low, thinking this was more "comfortable" for the baby. It's supposed to be across the chest. Anything lower, and the baby can fly right out of her carseat in a wreck.

The buckle should be even with the armpits. The point of carseats is not the comfort of the child, but the safety of the child. A couple of other points are that the straps should be tight enough to only slip a finger underneath them and you should not be able to take the strap and pinch it between your fingers. If you can, the straps are too loose.

Many people do not realize how difficult it to install a carseat correctly. My cousin's wife is certified and she showed me some great tips for getting it in there correctly. The carseat should not move more than an inch in either direction when installed properly. Push your knee into the seat or the base to get everything super snug as you adjust the seatbelt or latch straps to the proper length. If you are using a convertible carseat in the rear facing position, use your hip bones to push the seat into position.

When in doubt, go to one of the free checks. At my dad's work, 100% of the people who participated had their seats installed incorrectly.

DWSTXS
05-21-2008, 06:03 PM
This thread reminds me of when my dad taught me how to drive. One of the first things he said was, "It'll take you at least five years to learn how to drive really well. You'll learn the basics real quick, by the time we're finished today. But the rest of it, like staying alive and avoiding accidents, you'll have to master on your own. It takes years."

He was right. Even something as simple as hesitating before powering through an intersection when the light turns green has helped me to avoid certain death when another driver runs a red light.

Man, I miss my dad.

In Dallas, you better WAIT after the light turns green and look again, both ways, before going through the intersection. We have SO MANY drivers that run red lights. It's just crazy.

Not to mention people on cell phones.

Saw a man in a pickup, smoking a cig, cell phone up to his ear, driving with his ELBOWS...blowing through an intersection.
Oh yeah...the REASON he was driving with his elbows? because he had ANOTHER cell phone in his other hand.

Seriously, he was talking on TWO cell phones at one time!

Dumbass! I seriously considered following him and calling the police to come ticket the jerkwad.

clockwork
05-21-2008, 06:23 PM
This thread reminds me of when my dad taught me how to drive. One of the first things he said was, "It'll take you at least five years to learn how to drive really well. You'll learn the basics real quick, by the time we're finished today. But the rest of it, like staying alive and avoiding accidents, you'll have to master on your own. It takes years."

He was right. Even something as simple as hesitating before powering through an intersection when the light turns green has helped me to avoid certain death when another driver runs a red light.

Man, I miss my dad.

That reminds me of my driving instructor. A wizened old gent who charged half what every other instructor was charging and the guy who taught about half the town to drive over the years.

On the ride home after I'd passed my test he said, "Well, you've learned the rules. You've passed the written, passed the practical. Now you can go drive like every other asshole out there."

His point being it doesn't matter how good a driver you are. Chances are the one time you choose not to wear a seat-belt is the same one time you'll get broad-sided by some prick talking on his phone. It's the only armour you've got, make sure you use it.

Lyxdeslic
05-21-2008, 06:39 PM
Let me preface by saying: I am a seatbelt wearer. :) Riding inside a one ton hunk of metal at speeds the human body isn't naturally capable of achieving on its own mandates precaution. IMO

But, to play advocate of the devil, I understand why people opt not to wear a belt. I understand why some opt not to wear a bike helmet. I understand why some people don't wear condoms.

It's a choice. A wise one? Probably not. But that's really not for me to judge. And I suspect the people who opt not to wear safety devices believe their safety decisions are just that. Theirs. Of course, a lot of them end up dead, with squished brains and/or poorly raising unwanted babies.

Lyx

sheadakota
05-21-2008, 07:09 PM
I have a bumper sticker on my car that reads;

ICU Nurse- Don't wear your seatbelt/ Helmet and I'm going to see you naked.

JimmyB27
05-21-2008, 07:15 PM
Let me preface by saying: I am a seatbelt wearer. :) Riding inside a one ton hunk of metal at speeds the human body isn't naturally capable of achieving on its own mandates precaution. IMO

But, to play advocate of the devil, I understand why people opt not to wear a belt. I understand why some opt not to wear a bike helmet. I understand why some people don't wear condoms.

