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View Full Version : Help! - My son has a soy allergy.



icerose
05-20-2008, 03:50 AM
He has had severe tummy troubles since he was a baby, always throwing up and such. We finally figured out he has a pretty bad allergy to soy. Not enough for hives, but enough to make his mouth itch and his stomach to either throw it up, or push it out through the other side in pure liquid.

My problem. EVERYTHING has soy. Bread, pancake mix, pizza, anything processed has soy. Cupcakes, brownie mixes, you name it, it has soy. Even peanut butter has soy, we've had to switch to the all natural kind. Cereals have it, all the crackers and cookies have it. I'm hard pressed to find things that don't have it. I'm starting to expect it in my milk, that's how much I've seen it. I never realized how many things now have soy in them. We can't eat out with him because all the fast food has soy in it.

I need some good recipes for snacks that he likes. Graham crackers, crackers, the sweet and salty granola bars. Things like that. Some oven baked doughnuts would be good too.

Also, lunch box suggestions. He's headed to kindergarten next year and everything at the school has soy in it too. It's very frustrating.

TheIT
05-20-2008, 04:01 AM
Ouch. The good thing is that you've identified the trouble. One possible place to look for recipe ideas might be in specialized recipe books for things like diabetic cooking. I've gotten some good granola bar recipes out of a diabetic cooking magazine. You might be able to adapt them to make sure there's no soy.

kikazaru
05-20-2008, 06:55 AM
Aw poor little guy.

As much as a pain this will be for you both, it sounds like you need to do is make everything from scratch! Not too difficult but a bit more time consuming.

Muffins are very easy to make from scratch because they don't require hauling out your mixer - a spoon works best. Also you can tweak muffins very easily adding or substituting ingredients. I often get all the dry ingredients together the night before and add the wet in the morning for fresh muffins to send off with my crew.

Pancakes are basic as well - simply flour, baking powder, salt, egg and milk. You can also make waffles and freeze them. They take just a bit of time to warm up in the toaster.

You might want to invest in a bread maker. You can set it the night before and wake up to home made bread and you can be sure there is no soy if you make it your self.

I can't vouch for this one, but it sounds good - your own home made graham crackers.http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/000126.html

Dommo
05-20-2008, 06:58 AM
At least his allergy doesn't sound too severe. Maybe he'll grow out of it like my friend grew out of his peanut allergy.

As far as recipes, I'm not too sure. I'd suggest going to some of the specialty cookbooks that might exist on the subject.

Fenika
05-20-2008, 07:15 AM
www.enjoylifefoods.com <- Great for snacks on the go

Also, try the health food stores and ask whats available.

Find his favorite raw fruit and veggie snack.

Get on a forum with other soy allergy sufferers to get brands that are not contaminated with soy.

Cheers,
Christina, who hates food allergies.

icerose
05-20-2008, 07:46 AM
Thanks,

Before we discovered Soy was the culprit it actually got to the point he was throwing up blood, so it is pretty severe. We have to really watch what he eats.

I have no problem cooking from scratch, I do it all the time, I try to bake bread once a week, it looks like I'm going to be amping it up. We've moved to all natural peanut butter and such.

It's just the crackers and such that I don't know how to cook and don't have the recipes for that are the hardest on us right now.

He's only four. He needs some sort of snack and every processed bit of food has soy. I'll check out the links, thanks.

Oh and on the fruits and veggies, we keep apples, oranges, bananas, pears, pinapple, watermelon, carrot sticks, celery and peanut butter, and so on stocked. We are huge veggie and fruit eaters, people are absolutely shocked when my kids run past the candy bars and straight to the fruit.

kikazaru
05-20-2008, 03:25 PM
I was looking for an oatmeal square that I make (oatmeal, sugar, butter pressed in a pan) but came across this one and it looks very good and you could subs. choc chips for the dried fruit if he prefers.

http://www.canadianfamily.ca/articles/recipe/awesome-oatmeal-bars/

Also re cereals - can you get Puffed Wheat in your area? This has nothing it it but wheat and there is a tasty bar that you can make with it. Have you checked the ingredients in Cheerios? According to their web site, they don't seem to have soy listed as an ingredient.

