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Kalyke
05-10-2008, 07:23 PM
I am about 150 pages into a suspense thriller in which both the protagonist and the antagonist are athletes in year 1970. One is a pitcher in the Los Angeles Dodgers. At first, he was not going to be as much a character as he became, so now I find myself needing to learn about baseball. This guy's core is really eluding me, as I am add and expect any sporting event to last only 2 minutes, or the time it takes a horse to run 1-1/4 mile around an oval track. I want to know the "heart and soul" of Baseball, so I can write from his Godlike perspective. If there are any Baseball people out there who can sucker me into getting stoked on spitballs, I would be much obliged. I may even end up liking Baseball. I need, especially, what "guys who play baseball" talk about amongst themselves. RBIs? Sports cars? Cigars? How do you find out those statistics? Is there a newbie site that talks about those sort of things? Thank you.

Oh, I own the book: True Blue "The Dramatic History of the Los Angeles Dodgers, Told by the Men who lived it" by Steve Delsohn

aka eraser
05-12-2008, 12:03 AM
Baseball is a beautiful game and certainly umpteen million words and many, many hundreds of books have been written about it.

But none of them will teach you to really appreciate it. You have to watch a lot of games. There's no short cut.

cletus
05-12-2008, 12:32 AM
Baseball is a beautiful game and certainly umpteen million words and many, many hundreds of books have been written about it.

But none of them will teach you to really appreciate it. You have to watch a lot of games. There's no short cut.
Agreed. There is no substitute for watching a lot of games. I've been a fan for over 30 years, but wouldn't even attempt a baseball themed book right now as I don't get a chance to watch many games these days.

One book I would recommend is Ball Four by Jim Bouton. It's mainly a diary of his 1969 season with the Seattle Pilots, who moved to Milwaukee the following year and became the Brewers.

Kalyke
05-12-2008, 12:47 AM
The entire book is not (thank goodness) baseball themed. The character is a baseball player. I have watched the game a few times, but not a modern game. It just needs to be convincing, not realistic.

DWSTXS
05-12-2008, 01:15 AM
The entire book is not (thank goodness) baseball themed. The character is a baseball player. I have watched the game a few times, but not a modern game. It just needs to be convincing, not realistic.

convincing, yet not realistic?
I'm not sure I'd buy that.

Chumplet
05-12-2008, 01:23 AM
How about taking in a few baseball flicks?

For Love of the Game
The Natural
Major League
Bull Durham

Just try not to steal any of their plot points LOL!

My upcoming novel is a romantic suspense with a hockey theme. It helps to eat, drink and breathe the sport from an early age, though. I hope you can catch up!

DWSTXS
05-12-2008, 01:25 AM
You don't have to have the players talk shop either. You can have them talk about anything, and just make a few casual remarks regarding their 'work'.

I work with an ex-NFL player that has 3 Super Bowl rings, and I've talked football with him a lot less than the other things we talk about.

Kalyke
05-12-2008, 08:37 PM
convincing, yet not realistic?
I'm not sure I'd buy that.

Sure, verisimilitude. The idea that a writer does not need to be the character he writes about. Certainly no writer who writes about murder has ever murdered, or similar crimes-- in that case, the prison system would be filled with authors, and they'd leave the pot smokers alone.

oh, a recent quote by Author James Kunstler (May 1, Colbert Report)
"...this is fiction, all you have to be is plausible, you don't have to be correct..."

Liam Jackson
05-13-2008, 04:33 AM
I played a little baseball. We talked about girls, sliding into second with cleats up to screw with some smartass shortstop, cold beer, and...girls.

Kalyke
06-07-2008, 04:23 AM
I played a little baseball. We talked about girls, sliding into second with cleats up to screw with some smartass shortstop, cold beer, and...girls.

I kind of thought it would have been something like that. Just "guy talk."

Vito
09-23-2008, 05:49 AM
I can think of three autobiographies written by former Dodgers that might be useful.

On the Run by Maury Wills. Maury was the Dodgers shortstop during the 1970 season, and this is his tell-all autobiography.

A Year At A Time by Walter Alston. Walter Alston was the manager of the Dodgers from the 1950s through the 1970s.

Garvey by Steve Garvey. Steve was a young infielder for the Dodgers in 1970, soon to become a legend.