It's a choice. A wise one? Probably not. But that's really not for me to judge. And I suspect the people who opt not to wear safety devices believe their safety decisions are just that. Theirs. Of course, a lot of them end up dead, with squished brains and/or poorly raising unwanted babies.

Lyx
But wwhy make that choice? It just doesn't make sense. There are no drawbacks to wearing a seatbelt, save for losing the two seconds it takes to do up.
You mentioned bicycle helmets. I do not wear a bicycle helmet when I cycle, but for very good reasons. They are hot, extremely uncomfortable, and their efficacy is highly questionable (http://www.magma.ca/~ocbc/hfaq.html).

clockwork
05-21-2008, 08:03 PM
Meant to say - if you're in the driver or passenger seat in my car and you don't buckle up, the car beeps loudly and incessantly until you do so. It's a neat feature that not only reminds you if you forget but is also stubbornly non-negotiable in its insistence. Should be a standard feature in all cars.

JimmyB27
05-21-2008, 08:08 PM
Meant to say - if you're in the driver or passenger seat in my car and you don't buckle up, the car beeps loudly and incessantly until you do so. It's a neat feature that not only reminds you if you forget but is also stubbornly non-negotiable in its insistence. Should be a standard feature in all cars.
A friend of mine has that feature. I assume it works with a pressure sensor in the seat. But what happens if you want to carry something heavy on said seat - can you turn it off? Can imagine it being darn annoying if not.

Cranky
05-21-2008, 08:12 PM
The airbags in our minivan work the same way (pressure). Thank heavens. It turns off when I'm on the passenger side, so I don't risk death from something that's supposed to save me.

I'll stick with the seatbelt, thanks.

clockwork
05-21-2008, 08:13 PM
A friend of mine has that feature. I assume it works with a pressure sensor in the seat. But what happens if you want to carry something heavy on said seat - can you turn it off? Can imagine it being darn annoying if not.

Not to my knowledge (which would defy the point a bit) but yeah, that happened a lot to begin with. :rolleyes:

But you learn to put your items on the floor, on one of the backseats or in the boot/trunk and it's not a big deal. It's great because it's not something a passenger can argue with - despite the enraged screams of, "I'm doing it, jackass!" (Usually directed at the dash-board, as though that's where the car's brain is.)

And if you still don't put your seatbelt on, the beeping gets louder and faster. :)

choppersmom
05-21-2008, 08:19 PM
A friend of mine has that feature. I assume it works with a pressure sensor in the seat. But what happens if you want to carry something heavy on said seat - can you turn it off? Can imagine it being darn annoying if not.

I don't have this alarm, but if I did, I'd continue to do what I do now - I buckle in all my heavy parcels. This keeps them from falling off if I have to stop short. I also buckle in my animal carriers if I have to take one of the managerie somewhere.

JimmyB27
05-21-2008, 08:26 PM
I don't have this alarm, but if I did, I'd continue to do what I do now - I buckle in all my heavy parcels. This keeps them from falling off if I have to stop short. I also buckle in my animal carriers if I have to take one of the managerie somewhere.
You're as smart as I look.

choppersmom
05-21-2008, 09:01 PM
You're as smart as I look.

Perhaps - but I just noticed that I spelled "menagerie" wrong!! :roll:

Lyxdeslic
05-21-2008, 10:31 PM
But wwhy make that choice? It just doesn't make sense. There are no drawbacks to wearing a seatbelt, save for losing the two seconds it takes to do up.
You mentioned bicycle helmets. I do not wear a bicycle helmet when I cycle, but for very good reasons. They are hot, extremely uncomfortable, and their efficacy is highly questionable (http://www.magma.ca/~ocbc/hfaq.html (http://www.magma.ca/%7Eocbc/hfaq.html)).Why? Not sure. I should've qualified my statement with "I don't completely understand, but..."

I'm sure they have their reasons, though. I personally don't like being told what I have to do when it comes to my safety. Of course, if I deem it as a smart choice, I do it. But others might simply opt out of wearing seat belts simply on rebellion instinct. I don't know. Maybe they're claustrophobic...no, wrong word, but I don't know the word for the phobia relating to the fear of being restrained. Maybe it digs into their neck and they don't want to bother purchasing one of those soft, fuzzy thingymabobs to remedy that.

I'm just sayin'.

