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BenPanced
05-07-2008, 08:18 AM
You know the one. The one where the only way to avoid your mother making it was turning 18 and moving out of the house.

Mine is neck bones, sauerkraut, and potatoes. My mother would buy a bunch of beef neck bones and boil them with the kraut and potatoes. Oh, I hated, hated, HATED that mess! There was no way to avoid the sauerkraut; you couldn't pick it off the neck bones and set it on the plate because of the smaller, itty bitty pieces you could never get to. To this day, I've never had a Reuben or a hot dog New York-style, and the only pierogi I'll eat are cheese and potato.

What say you? Have a food nightmare to share?

Lyra Jean
05-07-2008, 08:23 AM
When my best friend's mom would make liver and onions. We were together enough at each others houses for this to be a problem. It would make me nauseous and I would actually have to vomit so she would let me off the hook and not eat it.

Cranky
05-07-2008, 08:30 AM
Two words: Swiss steak.

Is that even real food? My dad would make it in one of those ridiculous electric skillets, and the smell...oh, there are no words.

L M Ashton
05-07-2008, 04:04 PM
Oh, I can get on board with the liver thing. My mother cooked it until it was hard enough to shingle the roof or make into shoes. And then there was the cauliflower, which I thought I hated, but turns out I just hate it boiled to death until it's bitter and flavoured with nothing but salt. Cauliflower that's battered and deep fried=yum! Cauliflower that's curried=yum! Cauliflower that's curried with curd=Yum!!!

And then there was the six days a week for the first 16 years of my life torture. Fried until nearly black and tough as nails hamburger rolled into sort of patties served with boiled until glue potatoes and either beans or carrots, boiled to death. Salt and perhaps pepper were the only flavourings. Oh, yeah, and the hamburger drippings made into gravy - I hate gravy, I have always hated gravy, I will always hate gravy. I think I tried that gravy once. It took me another, oh, decade or so of moving away from their house before I could look at any of those foods again. Except the gravy. I still won't eat gravy.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-07-2008, 04:08 PM
Chicken gizzards. 'Nuf said.

Sarita
05-07-2008, 05:13 PM
There was a time, for about 8-10 months where we had nothing in the house to eat but a frozen cow that my dad got from one of his buddies (where the hell the cow came from, I don't want to know, we lived about 30 min from NYC,) banana chips, and mint tea. To this day, I'm a non-red meat eater and the thought of most things mint churns my stomach. I ate my share of T-bone steaks to last a lifetime.

Seaclusion
05-07-2008, 05:40 PM
When I was young and my parents would ask me what restaurant I would like to go to, I always picked a German restaurant (they didn't ask me too often). I loved saurbratten, that pickled and boiled roast with the sweet-n-sour gravy on top. Then the family bought a German restauant and there was an unlimited supply of saurbratten. I ate it every night for the first week. Then one day I fixed a plate, sat down to eat, looked at the saurbratten and realized I couldn't eat it. I had had enough saurbratten to last a lifetime and have not eaten it since.

Richard

jennontheisland
05-07-2008, 05:48 PM
Tuna casserole. Macaroni with tinned tuna and frozen peas in the middle, and some kind of tinned soup poured on top.

Beef Stew. For years I refused to eat or make this. My husband finally made it himself and insisted I taste it. Well, whaddaya know. It was just her beef stew. To this day I have no idea what she did to it.

Hamburger helper soup. Burger helper with water, frozen veggies and a tin of tomatoes. She'd make it every time my cousins came to visit. They loved it. My brother and I choked it down.

Elwood
05-07-2008, 05:58 PM
You know the one. The one where the only way to avoid your mother making it was turning 18 and moving out of the house.

Mine is neck bones, sauerkraut, and potatoes. My mother would buy a bunch of beef neck bones and boil them with the kraut and potatoes. Oh, I hated, hated, HATED that mess! There was no way to avoid the sauerkraut; you couldn't pick it off the neck bones and set it on the plate because of the smaller, itty bitty pieces you could never get to. To this day, I've never had a Reuben or a hot dog New York-style, and the only pierogi I'll eat are cheese and potato.

What say you? Have a food nightmare to share?


I agree! Plus it is getting murderously difficult these days to find an angry German. As far as horrible I have only one word. Carp!!! A delicate dish served in many European households as we serve Turkey on Christman. A truly horror filled repast! Unless of course you love a bit of jelly like fish on your palate!

Woof
05-07-2008, 06:25 PM
When my best friend's mom would make liver and onions. We were together enough at each others houses for this to be a problem. It would make me nauseous and I would actually have to vomit so she would let me off the hook and not eat it.

I can relate. My mother seemed to have a love affair with organ meats, especially broiled liver. Revolting smell, repulsive to look at, I gagged every time I felt its loathsome texture going down my throat. And since I wasn't allowed to leave the table until it was all finished, I grabbed the opportunity of sticking a piece in my pocket every time my mother's back was turned. But then I had to figure out a way to explain my greasy pockets...

Angela_785
05-07-2008, 06:41 PM
I can relate. My mother seemed to have a love affair with organ meats, especially broiled liver. Revolting smell, repulsive to look at, I gagged every time I felt its loathsome texture going down my throat. And since I wasn't allowed to leave the table until it was all finished, I grabbed the opportunity of sticking a piece in my pocket every time my mother's back was turned. But then I had to figure out a way to explain my greasy pockets...

What is it with the liver and onions? Maybe that generation learned it in some secret handbook on successfully getting your kids to leave after graduation and not return...

Hey...

*mentally files idea away for when my kids near graduation*

A.M. Wildman
05-07-2008, 06:45 PM
ooh! We have liver and onions, chicken gizzards, saurbratten, and swiss steak.

I'd be eating good for a week.

Psst. You gonna eat that?

Angela_785
05-07-2008, 06:53 PM
*shudders and shoves plate at A.M.*

WendyNYC
05-07-2008, 06:59 PM
I know lots of people adore it, but I abhor meat loaf. MEAT in a LOAF? Ew. Once my mother made me eat three big girl-scout bites before I could go out trick-or-treating, and I had a really cool costume. I've hated it ever since.

StephanieFox
05-07-2008, 07:40 PM
We're so weird. We love 'variety meats' (organ meats) and eat them whenever we can. For some reason, though, they've become expensive. The bones and saurkraut sound great! We eat carp, especially at Passover and in the summer.

Of course, we don't like badly prepared anything. I agree with the dislike of overcooked califlower. Eeeew.

I hate fresh lima beans, though. When I was a kid, when forced to eat them, I'd swallow them whole, with milk, like they were pills. Unless, of course, they ended up in the stomachs of the three dogs that lived under the kitchen table.

CaoPaux
05-07-2008, 07:40 PM
Two words: Swiss steak.

Is that even real food? My dad would make it in one of those ridiculous electric skillets, and the smell...oh, there are no words.OMG, that's mine too!! I swear it took five minutes to chew every bite, which was gray and tasteless to start and just got worse from there.... *gag*

Alas, Mom overcooked everything. Don't get me started on frozen vegatables.... *gag, retch*

Woof
05-07-2008, 09:04 PM
Two words: Swiss steak.

Is that even real food? My dad would make it in one of those ridiculous electric skillets, and the smell...oh, there are no words.

