PDA

View Full Version : If you could, would you?



Kalyke
05-12-2008, 07:51 PM
So, Question: Working folks who do not write full time, If you could, would you just let it all go in order to get a solid several months of writing time? How a bout a year?

CaroGirl
05-12-2008, 07:53 PM
Yes.

Momento Mori
05-12-2008, 07:55 PM
If someone was willing to pay my mortgage payments, utility bills and other outgoings for that period then yes, definitely. Unfortunately, no one is willing to subsidise me at the moment (dammned selfish people!) so I'm going to have to keep the full-time day job. Or pin my hopes on the National Lottery (damn you, Camelot! Why must you mock me by not letting me win?)

MM

Pamster
05-12-2008, 07:57 PM
I definitely would...

ChaosTitan
05-12-2008, 07:57 PM
When you say "let it all go" do you mean stop working completely? Run out of food and starve to death? Be unable to pay rent and tossed out of my apartment? Broke and unable to buy catfood and watch my poor kitties wither away to nothing?

CaroGirl
05-12-2008, 08:03 PM
When you say "let it all go" do you mean stop working completely? Run out of food and starve to death? Be unable to pay rent and tossed out of my apartment? Broke and unable to buy catfood and watch my poor kitties wither away to nothing?
I think the operative phrase here is "if you could". I took that to mean having the ability to do so without my life and finances falling apart. No?

drachin8
05-12-2008, 08:06 PM
Let everything go for a few months or just a year? No. I don't think that is enough time to establish yourself in this field, and it is a field difficult to make enough money to "survive" on as it is. Since I am the primary breadwinner in my family, it is important that I provide a stable income. Until writing can provide that, the day job stays. Were circumstances different and my income only secondary in my family, this might be more worth considering. Responsibility must always come first, though, even when it slows down the secondary career process as a whole.


:)

-Michelle

ChaosTitan
05-12-2008, 08:07 PM
I think the operative phrase here is "if you could". I took that to mean having the ability to do so without my life and finances falling apart. No?

I interpreted the question sans "without my life and finances falling apart." Because yes, I have the ability to stop working and write for a few months. It wouldn't turn out well, but I could. ;)

DWSTXS
05-12-2008, 08:10 PM
Yes. Hell Yes. I would.

Broadswordbabe
05-12-2008, 08:12 PM
Goddess, yes. Assuming you mean - could you do it and survive financially. If I could do it and still eat, pay my mortgage and feed the cats, yes.

But then if I had another source of income I wouldn't be giving up anything I want to keep - my job is very, very dull. However, I would need the income. The last time I was out of work and constantly worried about money I found it very hard to write.

I fantasise about producing thousands of words a week (two books a year? Hah! Four at least!) if I didn't have to work the day job. But - if I didn't have to squeeze my writing around work hours, so that actually getting any done at all feels a little bit like an act of revolutionary defiance, I don't know whether I'd be any more productive. I might be less...

maestrowork
05-12-2008, 08:28 PM
I did.

Namatu
05-12-2008, 08:42 PM
I wouldn't! Not completely. I need some structure. A "real" job requires me to prioritize my "non"-job activities, and sometimes when I'm the busiest at work is when I'm also the most creative. Whether I can get to a pen in time to take advantage is another issue. If my day was open to all writing, all the time, I can guarantee you I wouldn't BIC as often as I should. I find lots of ways to procrastinate.

Before making a definitive decision, however, I volunteer to try it for a month. :D

Melenka
05-12-2008, 08:48 PM
Of course. I simply can't make that work now, so I'm settling for sleep deprivation to get my several thousand words per week. As a temporary solution, it's fine. Good thing I'm raising independent children.

James81
05-12-2008, 09:08 PM
Absolutely. And I am working towards that goal, actually.

I've whittled my expenses down to an absolute bare minimum, and I intend to keep that way and any extra income I get along the way is going into investments/bank until I get enough for an extend period of time (a year) to focus on writing, going back to school, etc.

Claudia Gray
05-12-2008, 09:18 PM
Yes, I hope to be able to do so someday. I'd have to restructure my life in some other ways (cut down on expenses, arrange some part-time volunteering so I got out of the house, self-imposed schedules, etc.) in order for it to happen, but I'd like to give it a try.