But I agree with Kevin. Absolutely! Wear your seat belts!

Lyx

Shadow_Ferret
05-21-2008, 10:36 PM
I don't want to get into this, but I want to ask all who will listen to PLEASE WEAR YOUR SEAT BELT. Whether you are going down the street or across the continent. It just takes a second to snap in. PLEASE WEAR IT.

That's all I'm saying. Don't make this thread an argument/debate. Just take the advice, snap your seatbelt in place from now on. People love you.I have ALWAYS wore a seat belt from day 1 and that was in the days when NOBODY wore seatbelts and most probably didn't even know their car had one.

And NOBODY sits in my car without putting on a seat belt.

Yeshanu
05-21-2008, 11:48 PM
*shudders*

Amen again. I used to think I'd have to staple seat belts to my girls before I let them drive--I'm gradually winning the war.

Dear God, I hope I am.

I've never had any problems, and I even trained foster children who had no previous background in seatbelt-wearing that it's not an optional experience.

My secret?

The key does not go into the ignition until all seatbelts are done up. Ever.

Not even once.

And the seatbelts stay done up until the keys are removed from the ignition.

My 17-year-old autistic son isn't even completely toilet-trained.

But he does up his own seatbelt, as soon as he gets in the car.

choppersmom
05-22-2008, 12:58 AM
Maybe it digs into their neck and they don't want to bother purchasing one of those soft, fuzzy thingymabobs to remedy that.

I have one of those thingamabobs. It's not soft and fuzzy, but it is padded. If this is the thing keeping you from putting on your seat belt, just go out and get one. They're not expensive, maybe a few dollars. It's worth it, and that belt could be the difference between a minor inconvenience and a funeral, no lie.

TerzaRima
05-22-2008, 01:23 AM
May I add that children should not ride in the flatbeds. Yes, redneck neighbors, this means you. You wash, wax, buff, and all but fellate the pickup trucks of a Saturday, pausing lovingly over the peeing Calvin. Great. Not to my taste, but not my business.

But when I see your whole pack o'preschoolers gleefully bumping unrestrained down the highway at 45 mph in the back of your truck, I see the aftermath of brain injuries, and I'd like to talk to you. And by "talk to you", I mean "hit you in the goolies".

mscelina
05-22-2008, 01:30 AM
I've never had any problems, and I even trained foster children who had no previous background in seatbelt-wearing that it's not an optional experience.

My secret?

The key does not go into the ignition until all seatbelts are done up. Ever.

Not even once.

And the seatbelts stay done up until the keys are removed from the ignition.

My 17-year-old autistic son isn't even completely toilet-trained.

But he does up his own seatbelt, as soon as he gets in the car.

When I'm in the car, they're buckled up. They know my prejudices and my eyebrow still kind of scares them when it hits my hairline.

I'm just praying that they are trained well enough to do the same when I'm NOT in the car. I believe my oldest daughter is; not so sure about the younger. But if I ever see her driving around without a seatbelt on, she loses driving privileges the very next day.

Esopha
05-22-2008, 01:30 AM
A kid from my school died this year because he went through the windshield and into a tree. He was graduating in five months.

JimmyB27
05-22-2008, 01:32 AM
May I add that children should not ride in the flatbeds. Yes, redneck neighbors, this means you. You wash, wax, buff, and all but fellate the pickup trucks of a Saturday, pausing lovingly over the peeing Calvin. Great. Not to my taste, but not my business.

But when I see your whole pack o'preschoolers gleefully bumping unrestrained down the highway at 45 mph in the back of your truck, I see the aftermath of brain injuries, and I'd like to talk to you. And by "talk to you", I mean "hit you in the goolies".

This reminds me of the time I was in Thailand with a friend, and we did a tour around the hills a little way north of Chiang Mai. We went up to the starting point in what were effectively flat bed trucks, but with covers and bench seats along the sides. Pretty dangerous, huh? It gets better.
There were too many people, so my friend and I ended up clinging to the back of the truck, our feet on a little footplate.
Now *that* was dangerous. Fun though. :D

Jean Marie
05-22-2008, 02:31 AM
I have a bumper sticker on my car that reads;

ICU Nurse- Don't wear your seatbelt/ Helmet and I'm going to see you naked.
Which is why they call those things: donor cycles :)

I'm an EMT. Nice to meet you :D

Clicking in is an easy task. Scraping off the pavement, involves more heavy lifting.

