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BrynnaC
05-02-2008, 10:39 PM
Anyone know any Gaelic phrases I can incorporate in my novel? My characters are Irish.

johnnysannie
05-02-2008, 10:43 PM
I know quite a few. It would help if you narrowed it down to what kind of phrases!

Post or PM me and I'll help where I can.

Menyanthana
09-10-2008, 03:34 PM
Gaelic can mean Scottish or Irish Gaelic, ist that correct?

I need some Irish (Gaelic) phrases: One term of endearment a grandmother would use for her grandchild, and a word she would use when she's angry with the child. (An insult which is only used for children)

Edit: I could need some curses, too. Everything one would remember his grandma saying, even if he doesn't speak one word gaelic. ;)

Carmy
09-10-2008, 07:21 PM
Yes, but there are differences between Irish and Scottish Gaelic.

waylander
09-10-2008, 11:32 PM
Gaelic can mean Scottish or Irish Gaelic, ist that correct?

I need some Irish (Gaelic) phrases: One term of endearment a grandmother would use for her grandchild, and a word she would use when she's angry with the child. (An insult which is only used for children)

Edit: I could need some curses, too. Everything one would remember his grandma saying, even if he doesn't speak one word gaelic. ;)

bábóg for the term of endearment
buachaill dána (bold boy) if the child is boy and she is angry with him.
cailín dána if the child is a girl

Menyanthana
09-12-2008, 01:22 AM
Thank you very much!

What does "bábóg" mean literally?

Edit: Could one also use "A leanbh", or is this only for adults/lovers?
(Since it already means child I am not sure if it can be a term of endearment used for children)

waylander
09-12-2008, 02:41 AM
Thank you very much!

What does "bábóg" mean literally?

Edit: Could one also use "A leanbh", or is this only for adults/lovers?
(Since it already means child I am not sure if it can be a term of endearment used for children)

bábóg means baby
Yes, you could use a leanbh.
It rather depends on where in Ireland your speakers come from.

ReallyRong
09-12-2008, 03:07 AM
The only one that I remember my Irish gran teaching me (not sure of spelling, so I'll do phonetic) was "pogue ma hone". It means "kiss my ***". Not sure if that helps, but it used to make me laugh when I was a kid.

Menyanthana
09-12-2008, 12:31 PM
The only one that I remember my Irish gran teaching me (not sure of spelling, so I'll do phonetic) was "pogue ma hone". It means "kiss my ***". Not sure if that helps, but it used to make me laugh when I was a kid.


That is the only Irish curse I knew...I thought an elderly lady wouldn't say that, or at least not if a child is present...:D
However, if Irish grandmothers do say it, I think I can use it.


As a term of endearment, "A Stóirín (ah store-een) – My little darling." sounds nice, too.

What are the regional differences? Where is "a leanbh" used?

waylander
09-12-2008, 01:36 PM
The major regional differences are between the Cork/Kerry dialect and the Donegal dialect.
A leanbh is more a Donegal phrase

Branwyn
09-15-2008, 04:08 AM
http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/

JimmyB27
09-15-2008, 03:26 PM
The only one that I remember my Irish gran teaching me (not sure of spelling, so I'll do phonetic) was "pogue ma hone". It means "kiss my ***". Not sure if that helps, but it used to make me laugh when I was a kid.
So the band that did 'Fairytale of New York' with Kirsty MacColl was called 'The Kisses'?

euclid
09-25-2008, 12:27 AM
bábóg means baby
Yes, you could use a leanbh.
It rather depends on where in Ireland your speakers come from.

My Irish is a bit rusty, but I'm pretty sure Babog (with the 2 fadas (accents)) means DOLL.

Leanbh (pronounced leean-iv) Means "a child".
"a leanbh" would be used when addressing a child. It mean "Oh child" or I suppose, in modern parlance, "my child".

I've been trying to remember some appropriate phrases, but have come up dry so far.