L M Ashton
05-20-2008, 04:14 PM
Icerose, making bread without a breadmaker is really really easy. I do it a couple or three times a week, no breadmaker, no mixer, all by hand, and all with kneading only a total of about one minute. More than that is not required - the ten or twenty minutes of kneading produces bread faster, but the slow method works just fine and gets me just as much rise. Same as sourdough vs. commercial yeast - sourdough is healthier, easier to digest, but takes longer to make as opposed to yeast bread. Commercial yeast just makes breadmaking faster. If you're into making your own bread anyway, maybe this'll help.

I make (nearly) everything from scratch, have for, well, forever, so I had no idea soy was that prevalent.

GhostAuthor
05-20-2008, 05:18 PM
I am allergic to soy too! I feel your pain because, yes, everything has soy. But I can imagine it's much tougher for a child, since they see all their friends eating things which they can't.

If I eat soy I can get hives, it just depends on how much I actually eat.

I have found the organic section of my supermarket to be very helpful. Many of the products are soy free (just check the labels). Amy's Foods has an entire line of healthy foods and lists a whole soy free section. I know there are crackers - I think it's either Amy's or Kashi - but they are soy free.

Hope this helps!

icerose
05-20-2008, 05:41 PM
Hi Ashon,

I have several bread recipes that I rotate through to keep the taste from getting old if you know what I mean. I, however, have never been able to stand the taste of sourdough, so I stick with yeast or baking powder bisquits. I just need to step up and make it more often. Most of the process of making bread is it either rising or baking.

Luckily I grew up on non-processed food and my mom made most everything from scratch so I'm used to it and learned how to cook at an early age. If I hadn't I'd be in trouble.

Hi Ghost,

Unfortunately I live in the middle of nowhere Utah, and I mean middle of nowhere. We are the county seat with a whopping population of 1,500. The nearest "city" is 45 miles away and they have 20,000 people. That's where Wal-mart is. We don't actually get organic food out here and it's pretty hard to find soy free products at a decent price. We're another 3 hour drive from any real city where I could possibly get them.

What I'm looking for is DIY recipes for things in the store like crackers and such, as there is not a single cracker in any of the nearby stores that don't have soy.

Kikazaru,

I don't get puffed wheat, but I do get puffed rice which is just rice puffed up. I have a wonderful recipe for snacks with it that my kids devour. You make them pretty much like rice cripsies, but they are much healthier, fewer calories, and packed with fruits and nuts.

Rice Crispy replacement treat.

3 Ounces Puffed Brown Rice
7 Ounces Mini Marshmallows
3 Ounces Toasted Slivered
Almonds
1.5 Ounces Each Dried
Cranberries & Dried
Cherries
1 Ounce Dried Blueberries
1 Tbs. Orange Blossom Honey (or regular honey this is just sweeter)
3 Tbs. Flax Seed Oil

I would also like to learn how to make power bars, like the original power bars from scratch, I have the ingredients, but not the quantities. I guess that's going to take some experimentation. I don't know why I like the chocolate one so much, but I can't afford to buy the store ones. Oh well. :) I'll figure it out.

icerose
05-20-2008, 06:23 PM
I was looking for an oatmeal square that I make (oatmeal, sugar, butter pressed in a pan) but came across this one and it looks very good and you could subs. choc chips for the dried fruit if he prefers.

http://www.canadianfamily.ca/articles/recipe/awesome-oatmeal-bars/ (http://www.canadianfamily.ca/articles/recipe/awesome-oatmeal-bars/)


From your link, these look fantastic! And you could change out the fruit. I have an easy recipe for crepes that are easy to do as well.

Fruit Burritos

1 tbsp granulated sugar
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
4 store-bought 9-inch crÍpes (10 to a package)
4 tsp smooth peanut butter or cream cheese
2 bananas diced
1 pear halved, cored and cut lengthwise into 12 pieces
1/4 cup fresh blueberries
1/4 cup raisins
1/2 cup vanilla yogurt
http://media.canadianfamily.ca/global/fh_directions.gif



Mix sugar and cinnamon together in a small bowl; set aside.
Lay crÍpes out on a flat, dry surface. Spread 1 teaspoon peanut butter on one side of each crÍpe. In centre of each crÍpe, mound equal portions of banana, pear, blueberries and raisins. Place 2 tablespoons yogurt on top. Dust with a pinch of reserved cinnamon sugar.
Wrap crÍpes one at a time: Fold each side in towards middle. Fold bottom of crÍpe over filling and roll it up tightly; repeat with remaining crÍpes.