Actually Swiss steak can be quite good if it's properly prepared. I first brown a thick slab of inside round steak, then add onions, carrots, celery, stewed tomatoes, oregano, and a dash of pepper and slow cook it in a covered casserole in the oven at 300 degrees for 3 hours. Then I strain the vegetables and add to the gravy a little red wine and flour to thicken it. The meat always comes out very tender and delicious.

smlgr8
05-07-2008, 09:09 PM
My mother used to make this thing she called "little meats", ugh. It was ground beef cooked into greasy obscurity with carrots and potatoes chopped into tiny pieces and all whirred together. It was so greasy and so gross. To this day, she STILL likes it. Thankfully I haven't had to stomach it in years, but it was nasty.

DWSTXS
05-07-2008, 09:10 PM
Two years ago I was asked if I wanted mashed potatoes, and I said yes. As the host is spooning them onto my plate, she revealed that she made them with cauliflower. It was too late for me to say no at that point, so I took a small bite just to be courteous, and they were GOOD!

Not potatoes with cauliflower added, but 100% cauliflower mashed and whipped until they resembled 'mashed potatoes'. I think she added a spoonful of sour cream and some butter

paprikapink
05-07-2008, 09:16 PM
It sounds like most of these horrors were horrors of bad cooking. My mom was a good cook and only made us taste foods. If we hated it we didn't have to eat it. But that didn't let me off the hook entirely. She was a single mom and worked all day so we spent a lot of time at babysitters. When I was in second grade the babysitter made the lunches. I could not eat those sandwiches! I would truly throw up. So I'd leave them in my lunchbox (Monkees, for the record). But the "courtesy girls" -- sixth graders who sat in the classroom while the teachers had lunch in the teachers' lounge -- said I had to eat them. I took to throwing them away on my walk to school. I was tortured, TORTURED, by the guilt of having littered whenever I peeked into the boxwood hedge where I dumped the sandwiches.

I got over it eventually. I can eat sandwiches, even bologna.

But I can't eat a lima bean. It doesn't matter how it's cooked or where it's hidden. There is something in those things that turns my esophagus inside out. Gaaaaahhhhh!

A.M. Wildman
05-07-2008, 09:22 PM
*shudders and shoves plate at A.M.*

Thanks... Mmmm.

See growing up I wasnt' "forced" to eat anything. In my parent's house you either ate what was on the table or you went hungry. It's a side effect of being dirt poor.

That served me well when I joined the Army and wound up in Infantry/Special Operations units where real food is a luxury. We are sometimes called "snake eaters".

I've eaten things that would make a billy goat puke. Including said billy goat. I'm not picky. I'll pretty much eat anything that doesn't crawl off the plate and escape or doesn't manage to eat me first.

The upside is I'm rarely ever hungry and I don't have problems finding something to eat. ;)


YMMV

slcboston
05-07-2008, 09:29 PM
Carrots. That's it, just carrots. I used to like them, then for some reason Mom went on a carrot binge and we had them at least once a week. Otherwise I can't think of much else Mom cooked that I didn't like.

Dad would make gizards and livers and such, but at breakfast, and completely optional eating.

TerzaRima
05-09-2008, 12:02 AM
My mom was and is a good cook, but as a child of the Depression, she thought it was a sin to throw anything away. So we ate leftovers of things that really should be eaten fresh, like fish. Also, hard boiled eggs refrigerated overnight to get flaccid and icy, served the next day for lunch.

My husband has introduced me to the idea of It's Okay To Toss It.

Devil Ledbetter
05-10-2008, 04:53 PM
Three-bean salad.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
05-10-2008, 05:00 PM
What is it with the liver and onions? Maybe that generation learned it in some secret handbook on successfully getting your kids to leave after graduation and not return...

Hey...

*mentally files idea away for when my kids near graduation*

My mother was a BIG believer in the restorative, preventative powers of beef liver. OMG.

I refused to eat it. Refused, I say. To the point where I'd not eat rather than face THAT.

Mom swore to me if I didn't eat my liver as a kid, I'd be forced to eat it raw, ground up, when I grew up and was pregnant.

To this day, I firmly believe that's the #1 reason I have no children.

Thump
05-10-2008, 07:18 PM
LOL, I love most of the things you people have mentionned >__<

Sauerkraut! YUM! Beef liver (not overcooked though) I ADORE! All organ meats <3...

What I do NOT like though are carrots and fish. I'll eat carrots cooked because I know they're good for me. I will not have them raw YUK! Fish I only enjoy raw though :) Mmmmh sushi! Or as tuna salad or ceviche, cooked fish makes me choke. It's gross but my dad makes it as often as he can >_< *shudders* I especially hate baked salmon.

Lyra Jean
05-10-2008, 07:40 PM
I don't especially like Collards, mustard greens, or turnip greens. I love spinach.

If it came down to starving to death and eating something I would eat it rather than starve. Yes, even liver.

Elaine Margarett
05-10-2008, 08:24 PM
My mom was a wonderful cook. The only bad food memories I have growing up were Fridays and fish (the whole can't eat meat on Friday/Catholic thing). I would dread Fridays! Fish sticks, cod fish or swordfish and mackeral <shudder> ! My dad was very strick regarding you ate what was on your plate. If it gagged you to chew it; you swallowed it whole. Mom would take pity on me and make me mac-n-cheese as a substitute. It was a happy day when the Chutch rescinded that decree (or whatever you call it).

GeorgeK
05-11-2008, 06:38 AM
If you don't like liver either you lack or have a particular enzyme in your saliva (I forget which it is) that allows you to either taste or not taste a few particular proteins which are concentrated in liver and brussel sprouts (MMM, one of my favorite dinners) OR the liver was improperly prepared. Liver spoils quickly. It is best when cooked the same day as the butchering and then to only medium to medium rare. Most of our ancestors feared trichinosis more than a bad meal, so they cooked it to leather which liberates some of those compounds to the point that even those who like the flavor have trouble enjoying it. If you are faced with overcooked liver, try it the next day, cold in a cheese sandwhich (colby or cheddar preferrably, unless you like limburger, then go for it, maybe a side of fresh green onions).

My home made Pate starts with a live pig in the morning and a delicate spread on crackers topped with some grilled parmesan cheese that evening, utilizing the liver, spleen, kidneys, omentum, heart and tongue.

L M Ashton
05-11-2008, 03:31 PM
My home made Pate starts with a live pig in the morning and a delicate spread on crackers topped with some grilled parmesan cheese that evening, utilizing the liver, spleen, kidneys, omentum, heart and tongue.
You make Pate out of a live pig? :eek:

Seriously, though, I actually much like lieberwurst, or liverwurst. Finely ground with herbs. Very nice. Lovely, really. :)

But I still don't like cooked liver. I've had it cooked very tender and still didn't like it, but that was all beef liver. And the liverwurst I've had has always been pig liver, so maybe that's it? *shrugs*

Stacia Kane
05-11-2008, 04:57 PM
Sloppy Joes. Shepherd's pie. "Junk salad".

I went to Thnksgiving dinner at an ex-boyfriend's house once; his sister made mashed potatoes with sour cream and onions mixed in. UNCOOKED onions. It was revolting, and of course I had to eat it because they didn't tell me they'd messed with the mash until I'd already put some on my plate. Yuck.

GeorgeK
05-11-2008, 09:53 PM
You make Pate out of a live pig? :eek:
*

Well, it's alive at the start of the process. Ask a chef, if you want fresh ingredients, go to the source.

SouthernFriedJulie
05-12-2008, 03:14 AM
This is the thread pregnant women should avoid at all costs. You have no idea how ICK this is. Ewie, eeeewie.

