Read Books By AWers!

Welcome to the AbsoluteWrite Water Cooler! Please read The Newbie Guide To Absolute Write

editing for authors ad

A publisher or agency using Google ads to solicit your novel probably isn't anyone you want to write for.


Go Back   Absolute Write Water Cooler > General Writing Interest > Novels
Register FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-07-2013, 03:42 AM   #1
huu
Can't wait till the draft's done...
 
huu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: San Antonio
Posts: 237
huu is on a distinguished road
Should I read a classic novel even if I don´t enjoy it?

So, I've been trying to read some Marcel Proust as well as some Jane Austen...and honestly...I'm not interested in either their body of works.

I'm really, really trying to absorb their techniques, study what made them popular, really trying to get into their heads...but it's just not going well.

I like Hemingway, Orwell, and Fitzgerald so much more. So much more. Tolstoy was very enjoyable. I like reading modern authors too. And non-fiction authors. Maybe even more so than novelists. Reading from this list is like breathing.

Should I still try and force myself through Austen, Proust, and other classic writers even if I truly am not enjoying them?
__________________


huu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 03:44 AM   #2
jaksen
Caped Codder
 
jaksen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: In MA, USA, across from a 17th century cemetery
Posts: 4,940
jaksen is a candidate for sainthoodjaksen is a candidate for sainthoodjaksen is a candidate for sainthoodjaksen is a candidate for sainthoodjaksen is a candidate for sainthoodjaksen is a candidate for sainthoodjaksen is a candidate for sainthoodjaksen is a candidate for sainthood
Life is short. Why would you force yourself to do anything you don't like or enjoy, unless you have to? (Like, if you're taking a class and are going to discuss the writer's works, etc.)

Read what you like. Write what turns you on. That's what I do.
__________________
Latest story in December 2013 issue of EQMM.

Eeyore was saying to himself, “This writing business. Pencils and what-not. Over-rated if you ask me. Silly stuff. Nothing in it.” A.A. Milne
jaksen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 03:46 AM   #3
Medievalist
Cultus Gopherus MacAllister
SuperModerator
 
Medievalist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: An meodoheall monig dreama full
Posts: 25,470
Medievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
I know as an educator I should say "Yes. It's good for you. "

But I had to read so very many books in grad school that while I could see why people admired them, and felt they merited it, I didn't enjoy them.

So I'm going to say:

Give them a fair shake to see if you like them, but if they don't interest you, go find a book that does.

I should note that I like Austen, but I liked some books more than others. Northanger Abbey makes me laugh now just as much as it did the first time. I also immediately liked Sense and Sensibility.

I like a lot of Dickens, especially Great Expectations and David Copperfield.

Go. Read. And then tell us about what you liked, and why.
__________________

AW Admin
About.Me
AWers On Twitter
Lisa L. Spangenberg
My opinions are my own. | Who else would want them?
Medievalist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 03:48 AM   #4
Sunflowerrei
practical experience, FTW
 
Sunflowerrei's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Queens, New York
Posts: 851
Sunflowerrei has a spectacular auraSunflowerrei has a spectacular aura
There are a ton of classic authors I've never even tried to read and probably never will. I was never a great one for being told what to read. It's my mind. It's my choice to read what I want to put in it.

But Jane Austen is one of my favorite authors. There are things we could learn from reading the classics, but maybe go with the ones that interest you instead?
__________________
The Keegans of Banner's Edge WIP: Historical fiction. 1799 Barbados, 1800-1801 Britain.
96,000 words. Querying.


Percolating Idea: Victorian, Gilded Age.

