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View Full Version : Gay stereotypes (for satire)



Parkinsonsd
04-26-2008, 12:25 AM
I'm looking for things that a guy would do and you would point at him and say "he's gay". I've got "Cried watching Brokeback Mountain", "Loves Lipstick Mafia" and a few others.

slcboston
04-26-2008, 12:37 AM
Compliments any woman on her shoes when they aren't six inch stilettos and all she's wearing. :D

Haggis
04-26-2008, 12:44 AM
Compliments any woman on her shoes when they aren't six inch stilettos and all she's wearing. :D

*ding...ding...ding...*

And we have a winner.

mscelina
04-26-2008, 12:45 AM
*rolls eyes*

CDarklock
04-26-2008, 12:49 AM
Shoes. Shoes, shoes, shoes.

I was out with some friends. One of them brought a female friend we didn't already know. That new friend and I were hitting it off very well. The friend who brought her poked me and said "I brought her for [Bob]". (Not his real name.) I looked at her and said "[Bob]'s gay." She refused to believe it.

So I turned to [Bob] and said "Hey, nice shoes." He immediately got up from the bar, posed his leg so we could see the shoe better, and spoke at great length about where he got them and how much they cost and how he was sure they wouldn't be his size, then eventually wound up with a story about how happy he was to find this belt that matched them perfectly at a different store.

When he finally sat down, my friend looked at me and said "You're right, he's gay."

Stereotypes become stereotypes for a reason. There are a lot of gay men out there who don't fit them, but there are also a lot who do. No straight man cares that much about his shoes.

Well, okay, some do. I mean, I have these fantastic harness boots, right? Great oil-treated black leather, some heel but not Cuban, and they just feel amazing. Plus they've got that whole "who's your daddy" vibe going on.

What? No, no, of course not. I haven't been to a gay bar in months.

slcboston
04-26-2008, 12:55 AM
Well, okay, some do. I mean, I have these fantastic harness boots, right? Great oil-treated black leather, some heel but not Cuban, and they just feel amazing. Plus they've got that whole "who's your daddy" vibe going on.

What? No, no, of course not. I haven't been to a gay bar in months.

Only months? :D

CDarklock
04-26-2008, 12:59 AM
Well, you know, I was just in the mood to have a few.

Wait. That didn't come out right.

slcboston
04-26-2008, 01:13 AM
Might be best to quit now while you're behind. :)

Just fly the rainbow flag and be done with it. :D

slcboston
04-26-2008, 01:16 AM
And in an attempt to bring this thread back to topic - the "flounce."

You know what I mean. It's not a "strut." That's Travolta and the Bee Gees (who, despite the skin-tight white outfits and ultra-high voices were not gay... I don't think. :Shrug:). It's...

Well, it's the blond guy from "Queer Eye." Watch him move. No straight man moves that way. :)

althrasher
04-26-2008, 01:40 AM
It's all in the walk. Watch people when they walk and move--lots of times gay guys will have a much higher sense of the space around them. (Not always, of course, but often.)

Autodidact
04-26-2008, 01:43 AM
IMO gay men have small butts.

Fenika
04-26-2008, 02:06 AM
Throws a fit when you hide his expensive shampoo (apparently my sister did this to a roommate and found it hilarious)

:)

chevbrock
04-26-2008, 05:22 AM
They check out the same guys you do.

Shwebb
04-27-2008, 03:30 AM
I know this might sound really weird, but I've had occasion to notice that many gay men I've met seem to adore "Designing Women" and even more, "The Golden Girls" reruns. I have no idea why.

A friend of mine and I were talking about gay stereotypes a few years ago; she's a very feminine lesbian and was married to a rather more masculine woman. We were laughing about how odds are that if a man loves to shop as much as we do, works as a florist, interior designer or clothing designer, and has an effeminate tone to his voice, odds are that he is gay.

(I will qualify this, though--I was acquainted with a man who did have many of these qualities and is as hetero as they come. He was having a bit of a problem in his marriage, so he and his wife went to counseling separately and together. The counselor tried to convince him he was gay and that that was why he and his wife weren't getting along. Anyway--I'll end the derail, now.)

Rabe
04-27-2008, 08:27 AM
Listen to Cher.

A lot.

Also Bette, Judy, Madge (yeah, calling her 'madge' rather than Madonna), Mariah, Beyonce and a few others.

Though, quite frankly, not exactly a "he's gotta be because of the Cher thing" as an exact point, but any man that loves Cher's music is automatically assumed to be gay. No matter what else goes on.

