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gettingby
04-30-2008, 03:44 AM
Four form rejections in one day! I hate those DEAR AUTHOR letters. My name is not Author! I have a name. I have an important book! When will the publishing world stop shunning me? OK, this is nothing more than a rant. I just never had so many of those stupid form letters show up in my inbox at the same time.

stormie
04-30-2008, 03:56 AM
Ouch! Yeah, it's hard, isn't it? But think of it this way, Author (Sorry, I just had to!)--it means you're ahead of the game. You're sending stuff out. Many don't. They say, "Oh, um, yeah, I'll get to it. I'm just not ready to." Sending our babies out into the cruel world of getting published is nerve wracking. But trust me, it's worth it.

xiaotien
04-30-2008, 04:00 AM
i actually started liking them more than
the personalized ones. i didn't have to agonize
over the two sentence personal note which
probably meant nothing but i was trying to make
something of them.

send out more queries! good luck!

soleary
04-30-2008, 04:05 AM
When I interviewed for my first job, I sent out 100 cover letters with my resume. It was the olden days (AKA late 80s), so I couldn't even email them. I would get several rejections a day, which I posted on the door to my bedroom. Before I would tape them up, however, I wrote comments and corrected grammar. Dissing the rejections was cathartic. You can write in your real name with gusto, and put in your commentary re: why they passed (i.e., because of their short-sided thinking, lack of judgement, etc.). Good luck!
P.S. I ended up getting my dream job, and all worked out well. It will for you, too!
P.S.2 Remember all who sent the form letters, and thank all who sent them in your foreword when you get published!!!

kct webber
04-30-2008, 10:00 AM
I plan to papier-mache myself a coffin with the form rejections. The personal ones are going on the headstone.

ACEnders
04-30-2008, 05:22 PM
I hate the form rejections too. I hate that they are just so busy and important that they can't take two seconds to type out a quick, personalized rejection letter. It makes me wonder if they actually even read the query letter.

gettingby
04-30-2008, 06:05 PM
ACEnders - I wonder the same thing. I mean, come on. When an agents form letter says it's not right for him/her and you've read something like an interview where the agent describes the type of projects they're looking for and you think, 'hey, that's my book,' what do they mean it's not a good fit for them? I have gotten requests from bigger agents than some of these form letter rejections senders. That puzzles me.

Karen Duvall
04-30-2008, 07:04 PM
ACEnders - I wonder the same thing. I mean, come on. When an agents form letter says it's not right for him/her and you've read something like an interview where the agent describes the type of projects they're looking for and you think, 'hey, that's my book,' what do they mean it's not a good fit for them? I have gotten requests from bigger agents than some of these form letter rejections senders. That puzzles me.

Gettingby, that shouldn't puzzle you at all. It makes perfect sense when you think about it. How many times have you picked a book up off the shelf and read the back cover blurb and said, "Ah, yes. This sounds great! Just what I'm looking for." Only to start reading it and find out, well, maybe not. Something about it didn't click for you. You couldn't connect with the characters, the style of writing got under your skin, the plot didn't take you where you thought it would... That's what happens to agents, too, when they read our manuscripts. It sounded good from the query, it's a genre they represent and enjoy, they have clients who've written similar books, but you know what? They're not "feeling the love." They can't represent a book they feel luke warm about. Perfectly natural and expected.

gettingby
04-30-2008, 07:11 PM
Karen - I am talking about form rejections to queries!!!

gettingby
04-30-2008, 07:13 PM
And I do think there might be times when agents or assistants just send out form letters without reading the query.

Karen Duvall
04-30-2008, 07:20 PM
Karen - I am talking about form rejections to queries!!!

Ah! Well, the same thing applies. Just based on the hook in your query can tell them if it's a good fit for what they like. For a good example, and some explanations as to why these forms say what they do, visit Query Shark (http://queryshark.blogspot.com/). I think you'll find your answer there.

What I don't get, not that it matters (and it's actually kind of funny), are the form rejections that say say something like, "We read the pages we requested, but unfortunately, we didn't like it as much as we had hoped." Or something like that. This is a form reject in response to a query. Pages? What pages? Or if there were pages, they weren't requested ones but were sent to comply with their submission guidelines. :Shrug:

Karen Duvall
04-30-2008, 07:23 PM
And I do think there might be times when agents or assistants just send out form letters without reading the query.