GhostAuthor
05-20-2008, 06:37 PM
Okay, well, here's a link to Amy's. They have an online store! Don't know how much shipping costs, but heck it might be worth it. They have frozen pizza that is soy free.
http://www.amyskitchen.com/index.php

Here's another great company with a lot of soy free products. They ship as well.
http://www.annies.com/ (http://www.annies.com/?id=2)
They have soy free mac and cheese and crackers called cheddar bunnies.

Hope this helps!

Shadow_Ferret
05-20-2008, 07:00 PM
EVERYTHING has soy. Bread, pancake mix, pizza, anything processed has soy. Cupcakes, brownie mixes, you name it, it has soy. Even peanut butter has soy, we've had to switch to the all natural kind. Cereals have it, all the crackers and cookies have it. I'm hard pressed to find things that don't have it. Wow. This is news to me. I didn't think ANYTHING had soy in it except soy sauce. Seriously. Why would they put soy in all that stuff? Just a cheap protein filler or something?

icerose
05-20-2008, 07:06 PM
Wow. This is news to me. I didn't think ANYTHING had soy in it except soy sauce. Seriously. Why would they put soy in all that stuff? Just a cheap protein filler or something?

They put soy in everything because they then can falsely claim it as healthy. Soy actually has so many toxins and poisons in its natural form that it has to be processed to death just to make it safe to eat. The less processed it is, the more dangerous it is. It's actually an anti-nutrient. But some weird skewed studies that had a group of kids put on a pure soy diet for a month despite the fact that they threw up most of the food and had various ailments, came out about the same weight it was considered safe and healthy.

Go figure.

You need quite a bit of protien to counteract soy's affects.

Anyway, it's been labled a health food and so now everyone is putting it in to get the cheap protien suppliment and so they can slap on a health benefit label on their over processed nutrient minimal food.

Yes, I'm quite irritated about all this and have done massive amounts of research.

icerose
05-20-2008, 07:13 PM
Okay, well, here's a link to Amy's. They have an online store! Don't know how much shipping costs, but heck it might be worth it. They have frozen pizza that is soy free.
http://www.amyskitchen.com/index.php

Here's another great company with a lot of soy free products. They ship as well.
http://www.annies.com/ (http://www.annies.com/?id=2)
They have soy free mac and cheese and crackers called cheddar bunnies.

Hope this helps!

Unfortunately I can't afford their products and most the stuff I can make.

With the pizza, I just make french bread dough, shape it out to a crust, roll the bottom in corn meal and parmesean, then let the kids add on their sauce and toppings, whatever they want. They really enjoy the process, I just never realized that when we went the quick way, i.e. buying it pre-made, that they all contained soy.

Heck, even hotdogs contain soy.

icerose
05-20-2008, 08:12 PM
Here we go, some cracker recipes!

http://www.garvick.com/recipesmm/cracker_recipes.htm

http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/olive-oil-crackers-recipe.html

http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/cat/1748/0.shtml

ETA: *sigh* even my vegetable oils and sprays are now soy. Guess it's back to shopping. Add margarine, salad dressing, miracle whip, ranch, and such to the list. They also contain soy...

Tirjasdyn
05-20-2008, 09:56 PM
I feel your pain. I have to limit my sugars to near diabetic proportions...and they add sugar to everything...even sugar substitutes.

icerose
05-20-2008, 10:10 PM
I feel your pain. I have to limit my sugars to near diabetic proportions...and they add sugar to everything...even sugar substitutes.

My mom is diabetic so I understand what you're going through, but she always cooked her food so it wasn't too hard to cut it out, it was just a matter of resisting the sugary temptations. She imagines the pain of a shot any time she wants a cookie or whatever and suddenly they don't look or sound very good.