Me? I lust Cher and like her music. And when I've gone to concerts, I've always seemed to have the same pattern - Lesbians to the right of me, bikers to the left of me and gays to the front of me! Not to mention all the straight people that were there as well.

(the best is when I was near a grandmother who got talked into going to the show by her six year old granddaughter).

Oh, another thing? Dances well.

Apparently the gene to dance well is also on the same gene to be gay. For guys. This seems to work in reverse for the lesbians I've known.

Rabe...

Lyra Jean
04-27-2008, 09:39 AM
Dancing Queen. They love the song Dancing Queen.

dpaterso
04-27-2008, 12:08 PM
Never uses soap on a rope.

Took me all of 2 minutes to get that one when I heard it.

-Derek

aonarach
04-27-2008, 10:50 PM
does not live with a woman but always puts the toilet seat down. i noticed this at several homes of gay (male) friends. oh, and the bathroom is immaculate.

MadScientistMatt
04-28-2008, 12:23 AM
Reads fashion magazines for the clothes instead of for ogling the women.

My brother's roommate his freshman year in college did this, and put up his favorite clippings out of the magazines and used them to decorate the dorm room. The roommate swore up and down he was straight, convinced everyone he wasn't really gay, but (for this and several other reasons) got the nickname "The most flaming straight guy on campus." The next year he'd dropped out of that school, moved to San Francisco and started working at a trendy clothes shop, and came out of the closet.

Rabe
04-28-2008, 04:28 AM
Reads fashion magazines for the clothes instead of for ogling the women.

My brother's roommate his freshman year in college did this, and put up his favorite clippings out of the magazines and used them to decorate the dorm room. The roommate swore up and down he was straight, convinced everyone he wasn't really gay, but (for this and several other reasons) got the nickname "The most flaming straight guy on campus." The next year he'd dropped out of that school, moved to San Francisco and started working at a trendy clothes shop, and came out of the closet.

Is the reverse of this then that they read men's fitness magazines for the pictures and not the articles?

((of course, a lot of the articles would be right up a gay man's alley - food, fashion and the like))

Though this post reminds me that a friend who's brother is gay referred to me as the 'gayest straight man I've ever met'. Seeing as how we dated for a bit, and knew how straight I am, I took it as a compliment.

Rabe...

plunderpuss
04-30-2008, 01:36 PM
- Complimenting women on clothes (not just shoes!)
- Flinging their wrist when they gesture
- Doing the black-lady-head-thing when they get upset
- Walking effeminiately (someone pointed out a flounce, but there's also the graceful supermodel walk too)
- Taking a long time to do their hair
- A lithp in thpeech lisp in speech
- Really well dressed
- Cooing over cute animals and/or having a lapdog
- Supernaturally good looking (I cannot count the number of times I've heard a woman say, "Dammit, he's too cute to be straight")

Hope that helps :)

HeronW
04-30-2008, 02:36 PM
Talks about going to a bear club.

jennifer75
05-01-2008, 11:57 PM
And in an attempt to bring this thread back to topic - the "flounce."

You know what I mean. It's not a "strut." That's Travolta and the Bee Gees (who, despite the skin-tight white outfits and ultra-high voices were not gay... I don't think. :Shrug:). It's...

Well, it's the blond guy from "Queer Eye." Watch him move. No straight man moves that way. :)

I saw this "non-strut" just the other day and quickly identified him as a gay man. I saw him again this morning walking, in the same "non-strut" holding a book with his forearms. Yes, the inner side of his forearms pressed together holding a book in place. It confirmed his gayness.

MacAllister
05-02-2008, 12:04 AM
I'm deeply curious as to what kind of "satire" you plan to do next. Women too stupid to know how to park a car? Black people eating fried chicken and watermelon? Native Americans saying "ugh!" and "How!"? Gosh, won't that be fun!

rhymegirl
05-02-2008, 12:19 AM
I don't really like these stereotypes.

My son is gay and you would not be able to tell by any of the above listed attributes. He doesn't notice women's shoes, he wears jeans and regular t-shirts and actually doesn't care that much about clothes in general. He's not super-neat.

Parkinsonsd
05-23-2008, 05:18 PM
I'm deeply curious as to what kind of "satire" you plan to do next. Women too stupid to know how to park a car? Black people eating fried chicken and watermelon? Native Americans saying "ugh!" and "How!"? Gosh, won't that be fun!


All great ideas, of course, and if I use any of them, I'll make sure I give you full credit.

