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nybx4life
04-30-2008, 05:32 AM
I'm not sure if all you guys here just decided: My life's calling is to be a writer!

So what I wanna know is, what made you start?

Was it due to anybody you know? Possibly a favorite book of yours?

Silver King
04-30-2008, 05:37 AM
These are all excellent questions that are better suited to the Roundtable forum, so we'll see what the folks there have to say.

coneflower2001
04-30-2008, 05:44 AM
Actually I've always wanted to write, but when I was in high school I let my family influence me. The whole "You'll starve" really did something to my self esteem. Now I'm 37 and I almost died of a thyroid storm. Well, In that moment I said, Wait, I have so much to say. I had to search deep inside and realized I needed to start writing again. Once I started, I just couldn't stop. Am I saying anything important, not really just stories. But I gave birth to them.

nybx4life
04-30-2008, 05:45 AM
Wow, well, since you went, let me go:
It's kinda stupid, but let me say it.

Before, in elementary school, I kinda liked writing. In 7th grade, I wrote a "pretty decent" short story.

But what really made me come all the way here, and try to get published, was a bet.
See, my friend was reading this romance novel which had vampires in it. I think the name of the book was [I]Twilight[I].
I told him that I could write a story as good as that any day, and he challenged me to do so. If I got published and became a New York Times Bestseller, I got to make fun of him in my acknowledgements (I tried to keep it friendly)
If I didn't make it though, I'd have to pay for his game membership to World of Warcraft for a year , about $90.

But yeah, that's how it started, and why my first novel got vampires in it:D

Claudia Gray
04-30-2008, 06:16 AM
I always enjoyed making up stories and writing them down, but for a very long time it never occurred to me to really try and do it professionally. I wish I could say precisely why it changed, but I'm still not sure. Eventually I simply set my mind to it. If not now, when, right?

ishtar'sgate
04-30-2008, 06:17 AM
I'm not sure if all you guys here just decided: My life's calling is to be a writer!

So what I wanna know is, what made you start?

Was it due to anybody you know? Possibly a favorite book of yours?
As far back as I can remember I loved to tell stories. I was also a voracious reader. When you put those two things together I guess you just naturally get a writer!
Linnea

nybx4life
04-30-2008, 06:19 AM
I always enjoyed making up stories and writing them down, but for a very long time it never occurred to me to really try and do it professionally. I wish I could say precisely why it changed, but I'm still not sure. Eventually I simply set my mind to it. If not now, when, right?


Practically the same as mine.
Except I never wrote them down:Shrug:

Beyondian
04-30-2008, 06:48 AM
I was always telling stories to my little brothers, and my favorite way to put myself to sleep is still to try to unknot a difficult plot problem. Ten-one I'll fall asleep at the most interesting part...
I dabbled in writing when I was young, but I got put off when my parents thought I was only doing so to copy my older brother (also a writer... though he has since rather dropped his novel). I was always trying to emulate him, and wile what they were trying to say was that it was okay for me to do my own thing, the comment did nothing for my self esteem.
After that, my next foray into the world of writing was a short story competition in my early teens. I got an honorable mention. I then played around with short stories for a few years before settling down and writing my first novel. I don't know _why_, it seemed like a good idea at the time.
Since then, I've become an addict. I carry a notepad wherever I go, and I just can't stop!
But looking back, I think I've always looked at things and tried to see the story behind them. It was just waiting to get out.

Riley
04-30-2008, 07:11 AM
I have absolutely, positively no idea.

Between the ages of 4-6, I wrote (not funny) funny plays. I don't know why I wrote them and I don't know why I moved on to poetry.

Moved on from poetry to novels and then decided I wanted to win a Pulitzer. Had the acceptance speech written out and everything. Are you even required to give a speech for a Pulitzer?

Started short stories, articles, poetry, novels, and everything else in between and realized that, while I had no idea why I started, what was important was why I continued: I wanted people to see and feel the things I did. I wanted to tell a story and entertain people. And maybe get famous. But mostly just tell a story. Hey, why are you laughing?

Zelenka
04-30-2008, 07:24 AM
I've been writing at least as far back as late primary school, like 9 or 10 years old. I don't know what started me initially. I'm an only child and lived in a different village to everyone else at my school, so had to find ways to occupy myself, I suppose. Then I read 'Lord of the Rings' when I was 10 and was bitten by the fantasy bug, and wanted to create a world like Middle-earth. I used to make up notebooks and folders' worth of stuff about this world and ended up writing lots of short stories, then finally a novel when I was about 17ish. My WIP now is a totally different universe but there are still some elements of the old world in there.

I realised I wanted to write seriously when I was in high school, probably first or second year (sort of 12 to 13 years old) but I do remember thinking I would need a money-making career too.

OK, so 15 years later I'm no further on than I was then, but hey, still trying...

jannawrites
04-30-2008, 07:30 AM
Writing (and English composition) was something at which I always excelled in school, and it was always an interest teetering somewhere in my mind, but I never really thought about it being my life's passion. I DO remember my mom always, always told me, "You should be a writer." Then after I got married, when I started looking to the future and deciphering what my "purpose" was, writing became a clear part of the picture.