I've seen helmets/seatbelts make the difference between life and scrambled brains. Seems like a no-brainer to me.

MattW
05-22-2008, 02:37 AM
There are two kinds of people I know who don't wear seatbelts: the ones who haven't been in an accident and won't take clues from all the deaths around them, and those who bucked the odds and were in a crash without a belt and refuse to wear one because they happened to be in the fluke accident where it was better they were thrown from the vehicle than not.

Both are very special kinds of idiots.

Jean Marie
05-22-2008, 03:00 AM
Idiots, nonetheless, Matt. But very good points.

Magdalen
05-22-2008, 04:15 AM
Meant to say - if you're in the driver or passenger seat in my car and you don't buckle up, the car beeps loudly and incessantly until you do so. It's a neat feature that not only reminds you if you forget but is also stubbornly non-negotiable in its insistence. Should be a standard feature in all cars.


Yeah, Extremely annoying. That's why I pulled the fuse on it. I hate the law, I hate feeling restricted. Death by auto accident doesn't seem such a bad way to go -- sure beats having Alzheimer's for 15 years like my mom. I do worry that some EMT with a hero complex will try to save me so I wear a DNR necklace. But since Jean Marie will think I'm an idiot if I don't add this, I will say that I do buckle up for freeway driving and/or when my kids are in the car.

sheadakota
05-22-2008, 04:43 AM
I do worry that some EMT with a hero complex will try to save me so I wear a DNR necklace.

Not to get off topic, but did you know that in some states, even if you have a living will stating DNR- your significant other has the legal right to do whatever they want regarding your care. Make sure the person who is your next of kin knows what your wishes are and that you trust them to abide by them.

clockwork
05-22-2008, 04:57 AM
But since Jean Marie will think I'm an idiot if I don't add this, I will say that I do buckle up for freeway driving and/or when my kids are in the car.

Thing is, statisically, you're far more likely to die on those simple five minute neighborhood runs to the store and back than you are on any freeway.

choppersmom
05-22-2008, 05:08 AM
Yeah, Extremely annoying. That's why I pulled the fuse on it. I hate the law, I hate feeling restricted. Death by auto accident doesn't seem such a bad way to go -- sure beats having Alzheimer's for 15 years like my mom. I do worry that some EMT with a hero complex will try to save me so I wear a DNR necklace. But since Jean Marie will think I'm an idiot if I don't add this, I will say that I do buckle up for freeway driving and/or when my kids are in the car.


Thing is, statisically, you're far more likely to die on those simple five minute neighborhood runs to the store and back than you are on any freeway.

Not to sound judgmental, Magdalen, but where would your kids be if the worst did happen? Rebellion and defiance for their own sake are just not worth the risk. Death by auto accident is grisly and I'm sure extremely painful, and it's also something your children would have to live with forever -that and the knowledge that they didn't have to lose you that way. Please reconsider your position. Please.

choppersmom
05-22-2008, 05:13 AM
It's not for the faint of heart, but if you really want to know just how bad the results of an auto accident can be, well, here it is.

http://xcden.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default

ETA: Wow - I just clicked on my own link, and I'm a little woozy now. Seriously, don't click it if you don't have a very strong stomach.

Danger Jane
05-22-2008, 05:14 AM
Based on my own personal experiences/tragedies this year...

I'm the most responsible driver of all my friends. My car has a lot of visitors. They always have a seatbelt on.

Carole
05-22-2008, 05:53 AM
Absolutely!!

I never let my kids ride without being in car seats no matter if they screamed to get out or not. Eventually they got tired of screaming. Thankfully, screaming moments were extremely rare. I think they were just more comfortable in them than out anyway. Child car seats are made to fit them. So when they were learning to drive, I wondered if me never letting them in the car without a car seat and later a seat belt would win - it did! YAY! They are as fanatical about it as I am!