She's been able to stay on minimal medication for over 18 years so far.

icerose
05-21-2008, 12:26 AM
Add bullion, canned soups, and chocolate to the list. Only chocolate going through this house has to start out as 100% cocoa powder. This is getting complicated.

On the bright side, we should all be pretty darn healthy by the time he grows up. He's past the age most kids grow out of it and it's only getting worse. :(

L M Ashton
05-21-2008, 05:44 AM
Hi Ashon,

I have several bread recipes that I rotate through to keep the taste from getting old if you know what I mean. I, however, have never been able to stand the taste of sourdough, so I stick with yeast or baking powder bisquits. I just need to step up and make it more often. Most of the process of making bread is it either rising or baking.

Luckily I grew up on non-processed food and my mom made most everything from scratch so I'm used to it and learned how to cook at an early age. If I hadn't I'd be in trouble.

The vast majority of my sourdough bread doesn't taste sour at all - it just tastes like regular bread. Whether it takes on the sourdough flavour has more to do with how long the dough is left to rise and sit and rise and so on. If you keep the rising times and whatnot short, then it doesn't have the time to develop that flavour. My cinnamon buns, for example, are sweet buns that are, well, fantastic. :) Not a sour thing about them.


About mayonnaise - I make my own. It's in protest to the extremely high price of imported mayonnaise here. I follow Alton Brown's recipe, and with my stick blender, it takes all of thirty seconds to make. Extremely easy. :)

icerose
05-21-2008, 07:03 AM
Yeah I have some recipes that I found. The biggest thing is just the entire lifestyle change we are going through. It's going to take some adjustment. I can't buy him chocolate any more, I can't make chocolate chip cookies pretty much ever again if he's going to be around them, we can't accept things other people make because they might have used soy products. He won't ever be able to eat the school's lunch, he won't be able to eat out with his friends when he gets older, I'll have to send instructions with him whenever he has a sleep over or eats over at a friends house. I'm sure it's not as big of a deal as it seems right now, it's just different than I expected it to be.

I bought all new oils today, I can't ever buy margarine again, I used to buy the 50% reduced fat, no more of that. No more bagels, unless I can find a recipe, no more tortillas except for homemade. No more pizza except homemade.

I'm sure we'll be the better for it and I need to cook more anyway, it's just a big adjustment for me and the family. At least they are all taking it very well. Even my husband resisted getting chips and crackers because they contain soy.

chevbrock
05-21-2008, 10:20 AM
Why is soy in everything?

The major food products that the US Government subsidises: Corn, soy, canola and beef.

It's in everything because it's cheap to grow and therefore it's cheap to feed the world on it.

Good luck, Icerose, and little Icerose! *Hugs*

icerose
05-22-2008, 03:44 AM
Well today was our first soy free day.

We had french toast with homemade bread for breakfast, homemade bread with all natural peanut butter and homemade strawberry jam along with carrot sticks and apple slices, then for supper I'm cooking tacos, with a home mixed spice mix and homemade tortillas. We avoided Hawaiian Punch and the cookies at my daughter's end of the year presentation because both had soy.

Oh and for dessert, cheesecake swirled brownies.

All I can say is it's certainly going to be interesting. We're going to be consuming a lot less preservatives.

chevbrock
05-22-2008, 06:55 AM
Yum! When's dinner? :)

Oh, and I forgot wheat, above. Of course, it's in pretty much everything, too - and look how many poor souls are allergic to it!

icerose
05-22-2008, 07:43 AM
Yum! When's dinner? :)

Oh, and I forgot wheat, above. Of course, it's in pretty much everything, too - and look how many poor souls are allergic to it!

Yes, I'm extremely grateful he doesn't have a wheat, oat, milk, or fruit and veggie allergy, which all run in the family on his father's side. His father is deathly allergic to shell fish. His aunt is allergic to the fruits and veggies (she lives on benedril), his one uncle is allergic to milk as well as his aunt on my side, and his other uncle on that side is allergic to most grains.

So considering the family history, he got pretty lucky because at least I can make him food without too much trouble, just natural pure ingredients. It's just a lot of cooking.