Lyra Jean
04-30-2008, 07:36 AM
I didn't really start writing until my first year of college but I've always wanted to write. My home life was not conducive for me to do or succeed at much of anything and I'll leave it as that.

I read the "Little House on the Prairie" series. I had most of it memorized although not verbatim. I could relate it to any conversation I had with any one person. Laura wrote so that children would know what it was like for her to grow up along with America.

I felt my voice wasn't being heard. Although I do not write memoirs or biographical work. I'm a speculative writer I figured my voice was still being heard. So yeah I lot of it stemmed from my growing up years and being treated as if my opinion was of no consequence and it didn't matter what I thought.

kct webber
04-30-2008, 08:10 AM
I wrote my first creative nonfic essay when I was 6; I still have it. It sucked, of course, but I loved doing it. I wrote off and on as a hobby from then until I was about 21. Then I started a short story that was inspired by a really freaky dream that my brother had. That short story evolved into a novel.

What made me realize it was what I wanted to "do" was the fact that it was the only thing that I had ever done where I hadn't asked, "Why the hell am I doing this?" To date, every other job I've had has brought that question--but never writing.

sheadakota
04-30-2008, 04:01 PM
When I was 15, I had read TLOTR for the first time- I was mesmerized. When I found out how little Tolkien wrote, I was crushed. I scoured the book stores, lingering in the fantasy isle looking for something comparable. When I couldn't, i decided "I can do that!' Yeah- right-

Anyway, after writing a very bad fantasy book- I started a thriller a few years later- now thats pretty much all I write- So blame it on Tolkien, I guess.

Dommo
04-30-2008, 04:28 PM
Hollywood movies with unrealistic physics.

No that's just the engineer talking :P. I really got into writing because I'm an idea machine. Like I always have ideas constantly churning in my head(I'm always tapped for designing RPG campaigns for friends and such), and over time this gradually devolved into me having to write stories for the backdrop.

This led me to investigating fanfiction as a means of practicing campaigns(since some of them take place in pre-existing universes, although most of my campaigns are one off jobs). And that's where I currently am. I write some fan fiction, but I also am starting to write a lot more short stories, and am beginning to outline a novel.

Hopefully, assuming I can keep my self motivated this summer I'll make some progress on all of my different writing projects.

Straka
04-30-2008, 04:37 PM
I remember loving telling stories as a kid and getting people's attention. I remember dressing up in this uniform jumpsuit and telling my neighbor I was actually in the army. At the time I thought she believe me and what a sucker she was. More specifically I recall reading books and being annoyed or inspired by their endings. So I started doing short stories and fantasy when I was around age 10. In middle school I did more fan fiction work. High school I started several novels but did not push myself until my friend told me it was writing book. Whatever it was competitive jealousy or whatever, I sat down and spent the next 3 years working on it.

Its all been down hill from there ;-)

gettingby
04-30-2008, 04:54 PM
I needed a job.

DamaNegra
04-30-2008, 05:09 PM
What made me start writing?

A man. Pointing a gun at my head. Write you &&%#/$&#.

JamieFord
04-30-2008, 05:24 PM
Inspiration from a bunch of books that I read when I was younger, that oddly enough, aren't all that inspiring anymore.

Also, my degree is in art & design. I ended up working in advertising as an art director, pimping my creativity for my clients. Writing became a creative outlet that I could call my own.

ACEnders
04-30-2008, 05:35 PM
I don't know...I"ve just always had a pen in my hand. A blank sheet of paper is a beautiful thing to me and always has been. I've always been writing.

WendyNYC
04-30-2008, 05:42 PM
Writing (and English composition) was something at which I always excelled in school, and it was always an interest teetering somewhere in my mind, but I never really thought about it being my life's passion. I DO remember my mom always, always told me, "You should be a writer." Then after I got married, when I started looking to the future and deciphering what my "purpose" was, writing became a clear part of the picture.

Pretty much the same as Janna. Of course, now that I'm actually writing, my mother keeps saying "See? I TOLD you that you should be a writer!" as if it's all her doing.

But what started me actually putting my B in the C was the fact that my youngest kid started kindergarten this year, and I suddenly had free time on my hands. Hmmm...go back to work? Still a possibility. But for now, I'm writing during the day.

eveningstar
04-30-2008, 06:07 PM
Lifelong love of books combined with all these people and places and things that live in my head. I figure it is much better for my mental health to have them live on paper.

Namatu
04-30-2008, 06:14 PM
I don't remember. I used to type out stories when I was five? six? I don't know what compelled me. As I grew older, my teachers always exclaimed over how well I wrote. I never put too much stock into it myself. It was easy. I didn't read other students' work so I didn't know how different my writing was from theirs (until my senior year of hs). I kept writing though, until shortly after high school. Something made me stop and pull into myself. I think it was a word of discouragement that wasn't even that bad, but I was apparently feeling sensitive. ;) A few years later, I realized that the language easily at my fingertips was no longer so accessible, and it pissed me off, so I started writing again in protest. I still don't know why I write stories, but they show up so I let them out.

nybx4life
04-30-2008, 06:28 PM
Wow, for some reason, it's kinda the same with everybody here (well, except me and one other guy)

We love books, we try to make our own.
Even though we're far from being greatest writers of our time, we still try, and I guess that works well enough.

