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klow
05-10-2008, 09:51 PM
Most moms-to-be think of the big stuff, but what about the little things they may not have even considered?
The small things: Things to do that you may not have thought of changing nipples out, expiration dates on baby food, formula, washing stuffed animals and toys, etc.

Can you think of things to add? Did you ever get stuck forgetting something? Did you make a list of things to remember? I need to include quotes from real moms (or dads) in this article.

Id love any help. Please email me directly at keathlow@aol.com (keathlow@aol.com)
Thanks.
Keath

Williebee
05-10-2008, 10:27 PM
babies bounce.

Shwebb
05-12-2008, 01:56 AM
There's nothing I can think of to remember. Because the baby is going to come, and you just deal with it. There's no such thing as "being ready." Ever.

Not with your first, not with your third, not with your last. At least, that's been my experience.

One thing I did learn is that as nice as things are right now--"slim fit" diapers that hold a great quantity of fluid, non-smelly diaper pails (well, relatively-speaking, here), things that make womb and whale sounds, doohickies that warm wipes so they don't feel so cold on a baby's bottom--most of the stuff is superfluous.

Okay. You need the diapers. Something to contain the smell of them until the garbageman comes for them. But the sound of your own heart beating in his/her little ear and your warm chest is a great deal cheaper, more convenient, and a great deal more comforting than a butt-wipe warmer.

I did the nursing thing, so I didn't worry about my nipples having an expiration date and having to change them out. Ack.

Melanie Nilles
05-14-2008, 11:00 PM
I did the nursing thing, so I didn't worry about my nipples having an expiration date and having to change them out. Ack.

Same here. So much more convenient, and fresh milk wherever you go ;)

As others said, you're never ready for the first one, no matter how much you think you are. Nothing can prepare you.

If someone were to ask me what to be ready to do/have on hand for a baby, I'd say this:

1. fleece blanket. Soft, warm, and snuggly, especially for those who need to be swaddled.

2. good quality carseat and stroller.

3. crib and/or playard

4. diapers. But don't stock up on small ones. Be prepared for them to grow fast, because some babies never fit newborns, or only do for a week then pudge up so fast that in a month they're wearing 2's.

5. projectile poop. Newborns, especially breastfed infants, have loose stools because their diets are all liquids. Sometimes that literally shoots from their little butts for several feet.

a. speaking of #5, give them a few minutes of grunt work, even as much as a half hour, to finish the job before changing. otherwise you will often end up with a #5.

b. Not all babies grunt when pooping. Our older daughter never showed any signs, but she has never had any problems with BMs.

c. Formula can cause constipation. have prune juice on hand to either mix in the formula or give separately. I've found that infants I've watched who had problems drank it better when mixed with their formula, but it only takes a small amount like a teaspoon to a tablespoon for 2-5 ounces. Also, it made the child spit up more often.

6. not all babies are ready for solids at 6 months. Our baby girl didn't want anything to do with food until around 7 months--she only wanted the breast. Don't try to rush them onto solids. They'll decide when they're ready.

7. Not all babies are alike. In doing daycare, I've seen a wide range of developmental steps. My kids are far ahead of their peers, but others I've had have been behind. Don't compare your kids to your neighbors or your siblings' kids. They all catch up when they're ready.

8. all babies love bouncy seats, especially the ones with vibrations.

9. follow the recommend minimum ages for toys, and even add a couple months. Usually the kids aren't ready to play with the toy appropriately.

Okay, enough for now. I'm sure others will add to the list.

DianaDB
05-15-2008, 02:08 AM
My kids are 11 months apart, and both pregnancies are relatively fresh in my memory. I have a large list of the useless stuff.

As for the small things...

1. With my son (firstborn) I never realized what I was missing without a formula mixer! It may be a luxury to some people, but I've found that some brands of formula are still pretty clumpy after a good shake. The mixer was only a couple of dollars and it works for more than formula. I personally use it with my chocolate milk!

2. You won't need something from the diaper bag until you forget it. Better to be overpacked than under if you ask me.

3. Just because one mom could handle an all natural birth with little pain doesn't mean you will. Never EVER feel pressured into a birthing experience you don't want. It isn't all fun and games but there are alternatives to spending eighteen hours screaming in agony. (But you needn't tell your teenagers that you were numb from the waist down and weren't sufferring when you brought them into this world.)