Hubby, on the other hand, is only a recent convert and he is probably more fanatical than I am. He rolled up on a head-on collision on a rural road somewhere in Kentucky a couple of years ago. He ran up to the first car and saw that obviously no one was alive, then he ran to the second car and only the passenger was alive. She was also the only one wearing a seatbelt.

From that day forward, he's never in aa vehicle without one.

Magdalen
05-22-2008, 06:01 AM
Not to sound judgmental, Magdalen, but where would your kids be if the worst did happen? Rebellion and defiance for their own sake are just not worth the risk. Death by auto accident is grisly and I'm sure extremely painful, and it's also something your children would have to live with forever -that and the knowledge that they didn't have to lose you that way. Please reconsider your position. Please.


I hope to be around to see my kids reach adulthood, really I do. I was 30 when my Dad died and it made me sad for months and months, but I got over it. I think his spirit was ready to move on and I believe he is in a good space now. BTW, I am way more careful than I was before becoming a parent. Yes, it would be sad for the kids to not have me around. Say I did wear a seatbelt, was struck by a drunk driver and through the miracle of modern medicine survived just enough to be severely handicapped for the rest of my life; I don't think that would do my kids much good either. Life is a walk on a high wire: eventually you're gonna fall off, so why fear death? It is inevitable. As I mentioned, my mother had Alzheimer's for 15 years and the last five were much harder on us than they were on her. I hope I don't get it. I would feel much worse about hanging around, a shell of a person with no ability to interact than I would if I died a sudden death. You ask me to reconsider my position and I'm not sure what you mean. I said I buckle up more often than not. Do you want me to enjoy it too?

Jean Marie
05-22-2008, 06:05 AM
Yeah, Extremely annoying. That's why I pulled the fuse on it. I hate the law, I hate feeling restricted. Death by auto accident doesn't seem such a bad way to go -- sure beats having Alzheimer's for 15 years like my mom. I do worry that some EMT with a hero complex will try to save me so I wear a DNR necklace. But since Jean Marie will think I'm an idiot if I don't add this, I will say that I do buckle up for freeway driving and/or when my kids are in the car.
Uh, I'm not the only one. But, yeah anyone who rides around w/o wearing a seatbelt is an idiot. You may as well play Russian roulet, especially w/ children in the car. Damn right.

Btw, death by car accident, you may just take another's life besides your own. Don't know whether this has occurred to you, or not.

DNR has to be updated every 6 months w/ your doc, in many states, as I'm sure you're aware. If you're married, your husband can override it, as I'm sure you're also aware. Or, your closest family members. So, DNR is only as good as those who are closest are committed to keeping it, under extreme duress, as I'm sure you're aware.

Jean Marie
05-22-2008, 06:11 AM
How can you even have a DNR when you don't have a fatal disease, or do you? You don't have Alzheimer's and you're talking about DNR. A DNR necklace doesn't hold water, you need the actual paperwork for it to mean anything. And it needs updating, like I said. Or, else this is a moot conversation and more like the ramblings of someone who's suicidal.

Magdalen
05-22-2008, 06:14 AM
Btw, death by car accident, you may just take another's life besides your own. Don't know whether this has occurred to you, or not.

What does that have to do with wearing a seatbelt? Do you mean if I'm not wearing one, fly out the window and hit somebody with my body?

DNR has to be updated every 6 months w/ your doc, in many states, as I'm sure you're aware. If you're married, your husband can override it, as I'm sure you're also aware. Or, your closest family members. So, DNR is only as good as those who are closest are committed to keeping it, under extreme duress, as I'm sure you're aware.My husband respects my wishes.

DEATH be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadfull, for, thou art not so,
For, those, whom thou think'st, thou dost overthrow,
Die not, poore death, nor yet canst thou kill me.
From rest and sleepe, which but thy pictures bee,
Much pleasure, then from thee, much more must flow,
And soonest our best men with thee doe goe,
Rest of their bones, and soules deliverie.
Thou art slave to Fate, Chance, kings, and desperate men,
And dost with poyson, warre, and sicknesse dwell,
And poppie, or charmes can make us sleepe as well,
And better then thy stroake; why swell'st thou then;
One short sleepe past, wee wake eternally,
And death shall be no more; death, thou shalt die.


-- John Donne

Jean Marie
05-22-2008, 06:18 AM
No, I mean if you hit another car. You know exactly what I mean.