Shadow_Ferret
04-30-2008, 07:33 PM
I don't know. But I'd like to go back in time and choke the shit out of whatever it was.

mscelina
04-30-2008, 07:39 PM
For me? Writing was cheaper than buying books, and it entertained me for longer. (translation--I read too quickly and too much)

jennontheisland
04-30-2008, 07:51 PM
I'm not sure what started it but I remember trying to come up with pen names when I was about 12 or 13. I think the desire has always been there, but I stuck to writing scenes and really short stories.

I started writing longer shorts and a novel when I was laid off from work, but had to sit in my office for 8 hours a day to wait out the time until my last day. I worked at a sawmill, and the mill was shut down; there was nothing else to do.

slcboston
04-30-2008, 07:53 PM
I've ALWAYS been writing, even in elementary school. I don't know why, it's just something I've always done, always enjoyed.

I also used to illustrate my own stories - thankfully for the viewing public at large, I've given that aspect of it up. :D

Wrathman
04-30-2008, 09:02 PM
Like others here, I'll blame Tolkien. There seemed to be so many more stories that needed to be told from Middel Earth, so I decided to try and tell them. Who knew his son would eventually steal my idea and get rich from it?

LOL!

Little Earthquake
04-30-2008, 09:15 PM
I love to read, and ever since I was young - around 9 or 10 - I've been writing stories. First, I copied appropriated the books I read - we will not discuss the historical romances I attempted to write after reading Gone with the Wind. In fact, I'd have to say it was Gone with the Wind that first planted the seed in my heart that I could be a writer. Later on, I wrote stories of adolescent heartache to heal my ... adolescent heartache! I stopped writing through college and returned to it right after my divorce because I missed it so much. I love creating characters, getting into their heads, developing their histories, and thinking up situations and relationships to toss them into. Writing is a way to give voice to all the "what ifs" in my head.

That's why I write fiction. I write creative non-fiction because I'm a mighty damn opinionated person and the world NEEDS to know my point of view. And if you folks would just apply my wisdom to your lives, you'd be as screwed up successful and happy as I am.

Plus, apparently I'm kind of good at this writing thing. I'm not even as good a graphic designer as I am a writer, and I GET PAID to design. I figure at some point I ought to get paid to do what I REALLY enjoy.

Another early literary influence: In 7th grade, my English teacher presented a long curriculum on reading and writing poetry. I blame her for all the terrible love poems I created as a teenager. (Um, and as an adult, too. At least I know enough not to share them, now!)

C.bronco
04-30-2008, 09:26 PM
As soon as I could write, I was writing stories. I'd go back and forth between that and drawing.

I blame my parents. They made me like this.
:D

James81
04-30-2008, 09:48 PM
I've been writing ever since I could pick up a pen. As a kid, I used to write all kinds of goofy things. This one time, I wrote a tiny "jokebook" on four index cards and then REWROTE it about 30 times and took it into school the next day and handed it out to every kid in class. Most of them loved it and thought it was pretty cool. lol

After that, I started to write short stories and "sequels" to movies. My most "famous" works were about Freddy Kruger, and I wrote about 4 different Home Alone sequels (as plays) that my friends all got a kick out of.

In 7th grade, I sat down with a 100 pages spiral notebook and banged out my first novel--all over 80 pages, with 20 chapters. It was my only "finished" work, that I never did anything with beyond finishing it.

In 11th grade, I wrote a paper in English class. The teacher came back to me after grading it and handed it to me personally. She said these words to me (which I will never forget):

"You have one of the best minds in my class, but you have one problem." And then, in big red words she scribbled the words "LAZY" across my paper. Something about that really "inspired" me.

In 12th grade I took College English, which basically consisted of writing papers all semester. My teacher LOVED my writing, and on one of them she wrote "You could be the next Andy Rooney!" (I had no idea who the hell that was at the time, but it was pretty cool)

I also went through a bint in my freshman year of college where I thought I could write poetry--that really wasn't poetry at all and was more prose than anything.

After High School, I lost the writing bug for a few years. In 2003, I picked it up again and started writing another novel in another notebook. I got about 60 pages of it done before I got sidetracked and never finished it.

Just last year, I started a blog. On it I began to recount all of the things that made my marriage fail (since then I've deleted it) and I got readers out of the woodwork who came along and told me how good my writing was. Up until that point, I never really considered myself a "writer", but it was sometime during that blogging experience that I realized that I wanted so desperately to be a published writer and to make a living (at least part time) writing.

This month, I've gotten further than I ever have with finishing a first draft novel. I'm almost at 50K words in my own NaNoWriMo and I hope to finish the story sometime next month.

What got me into writing? I really have no idea which of those experiences got me into it. I write because it's what I've always done and it makes my life complete. I write because I don't know what it's like NOT to write. I write because I love the craft and I love to read and want to create stories of my own.

inthecards
04-30-2008, 10:02 PM
I get paid to create in my day job but mostly strategy, architecture and almost all visually communicated. Took a sabbatical, cleared my brain and realized that I wanted to pour some of my energy into written words and see what happens.