Dawno
05-15-2008, 02:11 AM
They grow up. Start a college fund *now* - even if it's just a small US Savings Bond every month or a couple of dollars per paycheck in a savings account - over 18 years you can grow and invest it (a Roth IRA is a good choice, I hear). I regret daily that I didn't do that now that I have a daughter in college.

sheadakota
05-15-2008, 05:58 AM
You will become obsessed with poop- theirs, not yours. One thing to remember is that breast fed babies can go up to a week without pooping and it's ok-

johnnysannie
05-15-2008, 05:27 PM
Most moms-to-be think of the big stuff, but what about the little things they may not have even considered?
The small things: Things to do that you may not have thought of changing nipples out, expiration dates on baby food, formula, washing stuffed animals and toys, etc.

Can you think of things to add? Did you ever get stuck forgetting something? Did you make a list of things to remember? I need to include quotes from real moms (or dads) in this article.

Id love any help. Please email me directly at keathlow@aol.com (keathlow@aol.com)
Thanks.
Keath

Some things that I would reccomend to any mom-to-be:

Lots of little flannel blankets. You can never have too many - they will get spit up on, pooped on, peed on, etc. Have lots so you don't have to wash a lot of blankies just to have some.

If you do use bottles/nipples, go with the Playtex nursers with the drop in liners. They are easier to use. And if you boil the nipples to sterilize each time like I did, be sure to put a toothpick in the hole or it will close during boiling.

Buy water to mix with formula; city tap water has lots of chlorine in it and well water isn't always safe (it can be filled with bacteria and other gross things).

Get a crib gym. Babies love kicking and batting at the little bouncy things.

Baby swing. It's great for those moments when you have to do something like go pee, make dinner, etc. My babies all loved the swing and it will often put them to sleep.

If you don't have one, get a rocking chair. It will come in handy, big time.

Forget the jar baby food junk. Buy a food processor (even one of the little mini choppers will work) and blend your own veggies, fruit, and eventually meat. It tastes better and is lots cheaper.

When my son was constispated soon after birth, his peditrician recommended a spoon of Karo syrup in each bottle to get things moving.

Get a good quality stroller. It will be your best friend for shopping trips, family outings, etc. Get one with a sun shade, plenty of storage space for the diaper bag, your purse, etc. Don't skimp on the stroller and don't buy one of the cheap umbrella strollers; they're not very good at all.

Get a infant carrier or cradle board or whatever you call it, a device to put the baby in that straps on and you can carry the baby front or back with you. I had one only with my youngest but it was absolutely great. When he was small, I carried him in the front and later on my back. It makes doing housework easier because the baby is right there, on you.

Don't bother with shoes until they're big enough to walk; they're just for show and are a waste of money. Bare feet when it's warm enough, socks for when it's not.

If you can find them, buy infant gowns as well as sleepers. These are for boys or girls and are like a sleeper but instead of legs, the gowns are long and have draw strings at the bottom so you could close them like a sack. The gowns make diaper changes LOTS easier.

Have plenty of little t-shirts.

That's all for now - I could probably think of a lot more, like any veteran mom!

Stacia Kane
05-16-2008, 05:10 PM
Get a infant carrier or cradle board or whatever you call it, a device to put the baby in that straps on and you can carry the baby front or back with you. I had one only with my youngest but it was absolutely great. When he was small, I carried him in the front and later on my back. It makes doing housework easier because the baby is right there, on you.




I totally agree with all of your tips but this one. I always tell expecting parents (ones I know who ask, not strangers on the street lol) not to buy one of these until after the baby comes; go to Babies R Us or whatever and try a few out with the baby, because my youngest daughter loved the carrier but the older one hated it, and I've known a few other people whose babies didn't like them either. So I always advise waiting to see if your baby likes it before spending the money.


Oh, and get a Boppie! The little one loved the Boppie and we totally regretted not getting one for the first when she was born. It's not only great for nursing, you can lay the baby in it, it's very useful for tummy time, it's terrific to travel with because it's like their own little pillow...we loved the Boppie.

klow
05-18-2008, 03:14 AM
Wow,
THanks everyone. I was out of town for a few days and came back to see all your responses!
Thanks so, so much.
Keath

Chumplet
05-18-2008, 04:02 AM
When you're in the hospital trying to get some rest, either before or after childbirth, invest in a good pair of silicone earplugs. It's a really noisy place.