Brings back horrid memories of living with my great grandmother who I loved dearly, but thought that frying fatback and putting it on the table swimming in grease was a side dish. Shudder, shudder.

GeorgeK
05-12-2008, 03:36 AM
Sloppy Joes. Shepherd's pie.

If they are made right, they're good, but if it arrives on a cafeteria tray, that's unlikely. What is shepherd's pie where you are in Great Britain? My version is a layer of taco meat, then a layer of cheese, then mashed potatoes topped with another layer of cheese



"Junk salad".

Never heard of that, what is it?





.. mashed potatoes with sour cream and onions mixed in..

I prefer garlic rather than the onions

BenPanced
05-12-2008, 04:22 AM
I can't stand liver when it's fried with onions, but I lurves me some braunschweiger! Two or three pieces between some white bread and slathered with yellow mustard? Now THAT'S a sammich!

Hollan
05-12-2008, 04:43 AM
My mom's a good cook, but I had some bad food at friend's houses.

Sloppy joes. They look like throw up and make the bread all soggy (a huge pet peeve of mine) and they're just plain nasty!

Fish sticks and fried shrimp. I don't like eating any kind of sea life, but the worst I ever tried where of the fried variety. I had to spit them both out b/c I would have thrown up otherwise. Ewww!

GeorgeK
05-12-2008, 08:06 AM
My mom's a good cook, but I had some bad food at friend's houses.

Sloppy joes. They look like throw up and make the bread all soggy (a huge pet peeve of mine) and they're just plain nasty!

Fish sticks and fried shrimp. I don't like eating any kind of sea life, but the worst I ever tried where of the fried variety. I had to spit them both out b/c I would have thrown up otherwise. Ewww!

The trick with sloppy joe's is to insulate the bread from the liquid. (I don't like soggy bread either) Lightly toast the bread/bun using a toaster over, grill, broiler, whatever where it isn't vertical. Then sprinkle a layer of grated cheese on both of the inside pieces and get it good and melted. Only then, add the meat. BTW it should look pretty much like chili, not vomit. If it looks like vomit it was probably made by one of those cafeterias where all it is is ground beef in ketchup and that's stuff that it is better to pass on.

Fish sticks, I agree yuk. I've never seen a cuboidal fish, so that ain't real, whatever it is.

Shrimp...fried is the worst way to appreciate the flavor. All you can taste is the breading and the sauce if you use sauce, so why not just dip a cracker in the sauce and skip the shrimp? Try skewers of grilled shrimp seasoned with a little salt, pepper, garlic and savory. Shrimp has a delicate flavor and it's easy to overdue spicing.

GeorgeK
05-12-2008, 08:10 AM
I can't stand liver when it's fried with onions, but I lurves me some braunschweiger! Two or three pieces between some white bread and slathered with yellow mustard? Now THAT'S a sammich!


Try a toasted braunschweiger sandwich with cheese and bacon.

Dommo
05-12-2008, 08:42 AM
I'm sorry but until you've had lutefisk, you can't complain about anything.

Lutefisk is basically fish that is soaked in lye, and has the consistency of a big nasty booger.

Not only does it smell horribly, it tastes like shit as well.

BenPanced
05-12-2008, 09:04 AM
Try a toasted braunschweiger sandwich with cheese and bacon.
That sounds...just...OMIGHOD I have to try one! What sort of cheese?

GeorgeK
05-12-2008, 11:07 AM
That sounds...just...OMIGHOD I have to try one! What sort of cheese?

I prefer swiss, but cheddar or colby works well too

Angela_785
05-12-2008, 05:54 PM
Mom swore to me if I didn't eat my liver as a kid, I'd be forced to eat it raw, ground up, when I grew up and was pregnant.

Three words: sick and wrong. Sick and wrong! That and the three bean salad. I'd forgotten about that one. Bleh.

Melisande
05-12-2008, 06:26 PM
I'm sorry but until you've had lutefisk, you can't complain about anything.

Lutefisk is basically fish that is soaked in lye, and has the consistency of a big nasty booger.

Not only does it smell horribly, it tastes like shit as well.

Yup. Know it well and I can not stand the smell. Was forced to eat eat every Christmas as a child until I moved away from home.

Every kind of pickled herring is also revolting to me, who was forced to eat it at summercamp ever saturday breakfast. And when I say forced, I mean brutally and phisically forced.

My mother is a very good cook, but every now and then she would make a sheep-and-cabbage stew that was truly gross. We had to eat, or go hungry, so I ate and gagged.:eek:

TerzaRima
05-12-2008, 07:38 PM
Oh God. You just gave me an unwanted blast of Minnesota nostalgia. Lutefisk is indeed awful.

A whole different area of bad food--traditional bad holiday dishes. That green bean dish with the french fried onions, that sweet potato...thing with little marshmallows, et al. Both have been banned from the holiday table chez Rima.

Stacia Kane
05-12-2008, 08:49 PM
If they are made right, they're good, but if it arrives on a cafeteria tray, that's unlikely. What is shepherd's pie where you are in Great Britain? My version is a layer of taco meat, then a layer of cheese, then mashed potatoes topped with another layer of cheese.

Yeah, that's not really anything like shepherd's pie as I've ever had it, lol. Shepherd's pie is just ground or shredded beef (actually, technically a shepherd's pie is lamb [and it's a cottage pie with beef], but I absolutely LOATHE lamb) with seasonings, carrots, peas, and onions, with mashed potatoes on top. No cheese at all.

According to my MIL when it has cheese it's actually a Lancashire Hotpot, but I don't know if that's true.





Never heard of that, what is it?


Junk salad is this awful thing my Mom used to make at holidays. I don't really know what all's in it as I never wanted anything to do with it. :) It had chopped fruit, I think, and some vegetables (I'm pretty sure it had cucumbers and celery), and it was in some sort of thick white dressing. Totally nasty.






I prefer garlic rather than the onions

:-) I guess if people have to put flavorings in mashed potatoes, I prefer garlic too. But I'd rather have potatoes that taste like potatoes--I'm not a seasoned fries or mash/flavored potato chips kind of girl. ;)

C.bronco
05-12-2008, 09:10 PM
My mom is a good cook. She is kind, and would never serve her children liver. We did have food fights at my house, however. The worst one was with butter. That is very hard to wash out of one's hair.
The end.

BenPanced
05-12-2008, 09:38 PM
My mom is a good cook. She is kind, and would never serve her children liver. We did have food fights at my house, however. The worst one was with butter. That is very hard to wash out of one's hair.
The end.
For future reference, use dish soap. Make sure to use a regular shampoo and conditioner after that, though. It might dry out your hair too much, otherwise.

GeorgeK
05-13-2008, 01:00 AM
a shepherd's pie is lamb [and it's a cottage pie with beef], but I absolutely LOATHE lamb) with seasonings, carrots, peas, and onions, with mashed potatoes on top. No cheese at all.


and probably cooked to death where it's mush and all the flavors blend so that it's basically lumpy baby food? Yeah, again, I've only seen that in cafeterias which I avoid.



Junk salad is ...chopped fruit, I think, and some vegetables (I'm pretty sure it had cucumbers and celery), and it was in some sort of thick white dressing. Totally nasty.
;)

Yeah, I think that goo is a mixture of fake mayonaise and fake whipped cream, sort of a vaguely sweet slime...again, cafeteria. I think that might be waldorf salad here and it's a little more tolerable when they add walnuts. I'll eat it if I'm hungry and there's nothing else around but won't go out of my way for it. I'm sure that somewhere there's a decent cafeteria. I just haven't found one.

pconsidine
05-13-2008, 01:18 AM
I'm sorry but until you've had lutefisk, you can't complain about anything.