Now I want to be a full time writer so come on literary agents, pick me up!

virtue_summer
04-30-2008, 10:25 PM
I don't know if I can name something specific. My dad used to read to my brother and I every night before we went to sleep when we were little and I loved that. I loved stories and I guess I figured out that there were these people called writers who got to create them, so by the time I was five I was telling my mom I was going to be a writer when I grew up. It just made sense to me. I had all of these stories in my head all the time so what was more natural than putting them on paper when I learned how to write?

C.M.C.
04-30-2008, 10:35 PM
I started writing my first non-academic story at the behest of a friend who thought that I had the requisite talents for the project. My novel started the same way, which says something about me, although I don't know what just yet.

Daehota
04-30-2008, 10:52 PM
When I was taught to read, I swear it was more like remembering how instead of learning how. Like I was born with the language already waiting there for me. I read and read and read. In 5th grade I wrote a play, Addams Familyish with my own cast of characters and plot. My teacher was so impressed she allowed me to produce it. Anything that got me out of a week's worth of class seemed like a good thing at the time.

I won essay contests and wrote bad poetry in my teen years and then life sort of interrupted for about a hundred years. Now I have a little free time and I badly needed a creative outlet, so naturally I returned to where I should have been all along...right here, BIC, cussing at the screen.

I must say things are both more confusing for today's writer and yet so much easier with the advent of the Internet. The ability to communicate with others like me is invaluable when I get discouraged or when I need a little help with a wip problem.

HeronW
04-30-2008, 10:52 PM
I loved to read and I think writing came naturally from that. I'd seen what other authors had to say, now it's my turn. Horror essays with 4th grade vocabulary words were fun!

jannawrites
04-30-2008, 10:57 PM
Yeah, I didn't think to mention it in my earlier post. I've always loved reading - I remember whining and complaining at a young age that I so badly wanted to be able to read, and I couldn't wait to learn - and I do think that can lead well into a love of writing for most.

Judg
04-30-2008, 11:23 PM
I always loved to read and from an early age, I had a manuscript going in my head. Heck, I would insert dialogue tags in my memories...

But I am easily distracted and had a busy life and suffered from the idea that I had nothing to say worth saying. Still, when we got our first computer I looked at it and thought, "Book machine."

So it niggled away at me. I made a few half-hearted attempts, but I'm not a good juggler and life was throwing too many balls at me.

Now I have no more excuses, so I sat down and discovered that a novel-length plot does not have to spring fully mature from my brain, but can be developed one step at a time. That I can get the same joy from crafting a story that I once did from writing a song. And I may or may not have a talent and a voice for the ages, but neither do a lot of people who get published, so why not? ;) In other words, I no longer lay the burden of greatness upon myself, which kept me intimidated for so many years. Good will be just fine. If greatness shows up, I won't chase it away, but it doesn't have to.

Okay, I'm shutting up now.

inkkognito
04-30-2008, 11:56 PM
At the age of three I remember walking around our basement and telling myself stories about our pet cat (in my toddler mind, I had elevated him to Super Fluffy, feline superhero). I wove elaborate stories with my building blocks. Once I got older and realized that writing could be a profession, there was no question that I'd do it someday. It amazed me that some other people hated to write! I remember in 5th grade a classmate was looking through my composition book and noticed that all my grades were perfect. He showed at around like it was something freaky, and all I could think was, "What's weird about that? Writing is FUN! How can you not get an A?"

My favorite "toy" was a typewriter, and I remember pounding out all sorts of tales about a racehorse and his cat friend. Sure wish I had saved them!

An old high school friend recently got back in touch with me, and she said that in her yearbook I had signed "Future great psychologist and famous writer." I had forgotten all about that but it made me happy that I am indeed a counselor and writer...I dunno about the "great" and "famous" parts, but I like to think that the 17 year old who wrote those words would be happy with who I am today.

nybx4life
05-01-2008, 02:52 AM
Wow, that's crazy.
I think before I wrote, I used to think of fan fic to some of my cartoons.
Some were almost fully thought out, others I couldn't get my mind to work enough on it.

A few here tried fan fic.
Anybody tried posting it somewhere, or sharing it to someone?

Nyna
05-01-2008, 05:46 AM
When I was really little -- four or five, tops -- we had this old computer (well, I suppose it wasn't old then) and on this computer we had a word program designed for little kids, with the huge lines with a dotted one through the middle and a little voice that would read out everything we typed in. I loved that thing -- I wrote so many stories on it that my Dad told me I had to delete a couple because they were taking up too much space.

This was, incidentally, how I taught myself to spell -- I'd type a word I wasn't sure about in and then let the computer read it out, and then change it until it sounded right. Which actually wasn't a bad way to learn, all things considered.

Anyway. I started writing stories when I learned how to write, started writing poetry when I was eight, and never slowed down. I like to think that the quality-to-drek ratio is improving with time, and hope it will continue to do so.

Fanatic Rat
05-01-2008, 06:04 AM
I read a lot and found that writing was really the only art I could express myself effectively (can't draw or dance worth anything, and I'm completely tone-deaf), which is why I want to be good at it so badly.