SouthernFriedJulie
05-22-2008, 03:32 PM
Sorry for any typos, I copied these items from around the net and on forums. I’ll post more as I find them.

Cheerio's
Kraft Mac/Cheese
Petridge Farm Bagels
Spectrum Mayonaise
some Spectrum Dressing
Canola Oil
Olive Oil
Fritos
Motts Apple Sauce
Philly Cream Cheese
Hershey Cocoa
Heart Healthy Bisquick
100% cheeses
Popcorn cooked in Canola Oil
Lay's Thick cut sea salted chips
Mozz string cheese is prepackaged for travel.
Dinty Moore Beef Stew is soy free, also bean and pea free.

icerose
05-22-2008, 06:04 PM
Thanks for the list, unfortunately we either can't get half of those or my son hates them. Such as the Dinty moore. But I will definitely keep my eyes open for things he can eat.

Shadow_Ferret
05-22-2008, 06:16 PM
Not sure what we would have done WITHOUT soy. Our kids were collicky and couldn't take regular formula.

icerose
05-22-2008, 06:18 PM
My kids would spew that soy stuff.

Shadow_Ferret
05-22-2008, 06:20 PM
Just gave my kids really bad smelling gas.

icerose
05-22-2008, 06:44 PM
I had to put all my kids on Good Start and we got through it.

Shadow_Ferret
05-22-2008, 06:47 PM
I had to put all my kids on Good Start and we got through it.
Got through what? Gas or collick?

Is Good Start just regular whey based formula or what?

icerose
05-22-2008, 06:50 PM
Good Start is supposed to be the closest to mother's milk in formula. It's also the cheapest.

And we got through the formula stage.

HeronW
05-22-2008, 07:16 PM
If you make something like a fruitcake with nuts and dried fruits: raisins, pineapple, papaya, dates, etc, and slice it thin, then toast the slices--that's sort of like a fruited snack cracker if thicker.

Shadow_Ferret
05-22-2008, 07:23 PM
Fruit cake! Is that even edible? I mean if you think soy is bad....

icerose
05-22-2008, 07:37 PM
I must admit I've never liked fruit cake and thought it served better as a door stop than an actual food.

I do make things like zuccini bread, banana bread, apple carrot zuccini bread {yum!} and such where they have fruit and nuts, just not every kind of fruit and nuts all in one. And no chuncks, they're part of the actual batter. But then again I don't like raisin anything. I don't like the switch in textures and flavor so abruptly, I like them to blend.

Kitrianna
05-23-2008, 01:18 AM
Icerose, I feel for you love. A couple years ago I had the opposite problem. I had to find things with soy and without eggs, fortunately I've found a way to deal with it (I was lucky, it wasn't an allergy). Soy, eggs adn wheat seem to be the three things that pop up in almost EVERYTHING. If you can hold out until Saturday, I will scratch my brain (hope it feels like working today) and try to remember all the things that I couldn't eat back then, but ultimately my supreme suggestion is to get comfortable with spending extra time in the grocery store reading labels or make as much of it as you can yourself. That's what I ended up doing. Nowdays, I barely every eat out (I'm still afraid of eggs).

icerose
05-23-2008, 04:48 AM
Icerose, I feel for you love. A couple years ago I had the opposite problem. I had to find things with soy and without eggs, fortunately I've found a way to deal with it (I was lucky, it wasn't an allergy). Soy, eggs adn wheat seem to be the three things that pop up in almost EVERYTHING. If you can hold out until Saturday, I will scratch my brain (hope it feels like working today) and try to remember all the things that I couldn't eat back then, but ultimately my supreme suggestion is to get comfortable with spending extra time in the grocery store reading labels or make as much of it as you can yourself. That's what I ended up doing. Nowdays, I barely every eat out (I'm still afraid of eggs).

Ouch, I'm glad I don't have to try and do things without eggs.

I've pretty much resigned to the fact that I'll have to make at least 95% of what we eat from here on out. It's not so bad, I made my own graham crackers and wheat thins today. As well as my own alfredo sauce which I actually like better than the jar stuff and didn't take that long.