Lutefisk is basically fish that is soaked in lye, and has the consistency of a big nasty booger.

Not only does it smell horribly, it tastes like shit as well.If you know lutefisk, then you know bacala, the Italian version. Dried salt cod soaked for a week in god-knows-what to reconstitute it and then served cold in garlic and olive oil. It actually doesn't taste all that bad, but it takes a really willing soul to try it after having put up with the smell of stagnant fishwater for a week.

johnnysannie
05-13-2008, 01:44 AM
I like salsibury steak. I like meat loaf. I like the first two bites of liver and onions (after that, it just gets gross). I like carp (I was raised on carp and other river fish like gar). I like shepherd's pie and cottage pie. I don't mind the occasional chicken gizzard and I can eat chicken livers with relish if they're made into rumaki. I like melts. Neck bones aren't bad if you cook them right.

And I've eaten a lot of game too.

Although I was once, I'm not a picky eater.;)

That said, the worse thing I hated growing up was a dish my dad made called "loose hamburger" which was basically just hamburger meat swirled around in a skillet until it was done, then flopped onto a plate - or a piece of bread if you were being fancy.

The other thing was a family dish called "liver and kanadles" which is basically liver and dumplings. No one ever could get me to eat that one and I couldn't even stand to watch the elders scarfing it up.

NancyMehl
05-13-2008, 04:33 AM
Saw this topic and had to post:

I love fried liver and onions. One of my favorite meals. I like meatloaf, too. If it's prepared correctly.

I have this strange fear of lima beans. I have no idea why.

But the one dish that almost everyone's mother made when I was a kid was...Hungarian Goulash!!! Did your mother make this stuff? OMG! Hamburger, macaroni, and lots of stewed tomatoes. Yikes! Once I moved out of my mother's house, I never went near it again. And I don't know anyone my age (and I'm not young) who makes it!

What the heck was that all about? Was my mother the only one who put that mess together on a regular basis????

Nancy

StephanieFox
05-13-2008, 04:44 AM
Saw this topic and had to post:

I love fried liver and onions. One of my favorite meals. I like meatloaf, too. If it's prepared correctly.

I have this strange fear of lima beans. I have no idea why.

But the one dish that almost everyone's mother made when I was a kid was...Hungarian Goulash!!! Did your mother make this stuff? OMG! Hamburger, macaroni, and lots of stewed tomatoes. Yikes! Once I moved out of my mother's house, I never went near it again. And I don't know anyone my age (and I'm not young) who makes it!

What the heck was that all about? Was my mother the only one who put that mess together on a regular basis????

Nancy


I agree with you on the lima beans....eeeeew. My mom fed it to me and it they didn't go beneath the table into the dogs' mouths, I would swallow it like I was taking a pill. Musty flavored and sandy texture. Who thinks this is a vegetable.

However, REAL Hungarian Goulash, make with quality stew beef (or veal if you can get if free-range), good onions and high quality paprika is excellent. No stewed tomatoes, no macaroni is allowed. I make it, although I may be a bit older than you.

NancyMehl
05-13-2008, 05:23 AM
I agree with you on the lima beans....eeeeew. My mom fed it to me and it they didn't go beneath the table into the dogs' mouths, I would swallow it like I was taking a pill. Musty flavored and sandy texture. Who thinks this is a vegetable.

However, REAL Hungarian Goulash, make with quality stew beef (or veal if you can get if free-range), good onions and high quality paprika is excellent. No stewed tomatoes, no macaroni is allowed. I make it, although I may be a bit older than you.

Your way sounds great. But my friends' mothers made it just like my mom. Maybe she was passing that awful recipe around! LOL!

Nancy

paprikapink
05-13-2008, 05:24 AM
My husband's mother made Hungarian Goulash. It was a family favorite. I'm still trying to get it right.

L M Ashton
05-13-2008, 05:29 AM
Damn, I just remembered head cheese. Which, for some inexplicable reason, my mother loved and even attempted to make once.

If you don't know, head cheese has nothing at all to do with dairy. Nothing. Uh, unless you count cows heads and ears and stuff. It's basically a block of gelatinized leftover body parts which is then cut into slices like cheese. *vomits*

BenPanced
05-13-2008, 08:13 AM
But the one dish that almost everyone's mother made when I was a kid was...Hungarian Goulash!!! Did your mother make this stuff? OMG! Hamburger, macaroni, and lots of stewed tomatoes. Yikes! Once I moved out of my mother's house, I never went near it again. And I don't know anyone my age (and I'm not young) who makes it!

What the heck was that all about? Was my mother the only one who put that mess together on a regular basis????

Nancy
That sounds like what we called chili-mac. I love raw tomatoes and tomato sauce, of course. But the first time I had a "fry-up" for breakfast my first morning in London, I couldn't deal with stewed tomatoes. The baked beans, yeah. Nom. But I'll never be man enough to stomach stewed tomatoes. *retch! gag!*

chevbrock
05-13-2008, 08:51 AM
My Mum used to do chicken livers in a tin of baked beans - Not too bad, although I haven't cooked or eaten it since I left home.

I hate broad beans, and minted peas.

P.H.Delarran
05-13-2008, 09:28 AM
I have this strange fear of lima beans. I have no idea why.

Did your mother make this stuff? OMG! Hamburger, macaroni, and lots of stewed tomatoes. ...
What the heck was that all about? Was my mother the only one who put that mess together on a regular basis????

Nancy
I'm with you on the lima beans.
but I LOVE that goulash stuff, so do my kids. we put lots of butter in it.


there are two childhood dishes that I will never revisit:
fried cornmeal mush -which my dad would make on a rare weekend morning, eewwww the smell, and then he would smother it in maple syrup. I tried to like it, but it always gagged me.

fruit salad. some weird concoction with mayo and whipped cream and
canned fruit, or, even worse, jello with fruit and nuts inside. nothing gags me more.

samgail
05-13-2008, 10:08 AM
I agree! Who decided mayo belongs in a fruit salad? And don't get me started on celery in jello!! Bleeeeeech

johnnysannie
05-13-2008, 06:17 PM
I'm with you on the lima beans.
but I LOVE that goulash stuff, so do my kids. we put lots of butter in it.


there are two childhood dishes that I will never revisit:
fried cornmeal mush -which my dad would make on a rare weekend morning, eewwww the smell, and then he would smother it in maple syrup. I tried to like it, but it always gagged me.

fruit salad. some weird concoction with mayo and whipped cream and
canned fruit, or, even worse, jello with fruit and nuts inside. nothing gags me more.

Oh, now, I love cornmeal mush fried and drizzled with syrup. Good old Southern favorite.

My kids, though, hate it.

Shadow_Ferret
05-13-2008, 06:59 PM
Unlike many of you, I have never been a picky eater.

If it's food, and I'm hungry, I'll eat it.

So there were no meals my parents made that I'd turn my nose up at.

BenPanced
05-13-2008, 07:15 PM
My mom makes/made "ambrosia", which is Cool Whip, fruit cocktail, and coconut. Problem is fruit cocktail has peaches in it and I fargin' hate peaches. Never did like them, nectarines, apricots, or plums.

DeborahM
05-13-2008, 07:41 PM
Fortunately, my mother was a good cook and the rule of the house was you tried everything once as well as eat everything on your plate, which wasn't too bad...until...