Summonere
05-01-2008, 06:39 AM
What made you start writing?


Money, groupies, boredom, dissatisfaction, cocaine, booze, crash, rehab, resurgence, victory, tragic accident.

Oh, and a propensity to lie.

mirrorkisses
05-01-2008, 06:54 AM
I started writing when I was around 8.
My teacher assigned us to cut pictures out of magazines and write a story. My first story was "the day the dogs took over," inspired by a dog food ad.
I kept writing ever since that day, because it was really fun.... It was the first time I found something that I really wanted to do when I grew up (not just a passing whim).

My parents really encouraged me and read all of my stories (usually about 20 pages, single-spaced). I didn't do a lot of writing in my teen years, and during college I didn't get to do it a lot because I was distracted by school. But I wrote my first novel at 19 (awful) and now I'm writing my second. I'm 27 now.

nybx4life
05-01-2008, 07:15 AM
I started writing when I was around 8.
My teacher assigned us to cut pictures out of magazines and write a story. My first story was "the day the dogs took over," inspired by a dog food ad.
I kept writing ever since that day, because it was really fun.... It was the first time I found something that I really wanted to do when I grew up (not just a passing whim).

My parents really encouraged me and read all of my stories (usually about 20 pages, single-spaced). I didn't do a lot of writing in my teen years, and during college I didn't get to do it a lot because I was distracted by school. But I wrote my first novel at 19 (awful) and now I'm writing my second. I'm 27 now.

9 years since your first?
Hope it turns out great:D

mirrorkisses
05-01-2008, 08:04 AM
I attempted a second (so technically this would be my third), but I didn't see it going anywhere. But yes, during college (which I was in for 7 years) I didn't find too much time to write fiction. I was doing a lot of reading, though, and a lot of being clinically depressed. I think depression is a pre-req for writing.

Elodie-Caroline
05-01-2008, 11:45 AM
I was writing ghost stories at the age of just 7. In my early teens, I was writing love stories that got passed around the school for all the girls to read. I had made up my mind that I wanted to be a writer when I was 12 yrs old.
However, life got in the way. I was working hard and playing hard too, I didn't have time to write and didn't have the inclination. To be honest, I forgot that I wanted to be a writer.

Anyone who knows me, knows I have a very big thing for the French actor, Jean Reno. I love his films because he's in them, but a lot of them are crap and he isn't always the main star. So I decided to start writing the kinds of things I would personally like to see him star in instead.

I could get him an Oscar with my stories, cuz he certainly ain't going to get one with the things he does do :D


Elodie

JimmyB27
05-01-2008, 01:32 PM
It was the men with guns. They keep me in a basement and make me write stories for them. I never wanted to write! I always wanted to be an accountant. I try to do sums when they aren't looking, but they always find my working and beat me for it.
They let me have Internet access when I told them I needed to research my stories. I tried to join an accountant's forum first, but they quickly latched on to that, and have now blocked any sum based content. They didn't block porn, but those aren't the sort of figures I'm interested in!

Okay, so most of that's not true. In reality, I've always made up stories. I never really played sport, most of the games I played as a kid were imaginative play. My friends and I would be cowboys, or spacemen or whatever. My primary school ran a creative writing competition every year, and I always looked forward to it, but never won. :( I still fondly remember the story of Sammy the Swallow and his migration south for the winter, though. :) I entered his story twice, once under the theme of animals, and once under the theme of travel. If I ever get an urge to write a children's story, I'll bring him back again.
It wasn't until university that I got the idea into my head that I could take my stories seriously, and actually write with the goal of being published. I don't really know what precipitated it, I think the characters in my head just got tired of being ignored.

swvaughn
05-01-2008, 05:09 PM
The Neverending Story.

I wanted to make people feel the way Bastien did . . . the idea that a book could suck someone in that thoroughly was just amazing to me, and made me think, "I want to do that!"

Note: I am not quite so crazy that I believe my stories will literally come to life and spit out flying luck dragons that can be used to get revenge on bullies . . . I am speaking figuratively here. :D

bumblebee
05-01-2008, 09:50 PM
I had to fill out a job application so I had to start writing.

nybx4life
05-01-2008, 10:53 PM
I had to fill out a job application so I had to start writing.

For real?
Dang, what job are YOU doing?

johnnygirl
05-01-2008, 11:17 PM
Sure, I'll go...

I've written for as long as I can remember but I never thought I could finish a novel. I guess it was my own insecurity that drug me away from writing because I thought I was wasting my time. When you're a young wife and mom, if what you're doing isn't making money or feeding anyone, it's probably a waste of time...

That was my mindset for years...until a little over a year ago. I finally realized that my life was not all that fulfilling. Yeah, I have the great husband and kids that so many don't ever get, but that's not really enough. Every day, we were scraping by financially, year after year, spending unfortunate amounts of time at jobs we didn't really like that left very little time for the things in our lives that we loved.

So, I had an epiphany...I recognized that unike so many people out there, there was something that I was good at that gave me a lot of joy...and to boot, I could potentially make a living doing it. In a way, I felt like it was my only option to break out of this mundane 9-5 (who am I kidding? more like 6-11) life and turn it into something that not only paid the bills but made me proud!