Shadow_Ferret
05-12-2008, 09:30 PM
So, Question: Working folks who do not write full time, If you could, would you just let it all go in order to get a solid several months of writing time? How a bout a year?
Heck no! Where do you think I do my writing?

Kalyke
05-12-2008, 09:36 PM
I have discovered how to do it, and am facing the reality that I may actually have a year in which I can do nothing but write! I'll certainly have to live on rice, but the utilities will be paid. I'll have to have a small part time job before winter, but the summer will be totally free. Oh the novels (and writing) I am working on are intended to help me get into a master's program, not necessarily for publication.

Soccer Mom
05-12-2008, 09:51 PM
Actually, no. I wouldn't. I like my life. I like my job (some days.) I like being involved with my kids and soccer and scouts. I like camping and fishing and working on my farm. I wouldn't want to limit myself to a life spent writing.

Phaeal
05-12-2008, 09:58 PM
Not unless I could return to my current job with full benefits at the end of the year. I'm practical for a Pisces. Besides, my job doesn't interfere with my writing 1000 words a day or putting in 2-4 hours a day on revisions, so I'm cool.

underthecity
05-12-2008, 10:10 PM
yes yes Yes YEs YES!!! I'm working toward it right now, trying to finish revising the Best Damn Novel I Can with plenty of Commercial Possibilities. I'm hoping/dreaming that it will sell and I can quit my job and write full time. I've done a lot of different jobs in my life, and I believe that my true calling is Writing.

allen

geardrops
05-12-2008, 10:12 PM
Nope. I happen to like my job. If I didn't have some engineering in my life, I'd flip out and start building weird gadgets in my spare time. This scratches the itch.

drachin8
05-12-2008, 10:36 PM
Just to clarify a bit further, I am in the same boat as Phael. The interruption to my job for a year of writing would be a difficulty when seeking employment again in my field, especially in an uncertain economy such as the current. I don't trust that what is here today will be happily waiting for me tomorrow. And I doubt I would magically become a family-sustaining writer during that year period no matter how much I wrote, so I would need to go back to work. Otherwise, I could take three months off now on what I have saved, possibly more with some budget restructuring. But then what would I have left to draw on in case of an emergency? The publishing industry is slow in every aspect, and there are other things I could do to reschedule my time and gain more writing devotion that would have a far less effect on the financial stability of my family.

I guess I am just not a huge risk-taker no matter how much I want the dream. Stability is too important to my mental well-being. Hopefully my slow and steady plod doesn't slap me upside the head because I can't risk more regardless.


:(

-Michelle

Blondchen
05-12-2008, 10:43 PM
I actually love my job (usually) and the fact that my gigs tend to last 8-9 months with some time off in between is the perfect arrangement for me.

Besides, I've done some of my best writing from the office. :D

Oh, and did I mention that I get to bring my dog to work??? Yeah, it rocks.

SPMiller
05-12-2008, 11:17 PM
I don't want to make any of you jealous, but...

I'm doing this right now.

CDarklock
05-12-2008, 11:30 PM
So, Question: Working folks who do not write full time, If you could, would you just let it all go in order to get a solid several months of writing time? How a bout a year?

Good Lord, no. Writing isn't the entire focus of my existence, and I don't work for the money. I need the money, but the real reason I work is because I like working. I've always got a half dozen or more irons in the fire, one of them paying the bills, the rest just side projects.

Right now, I'm taking a short break from paying the bills, and running down some savings - but that's not for writing. It's mostly so I can devote more time to playing GTA4.

Bubastes
05-12-2008, 11:33 PM
I wouldn't. I'd want to have some type of part-time work to get me out of the house and keep me engaged with the outside world. If I spent all of my time writing, my well of inspiration would dry up darn quick because there's no input coming in. Writing is only one of the many things I want to do.

dirtsider
05-12-2008, 11:46 PM
No, I'd go stir crazy and/or procrastinate. I need the structure of a full time job to keep me going. Otherwise, I'd do anything and everything other than write. And sometimes, the frustration of a long day at work (who doesn't have one of those days??) is what gets me to sit down and pound the keys.

JJ Cooper
05-13-2008, 02:17 AM
I will. I have a plan.