Blog: The Sunflower's Scribbles

Twitter

Goodreads
Sunflowerrei is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 03:54 AM   #5
fredXgeorge
I heart sexy elves and wizards.
 
fredXgeorge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Australia
Posts: 944
fredXgeorge is a shiny, shiny jewelfredXgeorge is a shiny, shiny jewel
No. I'm sure there are many other books you want to read, so why waste your time forcing yourself to finish ones you hate? If you've given them a go and decided they're not for you, then give yourself permission to put them down and move onto something more enjoyable.
__________________
Twitter

'Hogwarts will always be there to welcome you home.'
- J.K. Rowling
fredXgeorge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 04:00 AM   #6
P-Jay
My name is PJ.
 
P-Jay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 144
P-Jay is on a distinguished road
I'm going to say no as well.

Reading should be something you do because you enjoy it, not because people say you "have to."
P-Jay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 04:05 AM   #7
Debbie V
Mentoring Myself and Others
 
Debbie V's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: New York
Posts: 2,189
Debbie V leaves trails of profuse coolnessDebbie V leaves trails of profuse coolnessDebbie V leaves trails of profuse coolnessDebbie V leaves trails of profuse coolnessDebbie V leaves trails of profuse coolness
I agree with the folks who say no, but it might help for you to figure out why these authors don't appeal to you. What is it about their styles you don't like? Is it topic, time period, characters? Once you know, you'll know what to avoid in your own writing. Sometimes you can learn as much from the negative as the positive. Still, the fair shake should be enough for you to figure that out. The whole book isn't necessary.
Debbie V is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 04:07 AM   #8
Chasing the Horizon
Creepy Centipede
 
Chasing the Horizon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: About to crawl on your keyboard
Posts: 3,902
Chasing the Horizon is a candidate for sainthoodChasing the Horizon is a candidate for sainthoodChasing the Horizon is a candidate for sainthoodChasing the Horizon is a candidate for sainthoodChasing the Horizon is a candidate for sainthoodChasing the Horizon is a candidate for sainthoodChasing the Horizon is a candidate for sainthoodChasing the Horizon is a candidate for sainthood
I never force myself to finish a book I hate once I've given it a fair chance. Life's way too short to read books you don't like, no matter how famous or 'classic' they are.

Hell, I write epic fantasy and have never read Lord of the Rings (because Tolkien's style makes me want to stab myself in the eye with a spork). Reading shouldn't involve suffering.

ETA: I agree with Debbie V that you should think about why you don't enjoy the book. I never put a book down without studying it enough to know *why* I'm putting it down.
__________________
Chasing the Horizon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 04:15 AM   #9
Undercover
I got it covered
 
Undercover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Not here, but there
Posts: 8,106
Undercover is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsUndercover is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsUndercover is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsUndercover is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsUndercover is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsUndercover is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsUndercover is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsUndercover is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsUndercover is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsUndercover is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsUndercover is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
I'm with everyone else. Don't read it if you don't like it. Unless it's required reading for school or a writing course or something.

I get library books all the time and some I've read up to 2 to 3 hundreds pages and then it falls flat and I stop. Even when there's only another 50 to 100 pages to go. Sometimes if it bothers me to finish I will just for the sake of saying "I read that." But most of the time if I'm not connecting with the book, I put it down and move on to the next.

Just think, it's like watching movies too. Ever start watching a movie fifteen to twenty minutes in and say, "THis sucks."? and then turn it off? Or even leave the movie theater? There's nothing wrong in that.
__________________
My blog

Disconnected
Undercover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 04:23 AM   #10
Gynn
Wandering worlds
 
Gynn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Noth
Posts: 661
Gynn has a spectacular aura
Quote:
Originally Posted by huu View Post
So, I've been trying to read some Marcel Proust as well as some Jane Austen...and honestly...I'm not interested in either their body of works.

I'm really, really trying to absorb their techniques, study what made them popular, really trying to get into their heads...but it's just not going well.

I like Hemingway, Orwell, and Fitzgerald so much more. So much more. Tolstoy was very enjoyable. I like reading modern authors too. And non-fiction authors. Maybe even more so than novelists. Reading from this list is like breathing.