I didn't let go of that drive until I finished my first novel, and now that I know I can do it, I don't think I'll ever stop. (I'm currently writing book #3...) Maybe it'll take 20 years to get published, or maybe I'll never get published, but at least I can say I tried...

darrtwish
05-02-2008, 12:15 AM
My grandmother is the reason I write. Although it was my parents that introduced me to reading at like 1 1/2 - 2 yrs old, my grandma was the one who sat me down with a pencil and paper at about 3 or 4 years old and told me to write my stories out that I would normally just dictate out loud to her. She's always been my inspiration for my writing, and is pretty much who I write for because she saw something more then just a little kid telling stories off the top of her head.

MadScientistMatt
05-02-2008, 02:17 AM
I watched "The Fast and the Furious" and thought, "I could write a better story than that!" So I got started writing one. It was a car movie but kind of a spoof of the "inspiration." But at some point I realized that I had no idea how to format a screenplay and I'd spent so much time that many of the car culture things I lampooned were way out of date.

So that half-finished screenplay is now abandoned, but I've kept writing.

nybx4life
05-02-2008, 02:24 AM
Sure, I'll go...

I've written for as long as I can remember but I never thought I could finish a novel. I guess it was my own insecurity that drug me away from writing because I thought I was wasting my time. When you're a young wife and mom, if what you're doing isn't making money or feeding anyone, it's probably a waste of time...

That was my mindset for years...until a little over a year ago. I finally realized that my life was not all that fulfilling. Yeah, I have the great husband and kids that so many don't ever get, but that's not really enough. Every day, we were scraping by financially, year after year, spending unfortunate amounts of time at jobs we didn't really like that left very little time for the things in our lives that we loved.

So, I had an epiphany...I recognized that unike so many people out there, there was something that I was good at that gave me a lot of joy...and to boot, I could potentially make a living doing it. In a way, I felt like it was my only option to break out of this mundane 9-5 (who am I kidding? more like 6-11) life and turn it into something that not only paid the bills but made me proud!

I didn't let go of that drive until I finished my first novel, and now that I know I can do it, I don't think I'll ever stop. (I'm currently writing book #3...) Maybe it'll take 20 years to get published, or maybe I'll never get published, but at least I can say I tried...

Hey, but when you tried to get it published after you finished your novel, you'd never expected it to be like this, huh?

But don't quit, I'm sure that you'll make it. Never too late to try:D

vfury
05-02-2008, 04:16 AM
I read an Enid Blyton book when I was eight. Apparently, I got it into my head that this writing thing could be interesting. My mother gave me three weeks, and I can safely say that I proved her wrong. ;)

I loved reading growing up and that bled into English being my favourite subject at school. I took this obsession into college with me, kept on writing, and never looked back.

Reckoner
05-02-2008, 09:16 AM
A fifth-grade project in which we all had to write a tall tale.

What I turned in was this: four handwritten pages detailing the adventures of John Bean, a tiny man of superhuman strength who was orphaned to the Canadian wilderness (because that's all Canada is when you're ten and foreign to it). He befriended a carnivorous butterfly (ah! the infamous Canadian fauna!), and tree-by-tree the two friends deforested the whole region to find John's way out.

I'm still awaiting the call from the Nobel Committee.

nybx4life
05-07-2008, 02:38 AM
Bump this back up.
I need more people to tell me their beginnings

petronella63
05-07-2008, 11:59 PM
I've always had stories running through my head, but it wasn't until I was in my teens I started writing the stories down.

Actually, I began with a comic strip type series - guess they're called graphic novels nowadays - about a group of young people who got whisked off to this alien space station from where they could go anywhere in space and time. I drew and wrote those comics for many years.

In my late twenties I discovered The Lord Of The Rings, and like numerous other people set about writing and rewriting and rewriting a fantasy in the same vein. I even sent the finished manuscript off to Del Rey. Foolish I know, but those were the days when things/the rules in publishing were less strict - I did get the manuscript back with a handwritten letter saying they had accepted a similar work just before mine. Never tried to place it anywhere else - not that there was anywhere else in those days. In a terrible occasion of bad luck the manuscript, all my handdrawn comic books, and many family pictures were all lost during a move, and never found again.

Sort of gave up on writing at that point, but took it up again about five years ago. So far I've finished one novel, am almost finished the first draft of another, got still another two-thirds done, and am a quarter of the way into yet another one. Hoo boy, I'm writing more than I thought considering I write in spurts and bursts.

Kitrianna
05-08-2008, 01:19 AM
I always liked writing since I was around 7 or 8. I used to get in trouble with my teachers for my short stories being too long because I just couldn't help myself. Then I started working on a project in high school with my best friend. Schwinny and I wrote half of a novel together before graduation (although he always told me I was the better writer, but I thought that he was pretty good!). When I met my husband, he got ahold of it and read it (the hubs HATES reading btw) and was mad at me for not finishing...so for 9 years he bugged and bugged and bugged for me to start writing again. Finally one day, I found myself really upset (can't remember why and it doesn't matter anymore), so I found comfort in venting through the typed word again. The rest...well that's both history and the future. Now hubs continues to bug, but it's for more to read. Wait a minute, that bugger is still bugging me to write...store bought bread and tap water for his dinner tonight!