JJ

Beyondian
05-13-2008, 02:35 AM
When I was working at a part time job (during pre-Uni days... seems so long ago now) I once wrote for 6-8 hours every day and got approx. 80,000 words of my novel finished in a few weeks. It was good.

Though I think I'd go for a part-time job or a part-time university course just to expand my horizons.

Susan Breen
05-13-2008, 02:52 AM
No. I think it would make me feel too pressured. I need to have some excuse for failure. Anyway, I like being out with people and I love my job and running around with my kids.

JoNightshade
05-13-2008, 03:09 AM
I did.

Me too.

jennifer75
05-13-2008, 03:21 AM
So, Question: Working folks who do not write full time, If you could, would you just let it all go in order to get a solid several months of writing time? How a bout a year?

If I could afford it you mean? Of course holy hell yes I would.

Devil Ledbetter
05-13-2008, 04:00 AM
I could and I did, but in this economy I am relieved to be working full time again.

BenPanced
05-13-2008, 04:05 AM
If I could be completely self-supporting, yes. I'd be very happy staying at home and writing without having to interact with many people on a daily basis. I'd still go out for coffee, to the grocery store, etc., but the less I'd have to deal with people in general, the better.

Yes, I'm becoming more anti-social as time goes on. Why'dya ask?

Stormhawk
05-13-2008, 04:33 AM
I actually love my job. ^_^ So I don't think I'd want to throw it in, if I could get a full-time maid, however, that would make things a lot easier.

However, a month retreat in a nice hotel overlooking the ocean would be absolutely wonderful...

Melenka
05-13-2008, 04:56 AM
I love my job, too. I have the perfect boss so I'm not changing or leaving my job unless he does first. Of course, he ignores that I write during down times, so that makes it easier. During the hell season, I'm sometimes at work until midnight, so it balances out.

mario_c
05-13-2008, 07:24 AM
Stormhawk & Melenka, and everyone who likes their job and boss, I'm jealous. I'd do anything to get out of my current position. Anything at all. That pays more and has a slightly lower masochism level.

bunnygirl
05-13-2008, 08:47 AM
I couldn't quit working altogether. I need something external to structure my day or my days get weird and unproductive, fast. But switch to a part-time job or a few days a week of volunteering? In a heartbeat, if I could afford it! I would then have more time for writing and more importantly, for pursuing traditional publication. And what's more, I'd actually have the time to do authorial marketing things if I did get published.

steveg144
05-13-2008, 02:42 PM
If someone was willing to pay my mortgage payments, utility bills and other outgoings for that period then yes, definitely. Unfortunately, no one is willing to subsidise me at the moment (dammned selfish people!) so I'm going to have to keep the full-time day job. Or pin my hopes on the National Lottery (damn you, Camelot! Why must you mock me by not letting me win?)

MM

LOL! Glad to see I'm not the old one who has "win the lottery, quit day job, retire to Languedoc, write full time" as a career goal! :tongue

Richard White
05-13-2008, 03:43 PM
My short term goal . . . sell enough novels and/or short stories to go half-time at work (keep the medical and 401K).

Long term goal - early retirement and write full time.

That's been the plan for a while now.

Broadswordbabe
05-13-2008, 03:44 PM
Come to think of it - it's only the boring-ass day job I'd give up, the second I could afford to. The fun stuff that doesn't yet pay much or anything - (costume making, writing-related work) oh, yeah, I'd keep doing those. If I did nothing but sit at home and write I'd probably run out of stuff to write about.

swvaughn
05-13-2008, 04:21 PM
Goodness no. I love working at McDonalds.

/sarcasm

sheadakota
05-13-2008, 04:32 PM
In a hearbeat.

KikiteNeko
05-13-2008, 06:08 PM
I'd forefeit health insurance to be able to work at home full time and still afford my expenses. I'd sell my car and ride a bike to make ends meet. I'd put off having children. I'd eat top Ramen every night.

DWSTXS
05-13-2008, 06:34 PM
I'd forefeit health insurance to be able to work at home full time and still afford my expenses. I'd sell my car and ride a bike to make ends meet. I'd put off having children. I'd eat top Ramen every night.


That's all you'd do?

Come on girl, where's your committment?


(just kidding!)