Should I still try and force myself through Austen, Proust, and other classic writers even if I truly am not enjoying them?
No, and my brain agrees with me. If I am forced to read something that doesn't interest me, it quickly deletes that information and stores more of my useless musings in its place lol
Gynn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 04:36 AM   #11
Buffysquirrel
Possibly not a real squirrel
 
Buffysquirrel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Coldest corner of the living room, United Kingdom
Posts: 5,862
Buffysquirrel is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBuffysquirrel is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBuffysquirrel is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBuffysquirrel is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBuffysquirrel is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBuffysquirrel is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBuffysquirrel is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBuffysquirrel is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBuffysquirrel is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
I remember someone complaining to me that they kept trying to read LOTR and couldn't get on with it. Eh. It's a labour of love; if you don't love it, don't labour.
__________________
Writing from a female point of view seems to be generally regarded as something more like writing from the perspective of a deer: you might get points for novelty, but it'd be impossible to get right, and who really wants to hear a deer narrate a story, anyway? Jennifer duBois

Self-sacrifice is vile. Joanna Russ

The Little Dog Laughed
Buffysquirrel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 04:46 AM   #12
KTC
Writer at large
 
KTC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 26,412
KTC is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKTC is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKTC is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKTC is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKTC is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKTC is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKTC is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKTC is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKTC is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKTC is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKTC is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
Quote:
Originally Posted by huu View Post

I'm really, really trying to absorb their techniques, study what made them popular, really trying to get into their heads...but it's just not going well.

Should I still try and force myself through Austen, Proust, and other classic writers even if I truly am not enjoying them?
Don't try to get into the heads of men of the past. I do think there is something to learn from Proust. I read most of his work and loved it...BUT...him and those like him are archaic. Good writing will always be good writing...but his style is not going to work in today's market. If you don't like classics, don't waste your time. Read your contemporaries if you want lessons in writing.
KTC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 04:48 AM   #13
frankiebrown
Simplify.
 
frankiebrown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Georgia
Posts: 962
frankiebrown has earned our admirationfrankiebrown has earned our admirationfrankiebrown has earned our admirationfrankiebrown has earned our admiration
Why read something you don't like?
__________________
"To a worm in horseradish, the world is horseradish."
Blog last updated 12/7: On Pacing
on twitter: @frankiebrown25
Debut novel: UNTIL WE END Bloomsbury Spark, Dec '13. Represented by JL Stermer.
frankiebrown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 05:01 AM   #14
lagdonk
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 11
lagdonk is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankiebrown View Post
Why read something you don't like?
To absorb its magical powers.
lagdonk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 05:31 AM   #15
LJD
practical experience, FTW
 
LJD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,504
LJD leaves trails of profuse coolnessLJD leaves trails of profuse coolnessLJD leaves trails of profuse coolnessLJD leaves trails of profuse coolnessLJD leaves trails of profuse coolness
In retrospect, I wish I hadn't forced myself to read (and finish) so many classic novels as a teenager because it sort of killed my love of reading. So...no.

Last edited by LJD; 01-07-2013 at 06:53 AM. Reason: typo
LJD is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 05:33 AM   #16
kkbe
Huh.
 
kkbe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Left of center
Posts: 4,375
kkbe is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentskkbe is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentskkbe is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentskkbe is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentskkbe is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentskkbe is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentskkbe is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentskkbe is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentskkbe is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentskkbe is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentskkbe is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
Imagine yourself in a room filled with the classics. Do you look like

A)

or

B)

I'm guessing the answer is A, which would imply. . .
__________________
From EFFIN' ALBERT:
Quote:
I see the booze taking over, words start sliding together and she’s saying you and Albert can’t accuse him of doing something horrible like that, Albert’s making it up how can you even say that, you boys are driving me nuts, what’s wrong with you people can’t you just stop for chrissake no wonder I—
She don’t finish it. She don’t have to.
/my little blog/
kkbe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 05:56 AM   #17
Medievalist
Cultus Gopherus MacAllister
SuperModerator
 
Medievalist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: An meodoheall monig dreama full
Posts: 25,470
Medievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsMedievalist is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
What I really really appreciate is when people tell me about a book they found interesting or loved or think is worth the effort it might take to read it.

