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View Full Version : Just found a Memoir Journal at book store!



jerrywaxler
05-12-2008, 05:24 AM
I was browsing the magazine rack at Barnes and Noble and came upon a journal called, of all things, "Memoir." How perfect is that? It's nicely put together and has quite a few stories, and even memoir poems. You can find more about it from their website, www.memoirjournal.com (http://www.memoirjournal.com).

Jerry Waxler

Ritergal
05-12-2008, 04:15 PM
Wow, thanks Jerry. This is a terrific find, as we've come to expect from you. I can't wait to pick up a copy -- maybe even request the library order it. (Remember -- I'm a zealot about libraries! Use them or lose them. Funding depends on it.)

jerrywaxler
05-13-2008, 05:30 AM
Wow, thanks Jerry. This is a terrific find, as we've come to expect from you. I can't wait to pick up a copy -- maybe even request the library order it. (Remember -- I'm a zealot about libraries! Use them or lose them. Funding depends on it.)

Hi Ritergal,

I live in a small town with an underfunded library, and I just always figured I was on my own, so I'm in the habit of buying everything I want to read. Your note is the first time I considered that using my library was a service to my community. What an interesting idea. I'm not sure if they can get the books I want, and sometimes I do like to mark books up, but you've given me something new to ponder. Thanks for the consciousness raising.

Jerry

Ritergal
05-13-2008, 03:10 PM
Jerry,

As a board member of a mid-size library with relatively strong local funding support, I know that there is never "enough" money. Currently we are facing some major structural problems that are going to cost a few hundred thousand to adequately address. This in a tight economy. Sigh ...

There are many simple ways for individuals to support libraries, and checking books and other materials out is the first step. If you live in PA, you can contact your local legislators and urge them to "unfreeze the funding formula" (ask your Librarian to explain what this means). This is an especially important step to help small libraries. You can request books via Interlibrary Loan. That helps. You can walk into the building, early and often. Each visit counts. Ask questions at the Reference Desk. Log onto the website. Attend programs at the library (if they have them). Offer to present a program or teach a class (maybe on writing). Start a writing group at your library.

Aside from that, put in requests for the books you want. Most libraries are happy for patron input, because that helps them stay in touch with the pulse of the community.

Every now and then I check out a book that really rings my bells, and I'll buy a copy to keep on my shelf after reading the one at the library. But more often, a couple of years after I buy a book, I donate it to the Friends of the Library Used Book Sale, and I buy many books there. Another way to support the Library. If your library doesn't have an FOL Used Book Sale, volunteer to help start one. That is a huge PR boost for the library and lots of fun to work on.

Many people think libraries are on the verge of extinction. Not true! But they are morphing into community centers, electronic research tools, and multi-media resources as well as purveyors of traditional print media. They are more important than ever.

jerrywaxler
05-13-2008, 04:03 PM
Hi Ritergal,

This is interesting, and I know we're in the wrong thread here, but what the heck. A few years ago, I joined a writing group in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. It was the Writers Room, a non-profit started by a writer named Foster Winans. My life was changed by this focused intense effort by Foster and the other volunteers, to bring writing to the community. The non-profit Writers Room has since gone out of business, but its energy lives on in me and other people who were affected by it. Another for-profit group moved into the same space (Jonathan Maberry and Writers Corner USA (http://www.writerscornerusa.com)), and Foster started a publishing company (http://www.wkpublishing.com/) down the street.

I used to praise the Writers Corner mightily and feared when they went out of business, I would have no sense of writing community. Fortunately, I've found Absolute Write and the micro-community of writers I've met by blogging. But you've also given me a nudge towards my local library. It is after all, a social institution whose intention is to promote literature. I've given a couple of talks at my library. Perhaps I need to do more.

Jerry