Then had individual apple pastries with butter and milk in the crust instead of water and oil, dipped in cut up strawberries, creamed creamcheese and vanilla yougurt, with fresh baked french bread on the side. My kids are pretty happy about the whole situation and my husband is grumbling less, so it's a start.

Yeshanu
05-23-2008, 05:42 AM
One thing I'd do if I were in your situation--get your son on board and choosing what he wants to eat as much as possible. Tell him as much as he can understand about his allergy, its effects and causes, and have him take responsibility early on in his life. That way, when you reach the "independence" years where he's visiting friend's houses or going on dates or living by himself, you'll feel confident that he can handle it on his own.

As for crackers, I'm wondering why they've become such an important thing for you. You mentioned that the kids prefer fruits and veggies. So how about apples dipped in peanut butter, or celery dipped in peanut butter? Why do you need the crackers?

(And all-natural peanut butter is much better for you, even apart from the soy, because it doesn't contain the added sugar and salt that the regular stuff does.)

To me, it sounds like you're on your way to a very healthy lifestyle. And a tasty one, too. When's dinner?

icerose
05-23-2008, 06:00 AM
One thing I'd do if I were in your situation--get your son on board and choosing what he wants to eat as much as possible. Tell him as much as he can understand about his allergy, its effects and causes, and have him take responsibility early on in his life. That way, when you reach the "independence" years where he's visiting friend's houses or going on dates or living by himself, you'll feel confident that he can handle it on his own.

As for crackers, I'm wondering why they've become such an important thing for you. You mentioned that the kids prefer fruits and veggies. So how about apples dipped in peanut butter, or celery dipped in peanut butter? Why do you need the crackers?

(And all-natural peanut butter is much better for you, even apart from the soy, because it doesn't contain the added sugar and salt that the regular stuff does.)

To me, it sounds like you're on your way to a very healthy lifestyle. And a tasty one, too. When's dinner?

We've already taught him how to read the word SOY, I've told him what things have it in it and what don't, he chose not to eat cookies and punch at my daughter's end of the year presentation because he knew they had soy in them.

He has also resisted offers of crackers and pretzles from the neighbor kids because he got to read the ingredient label and see it on there.

He's been really good about it.

As for why crackers are important, it's just something I'd like to have for him occasionally and the only way he's ever going to get them is if I cook them, also he really likes them. It all comes down to the fact that I'm experimenting, trying to see what kind of food range I have and such.

Fruit wise, he ate two sliced oranges, four strawberries, an apple, and an apple pastry dipped in strawberries, cream cheese, and yougurt.

He has been helping me stir and kneed dough, measure things, and taste things, and put them in pans since he could hold a spoon. So I am using this time to teach him how to cook. He's going to have to be completely independant by adulthood in that section, there is no doubt about that, and he's willing to learn, so it's nice.

I often ask my kids what they want for supper that night, and they help me pick, though I'm going to start meal planning for the week every Sunday because with all this cooking I can't do any seat of my pants type meals very often. Today he picked pasta, so we did Chicken fetticini alfredo, with a homemade white sauce and Itallian spices as the sauce, then the apple pastries and strawberry stuff for desert. Also I had french bread made so it made a nice addition.

We have moved to all natural peanut butter as well, so we're getting there.

icerose
05-23-2008, 07:48 PM
Add my youngest daughter in there. She's thrown up everything with soy in it in the last little while and just got a confirmation that she is in fact allergic to it. She is under the age of three though so hopefully by removing it she'll grow out of it.

L M Ashton
05-24-2008, 05:51 AM
Well, at least she has the same allergy, so you won't have to made additional modifications to the diet... Small blessings and all that?

I'm sorry your kids have been vomiting over this. That's just nasty.

icerose
05-24-2008, 06:20 AM
Yeah, it is a small blessing, they've been sick like this for years really, we just finally figured out why, beyond the doctors "They have a weak gag reflex, they'll grow out of it." explanation.

L M Ashton
05-24-2008, 06:30 AM
Oh, I know the feeling. Took me 37 years.