This argument is ridiculous.

You don't have Alzheimers.

Now, we can speak of someone who is DNR...my mom. She's stage 4 cancer. She's got a leg to stand on when it comes to an honest DNR. Matter of fact, she's not got much time left. So, I think my time is better spent w/ her.

See ya.

Magdalen
05-22-2008, 06:23 AM
How can you even have a DNR when you don't have a fatal disease, or do you? You don't have Alzheimer's and you're talking about DNR. A DNR necklace doesn't hold water, you need the actual paperwork for it to mean anything. And it needs updating, like I said. Or, else this is a moot conversation and more like the ramblings of someone who's suicidal.


How rude! And mean!
You don't have to have a fatal disease to fill out DNR papers. I don't carry them with me.

Jean Marie
05-22-2008, 06:28 AM
How rude! And mean!
You don't have to have a fatal disease to fill out DNR papers. I don't carry them with me.
Um, yeah you do.

They don't hand out DNR's for the flu. I know a little about this. It's not taken lightly and you've got to have a good reason to get them.

You're being over the top w/ your arguments for not wearing a seat belt. Sorry.

Jean Marie
05-22-2008, 06:28 AM
Back to my mom, she's way more important.

Magdalen
05-22-2008, 06:32 AM
Back to my mom, she's way more important.


Bye!

TerzaRima
05-22-2008, 06:41 AM
I hate the law, I hate feeling restricted. I do worry that some EMT with a hero complex will try to save me so I wear a DNR necklace.
Um. Not to pile on, but EMTs don't work to save you because of a hero complex; it is their job to assess you at the scene and do what stabilization they can, regardless of what jewelry you may be wearing.

Bummer that you hate the law.

Jean Marie
05-22-2008, 06:49 AM
Thanks, Terza. Glad someone appreciates what we do :)

*Mom's in the shower*

Silver King
05-22-2008, 06:52 AM
I'm all for arguing here and engaging other members in discourse; but please do so in a respectful manner.

Be cool, you know?

Magdalen
05-22-2008, 07:05 AM
http://www.legislature.mi.gov/(S(enondoqlm2zos455m00p4z45))/mileg.aspx?page=getObject&objectName=mcl-333-1055

just in case you'd like to read the law.

:)

Magdalen
05-22-2008, 07:10 AM
Um. Not to pile on, but EMTs don't work to save you because of a hero complex; it is their job to assess you at the scene and do what stabilization they can, regardless of what jewelry you may be wearing.

Bummer that you hate the law.


(4) At any time after an order is signed and witnessed, the declarant or an individual designated by the declarant may apply an identification bracelet to the declarant's wrist.


Hope I'm already dead when they get there.

KTC
05-22-2008, 07:12 AM
I think this thread has sadly run its course. I was hoping for more. If a mod would care to lock it, that would be cool. If not... please continue. Wherever you're going with it.

Magdalen
05-22-2008, 07:17 AM
KTC: Should I have not posted my opinion on this topic?

You can please some of the people all of the time and all of the people some of the time, but you can't please all of the people all of the time.

KTC
05-22-2008, 07:22 AM
KTC: Should I have not posted my opinion on this topic?

You can please some of the people all of the time and all of the people some of the time, but you can't please all of the people all of the time.

I wasn't pointing at anyone. Really. I just wanted to say 'wear your seatbelt' and leave it at that. I was happy to see that most if not all were wearing their seatbelt. I wasn't going to say anything else and was hoping it would just be, "Yep. I wear mine." or "Maybe I should wear mine." I have a brother who almost never wears his... my baby brother. I worry about it all the time. On Sunday my cousin's son died in a car accident. He wasn't wearing his seatbelt. He was 22. Married with 2 very very young children. He's dead now. He wasn't wearing a belt.

I just wanted to tell people to please wear their belts.

That was all.

Jean Marie
05-22-2008, 07:22 AM
http://www.legislature.mi.gov/(S(enondoqlm2zos455m00p4z45))/mileg.aspx?page=getObject&objectName=mcl-333-1055 (http://www.legislature.mi.gov/%28S%28enondoqlm2zos455m00p4z45%29%29/mileg.aspx?page=getObject&objectName=mcl-333-1055)

just in case you'd like to read the law.