Perle_Rare
05-13-2008, 06:36 PM
I've tried it and failed miserably. I quit work and had this lofty idea that I'd stay home and write a novel. Well, the muse didn't strike and for each day that went by with little output, I'd put more pressure on myself for the next day. Unhappiness followed promptly. So back to work I went.

I've now started writing a novel in my spare time and I've toyed with the idea of quitting work again. Eventually, I stepped back from the brink and decided not to. Again, I'd apply too much self-induced pressure to produce something.

I'm happy with the current status-quo so I'll keep it for a while. Someday, I might be brave enough to try again... :D

DWSTXS
05-13-2008, 06:42 PM
I've tried it and failed miserably. I quit work and had this lofty idea that I'd stay home and write a novel. Well, the muse didn't strike and for each day that went by with little output, I'd put more pressure on myself for the next day. Unhappiness followed promptly. So back to work I went.

I've now started writing a novel in my spare time and I've toyed with the idea of quitting work again. Eventually, I stepped back from the brink and decided not to. Again, I'd apply too much self-induced pressure to produce something.

I'm happy with the current status-quo so I'll keep it for a while. Someday, I might be brave enough to try again... :D


I say I would, and I probably would if given the chance financially. But, my foray would more than likely end like yours, in that I'd have to head back to work.

It seems we need some 'friction' in our lives in order to spur us on to obtain our dreams.
If the dream was 'given' to us up front, then what would be the motivation?
I guess the old saying really is true. That it's the journey that matters.

Still though, I'd love to try it.

DeleyanLee
05-13-2008, 07:03 PM
Been there, done that, have no intention to do it again.

Having been laid off and on workers' comp--nicely paid and available for writing--several times in my life, I know that I never write when I'm in that position. Creating my own routines with no outside demands is not a forte of mine, so I really do need some kind of commitment like a money job (even part-time) to be productive on the writing end.

Working also drags me out from beneath my happy little bridge and forces me to interact, observe and be human instead of waiting for fortune to occasionally throw me a goat leg. I think having that connection also improves my writing since I don't have much of a social life.

The Scip
05-13-2008, 07:51 PM
I enjoy writing to the point that if I could stop my 'day' job and just write and live off of that income then yes I would do it. I wouldn't stop for a few months or a year thought just to write.

Sassee
05-13-2008, 11:45 PM
I fantasise about producing thousands of words a week (two books a year? Hah! Four at least!) if I didn't have to work the day job. But - if I didn't have to squeeze my writing around work hours, so that actually getting any done at all feels a little bit like an act of revolutionary defiance, I don't know whether I'd be any more productive. I might be less...


I wouldn't! Not completely. I need some structure. A "real" job requires me to prioritize my "non"-job activities, and sometimes when I'm the busiest at work is when I'm also the most creative. Whether I can get to a pen in time to take advantage is another issue. If my day was open to all writing, all the time, I can guarantee you I wouldn't BIC as often as I should. I find lots of ways to procrastinate.

Before making a definitive decision, however, I volunteer to try it for a month. :D


Heck no! Where do you think I do my writing?


Besides, I've done some of my best writing from the office. :D


I wouldn't. I'd want to have some type of part-time work to get me out of the house and keep me engaged with the outside world. If I spent all of my time writing, my well of inspiration would dry up darn quick because there's no input coming in. Writing is only one of the many things I want to do.


No, I'd go stir crazy and/or procrastinate. I need the structure of a full time job to keep me going. Otherwise, I'd do anything and everything other than write. And sometimes, the frustration of a long day at work (who doesn't have one of those days??) is what gets me to sit down and pound the keys.

Great big "ditto!" to these posts. I need the daily routine and that feeling of "I'm doing this when I'm not supposed to be so quick get all I can on paper while the boss isn't looking."

talkwrite
05-14-2008, 12:43 AM
I definitely would. I already have been self employed- and financially independent working out of my home for close to 30 years...so I have this starvation thing down to an art form. ;) But I have already learned to develop my own structure and to discipline myself and identify my inherent productivity. All I need is some editors and publishers loving my submissions and a little more faith in my writing and I'd dive in for a year.

thethinker42
05-14-2008, 12:54 AM
So, Question: Working folks who do not write full time, If you could, would you just let it all go in order to get a solid several months of writing time? How a bout a year?