Kitrianna
05-24-2008, 07:29 PM
Actually Icerose, the whole no egg thing wasn't all that bad. I still really don't eat them. It probably has something to do with the nausea and cramps(I fortunately never vomitted!) I used to get from them, I think. I think the worst part was not being able to just walk into Timmies and get a muffin or a donut (mmm donuts!).

icerose
05-24-2008, 07:48 PM
Actually Icerose, the whole no egg thing wasn't all that bad. I still really don't eat them. It probably has something to do with the nausea and cramps(I fortunately never vomitted!) I used to get from them, I think. I think the worst part was not being able to just walk into Timmies and get a muffin or a donut (mmm donuts!).

The reason why I think it's bad is because most of my recipes use eggs and I'd have to find all new ones. Cooking from scratch, soy is pretty easy to avoid as long as you are selective, egg is a whole other matter.

My kids won't get donuts unless they are homemade, the bakeries use veggie oil which is soy. My kids have thrown up quite a bit for quite some time, I kept on asking the doctors thinking this couldn't possibly be normal, and they kept on telling me they had a weak gag reflux and they'll grow out of it. I'm just glad I pinpointed the soy allergy now, due to my son's mouth "itching" after eating some chinese food.

paprikapink
05-24-2008, 08:26 PM
Amazon.com sells non-perishable groceries now. It can be a way to get healthy foods when you live far from population centers full of hippies and other crunchy-granola-type people. Their prices are not bad either, but they mostly ship fairly large quantities. And lots of stuff even qualifies for their "free super-saver shipping."

icerose
05-24-2008, 08:49 PM
Amazon.com sells non-perishable groceries now. It can be a way to get healthy foods when you live far from population centers full of hippies and other crunchy-granola-type people. Their prices are not bad either, but they mostly ship fairly large quantities. And lots of stuff even qualifies for their "free super-saver shipping."

Thanks, I'll check it out.

writin52
05-24-2008, 09:20 PM
From: FAST BREADS by Howard Early and Glenda Morris:The Crossing Press, Trumansburg, NY 14886: 1986.

Dry Ingredients:
2 c. whole wheat pastry or graham flour
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda

Wet Ingredients:
1/4 c. honey
1/2 c. sour cream

Combine the dry ingredients. Stir in the wet ingredients. Knead gently in the mixing bowl for about 2 minutes. On floured board, roll out dough to about 1/4" thickness. Cut into whatever cracker size u prefer, then gently transfer to 15" greased baking sheets using a spatula. Bake in a 375*F oven for about 10 minutes. Remove crackers from the sheets and cool on wire racks.

PM me if you would like any of the following recipes from the book: Basic Cracker, Whole Wheat Oat Crackers, Potato Crackers, Rye Crackers. This book is also a terrific source for unusual quick breads like: Garlic White Bread, Rice Bread, Peanut Butter Bread, Potato Chocolate Bread, and Triple Pear Bread

icerose
05-25-2008, 07:40 PM
Another soy-free day went well yesterday. I made Amish Friendship Cake, it turned out like a cinnimon coffee type cake, it was sweet, but not overly sweet, we had it for breakfast, the kids were very happy to have it. We had pancakes and eggs and hashbrowns for breakfast yesterday, then barbequed burgers on homemade rolls and fruit slices for lunch, then grilled chicken, mashed potatoes, and corn, with chocolate cake and chocolate frosting (all homemade) for dessert in celebration of his fifth birthday. The kids broke open a pinata filled with soy-free candy like starburts and such.

I went through my kitchen yesterday and gave all foods with soy in them to my brother-in-law. They were happy for them and I was happy to get a fresh start on our altered lives and not worry about what I was grabbing out of the cupboard.

kikazaru
05-26-2008, 07:58 AM
I've now been perusing the ingredient lists of things in my cupboard and am amazed at how many have soy or at least soya oil in them. One thing that I did find is that "Trisicuits" and "Wheat Thins" (both by Christie) don't have soy in them - at least the ones we get in Canada. If your kids like those crackers you could perhaps buy those.

icerose
05-26-2008, 05:44 PM
I've now been perusing the ingredient lists of things in my cupboard and am amazed at how many have soy or at least soya oil in them. One thing that I did find is that "Trisicuits" and "Wheat Thins" (both by Christie) don't have soy in them - at least the ones we get in Canada. If your kids like those crackers you could perhaps buy those.

