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A.M. Wildman
05-02-2008, 06:13 PM
Ever go to a restaurant which serves such fantastic dinner rolls that by the time your entree has arrived your table has polished off the bread basket?

Ever looked at the server with that "I haven't eaten in a month, pity me look" hoping they'll bring you more of those delicious hot, rolls?

Ever hid the wrapper of your bakery/store bought rolls and stressed all through dinner hoping your mother-in-law wouldn't notice?

Have you wished you could make rolls like that? Now you can.

What I'm about to share with you may get me stoned. (Not that way :tongue) Or at least not invited to any more family dinners.

This recipe has been in my family for generations with only one minor change. They are a little bit of work and time but I guarantee they'll blow your friends and family away.

Restaurant Quality American Ice Box Rolls

You'll need one small and two large mixing bowls and an area big enough to knead the dough.

Ingredients:

1 c. Boiling water
1/2 c. sugar
1 tbsp. salt
1/2 c. Crisco Butter
1 c. cold water
1/4 c. lukewarm water
2 pkg. dry yeast
1 tsp. sugar
2 eggs beaten
8 c. flourIn the large bowl combine boiling water, sugar, salt, crisco butter and stir well. Set the cup of cold water to the side for the moment.

Yeast Mixture

1/4 c. lukewarm water
2 pkg. dry yeast
1 tsp. sugarAdd yeast mixture to smaller bowl stir briskly just until blended.

Add cold water to first bowl. Stir well. Dump yeast mixture into first bowl stir well, add the 2 beaten eggs and stir until mixed.

Stir in 4 cups of flour until thoroughly mixed. Add remaing cups of flour 1 cup at a time until thoroughly mixed.

Turn dough out onto floured board or work surface and knead approximately 20 times. Place kneaded dough into a greased bowl. Cover and place in refrigerator overnight.

When ready to use the next day. Remove from the fridge, punch the dough down, knead approximately 20 times on floured work area.

Pull off and shape into rolls. Cover and allow to rise in warm room for 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

Bake at 350 degrees until brown. Makes approximately 2 dozen rolls.

*Rolls allowed to rise but not baked can be frozen for later use.



Enjoy.:)

L M Ashton
05-02-2008, 06:36 PM
It looks like a good recipe. I like that you use the low-knead method. *nods approvingly*

I think I might try to figure out a sourdough version of this and see how it is. I'm looking for good bread recipes. :)

Thanks for sharing! But, you know, a thought just occurred to me... I highly doubt this exact recipe for generations. Crisco butter has only been around for, what, fifteen years? Maybe twenty? :tongue

A.M. Wildman
05-02-2008, 06:38 PM
It looks like a good recipe. I like that you use the low-knead method. *nods approvingly*

I think I might try to figure out a sourdough version of this and see how it is. I'm looking for good bread recipes. :)

Thanks for sharing! But, you know, a thought just occurred to me... I highly doubt this exact recipe for generations. Crisco butter has only been around for, what, fifteen years? Maybe twenty? :tongue

You are correct. I should have stated that was a recent addition. It's the only thing that's changed in the recipe since my grandmother passed it to my mother, then my sister and now me.

L M Ashton
05-02-2008, 06:39 PM
What was it before it was Crisco Butter? That might help me decide what to substitute... :)

A.M. Wildman
05-02-2008, 06:40 PM
What was it before it was Crisco Butter? That might help me decide what to substitute... :)

home made butter from the churn.

L M Ashton
05-02-2008, 06:41 PM
*drools*

kikazaru
05-05-2008, 05:29 AM
Thanks for posting that. I just copied it down and I'm going to make it when my pants fit a bit better - I just have no self control when it comes to home made breads.

Shadow_Ferret
05-05-2008, 06:20 PM
Can I make that in my bread machine? I have no clue how to knead bread.

L M Ashton
05-06-2008, 05:45 AM
Shadow Ferret, go to my no-knead & low-knead thread and follow the links to other techniques so you don't have to knead. :)

Pthom
05-06-2008, 09:36 AM
Crisco, flavored or plain, is pure vegetable shortening. Butter is milk fat, and contains about 20% water (according to Alton Brown and to this discussion (http://wiki.answers.com/Q/If_a_cream_cheese_cookie_recipe_calls_for_butter-flavored_Crisco_can_you_use_real_butter_instead).

Before I learned this, I always wondered why the recipes I where I exchanged one for the other didn't perform as expected. If you have a successful recipe using Crisco (or other veg. shortening) and want to substitute butter, adjust the liquid elsewhere in the recipe, or the results may be disappointing. Of course, the reverse is also true.

Personally, if I want butter flavor, I'll use butter, thank you (the unsalted kind--I like to control the salt in my food). I have never tasted artificial butter flavoring that didn't somehow seem, um, poisonous. Or at least not anywhere close to good for me.

Woof
05-06-2008, 05:04 PM
Alas, there is no substitute for the taste of real butter. I use it sparingly because I'd rather avoid animal fat whenever I can. Still, the truth is you can't make a decent omelette or bake a chocolate cake with extra virgin olive oil. And what's the deal with "extra virgin" anyway? Isn't that like being "a little bit pregnant" ?

kikazaru
05-07-2008, 06:44 AM
Can I make that in my bread machine? I have no clue how to knead bread.

You would have to halve the recipe I would think since most bread machines have a smaller capacity than the 8 cups of flour required here.

You would also have to tweak it a bit since bread machines rely on rapid rise yeast and this recipe uses traditional which requires "proofing" in water and sugar. In the machine you would add the yeast to the flour, not the liquid. Some machines also require you to not allow your salt to touch your yeast if so, you would adjust for that.

Then you would have to set it to the dough cycle and remove it to refrigerate. A long slow, cool rise is most likely also beneficial to the texture of these buns.