I love hearing about those books. I've found so many super books of all sorts, and new authors, because someone mentioned liking a book, and why.
__________________

AW Admin
About.Me
AWers On Twitter
Lisa L. Spangenberg
My opinions are my own. | Who else would want them?
Medievalist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 06:06 AM   #18
frankiebrown
Simplify.
 
frankiebrown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Georgia
Posts: 962
frankiebrown has earned our admirationfrankiebrown has earned our admirationfrankiebrown has earned our admirationfrankiebrown has earned our admiration
Quote:
Originally Posted by lagdonk View Post
To absorb its magical powers.
Why didn't I think of that?!

*picks up Moby-Dick*

*dies*
__________________
"To a worm in horseradish, the world is horseradish."
Blog last updated 12/7: On Pacing
on twitter: @frankiebrown25
Debut novel: UNTIL WE END Bloomsbury Spark, Dec '13. Represented by JL Stermer.
frankiebrown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 06:14 AM   #19
Susan Littlefield
Tell it like it Is
 
Susan Littlefield's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: With my cats
Posts: 8,023
Susan Littlefield is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsSusan Littlefield is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsSusan Littlefield is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsSusan Littlefield is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsSusan Littlefield is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsSusan Littlefield is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsSusan Littlefield is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsSusan Littlefield is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsSusan Littlefield is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsSusan Littlefield is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsSusan Littlefield is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
Just because a book is a classic does not mean you have to read it. it's like reading any other book and reading what you like and not reading what you don't like. If you choose to read classics (and I think we, as writers, need to), then read those authors you like and avoid the ones you don't like.
__________________
Susan

Please visit my website: http://www.susanlittlefield.blogspot.com/

Susan Littlefield is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 06:15 AM   #20
Pyekett
Understood.
 
Pyekett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: At the corner of Bedlam and Squalor
Posts: 995
Pyekett has earned our admirationPyekett has earned our admirationPyekett has earned our admirationPyekett has earned our admiration
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medievalist View Post
What I really really appreciate is when people tell me about a book they found interesting or loved or think is worth the effort it might take to read it.
That's a great segue into my response.

No, don't force yourself to read a book, not unless you are being tested on it. For tests, a certain amount of breath-holding ability is needed.

But do consider talking to a fan of that author or text, or reading about another's love of it. There are so many things in my life that I never would have gotten into if I hadn't been infected by someone else.

It's not a failsafe, more a sort of second chance. You might find something you love. Sometimes you just remind yourself that the world is wide and varied, as are the tastes of people in it. Both are okay. The former is more fun the more you have it--at least, when it's authentic. No fun to force it, though.
__________________
Gone Fishin' (February 25, 2013)
Pyekett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 06:36 AM   #21
angeliz2k
never mind the shorty
 
angeliz2k's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Commonwealth of Virginia--it's for lovers
Posts: 2,033
angeliz2k is a splendid one to beholdangeliz2k is a splendid one to beholdangeliz2k is a splendid one to behold
Well, there are a few things I would like to point out:

1. Just because it's not enjoyable (per se) doesn't mean it isn't worth reading. I use Heart of Darkness as an example. It's not exactly a relaxing, fun read, but it really made me think.

2. You should try to be as wide-read as possible. That doesn't mean you have to read all the classics, but enough that you know what's what.

3. If you really don't like a "classic", don't read it unless it's for a class. There is a long list of classics to choose from, so try a different one.

4. There's no set list of classics. You can like whatever you damn well please and make your own list of classics.
__________________
"Cotton. Cotton until Kingdom Come."