Now THAT I have to agree with. I can understand the not fitting part. But if they claim to be actively building their list, why not at least read the queries?

gettingby
04-30-2008, 07:25 PM
But my query is good, really good. My query is not the problem.

stormie
04-30-2008, 07:25 PM
Maybe they do read the queries, but pluck any ol' form letter from the pile and mail it out.

gettingby
04-30-2008, 07:26 PM
Form letters are the problem.

stormie
04-30-2008, 07:28 PM
Funny, but in the beginning I used to save every. single. rejection. Why, I have no idea, esp. when most were (and yeah, still are) form rejections.

Karen Duvall
04-30-2008, 07:30 PM
Regardless, Get, any time 4 rejections arrive on the same day just SUCKS! It makes you feel crappy... temporarily. One man's junk is another man's treasure, so they say. This is such a subjective business. I remember a rejection I got within about an hour of emailing the query that told me I should google urban fantasy because I obviously didn't know what it was. Now I'd have taken a form rejection over that response any old day.

Bourgeois Nerd
04-30-2008, 09:51 PM
It's funny that this form letter stuff is being discussed because I just got MY OWN QUERY back with an ink-written note jotted on the bottom - "thanks but no thanks, we'll pass" and the agent's initials! I found that as jarring and upsetting as you found the form letters, Getting By. I was actually expecting a form letter! Heh. :)

What's up with getting YOUR OWN QUERY back? Has that ever happened to anyone?

Karen Duvall
04-30-2008, 09:58 PM
What's up with getting YOUR OWN QUERY back? Has that ever happened to anyone?

Oh, yeah. Many times. My favorite is the red stamp on my returned query letter that says "NO THANKS." LOL! Alrighty, then. But I do like the agents who handwrite a personal note on the query letter before returning it. Those are pretty special.

gettingby
04-30-2008, 11:58 PM
Bourgeois - Could you please give my that agents info? I would like to apply for the job of freelance form rejection letter writer. It looks like they could use someone.

Bourgeois Nerd
05-01-2008, 12:11 AM
Bourgeois - Could you please give my that agents info? I would like to apply for the job of freelance form rejection letter writer. It looks like they could use someone.

It sounds like you're being sarcastic but I'd love to tell you who this is as I posted the same complaint in another forum about agents. It was Artists and Artisans. The agent was Jamie Brenner.

So I take it this is a pretty insulting way to be dealt with? I certainly took it this way. I can handle being rejected and it's just ironic Get, that I expected a form letter and was even more disappointed to get this slap in the face. Seriously folks, I hadn't bargained on getting my own query letter back. That's not going to be standard practice, right?

I can expect to get the form rejection letter back or just not hear at all despite sending an SASE? I would love to have the latter happen than to see my own query kicked backed at me. Ouch!

:rant::Soapbox:

C.M. Daniels
05-04-2008, 10:33 PM
Eh, I just stuff them in my rejection letter portfolio and move on, though I do have to admit, the language in them can be funny sometimes, because they're blanket replies.

steveg144
05-05-2008, 03:24 AM
Ugh,yeah. Four form rejections in one day is a personal "best" for me also. It goes down hard. You have my sympathies. Courage!

steveg144
05-05-2008, 03:26 AM
Funny, but in the beginning I used to save every. single. rejection. Why, I have no idea, esp. when most were (and yeah, still are) form rejections.

Yeah, I got a big bull clip and hung it on my corkboard and clipped the rejections to it. Eventually the number of rejections got too big to fit into the clip,and I stopped doing it.

achromy
05-07-2008, 05:45 PM
My name is Adam Chromy and I am the President of Artists and Artisans Inc. and I have the privilege of working with Jamie Brenner.

Jamie loves books and any author lucky enough to be represented by her has an agent who is professional, intelligent and enthusiastic about the written word and the publishing industry.

And she is merely following the company policy when she sends back queries with notes on the query letter in the SASE. We do that to save paper and time.

We are a FOR profit company and not some philanthropy dedicated to the mission of helping frustrated writers feel good about themselves as we let them down easy and aesthetically with fancy rejection letters.

We have a business imperative and a fiduciary responsibility to pursue the best interest of our clients. And we read queries with self interest on the look out for new clients. The systems works for us as we regularly find new clients. We also offer advice to authors whose queries we like, speak at conferences and reach out in other ways to help aspiring writers and potential future clients.

So to judge an agent or agency based on how they choose to reject the thousands of queries they receive a month I think is misguided. It's energy that could be better spent trying to create material (the query and the writing queried about) that agents and by extension publishers would benefit from taking notice.

Good luck.
Adam Chromy