My step-father was a hunter and every year we had a gamey venison roast with a wine marinade. I can still smell it cooking but my mind has blocked the taste in my mouth. Now, I can say the venison chili was the best I've ever eaten. It makes my mouth water thinking about it.

Another step-father favorite is his oyster stew. Big to do about nothing. Boiled milk, butter and an oyster. But no, he has to cook the oyster until it bounces like a rubber ball. THEN, at the table you're not supposed to chew it, but swallow it whole. AND if you throw up, you eat that too. It took 20 years before I could eat a raw oyster.

He was a sadistic SOB, sorry...back to the food.

soleary
05-13-2008, 08:01 PM
My mom's meat loaf crunched. To this day, I still hate the thought of crunchy meat. I don't think meat should crunch, especially meat formed in a loaf and filled with all sorts of strange things. I never truly knew if it was the meat crunching or one of the foreign edible objects placed within the meat.

It's definitely a salad for lunch kinda day now ...

Shadow_Ferret
05-13-2008, 08:13 PM
Be interested to know what she put in there. I've seen many a meat loaf recipe and none of them have crunchy things in there. Only the top gets crunchy if it crisps up.

soleary
05-13-2008, 08:29 PM
I don't know. I was afraid to ask. It's a dangerous thing, though, to have a very active imagination and find yourself staring down a plate filled with steaming crunchy meat. Uck!

tjwriter
05-13-2008, 09:17 PM
Corn meal mush breaded and fried up is delicious. I don't care for syrup on mine, but it has to be certain window of done or I don't care for it.

I love my meatloaf. It's well seasoned and flavorful. My husband doesn't like meatloaf, so I rarely fix it.

A properly done Waldorf salad is delicious.

My mom eventually quit making me take so many bites of liver and onions. She's a perfectly good cook, but I never could grow to like the taste.

I don't care for ham and beans or potato salad. Detest might be the word. My husband adores these things, and so I fix ham and beans for him every so often. I ate it as a kid and never really enjoyed it. There's something very wrong about the texture.

pconsidine
05-13-2008, 11:45 PM
Fortunately, my mother was a good cook and the rule of the house was you tried everything once as well as eat everything on your plate, which wasn't too bad...until...That was the rule of my house too, until my mom decided it would be fun to try serving breaded calf brain for dinner one night. She thought that if she didn't tell us what it was, we wouldn't recognize that it was completely disgusting.

I'm glad to say that we proved her wrong.

RLB
05-13-2008, 11:53 PM
some weird concoction with mayo and whipped cream and
canned fruit, or, even worse, jello with fruit and nuts inside. nothing gags me more.

Ick. In my experience, the only time to try to serve someone jello is if they've just had their tonsils out. And there is never an excuse to suspend anything inside the jello. Never.

DeleyanLee
05-14-2008, 12:04 AM
Heh. One of my favorite holiday dishes is orange Jell-O with shaved carrots and crushed pineapple. Trick is, instead of using the cold water, you use Vernor's Ginger Ale. Has to be Vernor's.

Now you want something obscene to do to Jell-O is to bake white or vanilla cake and then, after it's cooled, to poke holes in it with a fork and pore freshly mixed/still warm Jell-O over it. The holes allow it to seep into the cake itself and, so I was told many times, the Jell-O on the top meant it didn't need icing.

This was my mother's favorite cake trick all through my teen years. I still get queasy at the thought of it.

Somehow, gods alone know how, Mom got the idea that my favoritest dish in the world was her 'cost cutter beef stroganoff'. It is, to this day, the one thing she makes that actually came back up with some force upon consumption. Start with chopped up cube steaks, and the "sauce" had cottage cheese or Miracle Whip or something other than the sour cream and since Mom hated mushrooms, she put green beans in there.

Gross. Just gross.

quickWit
05-14-2008, 12:34 AM
*walks calmy into thread with pants on head, produces a spoon and tastes the sauce*

Mmmmmmmmmmmmm, very nice.

(Don't ask where I got the spoon)

Cranky
05-14-2008, 12:35 AM
*shoves quicky out of thread and steals his spoon*

Hey, this is pretty good sauce. Carry on, y'all.

Stacia Kane
05-14-2008, 01:39 AM
I hate anything with mayonnaise, and I also think I'm one of the only people in the world who dislikes macaroni and cheese.

And anything with crushed potato chips on top. *shudder* I love potato chips, but I hate them mixed into or on top of stuff. :)

pconsidine
05-14-2008, 02:12 AM
I also think I'm one of the only people in the world who dislikes macaroni and cheese. How many ways have you had it? I used to be a firm anti-mac-and-cheese guy until I got to try some from my mother's recipe. It's a Mornay sauce with sautéed onions and sharp white cheddar (no Velveeta here), pour it over cooked ziti (and it HAD to be ziti) and then bake it for half an hour or so to get it good and crusty on top. Pretty damn amazing, I must say.

Of course, the one time I tried to make it, I forgot to sauté the onions first. It was a little...potent.

samgail
05-14-2008, 02:44 AM
I hate anything with mayonnaise, and I also think I'm one of the only people in the world who dislikes macaroni and cheese.

And anything with crushed potato chips on top. *shudder* I love potato chips, but I hate them mixed into or on top of stuff. :)

Oh man, I think I must have repressed this memory and you jogged it loose. So, my mom made the best mac and cheese which was great-until i went to dinner at my best friends house. Her Mom made mac and cheese from the box and it was awful and nobody understood that i did not care for it "What do you mean you don't like it, it's macaroni and cheese!!" I was polite and made an effort but it was not something i ever ate again. She was a good cook and I did enjoy some of the classic american casseroles at her house. My mother never made them so it was an interesting cultural experience potato chip tops and all.

CDarklock
05-14-2008, 03:25 AM
My mother makes this disgusting thing which is basically green beans in cream of mushroom soup under a layer of Velveeta.

Every time we go over for thanksgiving, she produces this thing and calls my attention to it. When I don't eat any, she asks why, and when I say I don't like it...

"But you love this!"

Look, you've been trying to feed me this garbage for thirty-five years. Don't you think I know whether I like it? Don't you think you ought to know whether I like it? It's revolting. You know I don't like green beans, you know I don't like mushrooms, and you know I don't like Velveeta. What, exactly, makes you think that I would in any way, shape, or form enjoy a combination of the three?

I swear, you might as well be offering me a dishwater, dirty sock, and dog crap casserole.

tjwriter
05-14-2008, 03:50 AM
Now you want something obscene to do to Jell-O is to bake white or vanilla cake and then, after it's cooled, to poke holes in it with a fork and pore freshly mixed/still warm Jell-O over it. The holes allow it to seep into the cake itself and, so I was told many times, the Jell-O on the top meant it didn't need icing.

This was my mother's favorite cake trick all through my teen years. I still get queasy at the thought of it.

Jell-O cake is quite delicious if prepared properly (that recipe is not). One must use a straw to place strategic round holes throughout the cake. Then one must use enough Jell-O to fill the holes, but not so much that the cake cannot absorb. There should no Jell-O layer on top as it should be soaked into the cake. Chill the cake and then layer with a heathly portion of Cool Whip. Keep it chilled in the fridge. It makes for a light yet filling summer dessert.

Also, green bean casserole (green beans, cream of mushroom soup, french's fried onions) is wonderful as are candied yams. The trick is that they are prepared properly.

Lyra Jean
05-14-2008, 04:19 AM
And there is never an excuse to suspend anything inside the jello. Never.