DWSTXS
05-08-2008, 01:40 AM
I've wanted to write since I was in the 3rd grade. What made me finally sit down and WRITE, was, I got divorced 2 years ago. Went into depression. Decided I had to 'save' myself from going nutso, so, I sat down and started writing.
Now, I have finished novel no. 1 (Blue-Eyed Son) and starting on novel no. 2 (Ousobouris), and have no. 3 planned also (Marsalien)

now, the depression is coming back because I'm heavily into re-write #2 on Blue-Eyed Son. (Not really. about the depression. but still. you know?)

I seriously feel like writing has saved my life, in a way.

nybx4life
05-08-2008, 01:56 AM
I seriously feel like writing has saved my life, in a way.


Well, that's a first I've seen in this thread.
I hope your writing is one of a masterpiece:D

DWSTXS
05-08-2008, 01:59 AM
Well, that's a first I've seen in this thread.
I hope your writing is one of a masterpiece:D

I'm trying!

HourglassMemory
05-08-2008, 02:37 AM
I remember being in school one day and I saw my friend writing his own story, something eh'd been working on for a long time.
I was 13 at teh time and I remember looking at him and thinking "If a book was to be written by me, what would it have?"
And then I started thinking of all the things I always wanted to see in stories but never did.
And then I just felt like writing it down.
It was rubish, obviously. I just put my main carachter watering hsi plants and finding this cool bug and living in nice little comfortable village. And I would just go on random little facts about the MC.
I say it's rubish because I actually have the papers and yes, it is rubish. I just feel like smacking my younger self in the face thinking that what I wrote was entertaining. It isn't.

I'm still working on that story. And I WILL finish it. It's a story I think should be out there. And the writing has improved a million times.

Hillary
05-08-2008, 02:46 AM
I have always been fascinated by the English language. I talk a LOT.

I can't recall what made me put the two together, but the "omg" moment came when my mother called me a writer. I was over the moon. My mother? Saying I'm a writer? Oh my friggin' GOD. Yeah, it took me several days to recover from that.

After that, it's just been a matter of being brave enough to share work. Which my boyfriend is actively trying to urge me to do.

Combined, the two of them will let my inner writer become brave enough to try to write for the public. They rock.

Esopha
05-08-2008, 02:54 AM
I haven't actually posted the entire story yet, but I think you'd all enjoy it.

At 6 years old I wrote my first-ever story for Highlights called "Princess Sophie and the Best Thanksgiving Ever." It was a startling, though-provoking fantasy story about mud fights, turkey and a dragon named Daisy. It was rejected.

In fourth grade, at age 9, my teacher told me she hoped to see one of my books on the shelf one day. I thought she was being silly.

At eleven I discovered Erma Bombeck, who was an amazingly funny woman. I bought all her books and read them religiously. I also met a close friend of mine at eleven. She started up an exchange journal where we would write a few pages of fanfiction and then exchange to continue the story. That's the first time I was every writing regularly.

At fifteen I read Terry Pratchett. It. Was. Awesome. I decided I could make people laugh and make people think while telling a great story, just like Erma Bombeck and Terry Pratchett did. So I did Nanowrimo.

Ever since then I've been writing regularly and enjoying myself quite a bit. :)

gypsyscarlett
05-15-2008, 07:27 PM
I just picked up a pen and started writing stories when I was about six or seven. I came from a book-loving family. So creating my own stories seemed natural.
Then an older cousin bought me a childrens typewriter (a typewriter! remember those things? :) And I was off....

Yasaibatake
05-16-2008, 01:40 AM
My mom took me to the library every day since they brought me home from the hospital. (okay, not really, but pretty close!) When I was just shy of turning 3, I announced that I wanted to read a book to her. She assumed I had memorized the story until my dad came home with a brand new book for me. (The Five Chinese Brothers - still have it!) I hadn't read it before, so, to prove I knew how to read, I read it aloud to both my parents. Perfectly. It's still their favorite story to tell about my childhood.

In the second grade, I got a diary for Christmas and promptly filled it with some terrible Power Rangers fanfiction. (still have that too. I'm just a packrat) The next year, American Girl magazine ran a fiction contest. I was thrilled with the idea of seeing my words in a magazine! My story had to do with a unicorn who had somehow lost her horn, which I thought was fantastic, but I never heard back from them. I was devestated that they never sent me a rejection letter, so I could be "just like a real writer".

I continued reading and making up stories until the ninth grade, when my English teacher gave us an assignment to write a long lost chapter of the Odyssey. I turned in a 20 page chapter about Odysseus fighting a dragon (complete with riddle battle, just like in The Hobbit.) Two weeks later, he gave them back - except mine. After class, I asked for it, and he said, "I just wanted to let you know, this is the best chapter I've ever read. I couldn't put it down." Encouraged, I asked him to read a poem I had written the day before. He read it carefully, then told me to stick to prose and threw my poem away.