WIP 1: Britannia c.AD 60. 120 k. Trunked.
WIP 2: Paris, 1780s. 88k. five fulls, one partial, six rejections
WIP 3: Antebellum South, 1854 100k; querying; two fulls, both rejected; R&R
WIP 4: Novella. Civil War w/a hint of supernatural. 43k
WIP 5: The Cotton Wars. 104k. Editing.

My Blog:
MARIE ANTOINETTE'S DIAMONDS:
angeliz2k is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 07:29 AM   #22
theelfchild
Thinking up something clever
 
theelfchild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Wonderland
Posts: 314
theelfchild is a glorious beacon of lighttheelfchild is a glorious beacon of light
You say that you're trying to absorb their techniques, but why would you want to absorb something you don't like? That means that you're going to write something you don't like, and that just seems to defeat the purpose of the whole thing.
__________________
"The Heart in the Chest" a lesbian fairy-tale romance. Apparently trying to get it published.
theelfchild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 08:31 AM   #23
blacbird
That hairy-handed gent
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Who ran amok in Kent
Posts: 29,293
blacbird is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsblacbird is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsblacbird is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsblacbird is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsblacbird is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsblacbird is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsblacbird is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsblacbird is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsblacbird is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsblacbird is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsblacbird is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
Possibly. First, many older novels were written when the reader expectations were different than they are today, and as such, tend not to offer instant "hooks" or gratification, which many readers today expect. Which means you may not know whether you'll "enjoy" the older novel, in the sense of feeling satisfied at having read it, until you get farther along than the first few pages or chapters.

Writers who took me a while to come to grips with, but whom I now treasure and have read most of their work, include especially William Faulkner and Joseph Conrad. Another issue with both of these (and some other) writers is that there are books of theirs you should read first, before tackling others. Students are taught to detest Conrad by being introduced to him through Heart of Darkness, and likewise Faulkner through The Sound and the Fury. In each case, among the most complex of the author's works, and best understood and appreciated only after a person has read many other of their works.

There are reasons why books like these have had long lives in the public consciousness, and it isn't because of some vast evil conspiracy on the part of literature professors.

caw
__________________
Bugrit! Millennium hand and shrimp!
blacbird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 08:38 AM   #24
rwm4768
practical experience, FTW
 
rwm4768's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Missouri
Posts: 11,456
rwm4768 is better than ice cream with hot fudgerwm4768 is better than ice cream with hot fudgerwm4768 is better than ice cream with hot fudgerwm4768 is better than ice cream with hot fudgerwm4768 is better than ice cream with hot fudgerwm4768 is better than ice cream with hot fudgerwm4768 is better than ice cream with hot fudge
If you don't like it, don't read it. There are too many good books out there to waste time on one you don't like. As another person said, why absorb their techniques when you don't like them? That way, you'll be writing something you don't like.
__________________
My writing blog: Ryan Mueller's Writing (updated 9/19)
Writing Advice
The Fantasy Reading List

WIP:
Empire of Chains (Epic Fantasy): 158K Revising
Sunweaver (Epic Fantasy): 105K Revising
rwm4768 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 09:15 AM   #25
meowzbark
practical experience, FTW
 
meowzbark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Arizona
Posts: 587
meowzbark is a shiny, shiny jewelmeowzbark is a shiny, shiny jewel
I know my problem with Jane Austin was the genre. I do not enjoy reading romances or "contemporary" novels. So, now when I pick a classic to read, I try to find one that is fantasy, sci-fi, or horror. I enjoyed Orwell's 1984, most of Ray Bradbury, and everything by Poe.
__________________
Faith of the Fallen - YA Paranormal, revising.
Locked out of Heaven - YA Paranormal, trunked novel
Unnamed -- YA Sci-fi, outlining for Nanowrimo.

|Book Review Blog |Twitter|
meowzbark is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Custom Search

If this site is helpful to you,
Please consider a voluntary subscription to defray ongoing expenses.

Buy Scrivener 2 for Mac OS X (Regular Licence)


All times are GMT +4.5. The time now is 04:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.