Not even a stapler?
http://www.jellostapler.com/img/swingline-stapler-in-jello-t.jpg

CDarklock
05-14-2008, 05:40 AM
Also, green bean casserole (green beans, cream of mushroom soup, french's fried onions) is wonderful as are candied yams. The trick is that they are prepared properly.

And "properly" in my book means they don't contain green beans, mushrooms, Velveeta, onions, or yams.

So I'll just take that bag of mini marshmallows, thank you. ;)

GeorgeK
05-14-2008, 05:48 AM
Of course, the one time I tried to make it, I forgot to sauté the onions first. It was a little...potent.

So you made Pasta Viagra?

ChaosTitan
05-14-2008, 05:55 AM
I was fortunate that my parents didn't experiment much with food. Most meals were some variant on meat/potatoes/vegetable. Occasionally they'd get adventurous with chicken 'n dumplings, lasagna, or beef stew. Nothing awful or disgusting (not like my uncle who once made "tuna" salad out of rabbit meat and didn't tell me until after I tasted it and realized how utterly disgusting it was).

The only things I distinctly recall refusing to eat were ham 'n cabbage, red beets, and fried collard greens. Actually, my dad refused to eat the beets and greens, too. :D Those were my mom's foods.

TerzaRima
05-14-2008, 06:25 AM
We were lucky kids--although my mom never threw anything away, she was a good cook. Also, she was first generation American, and we grew up on what people now call the Mediterranean diet--lots of whole grains, olive oil, fresh vegetables, a little chicken and lamb. Very heart healthy, and absolutely delicious.

Jersey Chick
05-14-2008, 07:01 AM
We were lucky - my mom had traumatic memories of liver and onions as a kid, so we never sayw them. Though I do like liverwurst - on rye with mustard.

My eurk foods are:

lima beans - WTF is inside them??? Blech
cooked spinach - gack. I love it raw, but cooked? kill me now
pumpkin anything
Velveeta - is that even real food?

And the horrible meal from childhood? Stuffed peppers. My grandfather lived with us, and he did all the cooking - which meant everything pretty much tasted the same because he cooked it all at 350 for an hour, no matter what it was. It's still a running joke whenever I ask my mom a cooking-related question - it's 350 for an hour and that's all you need to know. She almost cried the night he baked (yes, baked) filet mignons that way.

Anyhoo - one time, he made stuffed peppers. It was the first time I'd ever had them and I liked them. My brother liked them. We saw them at least twice a week from then on - and it was harder and harder to get them down. Finally, we went to my mom and begged her to please talk to my grandfather (the peppers were really revolting at this point, but he thought he was being nice and we didn't want to hurt his feelings).

It's been 25 years since I last had stuffed peppers. The smell of them still makes me nauseous.

NancyMehl
05-14-2008, 08:53 AM
That was the rule of my house too, until my mom decided it would be fun to try serving breaded calf brain for dinner one night. She thought that if she didn't tell us what it was, we wouldn't recognize that it was completely disgusting.

I'm glad to say that we proved her wrong.

Oh, man. Flashback to something I'd forgotten.

Finding out that the meat my grandmother put in the scrambled eggs was brain.....

After we'd already eaten it!!!!! Ugh...

Nancy

DeleyanLee
05-14-2008, 04:56 PM
I swear, you might as well be offering me a dishwater, dirty sock, and dog crap casserole.

Yes!

My mother used to make "mincemeat squares" in which she would roll out pie dough on a cookie sheet, spoon out jarred mincemeat (no alterations, just straight out of the jar), cover the mess with another layer of pie dough and bake, then smear the top with icing.

She did this every year because my uncle once ate them the first year she was married to his brother. He was being nice, because he was a nice man. He suffered through her making this entire tray of mincemeat squares (and sending the uneaten portion home with him) every year for more than 30 years until he gleefully announced he was diabetic and couldn't partake of them anymore.

Honestly, it doesn't pay to be nice sometimes.

GeorgeK
05-15-2008, 03:43 AM
Oh, man. Flashback to something I'd forgotten.

Finding out that the meat my grandmother put in the scrambled eggs was brain.....

After we'd already eaten it!!!!! Ugh...

Nancy


If you already had eaten it you should have decided whether you liked it prior to knowing what it was. (That's a pet peeve...try it before you like it, or not like it.)

My grandmother made it too, but I was hungry a lot as a kid and my grandmother always had something to eat. I never went hungy when I was allowed to visit her. I have fond memories of brainy eggs. I think she called it something like "soft sausage".

CDarklock
05-15-2008, 05:04 AM
I often experiment with food. I once had this great idea that if peanut butter and chocolate were great together... what about peanut butter, chocolate, and MINT?

So I made a graham cracker crust, and melted a box of Andes mints in a double boiler. Then I carefully - oh, so carefully - poured concentric rings of mint to lead up the side of the crust. It was beautiful, like looking at the inside of a beveled Slinky. I made a basic pastry cream, added peanut butter, slowly filled the pie shell, and finished it off with a lovely hand-whipped cream topping. It took me about six hours.

That night, I happily presented this to my parents, sliced it for them, put it on plates, served it... and about four minutes later, threw the whole damn mess in the trash.

It was disgusting.

They've never let me forget it. Every time I bring something over for them to eat, they ask if it's a peanut butter mint pie. When we're talking about meal planning, they ask about how often I make my peanut butter mint pie. When I discuss having people over for dinner, they ask if I served peanut butter mint pie.

I just want to smack them.

Lyra Jean
05-15-2008, 09:01 AM
Coco Solo or another coconut flavored soda pop
Blue kool-aid
Ice

Mix soda pop and kool aid until you have carbonated kool-aid. Add ice. Drink.

Me and my friends made it. Coco Solo soda pop tastes and smells like suntan oil. So draw your own conclusions. Although one of my friends who is the pickiest eater I know loves this concoction so yeah.

Bartholomew
05-15-2008, 02:27 PM
Spend a few months in Africa with no money. You'll eat anything when you come back.

icerose
05-15-2008, 07:34 PM
For a while there it was tater tot caserole and spagetti, my mom had a severe stroke and was down for 3 months. Everyone and their dog would bring us tater tot caserole or spagetti. That was it. That was all we had for three freakin months! It took me ages to be able to eat those two dishes again. I wish I would have been older, I would have just taken over the cooking.

As for currently, it's a recipe my mother-in-law uses. We call it Crunchy Surprise! It has chicken, cashews, mustard, and grapes. It's an awful combination. Makes me absolutely ill.

Kitrianna
05-16-2008, 01:40 AM
Green bean casserole is the most vile concoction that I have EVER eaten, but my mom didn't make it.
My parents rule for us growing up was try a bite, if you don't like it, we'll make you some hotdogs. But I'm not saying my mom was a good cook or anything, I just never realized how bland the side dishes and casseroles were or how overcooked the meat always was until I started seriously cooking myself. Now I know better, but I will admit that I have altered some of her recipe ideas to suite my palate.

GeorgeK
05-23-2008, 11:16 PM
Velveeta - is that even real food?
.

I think of it as orange petroleum jelly

CatSlave
05-23-2008, 11:29 PM
My mother is a wonderful cook, but she really blew it once when I was a kid.

We had just moved to Florida, and my brothers and I brought home some catfish we had just caught. Mom had no idea what to do with them, so she tossed them in the pressure cooker.

Ewww!
Can you say "fish oatmeal?"