C.bronco
05-23-2008, 05:22 PM
I know a lot of straight men who can give good advice on decorating and fashion. There really aren't any exclusive traits for the gay men that I know except "romantically prefers men to women."

dobiwon
05-23-2008, 05:48 PM
I'm deeply curious as to what kind of "satire" you plan to do next. Women too stupid to know how to park a car? Black people eating fried chicken and watermelon? Native Americans saying "ugh!" and "How!"? Gosh, won't that be fun!My thoughts, too. These kinds of things lend themselves not so much to satire as to ridicule.

Medievalist
05-23-2008, 05:56 PM
I'm deeply curious as to what kind of "satire" you plan to do next. Women too stupid to know how to park a car? Black people eating fried chicken and watermelon? Native Americans saying "ugh!" and "How!"? Gosh, won't that be fun!


All great ideas, of course, and if I use any of them, I'll make sure I give you full credit.

You've completely missed MacAllister's point -- which was these stereotypes are not funny, and not at all appropriate for "satire".

rugcat
05-23-2008, 07:48 PM
How about this, which a gay friend of mine did:

Took bike trip up the California coast to Oregon with two straight friends, eventually moved to Alaska because of his love of the outdoors.

hlwriter
05-23-2008, 08:15 PM
How about : I am a six foot two lesbian driver of eighteen wheelers. Cross the damn country in my rig. I wear checkered shirts have bow legs, dip, spit and wear pink pumps. I also beat the crap out of men on a regular basis.

Rabe
05-24-2008, 08:41 PM
You've completely missed MacAllister's point -- which was these stereotypes are not funny, and not at all appropriate for "satire".

Of course not. Never, at all.

Except. Well, when it's done right and shows the stupidity of such ideas.

Imagine, if you will, a movie wherein a classically trained actor - best known for playing a starship captain - plays what is a typically stereotypically gay man, complete with 'swishing'. His character is even a *gasp* interior decorator! He lives with a boytoy that is a *gasp* chorus boy in a very famous feline oriented Broadway show. Who is even MORE stereotypical than the interior decorator.

And yet, through the 'satire' of these characters we are given to see the strength and humanity of gay men - much more so than through the main characters and the main plot wherein the main characters are a lot more 'straight' than this couple.

Or even a very well received, long running show about a gay man, his straight female roommate and their outrageous friends. Tell me, who was the more popular of the two men on that show? Who was the more fun to see? Yep, the one that exhibited the entire range of stereotypes. And yet, we also get to see just how much those stereotypes strengthened those characters.

Or the very long list of shows that 'satire' stereotypes in order to show how stupid they really are. Believe it or not, that message really does get across. The fifties housewife showed how much power and influence women really had in the household (think June Cleaver here). The stereotype of 'hillbillies' used to show the stupidity of a society that dismisses them. A show wherein they used a 'genie' who is subservient to her 'master' yet has all the power. The housewife who is a witch - again with all the power in the relationship.

A show wherein a black racist is wildly successful and living in an 'apartment in the sky' (or was that penthouse?).

Or even this thread wherein people - mostly straight people - have said the things THEY do that is considered 'gay' and therefore showing gay 'stereotypes' and how ridiculous they are. How many of these 'stereotypes' are still out there and how many of them are actually being mocked anymore to strip them of their power.

Hell, I'm more 'gay' than all of my gay friends...those who abhor showtunes, gardening, cooking and interior design. Stuff I actually enjoy. Yet, once again...am not gay. By discussing this we show that gay people are first and foremost people. And oftentimes good satire is what is best used to get that message across.

I mean, Shakespear certainly knew that. As did a whole host of other writers that worked under repressive regimes.

Rabe...

Kalyke
05-25-2008, 01:39 AM
Stereotypes are based on facts. The people who are doing the steriotyping are the ones who can be harmful because they make judgments. There are people who are stereotypical gays, lesbians, football players, housewives, executives, cowboys, and goat herds. Sometimes the person fits the stereotype, and sometimes they don't. At the bottom of every characterization, is a stereotype, and at the bottom of every plot is a cliche. I've known plenty of gay hairdressers, and desgners who were exactly as portrayed in the steriotype, and I have met many more who were not. I think you can be one, and not be made fun of. One thing that has helped my writing when it comes to characters is to find what "typical" people who are in some field, or believe or do something are like. Strangely, 9 out of 10 times the people who are in the field will adhere to the "typical" person in the field, with only a small percentile who do not.