:)
As I thought, it's not a federal law, thank God!

Most states are more sane. Such as where I live in CT and CA where you have to have a doc sign DNR papers. Again, I say, thank God. And, it has to do w/ having an actual disease as in reaching the end of life. Of course there are living wills that we all know about.


I think this thread has sadly run its course. I was hoping for more. If a mod would care to lock it, that would be cool. If not... please continue. Wherever you're going with it.
Kevin, I'm very sorry your thread went way off track. I apologize for having been a part of that. I was more interested in discussing why peeps wouldn't buckle up, then the other.

Not using a seat belt is way more, well, I already said it. And, it's something that I see a lot of, as in what happens when you don't use them.

Good thread, Kevin!

I'll miss chatting w/ you over the next couple of weeks as I'll be away w/ my mom.

Magdalen
05-22-2008, 07:47 AM
I wasn't pointing at anyone. Really. I just wanted to say 'wear your seatbelt' and leave it at that. I was happy to see that most if not all were wearing their seatbelt. I wasn't going to say anything else and was hoping it would just be, "Yep. I wear mine." or "Maybe I should wear mine." I have a brother who almost never wears his... my baby brother. I worry about it all the time. On Sunday my cousin's son died in a car accident. He wasn't wearing his seatbelt. He was 22. Married with 2 very very young children. He's dead now. He wasn't wearing a belt.

I just wanted to tell people to please wear their belts.

That was all.

I'm sorry for your loss. My nephew was 3 years old when his father (my BIL) died. We had the opportunity to be closely involved with him for a few years and then he and his mother moved across the country. Throughout the years we continued to visit and as he got older we shared our memories and pictures of his father at appropriate times. When Grandpa died my nephew flew out to attend the funeral. He was 19 years old. He'd never been to the cemetary and had never seen his father's gravestone until that day. He stood there, in the rain, tears streaming down his face as he reached down and touched the letters etched in stone. It was heartbreaking. So I really feel for those kids.

But I am surprised that you asked to have this thread locked because I didn't agree with you!

Lyra Jean
05-22-2008, 08:53 AM
My car has sensors as well. I always tell my brother to put the seat belt on cause the car knows. Mwahahahaha. Who am I kidding? I tell all my passengers that. Plus, I tell them be smart your driving with me don't you want to feel safe at least Bwahahaha. I just got my license last year and I'm 28.

It also makes the beeping sound and has a flashy light. They turn off when the seatbelts are on. I put my stuff in the back seat, on the floor, or in the trunk.

Carole
05-22-2008, 02:23 PM
But I am surprised that you asked to have this thread locked because I didn't agree with you!

I don't think that was the point. Kevin asked at the very beginning of this thread for it to not turn into arguments (or debates or something like that. Sorry - I can't remember the exact words he used off the top of my head.) I think he wants to avoid it turning south in a major way.


Edited:

I don't want to get into this, but I want to ask all who will listen to PLEASE WEAR YOUR SEAT BELT. Whether you are going down the street or across the continent. It just takes a second to snap in. PLEASE WEAR IT.

That's all I'm saying. Don't make this thread an argument/debate. Just take the advice, snap your seatbelt in place from now on. People love you.
That's what I was trying to remember.

JJ Cooper
05-22-2008, 02:46 PM
Our actions influence others, regardless of whether you believe they do. They do.

If an adult doesn't buckle-up, what do you think a child will do? Be-it now or in the future, they will replicate your actions.

Even if you don't give a shit about your life - buckle-up to save the kids.

JJ

choppersmom
05-22-2008, 04:14 PM
I hope to be around to see my kids reach adulthood, really I do. I was 30 when my Dad died and it made me sad for months and months, but I got over it. I think his spirit was ready to move on and I believe he is in a good space now. BTW, I am way more careful than I was before becoming a parent. Yes, it would be sad for the kids to not have me around. Say I did wear a seatbelt, was struck by a drunk driver and through the miracle of modern medicine survived just enough to be severely handicapped for the rest of my life; I don't think that would do my kids much good either. Life is a walk on a high wire: eventually you're gonna fall off, so why fear death? It is inevitable.