Kate Thornton
05-24-2008, 12:52 AM
My mom & dad grew up in the Depression, so you had to eat what was on the table at our house. Fortunately, my mom was a fair cook & my dad liked food plain & simple.

But some foods were For Adults Only and my brother & I were not allowed to eat them: coffee, squash, mushrooms, beets, lima beans, oysters - things kids don't like anyway, but we didn't know this. We just knew these fascinating delicacies were Off Limits to kids.

When we turned 16, we were allowed to eat Grown Up foods - what a treat it was! I still love them all to this day!

As for liver & onions, Jack's in Albany NY serves the absolute best - buttery soft and tender and worth every cent of a plane ticket to get there. I never cook it at home - I'm not that good a cook. Good liver needs a real chef.

We never had odd combos or casserole things - we usually ate meats prepared simply, vegetables raw or steamed (we always had sliced tomatoes on the table in the summer and "honeymoon salad" - lettuce alone - with vinaigrette or thousand island dressing) and potatoes of every style. Desserts were homemade pies and cakes and I didn't experience Jello until I took Home Ec in high school.

We had cornbread, too - my mom baked both kinds - and our favorite snack was a piece of leftover cornbread with butter.

I sure miss my folks when I think of our happy dinners.

DragonHeart
05-18-2009, 05:42 PM
I used to like seafood until the night my father decided to cook salmon. I have no idea what kind of sauce he used but the end result was bright orange and completely unpalatable. The mere thought of it makes me ill. His rule was always that I couldn't leave the table until I ate everything on my plate (he's also the one who filled the plate for me, so I didn't get a say in what I ended up with).

I think I ended up sitting at the table for over three hours staring at that cold disgusting mess before my mom took pity on me and made some oatmeal so I wouldn't go to bed hungry.

I swore off fish forever after that night. I occasionally feel a twinge of regret that I'm missing out on such a healthy food, especially something I once enjoyed, but not enough to make the attempt.

icerose
05-18-2009, 06:27 PM
Mine aren't weird like alot of yours are. My mom had been forced to eat liver and saurkraut when she was little and onion soup with whole quarter onions so she didn't torture us with those foods. Foods that I despise.

Saurkraut. I took a German speaking class. The teacher opened a can of Saurkraut and I almost lost everything in my stomach, though this is one food I have never actually eaten and never will.

Ravioli. My first and only experience with ravioli. It was for school lunch and it was still cold inside. Blech.

I had a really hard time with fried potatoes for a really long time because my dad wouldn't rinse the potatoes and he'd cook them on high. So it was black burnt and crunchy on the outside and green and gritty and full of starch on the inside.

Eggs, I've never been able to eat the runny yolk and one day my dad didn't cook it all the way through. I bit into it and it squirted in my mouth and it took me years and finally my own cooking to get me to even like the taste of eggs again.

ETA: Post trimmed, I've already participated in this thread.

brainstorm77
05-18-2009, 07:13 PM
Blood pudding.... need I say more... ugh! My dad loves it!

CatSlave
06-27-2009, 10:56 AM
You know the one. The one where the only way to avoid your mother making it was turning 18 and moving out of the house.

Mine is neck bones, sauerkraut, and potatoes. My mother would buy a bunch of beef neck bones and boil them with the kraut and potatoes. Oh, I hated, hated, HATED that mess! There was no way to avoid the sauerkraut; you couldn't pick it off the neck bones and set it on the plate because of the smaller, itty bitty pieces you could never get to. To this day, I've never had a Reuben or a hot dog New York-style, and the only pierogi I'll eat are cheese and potato.

What say you? Have a food nightmare to share?
Oh My Gawd.

I LOVE sauerkraut and potatoes with any kind of pork pieces or sausage.
Maybe it's my eastern European DNA showing.

That being said, I refuse to eat catfish made in a pressure cooker.

CatSlave
06-27-2009, 11:31 AM
My mom makes/made "ambrosia", which is Cool Whip, fruit cocktail, and coconut. Problem is fruit cocktail has peaches in it and I fargin' hate peaches. Never did like them, nectarines, apricots, or plums.
Tell her to make it with layers of thinly sliced peeled fresh oranges, squeeze the juice over, add a bit of powdered sugar and grated fresh coconut.*
Then add a couple shots of good bourbon and chill thoroughly.
You can garnish with a few maraschino cherries if you care for them.

Don't ever eat canned fruit cocktail.
It will give you brain damage and make your weenie limp.

*chunks of peeled, fresh coconut can be found in many grocery stores

tjwriter
07-01-2009, 12:15 AM
And "properly" in my book means they don't contain green beans, mushrooms, Velveeta, onions, or yams.

So I'll just take that bag of mini marshmallows, thank you. ;)

Responding to something older than dirt, but who the hell puts velveeta in green bean casserole or sweet potatoes?

BenPanced
07-07-2009, 05:45 AM
Tell her to make it with layers of thinly sliced peeled fresh oranges, squeeze the juice over, add a bit of powdered sugar and grated fresh coconut.*
Then add a couple shots of good bourbon and chill thoroughly.
You can garnish with a few maraschino cherries if you care for them.

Don't ever eat canned fruit cocktail.
It will give you brain damage and make your weenie limp.

*chunks of peeled, fresh coconut can be found in many grocery stores
Can I skip most of it and go straight to the bourbon?

ShebaJones
07-07-2009, 04:02 PM
I was pretty lucky that my grandma was a good cook, and also that I grew up having no idea what "spicy" actually meant. In that house, "spicy" was a little too much black pepper in the corn.

The only bad food growing up was steak. Yes, steak. Cooked until it was black outside, gray inside, and required an extra set of teeth and a thick layer of A-1 to chew it. Sirloin, ribeye, New York strip, didn't matter. I hated steak until one day, someone asked me how I wanted it cooked. I had no idea there was more than one way to cook it. In those rebellious first days, it was extra-rare. Now, I'm good with medium.

Personal taste hatreds are bell peppers (I can eat them under certain conditions; diced up, cooked well, on pizza) and organ meats (I dig braunschweiger anyway).

I will grub on just about anything otherwise.

benbradley
07-07-2009, 05:46 PM
I haven't read much of this thread, but.... my mother occasionally made soup, especially later in her life (when I at least didn't have to eat the whole bowl once I tasted it). She would used mostly canned vegetables.

Anyone who has ever looked at labels or knows anything about canned food knows how much salt is in canned foods - a lot.

So my mother puts all this in a huge pot, adds water, and ... yes, she adds salt. It's worse than a V8 (the drink, not the engine) as far as salt content, and yes, it's enough where you can outright taste it even if you're used to salt. I used to be "used to salt" many years ago on things like potato chips and regular V8, but having learned something about more healthy diets about 15 years ago (and that most people eat way too much salt and it's rare to get too little salt) I switched to low-sodium V8, and it's a very different taste, but I can more accurately gauge salt content in food now, and my threshold of "too much" is lower than it was decades ago. But mom's soup ALWAYS had too much salt.

Saint Fool
07-08-2009, 01:12 AM
For the most part, my mom was a great cook (and bread maker). But every once in a while she'd go "WHAT IF I TRIED THIS CRAZY."

Just so you know, a cup of wheat germ is not equal to a cup of bread crumbs. Her usually wonderful meatloaf was transformed into a meatbrick. She tried to transform it into something else, but nothing, not even stewing, changed the consistency.

stormie
07-08-2009, 03:47 AM
Lima beans. My mother was a great cook who learned Italian recipes from her mother who came from Italy. BUT macaroni (pasta) with lima beans--uh-uh. Hate those ugly little beans.

jodiodi
07-08-2009, 06:11 AM
Fortunately, my mother couldn't cook worth a damn so I started doing all the cooking when I was 8 years old. Besides, my mother was much more squeamish than I ever was when it came to food.