Being stubborn, I wrote nothing but poetry for the next four years. Slowly, various influences convinced me to give up poetry too. It wasn't until last August, when I enrolled in a class called "Literature and Culture", taught by one Prof. Erik McCarthy, that I even considered picking up my pen again. Though Prof. McCarthy's tastes couldn't be much further from my own, he was clearly passionate about literature, and by the end of the semester, his passion had re-ignited my own. It's been downhill ever since :D.
I have to add that I managed to luck into another fantastic teacher this semester: Prof. David Davis, who teaches "Literature of Science Fiction". He was a major source of inspiration and confidence-building (which explains why everything I've written in the last two months was sci fi) and helped me send out a grand total of five subs this semester. He also helped me get over being rejected five times (with letters this time, at least!) But I started work on my next short story last night....so now you know who to blame! :)

Kalyke
05-16-2008, 01:57 AM
I was plunged into writing term pages and such and I got stoked on non fiction writing. I then went to school and got a degree in "Professional Writing" which is a funny sort of everything degree. I took a few fiction writing classes at college and fell in love with fiction writing.

Before all that, in High School, I mainly did the visual arts but I was a big reader, won a poetry prize or two in a statewide competition, and wrote a lot of poetry and little paragraphs about life. In grammar school I was reading 12th grade level in the 4th grade, but I could barely spell, and couldn't put sentences together. Too independent, I think.

When I think of it, I decided to become a writer in my 20s when I read Stephan King's "The Stand." I wanted to write Horror, so a lot of my early stuff was really cruel. I'd never show it now. I like really subtle scary stuff, man's inhumanity to man and all sorts of real/ possible things. They clutch my heart strings more than creature features.

I ignored the urge to become a writer because my favorite thing was art. I worked from 20 to 30 as a sculptor of huge bronze and fiberglas dinosaurs. A picture of my work is in Encarta. I traveled all around the globe. It was exciting. When that ended (the company folded) I was depressed for a long time because I was now 30 and had no job skills other than making giant dinosaurs (try to put that on a resume and see how far it will get you). I went back to college and that is where the first paragraph happened.

Presently, after many years of trial and error I have finally found an "original" book in me and writing it is no sweat.

CDarklock
05-16-2008, 02:54 AM
You're lucky. I got a two-year degree in occult science. That's a funny sort of nothing degree. If I got a master's, I could teach it. That's... about all I can do with it.

It's also an applied science degree. That cracks me up.

I started writing because I read Harriet the Spy and just fell in love with the idea of being a writer. I even carried composition books around for years and wrote in them just like Harriet did.

stormie
05-16-2008, 03:16 AM
Sure, I wrote jokes at the age of six, many poems as a teen, even two short stories. But I put all of those aside. Until--

About eight years ago, two things happened: One, I was upset by all the building of large homes on small sites where there once was a hundred-acre farm. I sat down at the computer and wrote a short story about it. The next week I came home from church and wrote an essay about a certain experience I had there. One of my sisters happened to read those writings and told me I was good. (When I was growing up, we were a family of people who discussed vocabulary, grammar, and books at the dinner table.) This certain sister wouldn't tell you something was good if it wasn't. That did it for me.

Zodiea
05-16-2008, 04:45 AM
I ran out of things to do on the internet one day and opened up a word processor and started talking crazy. A couple weeks later I had a fourty-two page story on a fantasy world. That was in grade/middle school. Looking back, it's a little odd because I remember that I hated reading.

Then quite a while after I made a friend who wanted to be a writer. Sometime around then I un-earthed my old story. I laughed at my pathetic effort, but then remembered how much fun it was.

Now here I am playing around with the same concept from back then, along with a hundred new ideas, patching it up, and telling myself to write it. The characters and themes have matured since my first attempt, I promise! ;) Those who come from book loving families are lucky. My dad is a roofer -- that says it all -- and my mom isn't that literate. That isn't to say she isn't smart, but I'm been asked to spell 'because' and others I take for granted quite a few times. Her spelling chaos 'kayos' always tickles me the most.

tehuti88
05-16-2008, 05:00 PM
I've written for as long as I can remember, but as for a definitive moment, at age eleven I was pestering my father in the kitchen and he told me to go write a story. So I left for a while, came back with a note tablet half filled up, and he exclaimed, "I told you to write a STORY, not a NOVEL!"

That story spawned a sequel, then another sequel, then another, and the rest is history.

To this day I still write unending series.

Manat
05-17-2008, 03:07 AM
I only started writing three years ago, but I've been a voracious reader of just about anything, since I first discovered the bookmobile in grade one. The first books I remember reading were The Black Stallion books by Walter Farley, and Tarzan by Edgar Rice Burroughs, after finding it in a box in the basement. Over the years I've spent hours at a time telling myself stories "in my head" sometimes at work "oops." I did do well at creative writing in school but didn't think about writing a book until two serendipitous occurrences. I had a chance to take a nice buy out a work, and my daughter gave me a beautiful leather bound blank book. About a month after I left work I was sitting on the beach doodling and telling myself a story and though...why not write it down in this book? Now it's coming out in November. I wish I started sooner but better late than never. Other than the crappy pay, uncertainty, and lack of health benefits,I love my work.