But in cases like this, it's avoidable. You have a DNR order, so you wouldn't be kept alive if that wasn't your wish, but the effects on your family would be devastating, since it all could have been prevented by a simple act.


As I mentioned, my mother had Alzheimer's for 15 years and the last five were much harder on us than they were on her. I hope I don't get it. I would feel much worse about hanging around, a shell of a person with no ability to interact than I would if I died a sudden death.

I'm sorry about your mom. I wouldn't want to live like that either, but neither would I want to be a mangled mess on the side of a road somewhere.


You ask me to reconsider my position and I'm not sure what you mean. I said I buckle up more often than not. Do you want me to enjoy it too?

No. I meant that in my opinion and that of many others who have posted here, and according to accident statistics, you should buckle up every time, not "more often than not." I meant that you shouldn't consider death by auto accident a better way to go than a peaceful death. I posted some pretty awful pics above. They are for sure not how I want my family's last sight of me to look.

No one's trying to make you "enjoy" wearing a seat belt. We're only pointing out their clear and very well-established life-saving benefits. It's obviously your choice to wear it or not. Some people thrive on rebellion, and that's entirely up to each individual person. All I wanted was to point out to you that this particular issue is not really the best one to rebel against, and that you would be missed terribly if you were taken in such a senseless and preventable way, and the preventability of it would only increase the pain of the loss.

Jean Marie
05-22-2008, 05:28 PM
Our actions influence others, regardless of whether you believe they do. They do.

If an adult doesn't buckle-up, what do you think a child will do? Be-it now or in the future, they will replicate your actions.

Even if you don't give a shit about your life - buckle-up to save the kids.

JJ
Bears repeating, since that's what this thread's about.

Buckling up saves lives, yours and others.

Magdalen
05-22-2008, 05:28 PM
I meant that you shouldn't consider death by auto accident a better way to go than a peaceful death.

That ship has sailed.


That's all I'm saying. Don't make this thread an argument/debate. Just take the advice, snap your seatbelt in place from now on. People love you.

I thought the point of posting topics for response was to allow for the free and fair exchange of opinions. But perhaps I am wrong. I guess the point of this thread for everyone to say, "Yes, sir. Great idea." In the future, I will try to be more sensitive to the nuances of the OP.

Jean Marie
05-22-2008, 05:33 PM
Wearing a seat belt is a great idea. There isn't much room for debate on the topic. That's Kevin's point.

KTC
05-22-2008, 05:55 PM
That ship has sailed.



I thought the point of posting topics for response was to allow for the free and fair exchange of opinions. But perhaps I am wrong. I guess the point of this thread for everyone to say, "Yes, sir. Great idea." In the future, I will try to be more sensitive to the nuances of the OP.

Again, I was not referring to you. I think I covered that. I was just saying wear you fucking seat belts. Get over yourself.

choppersmom
05-22-2008, 05:57 PM
I wasn't pointing at anyone. Really. I just wanted to say 'wear your seatbelt' and leave it at that. I was happy to see that most if not all were wearing their seatbelt. I wasn't going to say anything else and was hoping it would just be, "Yep. I wear mine." or "Maybe I should wear mine." I have a brother who almost never wears his... my baby brother. I worry about it all the time. On Sunday my cousin's son died in a car accident. He wasn't wearing his seatbelt. He was 22. Married with 2 very very young children. He's dead now. He wasn't wearing a belt.

I just wanted to tell people to please wear their belts.

That was all.

Kevin, I didn't see this post until after I posted earlier. I'm so sorry for your loss. I will not contribute to any further debate, as you requested.

Magdalen
05-22-2008, 06:02 PM
Again, I was not referring to you. I think I covered that. I was just saying wear you fucking seat belts.


Yes, Sir! Great idea!



Get over yourself.

Yes, Sir! Great idea!

Silver King
05-22-2008, 06:24 PM
This might be a good time to close this thread. As Kevin said earlier, the discussion has run its course.

I might open it later, but that's doubtful.

A word to the wise for some folks who just aren't capable of dropping a subject: Sometimes, it really is better to walk away from a discussion instead of ruining a thread with petty and useless vitriol that dooms what was an otherwise civil dialogue between well-meaning people.