Absolutely. In fact, my husband and I are trying to work some things out so I may be able to take 6-12 months off and just write. We'll see how that goes. Some time without the stress of my job, without sleeping on someone else's schedule (I'm a chronic insomniac...sleep is a major issue for me), and with 50 more hours per week at my disposal...yes, I absolutely would get more writing done.

Right now, we just need to get some debt issues under control, and then I will be in a position to take some much-needed time off to write...YAY!

murmel
05-14-2008, 02:56 AM
yes!!!

inthecards
05-14-2008, 03:03 AM
Writing is still a treat to me, something that's *not* work. If I gave up my day job and only wrote, I wonder if it would become work instead of fun. Would like to think that it would remain a joy and that I would love life and remain productive but part of me knows that some of the edge would be gone.

When I'm daydreaming I am a full time writer, poker player, golfer and motocross rider. When I wake up I'm an engineer and part time everything else :)

Bartholomew
05-14-2008, 05:36 AM
I say I would, and yet, I keep showing up to class...

mario_c
05-15-2008, 02:06 AM
I notice a lot of responses saying "I would never have the discipline to sit and write 40 hours." First of all, there's nothing like that monthly mortgage, cable/internet and phone bill, not to mention those $50 fillups for the car, to motivate me to go home every night and do something constructive. And every day off too. Thank the stars I have no family. So I would love to be able to focus on just one project for 8 hours, and then go out and be a person at night.
To be fair, sometimes you go dry. Sometimes you need to rent movies, or walk in the park, or sit in Starbucks and think about your life. You need human activities and contact, if only for inspiring material. You need to wait for inspiration to happen. Pros do too, I'm certain; they just can't wait as long.
To be even more fair, I not only write but play music and animate. I realized if I was ever going to break out of the cubicle plantation I would need to be organized and disciplined. So I track hours, I budget like a mofo, and I wait a little longer for those rare days (and nights) when I just get to have fun.
I think it would be a better life, don't you?

bethany
05-15-2008, 02:13 AM
I think I'd like to take off when my kids are in middle school. Or maybe teach part time or a college class or something. I can see the full time job and the writing and the kids being too much in the future. But for right now they kind of depend on each other.

ACEnders
05-15-2008, 02:29 AM
If I could? If I didn't need the money that my job brings in? Without question. Absolutely. And with a huge smile on my face.

Blondchen
05-15-2008, 02:59 AM
$50 fillups for the car,

Only $50? Where do you live so I can come and fill up there! I'm at $60, and I drive a smallish 4-door sedan!

Matera the Mad
05-15-2008, 05:44 AM
I already been there done that, but not out of choice.

mario_c
05-15-2008, 07:31 AM
Only $50? Where do you live so I can come and fill up there! I'm at $60, and I drive a smallish 4-door sedan!You should get your local rates at gasbuddy.com . I'm an hour from NYC so it's competitive, but it's at $3.85 minimum now. I'm just glad I'm a bike ride away from all the essentials now (like the train to NYC :D) I imagine LA is pretty bad?

Blondchen
05-15-2008, 07:39 AM
You should get your local rates at gasbuddy.com . I'm an hour from NYC so it's competitive, but it's at $3.85 minimum now. I'm just glad I'm a bike ride away from all the essentials now (like the train to NYC :D) I imagine LA is pretty bad?

I'd like a train in Los Angeles, IF WE F'ING HAD THEM. Oh wait, there's that one that goes from the Valley (*shudder*) to Downtown and the other that goes from nowhere to nowhere. Good times.

I have to use Premium gas and we are well over $4/gallon here on the Westside.

Storm Dream
05-15-2008, 09:50 AM
On the one hand, I'd love to just be able to write. On the other hand...I need human interaction throughout the day to keep me from falling into a stupor.

I think at this point in my life, I lack the discipline to make it a full-time thing. And frankly, despite my current frustrations with my job situation, I get plenty of downtime that I use to write. I think if I did write full-time, I'd probably get a similar amount of words (and maybe that much more mental frustration/burnout).

Now, part-time? I think that'd be awesome. Go into work 20 hours a week and spend the other 20 hours writing. Schweet.

(Won't pay the bills, unfortunately.)