Thanks, I will definitely check. I know, it's absolutely sickening how many things it's in. I even had to give away my boxes of pudding, both the baked and instant have it in, I have to cook it all from scratch. Luckily I've done it a couple times before but my recipe is irrelevant since it has two ingredients I can't use. So I'm on the hunt for pudding recipes and how to vary them. I would love one basic one, then variations to it, so far I found a somewhat basic one, but no variations so far.

L M Ashton
05-26-2008, 05:56 PM
What's your list of ingredients that you can't use? We know about soy, but what else? If we have that, maybe someone will have a recipe that'll fit.:)

kikazaru
05-26-2008, 05:56 PM
I've made this one from epicurious a few times and it is delicious. I do however use half 1% and half cream instead of just the lo fat milk and all cornstarch leaving out the flour. Read the reviews (some say to cut back on the cornstarch which I didn't and perhaps because I used cream in it it didn't have the texture that people objected to) and use your judgement as to how thick you like it.

In any case it was gobbled up by my family.

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/NEW-STYLE-OLD-FASHIONED-CHOCOLATE-PUDDING-5913

icerose
05-26-2008, 06:58 PM
What's your list of ingredients that you can't use? We know about soy, but what else? If we have that, maybe someone will have a recipe that'll fit.:)

Malted milk, sweetened chocolate of any kind (dark, semi-sweet, milk, and so on), pretty much anything processed, as they all contain it.

The recipe I know has both malted milk and semi-sweet chocolate chips, which load it with soy.

icerose
05-26-2008, 07:00 PM
I've made this one from epicurious a few times and it is delicious. I do however use half 1% and half cream instead of just the lo fat milk and all cornstarch leaving out the flour. Read the reviews (some say to cut back on the cornstarch which I didn't and perhaps because I used cream in it it didn't have the texture that people objected to) and use your judgement as to how thick you like it.

In any case it was gobbled up by my family.

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/NEW-STYLE-OLD-FASHIONED-CHOCOLATE-PUDDING-5913

Thanks for the link, I'll have to try it. I'll start out with the 2 tbsp and increase if necessary. One thing to consider is different altitudes and the thickness of the milk will change in response to the corn starch.

Gee, I hope that makes sense.

icerose
05-26-2008, 11:14 PM
Yay, thanks to a recipe from my sister, I was able to successfully make Cream of Chicken soup for my family's all-time favorite meal, chicken and rice.

Chopped up chicken + veggies + rice + Cream of Chicken soup = All inclusive meal.

icerose
05-31-2008, 09:32 PM
I've now been perusing the ingredient lists of things in my cupboard and am amazed at how many have soy or at least soya oil in them. One thing that I did find is that "Trisicuits" and "Wheat Thins" (both by Christie) don't have soy in them - at least the ones we get in Canada. If your kids like those crackers you could perhaps buy those.

Unfortunately in the US both of those crackers contain soy. We are trying out your pudding recipe today though.

Update: I made the pudding today, it was rich, not too sweet dessert that was excellent with slightly sweetened whipped cream, my family devoured it, it wasn't allowed to even fully cool off before it was gone, I'm going to have to double it next time because they were wanting seconds and it was gone.

Oh and I went with the 2 TBSP cornstarch and it turned out perfect.

tjwriter
06-01-2008, 02:09 AM
I know what a struggle this has been for you, so I just wanted to mention that while perusing the website for the local theme park, they mentioned all sorts of food that is free of the top seven or eight allergens, soy included.

There are places that think of those who have a hard time. I was greatly impressed and immediately thought of your situation when I saw that.

icerose
06-01-2008, 04:20 AM
I know what a struggle this has been for you, so I just wanted to mention that while perusing the website for the local theme park, they mentioned all sorts of food that is free of the top seven or eight allergens, soy included.

There are places that think of those who have a hard time. I was greatly impressed and immediately thought of your situation when I saw that.


That is pretty cool, when we can actually go to a place like that in three or so years, then I will definitely watch for places that are allergen friendly.

Tonight's supper is homemade chicken pot pie, with whole wheat rolls on the side and homemade strawberry frozen yogurt for dessert. It should go well.