My daddy, however, cooked and on occasion he'd cook something (as a teenager during the Depression, he ate lots of crap) that I absolutely refused to eat. Souse is the only thing I can recall offhand. He had some of that and I refused to eat it.

Oh, and tripe. Nasty.

I don't like beets, mustard greens, turnips and turnip greens, collards--stuff like that.

However, I do like spinach. Go figure.

My husband's family eats stuff I refuse to touch: Chocolate Meat (it ain't chocolate), longanisa (stinks to high Heaven), bitter melon (or some such crap). I don't remember all of them.

I'm very particular about meat. If I can't identify it, I don't eat it. I'll eat vegetables, but not if they're seasoned with meat I can't identify. I refuse to eat anything swimming in liquid if I don't know what it is and I didn't cook it.

Sweetleaf
07-08-2009, 06:11 AM
Mine's mashed potatoes.

I HATE mashed potatoes! I escaped it for years, but now I have a husband and two kids that absolutely love it, so I relent and cook it for them sometimes.



But not often.
:)

brainstorm77
07-08-2009, 08:55 AM
I like mashed potatoes with lots of butter and finely chopped fresh chives.

brainstorm77
07-08-2009, 08:56 AM
Fortunately, my mother couldn't cook worth a damn so I started doing all the cooking when I was 8 years old. Besides, my mother was much more squeamish than I ever was when it came to food.

My daddy, however, cooked and on occasion he'd cook something (as a teenager during the Depression, he ate lots of crap) that I absolutely refused to eat. Souse is the only thing I can recall offhand. He had some of that and I refused to eat it.

Oh, and tripe. Nasty.

I don't like beets, mustard greens, turnips and turnip greens, collards--stuff like that.

However, I do like spinach. Go figure.

My husband's family eats stuff I refuse to touch: Chocolate Meat (it ain't chocolate), longanisa (stinks to high Heaven), bitter melon (or some such crap). I don't remember all of them.

I'm very particular about meat. If I can't identify it, I don't eat it. I'll eat vegetables, but not if they're seasoned with meat I can't identify. I refuse to eat anything swimming in liquid if I don't know what it is and I didn't cook it.

What's chocolate meat?

Sweetleaf
07-08-2009, 08:59 AM
I'll never forget a travel writer's description of trying durian fruit.

'It smells like shit, tastes like shit and looks like shit, unless you have the durian ice cream, which smells like shit, tastes like shit but looks like ice cream.'

:)

Devil Ledbetter
07-08-2009, 04:27 PM
Creamed chipped beef on toast. It looks like someone vomited.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2188/2275671254_c4a16dbc1d.jpg

She was usually a wonderful cook. But anything that looks like puke and makes toast soggy is out of the question for me.

RickN
07-08-2009, 04:50 PM
Can I skip most of it and go straight to the bourbon?

You want to be sure that it hasn't spoiled before you use it in food. Safety first, that's my motto!

RickN
07-08-2009, 04:55 PM
My father would make stuff for us kids on the weekends when mom had to work. he called it "Chuck Wagon Mac". Ground beef, macaroni, and some tomato sauce. Then, to be healthy, toss in a can of veggies from the pantry. If he chose corn, the combo wasn't bad. Green beans were just weird.

Depression story: My grandmother-in-law grew up in the Depression, so she was a miser in the 1990's. She thought chocolate chip cookie recipes had too many chips in them and wasted money, so when she made cookies it became some bizarre version of "Where's Waldo" to find the chocolate.

Devil Ledbetter
07-08-2009, 11:34 PM
Depression story: My grandmother-in-law grew up in the Depression, so she was a miser in the 1990's. She thought chocolate chip cookie recipes had too many chips in them and wasted money, so when she made cookies it became some bizarre version of "Where's Waldo" to find the chocolate.My grandma had the same issue. She also had very little sense of taste, which made her possibly the worst cook ever.

One time, she was asked to bring ham & cream cheese roll ups to a party. She show up with bologna & Miracle Whip roll ups.

tjwriter
07-09-2009, 12:16 AM
My grandmother was sort of like that too.

She used to watch my cousins, my brother and I for a few hours after school every day. During snack, my cousins are telling us that Teddy Grahams are good in milk like cereal.

So we all have our little bears in a bowl of milk like cereal. Everyone loved it except me. It was nasty and I refused to eat it. My parents had the rule that we had to try something, but if we didn't like it, we didn't have to eat it all. My grandmother has other ideas and refused to let me leave the table until I ate it.

I sat there alone at the table while the others played for two + hours until my parents got home because I would not eat that disgusting mess. Of course, I had hardheadedness down to a science as a toddler, so I was no match for anyone else.

AngelicaRJackson
07-09-2009, 04:37 AM
Liver, bacon and onions was one of the dishes my mom made that I liked as a child---but it was mostly the taste of the bacon and onions fried up together, and I tolerated the liver. And then I was diagnosed as anemic and she made it more often; it turns out it was a dish that was better only occasionally savored.

The worst thing she made was a tuna casserole made with mackerel instead of tuna (because we'd caught some mackerel on a fishing trip) that she tried to pass off. It was so greasy and strong-flavored, but she refused to throw it out. I ate cold cereal for the next few days that it took her to eat the leftovers. And she loves pork ribs cooked in sauerkraut (we're Polish on her side) and that stuff stinks up the house to high heaven.

She also ruined spinach and squash for me for many years; cooked them into oblivion, and then served the spinach swimming in vinegar. Now I like them and grow them myself. But my husband doesn't like squash much so I have to sneak it into things.

Oh, and when I went vegetarian as a teenager, she would order the "meat lovers" pizza and tell me to pick off the sausages. Never mind that it was flooded with orange grease an inch thick---but she has apologized for not respecting my choices on that one.

Pagey's_Girl
07-09-2009, 04:48 AM
Anything my father got in his head to cook, but especially his chili. Meat, grease and a can of tomatoes for color. Worse, when he cooked, you had to eat whatever it was and make a good show of pretending to like it, otherwise he'd get his feelings hurt, throw a tantrum, then not speak to you for a month.

Yeah, I sometimes wonder if he's the real reason I've sworn off on relationships, much less marriage....

ETA - If my mom cooks something inedible, it's either an honest screwup or a bad recipe. She knows what she's doing. :) When I screw up, it's usually because I forgot what I was doing - again. Forty-five minute egg, anyone?

K. Taylor
07-09-2009, 07:07 PM
My dad made peanut butter and jelly sandwiches with butter on the slices of bread first. EWWW. He also cooked steaks until they were gray inside. I don't know why, as he doesn't order them that way! It was hell only chewing with one side while I waited for adult molars to come in.

Hate lima beans. Thankfully, my mother only made me try them once.
I only eat peas in raw pea pods.
Can't eat watermelon anymore. OD'd on it as a kid. Almost did that with olives, too, but my like of them came back after avoiding them for a while.
My grandmother loved liver, so I got to smell it every time we went out of dinner at a casual restaurant. Never made me try it, though.
Hate the smell of pork and sauerkraut. My boyfriend LOVES it.
Can't stand anything with anise seed in it.
HATE refried beans. and cucumbers and cabbage and radishes. School lunch food!